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Susan Culverwell Whitaker's Culverwell Family
Posted by: Jim Drew-Whitaker (ID *****8375) Date: April 16, 2002 at 11:41:32
In Reply to: William Whitaker (1548-1595) Regarding Papists by Jim Drew-Whitaker of 4664


Excerpt taken from the introduction of Nathaniel Culverwell's book "The Light of Nature":

Nathaniel Culverwell was christened on January 13, 1619, in St. Margaret Moses Church, Friday Street, London, the eldest child of Richard Culverwell, the minister of that parish, and his wife Margaret. His father Richard (1580?-1644) attended St. Paulıs School and Exeter College, Oxford, receiving his BA in 1602, MA in 1607, and BD in 1617. In March of the following year, nine months before Nathaniel birth, he was appointed rector of St. Margaretıs, a position which he held until his death in April 1644. He was succeeded at St. Margaretıs in 1648 by Benjamin Needler who three years later married Marie Culverwell, Richard's daughter. Richard had five children, two of whom died in *infancy.
The name Culverwell appears with intriguing frequency in the annals of both Cambridge University and Emmanuel College. The Patriarchal Nicholas Culverwell, probably Nathaniel's great and an Elizabethan haberdasher of St. Martin Vintry who was Queen Elizabeth's merchant for wines, established funds in 1569 for an annual L5 to be rewarded to ³the poorest preachers studying divinity² at Christ's College, Cambridge, and Magdalen College, Oxford. In 1576 his daughter Cecelia married Laurence Chaderton who became the first Master of Emmanuel College at its foundation in 1548; his brother Richard, mercer and alderman of London as well as benefactor of the University, appears to have acted with Chaderton as intermediary in acquiring the site for Emmanuel College for Sir Walter Mildmay, the founder; his son **Ezekiel (1554-1631), a popular Puritan preacher and author who took BA and MA degrees at Oxford in 1573 and 1577, was mistakenly classed by Fuller among ³the learned writers of ***Emmauel², Susan and Elizabeth, his remaining daughters, married William Whitaker, Puritan controversialist and Master of St. Johnıs College, and Thomas Gouge, father of William Gouge, Puritan divine. The tradition that there was a fourth daughter who married Arthur Dent is groundless. Transcribed by Jim W. Drew-Whitaker; 4/14/02.

*/Register of St. Margaret Moses Church, ed. W. Bruce Bannerman (London 1912). A MS at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library in Los Angeles (B8535M3) contains extensive summaries of sermons delivered by Richard Culverwell at St. Margaret Moses on the Lord's prayer, the sacraments, and the creed from 1625 t0 1641. These digests were made by one of the parishioners who continued to transcribe outlines of sermons delivered at St. Margaret Moses until 1665, including some by Benjamin Needler, Edmund Calamy, William Gouge, et. al.
**Ezekiel Culverwell (1554-1631) BA 1574; Rector: Great Stambridge Essex 1592-1609; married Winifred Barefoot, 1598. Curious to know if Winifred Barefoot was related to: Ancestor MARY BAREFOOTE (d/o JOHN) born 1631/3 in St. Dunstan, Stepney, London, England, and married ancestor DR. HENRY GREENLAND, born Abt. 1628 in England, and died Bet. 11 December 1694 - 07 February 1694/95 in Piscataway, Middlesex Co., New Jersey.

***/Thomas Fuller, History of the University of Cambridge (London, 1655), 147.

John Foote, born in Royston, Cambridgeshire, England; died Abt. December 04, 1616 in prob. London, England; married Margaret Brooke April 10, 1581 in St. Mary Woolnoth Church, England.        
Notes for John Foote:
Will dated November 17, 1616 and proved December 4, 1616, mentions a great number of relatives and other beneficiaries. In his will he addresses the celebrated poet and clergyman, John Donne, as "loving friend." A bequest was also made to "Mr. Culverwell the preacher," probably Nathaniel Culverwell (d. about 1651) of Cambridge, author of "Light of Nature" (1652), and possibly father of Cicely Culverwell, who married Dr. Lawrence Chaderton, Puritan Divine.

jwdw notes: Nicholas Culverwell I (will 1569) was Rev. Alexander Whitaker's maternal grandfather; father of Susan Culverwell m. married William Whitaker.

Ancestors Richard Cheney & Elizabeth Offley were married at St. Mary Woolnoth Church, 6 Feb. 1691.

--------------------------------------

Although, Nathaniel Culverwell and John Milton both attended St. Paul's School and went on to Cambridge, there is no evidence to indicate that they knew each other. The probability that they did is perhaps increased by the fact that both were associated with the parish of St. Giles Cripplegate. J. Milton French notes in his Life records of John Milton (Rutgers, 1949, I, 33) that in 1620 William Priestly, Merchant Taylor, drew up a will leaving money to John Milton the elder and to a Culverwell (quite possibly Richard) identified only as one of the "Preachers of God's Worde," and it is possible that the two families had at least a common acquaintance.

John Foote, born in Royston, Cambridgeshire, England; died Abt. December 04, 1616 in prob. London, England; married Margaret Brooke April 10, 1581 in St. Mary Woolnoth Church, England.  

Will dated November 17, 1616, and proved December 4, 1616, mentions a great number of relatives and other beneficiaries. In his will he addresses the celebrated poet and clergyman, John Donne, as "loving friend." A bequest was also made to "Mr. Culverwell the preacher," probably Nathaniel Culverwell (d. about 1651) of Cambridge, author of "Light of Nature" (1652), and possibly father of Cicely Culverwell, who married Dr. Lawrence Chadderton, Puritan Divine.

jwdw notes: (1). Above is in error because Nicholas Culverwell was the father of Cecelia Culverwell m. Lawrence Chaderton. He was also the father of Susan Culverwell m. married William Whitaker the parents of Rev. Alexander Whitaker. Nathaniel Culverwell (author of "Light of Nature") was born in 1619 three years after Foote's will was written. The Mr. Culverwell mentioned in Foote's will was most probably afsd. Nicholas's son Ezekiel (1554-1631) or his grandson Nicholas II (1587-1635). (2). Curious that a Culverwell was mentioned in the 1620 will of William Priestly, with elder John Milton father of the Poet John Milton. (3). Oliver Cromwell & Elizabeth Bourchier were marred at St. Giles Cripplegate, 22 Aug. 1620. Nathaniel Culverwell & John Milton were associated with the parish of St. Giles Cripplegate which gives a good clue that Mary Bourchier wife of Jabez Whitaker was in the area....

(4.) Poet/Rev. John Donne & Poet/Rev. George Herbert were of Royston, Cambridgeshire.
Here's an excerpt from "Some Famous Country Parishes" by Ezra Tipple:
King James regarded Rev. George Herbert as "the jewel of that university (Cambridge)," and when the king went to hunt at Royston near Cambridge, he was usually accompanied by the university's official maker of sweet phrases and pretty sentences.
Here, at Cambridge, he (George Herbert) made other influential friends also. He came to know Herrick, the poet devine, who enjoys a better reputation as a poet than as a devine, dying in his Devonshire parish, a lone man, sick and tired of the convivial life which he had spent in London; Milton, who came to Cambridge as a student in 1624, three years before Herbert left; (Oliver) Cromwell and Jeremy Taylor, who were both born at Cambridge in 1613; (jwdw note: born at Cambridge in 1613 must mean when later Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell & Poet Jeremy Taylor had become students at Cambridge) Sir Henry Wotton, the successful diplomat, and Nicholas Ferrer, the scholar-merchant who gave up public life for religious seclusion. More important than these even, though, were such powerful friends as the Duke of Lennox, the Duke of Richmond, the Marquis of Hamilton, who became his patron, and Lord (Francis) Bacon, whom he met in 1620, the beginning of a helpful, stimulating friendship which continued with increasing closeness until Bacon's death. Dr. John Donne, too, the brilliant Dean of Saint Paul's Cathedral, London, the fascinating conversationalist and unusual preacher and poet, became his firm friend. He had long been the friend of Herbert's mother; addresses to her his lines on "Autumnal Beauty," beginning,

"Nor spring nor summer beauty hath such grace
as I have seen in one autumnal face,"

and his sonnet "Saint Mary Magdalene," and at her funeral preached one of his greatest sermons.
transcribed by Jim W. Drew-Whitaker, 4/16/02

Here's an excerpt from "John Donne Man of Flesh and Spirit" by David L. Edwards

The plague which had killed his brother gave Donne some free time during the second half of 1593, when the normal activities at Lincoln's Inn were suspended, and he seems to have plunged into theological study, purchasing and heavily marking the recently published long defense of Roman Catholicism by Cardinal (Roberto) Bellarmine. He could show a heavily marked copy to an Anglican clergyman who interrogated him. Later he could say that he had 'surveyed and digested the whole body of divinity controverted between ours and the Roman Church' before deciding that the Church of England was 'ours'. Meanwhile he conformed to the government's religion outwardly, his comments on Bellarmine seem to have satisfied his Anglican examiner, and the principle which governed his private thoughts was stated in his third 'satyre', a poem which no doubt he kept private: 'doubt wisely'.

jwdw notes: See excerpt fromWilliam Whitaker, D. D.'s, book "A Disputation on Holy Scripture, Against the Papists, especially Bellarmine and Stapleton.

John Donne's grandmother was the sister of Thomas More. Like More, Donne's grandfather John Heywood had incurred the wrath of Henry VIII.


Any information regarding the above would be "greatfully" appreciated. Thanks. Best regeards, Jim



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