Starting Sept. 30, 2014, Genealogy.com will be making a big change. GenForum message boards, Family Tree Maker homepages, and the most popular articles will be preserved in a read-only format, while several other features will no longer be available, including member subscriptions and the Shop.
 
Learn more


Chat | Daily Search | My GenForum | Community Standards | Terms of Service
Jump to Forum
Home: Regional: U.S. States: Texas: Limestone County

Post FollowupReturn to Message ListingsPrint Message

Rasco, Davis, Stokes & Wright Kin in CSA from Limestone Co, TX
Posted by: Meg Barnett (ID *****2456) Date: December 01, 2005 at 20:21:16
  of 861

I'm engaged in writing a history about some of the Rasco and Davis from Limestone County involvement in the CSA in Texas and its effect on descendants. Not done with it yet, but here's some data I'm ready to share. This covers every Rasco/e listed in the Civil War Soldier and Sailor online search engine. Feel free to use and also please let me know any corrections. Thanks. -- Meg

RASCOS AND SOME ALLIED FAMILIES WHO SERVED IN TEXAS CSA UNITS

(extracted from Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System database at http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/index.html)

---E.D. Rasco served as a private in Company D, 12th Regiment, Texas Infantry (Young's), CSA. 12th Infantry Regiment [also called 8th Regiment] was organized and mustered in Confederate service at Waco, Texas, during the spring of 1862. Its members were recruited in the towns and cities of Clarksville, Cameron, Hempstead, Nacogdoches, Fairfield, and Waco, and the counties of Comanche, Milam, and Grimes. The regiment was assigned to O. Young's and Waul's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and saw action in Louisiana and Arkansas. After fighting at Jenkins' Ferry, it moved to Hempstead and disbanded in the spring of 1865. The field officers were Colonel Overton Young; Lieutenant Colonels William Clark, B.A. Philpott, and James W. Raine; and Major Erastus Smith. [NOTE: Which Rasco is E.D.? He's not in my database.]

---Gabriel (Harrell) Rasco, son of Jesse Harrell Rasco and Elizabeth Harrison: Gabriel Rascoe served as a private in Company A, 2nd Regiment, Texas Cavalry (2nd Mounted Rifles). 2nd Cavalry Regiment, about 1,200 strong, was organized in May, 1861, under the designation of the 2nd Texas Mounted Rifles. It was reorganized in April, 1862, as the 2nd Cavalry Regiment. The men were recruited in San Antonio, Houston, Marshall, and Beeville, and the counties of Anderson, Houston, Nacogdoches, and Cherokee. Serving in the Trans-Mississippi Department, it was active in various conflicts in the New Mexico Territory and Louisiana, then saw action in the defense of Galveston. In November, 1862, the unit totalled 752 effectives, had 19 officers and 167 men in July, 1864, and about 150 present in April, 1865. Although it was included in the surrender on June 2, it had previously disbanded. The field officers were Colonels John S. Ford and Charles L. Pyron; Lieutenant Colonels John R. Baylor and James Walker; and Majors John Donelson, Matthew Nolan, William A. Spencer, and Edward Waller, Jr.

---John B. "Jack" Rasco, son of John Rasco and Lucy Taylor: John Rasco served as a corporal (entry rank) and sergeant (exit rank) in Company H, 20th Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Bass'), CSA. Also serving in this regiment were the following Rasco/Davis kin: Joshua Rascoe; Josiah Rascoe; Leonidas Rascoe; Solon Rascoe; Franklin L. Davis; George Tipton Davis; John Sylvanus Stokes; James Madison Wright (all in Company H); and Laban Taylor Rascoe (Company G). John Rasco was captured at the Battle of Honey Springs, IT on 17 July 1863 and is reported on the roll of the Union Army prison Camp Morton, Indiana on February 26, 1865 as paroled and being sent to City Point, Virginia for exchange. 20th Cavalry Regiment, recruited in Hill County, Texas, was organized during the spring of 1862 with about 850 officers and men. The unit was assigned to Cooper's and Gano's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and primarily confronted the Federals in the Indian Territory. It was included in the surrender of the Indian Troops at Doaksville on June 23, 1865. The field officers were Colonel Thomas C. Bass, Lieutenant Colonels Andrew J. Fowler and T.D. Taliaferro, and Majors Dempsey W. Broughton and John R. Johnson.

---Joshua Rasco, son of John Rasco and Lucy Taylor: Joshua Rascoe served as a private in Company H, 20th Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Bass'), CSA. Also serving in this regiment were the following Rasco/Davis kin: John Rascoe; Josiah Rascoe; Leonidas Rascoe; Solon Rascoe; Franklin L. Davis; George Tipton Davis; John Sylvanus Stokes; James Madison Wright (all in Company H); and Laban Taylor Rascoe (Company G). Joshua Rasco, however, was discharged by June 1862 for being over the age of 35. 20th Cavalry Regiment, recruited in Hill County, Texas, was organized during the spring of 1862 with about 850 officers and men. The unit was assigned to Cooper's and Gano's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and primarily confronted the Federals in the Indian Territory. It was included in the surrender of the Indian Troops at Doaksville on June 23, 1865. The field officers were Colonel Thomas C. Bass, Lieutenant Colonels Andrew J. Fowler and T.D. Taliaferro, and Majors Dempsey W. Broughton and John R. Johnson. Joshua Rascoe also served as a private in Company K, 12th Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Parson's Mounted Volunteers). 12th Cavalry Regiment was organized with about 940 men in August, 1861, by Colonel W.H. Parsons. Most of the men were from Hempstead, Fairfield, Georgetown, and Waxahachie, and Ellis and Hill counties. This unit served in Hawes' and Steele's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department and skirmished the Federals in Arkansas and Louisiana. During 1865 it was in Northern Texas guarding approaches from the Indian Territory. The regiment was included in the surrender on June 2. Its commanders were Colonel William H. Parsans, Lieutenant Colonels Andrew B. Burleson and John W. Mullen, and Majors Locklin J. Farrar and E. W. Rogers.

---Josiah Rasco, son of William A. "Short Bill" Rasco and Mary Rasco: Josiah Rascoe served as a private in Company H, 20th Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Bass'), CSA. Also serving in this regiment were the following Rasco/Davis kin: John Rascoe; Joshua Rascoe; Leonidas Rascoe; Solon Rascoe; Franklin L. Davis; George Tipton Davis; John Sylvanus Stokes; James Madison Wright (all in Company H); and Laban Taylor Rascoe (Company G). 20th Cavalry Regiment, recruited in Hill County, Texas, was organized during the spring of 1862 with about 850 officers and men. The unit was assigned to Cooper's and Gano's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and primarily confronted the Federals in the Indian Territory. It was included in the surrender of the Indian Troops at Doaksville on June 23, 1865. The field officers were Colonel Thomas C. Bass, Lieutenant Colonels Andrew J. Fowler and T.D. Taliaferro, and Majors Dempsey W. Broughton and John R. Johnson.

---Leonidas "Lon" Rasco, son of William Marsellus Rasco and Margaret Elizabeth Rasco: Leonidas Rascoe served as a private in Company H, 20th Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Bass'), CSA. Also serving in this regiment were the following Rasco/Davis kin: John Rascoe; Josiah Rascoe; Joshua Rascoe; Solon Rascoe; Franklin L. Davis; George Tipton Davis; John Sylvanus Stokes; James Madison Wright (all in Company H); and Laban Taylor Rascoe (Company G). Lon Rsco was captured at the Battle of Honey Springs, IT on 17 July 1863; he was exchanged at "the mouth of the Red River" on 4 May 1865. 20th Cavalry Regiment, recruited in Hill County, Texas, was organized during the spring of 1862 with about 850 officers and men. The unit was assigned to Cooper's and Gano's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and primarily confronted the Federals in the Indian Territory. It was included in the surrender of the Indian Troops at Doaksville on June 23, 1865. The field officers were Colonel Thomas C. Bass, Lieutenant Colonels Andrew J. Fowler and T.D. Taliaferro, and Majors Dempsey W. Broughton and John R. Johnson.

---Solon Rasco, son of John Rasco and Lucy Taylor: Solen (sic) Rascoe served as a private in Company H, 20th Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Bass'), CSA. Also serving in this regiment were the following Rasco/Davis kin: John Rascoe; Josiah Rascoe; Leonidas Rascoe; Joshua Rascoe; Franklin L. Davis; George Tipton Davis; John Sylvanus Stokes; James Madison Wright (all in Company H); and Laban Taylor Rascoe (Company G). 20th Cavalry Regiment, recruited in Hill County, Texas, was organized during the spring of 1862 with about 850 officers and men. The unit was assigned to Cooper's and Gano's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and primarily confronted the Federals in the Indian Territory. It was included in the surrender of the Indian Troops at Doaksville on June 23, 1865. The field officers were Colonel Thomas C. Bass, Lieutenant Colonels Andrew J. Fowler and T.D. Taliaferro, and Majors Dempsey W. Broughton and John R. Johnson.

---Laban Taylor Rasco, son of Jesse Harrell Rasco and Elizabeth Harrison: Laban Taylor Rascoe served as a bugler in Company G, 20th Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Bass'), CSA. Also serving in this regiment were the following Rasco/Davis kin: John Rascoe; Josiah Rascoe; Leonidas Rascoe; Solon Rascoe; Franklin L. Davis; and George Tipton Davis (all in Company H). 20th Cavalry Regiment, recruited in Hill County, Texas, was organized during the spring of 1862 with about 850 officers and men. The unit was assigned to Cooper's and Gano's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and primarily confronted the Federals in the Indian Territory. It was included in the surrender of the Indian Troops at Doaksville on June 23, 1865. The field officers were Colonel Thomas C. Bass, Lieutenant Colonels Andrew J. Fowler and T.D. Taliaferro, and Majors Dempsey W. Broughton and John R. Johnson.

---Lycurgus Rasco, son of John Rasco and Lucy Taylor: Lycurgus Rascoe served as a private in Company B, 6th Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Wharton, Stone's). Lycurgus Rasco was captured and taken to a Union POW camp at Finnis Point, Salem, New Jersey where he died on 8 May 1865. 6th Cavalry Regiment [also called 2nd Regiment] was organized with 1,150 men at Dallas, Texas, in September, 1861. Many of the men were from Dallas, McKinney, Waco, Austin, and Lancaster, and Bell County. The unit skirmished in the Indian Territory, fought at Elkhorn Tavern, then moved wast of the Mississippi River. It contained 803 effectives in the spring of 1862 and was dismounted during the battles at Corinth and Hatchie Bridge. Here the regiment reported 148 killed, wounded, or missing. Assigned to Ross' Brigade, it served with the Army of Tennessee during the Atlanta Campaign, was active in Tennessee, and ended the war in Mississippi attached to the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana. The field officers were Colonels Lawrence S. Ross, B. Warren Stone, and Jack Wharton; Lieutenant Colonels John S. Griffith and Peter F. Ross; and Robert M. White and Stephen B. Wilson.

---Franklin L. Davis, son of Brinkley Davis and Leah Sappenfield, husband of Nancy Rasco who was daughter to John Rasco and Lucy Taylor: F.L. Davis, also listed as Franklin Middleton Davis, served as a private in Company H, 20th Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Bass'). Also serving in this regiment were the following Rasco/Davis kin: John Rascoe; Josiah Rascoe; Leonidas Rascoe; Joshua Rascoe; Solon Rascoe; George Tipton Davis; John Sylvanus Stokes; James Madison Wright (all in Company H); and Laban Taylor Rascoe (Company G). Franklin Davis was killed at the Battle of Honey Springs, IT, on 17 July 1863. 20th Cavalry Regiment, recruited in Hill County, Texas, was organized during the spring of 1862 with about 850 officers and men. The unit was assigned to Cooper's and Gano's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and primarily confronted the Federals in the Indian Territory. It was included in the surrender of the Indian Troops at Doaksville on June 23, 1865. The field officers were Colonel Thomas C. Bass, Lieutenant Colonels Andrew J. Fowler and T.D. Taliaferro, and Majors Dempsey W. Broughton and John R. Johnson.

---George Tipton "Tip" Davis, son of Brinkley Davis and Leah Sappenfield, brother-in-law to Nancy Rasco who was daughter of John Rasco and Lucy Taylor: G.T. Davis served as a sergeant/first sergeant in Companies H and K, 20th Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Bass'). Also serving in this regiment were the following Rasco/Davis kin: John Rascoe; Josiah Rascoe; Leonidas Rascoe; Joshua Rascoe; Solon Rascoe; Franklin L. Davis; John Sylvanus Stokes; James Madison Wright (all in Company H); and Laban Taylor Rascoe (Company G). Franklin Davis was killed at the Battle of Honey Springs, IT, on 17 July 1863. 20th Cavalry Regiment, recruited in Hill County, Texas, was organized during the spring of 1862 with about 850 officers and men. The unit was assigned to Cooper's and Gano's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and primarily confronted the Federals in the Indian Territory. It was included in the surrender of the Indian Troops at Doaksville on June 23, 1865. The field officers were Colonel Thomas C. Bass, Lieutenant Colonels Andrew J. Fowler and T.D. Taliaferro, and Majors Dempsey W. Broughton and John R. Johnson.

---John Sylvanus Stokes, husband of Elvira Rasco, daughter of John Rasco and Lucy Taylor: John Sylvanus Stokes served as a private in Company H, 20th Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Bass'), CSA. Also serving in this regiment were the following Rasco/Davis kin: John Rascoe; Josiah Rascoe; Leonidas Rascoe; Solon Rascoe; Franklin L. Davis; George Tipton Davis; James Madison Wright (all in Company H); and Laban Taylor Rascoe (Company G). 20th Cavalry Regiment, recruited in Hill County, Texas, was organized during the spring of 1862 with about 850 officers and men. The unit was assigned to Cooper's and Gano's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and primarily confronted the Federals in the Indian Territory. It was included in the surrender of the Indian Troops at Doaksville on June 23, 1865. The field officers were Colonel Thomas C. Bass, Lieutenant Colonels Andrew J. Fowler and T.D. Taliaferro, and Majors Dempsey W. Broughton and John R. Johnson.

---James Madison Wright, husband of Lucy Rasco, daughter of John Rasco and Lucy Taylor: James Madison Wright served as a private (entry rank) and 2nd Lieutenant (exit rank) in Company H, 20th Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Bass'), CSA. Also serving in this regiment were the following Rasco/Davis kin: John Rascoe; Joshua Rascoe; Josiah Rascoe; Leonidas Rascoe; Solon Rascoe; Franklin L. Davis; George Tipton Davis; John Sylvanus Stokes (all in Company H); and Laban Taylor Rascoe (Company G). 20th Cavalry Regiment, recruited in Hill County, Texas, was organized during the spring of 1862 with about 850 officers and men. The unit was assigned to Cooper's and Gano's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and primarily confronted the Federals in the Indian Territory. It was included in the surrender of the Indian Troops at Doaksville on June 23, 1865. The field officers were Colonel Thomas C. Bass, Lieutenant Colonels Andrew J. Fowler and T.D. Taliaferro, and Majors Dempsey W. Broughton and John R. Johnson.

Additional Note: The most significant Civil War engagement for the Rascos and allied families in Texas is undoubtedly the Battle of Honey Springs in Muskokee County and McIntosh County, Oklahoma (what was then Indian Territory). This battle is also known as the Battle of Elk Creek and the Battle of Shaw's Inn, and was part of the campaign known as Operations to Control Indian Territory (1863). It took place on a very hot July 17, 1863. The principal commanders were Major General James G. Blunt [U.S.] and Brigadier General Douglas H. Cooper [CSA]. Forces engaged included the District of the Frontier [U.S.], 1st Brigade, Native American Troops [CSA]. Several units of Texans were serving with the CSA Indian forces, including the men of 20th Regiment, Texas Infantry: John B. Rasco, Joshua Rasco, Josiah Rasco, Leonidas "Lon" Rasco, Solon Rasco, Franklin L. Davis, George "Tip" Davis, John Sylvanus Stokes, and James Madison Wright, all of Limestone County and all related by blood or marriage. When the battle was over, only Josiah Rasco, John Stokes and James Wright escaped unscathed. Frank and Tip Davis were killed during the battle and are presumably buried in an unmarked grave there; John and Lon Rasco were captured and send to Union Army prisons for the remainder of the war; and Solon Rasco was wounded and had his right foot amputated. Solon was taken back to Fort Washita, IT where he was discharged in the spring of 1864 and walked the entire way home back to Limestone County on a crutch. According to family story, his limping arrival gave the rest of the family the first news of the tragedy that had struck its band of brothers.
       Estimated casualties of the Battle of Honey Springs were 716 totals (US 70, CSA 637). The description at the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System reads: Union and Confederate troops had frequently skirmished in the vicinity of Honey Springs Depot. The Union commander in the area, Maj. Gen. James G. Blunt, correctly surmised that Confederate forces, mostly Native American troops under the command of Brig. Gen. Douglas H. Cooper, were about to concentrate and would then attack his force at Fort Gibson. He decided to defeat the Confederates at Honey Springs Depot before they were joined by Brig. Gen. William Cabellís brigade, advancing from Fort Smith, Arkansas. Blunt began crossing the swollen Arkansas River on July 15, 1863, and, by midnight on July 16-17, he had a force of 3,000 men, composed of whites, Native Americans, and African Americans, marching toward Honey Springs. Blunt skirmished with Rebel troops early on the morning of the 17th, and by midafternoon, full-scale fighting ensued. The Confederates had wet powder, causing misfires, and the problem intensified when rain began. After repulsing one attack, Cooper pulled his forces back to obtain new ammunition. In the meantime, Cooper began to experience command problems, and he learned that Blunt was about to turn his left flank. The Confederate retreat began, and although Cooper fought a rearguard action, many of those troops counterattacked, failed, and fled. Any possibility of the Confederates taking Fort Gibson was gone. Following this battle, Union forces controlled Indian Territory, north of the Arkansas River.
       A description of this battle by LeRoy H. Fischer for the Oklahoma Historical Society, located at online at http://www.ok-history.mus.ok.us/mus-sites/LHF-bhs.htm#N_1_, gives a more vivid picture of what transpired: "Then a set of unusual circumstances prevailed to turn the tide of the battle. Blunt ordered Colonel James M. Williams, the commanding officer of the First Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment, located near the center of the Federal line, to capture the four-gun Confederate artillery battery supporting the 20th and 29th Texas Cavalry Regiments. Williams, of abolitionist beliefs, had told his men before the battle that no quarter would be given if they were captured. He then ordered them to "fix bayonets" and move forward in formation. Soon the Federal and Confederate lines fired simultaneously. Colonel Williams and Colonel Charles DeMorse of the 29th Texas Cavalry Regiment received severe but not fatal injuries. Incessant firing continued.
       "As the battle progressed, units of the Federal Second Indian Home Guard Regiment unintentionally moved in between the First Kansas Colored Volunteer Regiment and the Texas dismounted cavalry regiments. Williams' successor, Lieutenant Colonel John Bowles, ordered the Indians to fall back to their position in the battle line. The Confederates heard this command and assumed that the Federals were falling back. The order was then given to pursue the Federals. The Confederates approached to within twenty-five paces of the Federals, to be met with a volley from the deadly accurate Springfield rifles of the Kansas Colored Regiment. The Confederate color bearer fell, but the colors were immediately raised, and again promptly shot down. They were raised again, and once more they were leveled by a volley from the Kansas Regiment. Then Federal soldiers from the Indian Home Guards picked up the Confederate colors, much to the dismay of men and officers from the Kansas Regiment, who asked permission to break ranks and secure them. Permission was refused, but they were promised that the matter would be righted later.
       "Realizing he could no longer hold his position north of Elk Creek, Cooper ordered his Confederate forces to remove the artillery, vigorously defend the bridge across the creek, and stand firm on the south bank of the stream. They made several determined efforts to hold the bridge, but finally superior Federal firepower prevailed. Many Texans died holding the bridge long enough to move the Confederate artillery across it. As the Federals poured across the bridge and the fords of Elk Creek and onto the prairies beyond, the Confederates were in orderly retreat for about a mile and a half down the Texas Road to Honey Springs Depot. Here a final but effective stand was made, mainly by the reserve Choctaw and Chickasaw Regiment and the two squadrons of Texas cavalry, giving the Confederates time to evacuate virtually all of their forces, artillery, and baggage train. All buildings and supplies at Honey Springs were fired by the retreating Confederates; the Federals arrived soon enough to extinguish some of the flames and save quantities of bacon, dried beef, flour, sorghum, and salt.
       "By 2:00 p.m., the battle was over--four hours after it began. The Confederates moved east from the battlefield and at about 4:00 p.m. joined Brigadier General Cabell's 3,000-man force en route with four mountain howitzers from Fort Smith, about 50 miles distant. If Cabell had arrived in time for the battle, the Federals would likely have lost. Cooper attributed his defeat not only to inferior ammunition and superior Federal arms, but also to the lack of Cabell's reinforcements. Blunt decided not to pursue the Confederates because his men and horses were fatigued and his ammunition was almost exhausted. Still suffering from an intense fever that forced him to go to bed, he ordered his forces to bivouac for the night on the battlefield, treat the wounded, and bury the dead, including the Confederates. Late on the day following the battle, Blunt directed his forces to return to Fort Gibson.
       "Cooper reported his losses as 134 killed and wounded, with 47 taken prisoner. He maintained the Federal killed and wounded exceeded 200. Blunt reported his losses as 17 killed and 60 wounded. He said he buried 150 Confederates, wounded 400 of their men, and took 77 prisoners. The exact numbers will never be known. Cooper afterwards sent a letter of appreciation to Blunt for his burial of the Confederate dead. Their unmarked graves may still be in the Honey Springs area. The bodies of the Federal dead were later reinterred in the Fort Gibson National Cemetery.

For excellent first-hand sources (Union and Confederate) of this battle, go to http://www.cr.nps.gov/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/68honey/68facts3.htm.


Notify Administrator about this message?
Followups:
No followups yet

Post FollowupReturn to Message ListingsPrint Message

http://genforum.genealogy.com/tx/limestone/messages/572.html
Search this forum:

Search all of GenForum:

Proximity matching
Add this forum to My GenForum Link to GenForum
Add Forum
Home |  Help |  About Us |  Site Index |  Jobs |  PRIVACY |  Affiliate
© 2007 The Generations Network