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Re: What is the Origin of the name Tolson?
Posted by: Norman Tolson (ID *****6078) Date: June 01, 2009 at 03:14:18
In Reply to: What is the Origin of the name Tolson? by Tolson Kennerley of 538

                      TOLSON COAT OF ARMS

Fig. 1. ( see Scrapbook left coat of arms ) the earliest known coat of arms for a Tolson family. They were used by the descendants of the Tolsons of Bridekirk, Cumberland County, i.e., Henricus de Tolson,
Esq., time of Edward 1(1239-1307).

Description of Arms:
Vert, on a chief azure, three martlets or, a bordure of the third pellette.

Crest:
Out of a ducal coronet or, a lion's gamb proper holding two ostrich feathers, one vert, the other azure.

Motto:
Ferro Comite. (a) (Roughly.- My sword for a companion." )

Fig. 2. ( see Scrapbook right Coat of Arms ) the Arms of Tolsons of Oakland, Dalton, Huddersfield, Yorkshire.

Description of Arms:
Vert, a rose argent, barbed and seeded proper, on a chief engrailed or, two martlets azure, all
within a bordure ermine, charged with five pellets and as many annulets alternately sable.

Mantling:
Vert and argent.

Crest:
On a wreath of the colours, in front of a demitower, issuant therefrom a bear 's paw, grasping
four ostrich feathers in a bend sinister argent, an annulet or.

Ferro Comite. (b)

Only the two foregoing coats of arms have been discovered to have been used by families of the name of Tolson. However, there is one used by a Toulson family and one by Toleson of London which will not be considered here.

The arms in Fig. 1 were apparently in use sufficiently early to have been borne by a remote and unknown ancestor of our family. But, since we have been unable to push our ancestry back further than to 1773, ( Ardath Stedman Tolson ) it obviously would appear presumptuous for us to adopt the insignia for our use.

       Apparently, the arms in Fig. 1 were used as the basis for the design in Fig. 2. The likelihood that the latter can be claimed by our ( Ardath Stedman Tolson ) family is not plausible. They were adopted by a family of Tolsons living in nearby Huddersfield at a later date than our ( Ardath ) earliest known ancestors in Earlsheaton- Dewsbury. The latter coat was used by the family of Legh Tolson (b. 1856), (c) who by tradition, only, was descended from the original Bridekirk family. Since some thirty years of research by him who possessed adequate funds and had easier access to available records, failed to disclose proof of this connection, (d) it is much less likely that one in our situation will be able to do so.
The Huddersfield contingent obviously held much better social and economic position at the time, than did ours in Dewsbury, but we do not rule out the possibility that the two families were "cousins" of some degree.
Heraldry is sometimes called "the shorthand of history," and a coat of arms granted by the English Crown to become family property,; (e) bears a message that only a student of that complex science is able to decipher. Heraldry had its beginnings with the first men who adopted a set of symbols for their own identification as well as for that of their families, tribes or clans: However, heraldry, as we know it today, is an outgrowth of the use of coat armour for distinguishing the identity of knights in tournaments or leaders and their troops in battle --once a military necessity. Since in more modern times, national flags, distinctive uniforms, etc., have supplanted the use of family or tribal insignia for military purposes, coat armour has become the insignia of a "gentleman. ,,(f) By the use of a certain coat of arms, a person asserts his descent from the person to whom those arms were granted. (g) Such insignia carries with it a certain amount of prestige,. and if merited can be displayed with a great deal of pride.
In England, all off spring in the male line of an armiger are entitled to bear, use and display the arms of their father. (h) By the same token, unless one has proof of this connection with an armigerous ancestor, while not unlawful to adopt such insignia for personal use, it is considered in poor taste to do so.
In America, however, there is a tendency to believe that if one is lineally descended from an armigerous ancestor, he or she is entitled to use the coat of arms and this is commonly practised. Here, also, it has become quite popular to display coats of arms which some "authority" has "researched" and found belonging to a family of the same or similar name, regardless of one's ancestral chain, which is no stronger than its weakest or even "missing" link. To admire and covet the possession of such a work of art as well as prestigious item is quite understandable, but its casual adoption is not freely condoned, even in America!

THE ORIGIN OF "TOLSON"
Lives there a person who has not at one time or another wondered about the origin and or meaning of his surname --by many centuries our oldest personal possession, rooted deeply in the past. How many of you whose surname is Tolson, have had teachers, businessmen, acquaintance's, reporter's, etc., to take liberties with the spelling of your name, though to you, it seemed perfectly phonetically spelled! Therefore, in records of known members of our family, both in America and in England, we find the name spelled or transcribed, Telsen, Towlson, Toulson, Tulson, Tolston, Tole son, Tollson, and even Tolman, Follsans, Dolson, and Thompson! Likewise, 'in early England the pronunciation and spelling of the name has been a source of confusion through the centuries for scholars and others depending upon the accent, handwriting and literacy of the persons involved in record making. At the time (ca. 1400) that hereditary surnames were adopted, most of the populace were illiterate and it was up to the "clerks" to write down what they heard in their own way. Therefore, in English records, including old parish records, one may find a variety of spellings for the name. Beginning as early as 1546 in the Dewsbury parish records, the spelling is at first "Tolson" giving way immediately to Towlson, Toulson, Touleson, Tilson, Towleson, the last most frequently used. (a) Beginning as early as 1584, in the parish register of Bridekirk in Cumberland, the seat of the earliest known Tolson family, the name is spelled as we use it and throughout this particular register to 1807, this spelling persists with the exception of two or three entries when it appears as Towson and Towlson.
Since several authorities on name origins have researched the name and succinctly give the accounts of the derivation and meaning of it --not always in agreement with one another - -it is deemed preferable to quote some of them here. One believes it is from the medial syllable in Bartholomew as Toll, Tolson, and Towle. ,,(b) Also, "Toll, Tolson (Eng.), de scendant of Toll a pet form of Bartholomew (son of Talmi, furrow); dweller or collector at a tollhouse."(c) Another asserts, Tolson along with other name s, i. e., Townson, Toulson, Towlson, Towson, Tollenson, Tolneson, are colloquial pronunciations of Tomlinson, particularly common in Lancashire. (d) Still another authority is of the opinion that there can be not the shadow of a doubt that the derivation of the name progressed in Lancashire and Yorkshire from Towlyngson in the early 1500's through Towlson, Tounson, Toulson, Towlnson, to Tolson by the early 1700's. (e) There is a possibility that the name was a place name, since some early Bridekirk Tolsons had "de" (of) as a prefix. However, "de" was sometimes used carelessly in this respect. .On the other hand, "son" sometimes evolved from the locational suffixes, "ston" and "sdonu and did not then originally indicate "son of." In the Domesday Book appears "Tol a Dane. ,,(f) If the non-Norman "Tol" was still in use when surnames were assumed, then coupled with "son" it could be the origin for many, if not all Tolsons.
These are examples of more than one "school of thought" concerning the origin and evolution of the name. Whether one is more correct than another is difficult to determine. Perhaps there is an element of fact in each explanation, and the name having come from a diversity of origins in England, and therefore a variety of unrelated families, it evolved through several stages to the most frequent spelling, "Tolson" of today. According to available public sources the spelling adopted and adhered to most often in the last century has become standardised to "Tolson, " both in England and America.
While the preponderance of evidence seems to indicate the name stems mainly from the northern counties of England, there is little or no doubt that it has multiple origins. (The name is also in use by Scandinavian immigrants to America, to a limited extent, and one known Russian immigrant family assumed the name. )(g) Therefore, though perhaps a bit unsettling, the naive belief which several of us may have held that the name was derived from one common source or ancestor, as the result of research by scholars, this idea may be dispelled for the time being!

(a) Morton, Maisie, of Yorkshire Archaelogical
Society, Leeds, Yorkshire, "Trans cript of
DewsburyParish Register, 1538-1698", 1971.
(b) Smith, E., American Surnames, edition 1969,p.67.
(c) Smith, E., Dictionary of American Family
Names, p. 216.
(d) Reany, Percy Hide, A Dictionary of British
Surnames, 1958 edition, p. 325.
(e) Bardsley, Char le s Waring Endell, Dictionary
of English and Welsh Surname s, 1967, p. 756.
(f) Ewen, Cecil Henry L'Estrange, A History of
Surnames of the British Isles, pp. 87,175, 248.
(g) Tolson, Jan, of San Francisco, "Letter," 1969.

              SOME EARLY TOLSONS
Henricus or Henry, a Saxon, according to family researchers' and historians, seated in Cumberland, a northern county of England, as early as 859 A. D. , (a) is said to be the "progenitor of the Tolsons." A man of considerable wealth and importance, he held lands in ancient records, the Koknat and Derwent, his manor house being located on the Derwent river near the present town of Cockermouth. These lands were in the "forest of Kokermouth" in Cumbri in the District of Cumberland, being a part of the Brigantes, an ancient kingdom of the Northumbers.
It is said that in proof of his rank, Henricus had in the upper part of his hall a Dais to receive and entertain his guests, and at the lower end a bower or recess, wherein he might, himself, repose. There was a streamlet flowing through the premises into the river Derwent, in which he reputedly baptised his children. (b) The land originally granted to Henricus, the Saxon, was from one Gulielmi de Kokriat, and had in turn been granted to him "from Alice de Vumeley, a daughter of a Gulielmi, son of Latcey. ,,(c) (Some "family historians" contend that there is a direct relationship between Henricus, the Saxon, and the Henricus de Tolson who follows, but it should be pointed out that the "fifth generation" descent between the two is not acceptable.
For genealogical purposes, one hundred years is estimated as equal to about three generations. The time lapse between the Saxon (ca. 859) and his "sixth-generation descendant, " Henricus de Tolson (ca. 1272), being about four hundred years, would constitute upwards of twelve generations, instead of the stated five. Therefore, though such an ancestry is not ruled out, it is not logical to believe that it came about in the manner set forth by the "historians." The story is given principally as an exercise in imagination and at the same as a caution to those who might be prone to unthinkingly accept what is seen in print.
It is asserted that five generations from Henricus, the Saxon, had passed when one of his descendants assumed the surname "de (of) Tolson" and it was his son who, during the reign of Edward I (1272-1307), was found guilty of high treason, but was given a full and free pardon by that Monarch. This Henry de Tolson held lands at Bridekirk in Cumberland which became property of a Catholic monastery in Yorkshire, and meanwhile the Tolsons who remained on the land were regarded as tenants until King Henry VIII (1509 -1547), in the 35th year of his reign, dissolved the monastery and re stored the manor of Bridekirk to a Henry Tolson, lineal heir. For many generations, it is stated, at least one son, generally the eldest, was given the name of Henry (Yorkshiremen more commonly use Harry).
Some lines of descent are brought down generation by generation from Bridekirk to recent times, one of whom is a Richard Tolson, who was born at Woodhall and baptized at Cockermouth in Cumberland. He resided at Lambeth and was buried there in l822 (d) While several provable lines are traced to the present from the foregoing ancient source, it is highly probable that there were many other members of the same family in every generation whose names for one reason or another were never recorded in genealogical or family records, and thus in a very few generations their family relationships were lost to themselves and others forever. As long as the law of primogeniture (the right of inheritance belonging to the first born, only), was effective many times the eldest son, by inheritance, became a wealthy and influential man, and his less fortunate siblingswere cut off from their accustomed plenty and relegated to a life among the poorer, uneducated, working class. (e) The descendants of the latter group were more numerous and certainly less traceable.
That the Derwent river valley and Kokermouth forest was the original seat of the predecessors of some of the Tolsons, appears fairly plausible. The published parish registers of nearby Bridekirk, which encompass a span of time from 1584 to 1812, and at best are somewhat incomplete, give numerous instances of baptisms, marriages, and burials of numerous Tolsons who obviously formed a large percentage of the parish. (Interestingly, it was King Henry VIII under whom as early as 1538-9, parish registers were begun and these records are the only source we have for vital statistics on the general population over an appreciable span of the Englishman's past. To Oliver Cromwell goes the credit for the destruction of many of these parish records, thereby rendering it difficult and sometimes impossible to complete a lineage. ) (f) Some particulars can be dug out of old records such as the Domesday Book, tax rolls, visitation rolls, etc., but are very hard to come by this side of the Atlantic.
(A correspondent recently wrote: "We have been in Cumberland a few times this last summer (1970), and have found the site of the old house where the family (Tolson) lived for many centuries. It was demolished about 80 years ago, and would have been built about 1630 or so, to replace the previous one on the same site that was burned down by an invasion of the Scots. There are fewer old houses in Cumberland and Westmoreland than anywhere else, due to the border wars. Only the large castles remain. It would probably be Cockermouth Castle where the family took refuge, this castle being only a couple of miles from the home
site. ,,)(g) At present the percentage of persons bearing the name of Tolson in the vicinity of Bridekirk Parish, seems to have decreased almost to the vanishing point. They likely have migrated to other areas of the Kingdom, and many are said to have been living in Yorkshire, particularly in Dewsbury and Huddersfield during the Industrial Revolution, by the end of the 19th century, and on into the present. (h) A transcript of the parish register of Dewsbury encompassing the years 1538-1698 lists many Tolsons. (I) At present, lacking records that cover the first three-fourths of the 18th century, renders it impossible to link our ancestry to any of these. Among the collections of published parish registers available to us are some of the Yorkshire parishes. One of them, Wath-Upon-Dearne contains a large number of Tolsons (also Tolston, Toulson, Towlson), and covers incompletely the years 1598- 1779. This parish is located some twenty miles from Dewsbury. Another is Thornhill Parish, which contains many of the name, also by a variety of spellings. Actually, from the available parish records, it appears that the favorite place of abode for the Tolsons was in the West Riding of Yorkshire!
Today, as well as in years past, there is a good percentage of persons in England by the name of Tolson, therefore, the name is not an uncommon one. A goodly number have in the past as well as the present, held positions of prominence, some in the service of the Crown. People in all walks of life bear the name.
To those of us who grew up in mid-America or the great Southwest and rarely, if ever encountered another, except family members, by the name of Tolson, it seemed entirely plausible that everyone bearing the name should in some, though perhaps remote way, be related. A bit of research, however, soon reveals that at least on this side of the Atlantic, our own immediate family, which was transplanted to America in the 1840's, is a relatively small contingent. Research has brought to light that people of the name have been coming to America since the early colonial period. For instance, one individual by the name of John Tolson, a member of Kingswell Colony, settled in York County, Virginia as early as the mid-seventeenth century, but it is thought improbable that he left descendants. (J) A few others by the name, had come to this country by the middle of the eighteenth century, in time to serve in the Revolutionary War with the Colonial Force S.(k) From these early day colonists, several Tolson families in Missouri, Kentucky, Washington, D. C., and Maryland, in particular, trace the beginnings of their Americanization.
In the First Census of 1790, there were only about 123 persons by the spellings: Tolsin, Tolson, Tolston, Toltson, in the U. S. This represents 17 Early Tolsons the 23 families listed in Maryland of which there were seven; in Virginia, four; and North Carolina, twelve. (1) , Through the years there were others bearing the name, filtering through immigration channels, settling near the coast and later venturing inland as their skills developed to match the westward progress of American development. Within ninety years, or 1880, although Maryland had the highest concentration of the name, Kentucky and Missouri were not far behind. At this time. there were about 14 states and territories which did not list some of the name by any spelling. Like the migratory trend of the country as a whole, there was a definite westward trend. A partial index of the 1880 U.S. census called the Soundex, included about 25 percent of the population of the U. S. In this we find about 779 with the name spelled Tolson, both black and white. This figure multiplied by four would indicate there were about 3, 116 persons of the name living in the U. S. at that time.
Based on the available evidence, it appears that about 70 per cent of all Tolsons were white at that time --much less than the national average of the total population today (about 90 percent).
Today (1970), based on information from the Social Security Administration, the name Tolson -" is one of about a million surnames that are borne by fewer than 12, 000 persons each in the country. Any Tolson in America can tell you that his name is relatively rare here. .
It is interesting to note that especially Maryland, Kentucky, Louisiana, and Washington, D.C. as well as a smattering in other states, there are nume rous black and mulatto familie with the name. This may indicate that some early day Tolsons were plantation owners who employed the use of slave labour prior to the War of Emancipation. It is also interesting to note that in 1880, fifteen years after the war, the similarity of the given names of white and black Tolson families in close proximity, indicates a likely former owner or overseer -slave relationship. Today, it would be difficult to find a state in which there are not at least a few Tolsons.
Though some have been contacted who know nothing of their ancestry beyond their parents or at best their grandparents, a few others can trace to early American descent, and a very few others have knowledge of a Yorkshire origin. Fewer still pinpoint their place of origin as Dewsbury--the same as our own, but no real effort has yet been made to find our connection, if any. Most come - overers, as well as a succeeding generation or so, and even in some cases of current generation members, there is a persistence in retaining the popular given names of their English forebears and kinsmen--as well as other English Tolsons: Abraham,c Mark, Richard, Thomas, George, William, Benjamin" Edward, Jacob, John, to name a few. Favourite feminine names on both sides of the Atlantic have been: Anne, Rebecca, Margaret, Mary, Elizabeth, Sarah, and in a few instances, Emma, Grace, and Ellen. In all fairness, it should be observed here that these names also tended toward some popularity in much of Yorkshire, regardless of the surname. From one source, members of the early American Tolsons have been characterized as conservative, kindly, intellectually able, and in a good many cases, successful in law, medicine, politics, ministry, and scholastic endeavours. (p)
That "One always retains the traces of one's origin, " is exemplified by a description of the Yorkshire people in general, (q) which also describes very well many of the Tolsons we have known: "The Yorkshire people are by reputation robust in physique though not especially handsome, efficient and vigorous in their undertakings, blunt in speech and rather well satisfied with themselves. They dislike excessive expression of emotion and are cautious with strangers, but once they accept you they are staunchly if soberly faithful. They prefer practice to theory. Above all, they are extremely independent. An Abbot of York wrote to Henry VIII: 'there be such a company of wilful gentlemen in Yorkshire as there be not in all England besides. ' ... A Yorkshire person has a strong backbone; lean on it but do not try to bend it. ,,(r) It goes without saying, that with a few generations' change in environment and the infusion of new blood, the outstanding features of the Yorkshire temperament are becoming less prominent, but they are still discernible,nevertheless.
REFERENCES
(a) Media Research Bureau, Washington, D. C.,
"A Compilation of Data," p. 3.
(b) Burke, Esq., J., A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, "Tolson of Bridekirk, " pp. 133-136.
(c) Op. Cit.
(d) Op. Cit.
(e) Tolson, Hugh, Ripon, Yorkshire, England, "Letter," 1960' s.
(f) Op. Cit.
(g) Tolson, Harold, Prestwich, Manchester, Lancashire, England, "Letter," March, 1971.
(h) Tolson, Roger W., Harrogate, Yorkshire, England, "Letter," May, 1969.
(i) Morton, Maisie of Yorkshire Archaelogical Society, Leeds, Yorkshire, "Transcript of
Dewsbury Parish Register, 1538-1698, " 1971.
(j) Media Re search Bureau, Op. Cit. , pp. 5, 6, 7.
(k) Op. Cit.
(1) Index of the 1790 Census of the U. S.
(m) Soundex file of "Tolson" in 1880 Census of all States and Territories of the U. S., in Archives Building, Washington, D. C., 1968.
(The Soundex Filing System, alphabetic for the first letter of the surname and numeric there -under as indicated by divider cards, keeps together names of the same and similar sounds,but variant spellings.)

                                          Notes on the Tolson's in general.

It would appear that the first coat of arms granted to the Tolson family was during the reign of King Edward 1

Henry Tolson was granted the manor of Bridekirk by letters patent by King Henry 8th at the dissolution of the monastries

There were several Tolson's with the Christian name - Henry

A Henry Tolson was Lord of the manor of Woodhale ( Woodhall ? ) 1/5/1694
he also bought the manor of Brundholme in 1649.

Myers - Returning to the moiety of the Manor which passed to Thurston Hall, who, founded the Chantry of St. Nicholas in Wath Church, we find that it became subdivided between his two daughters the only issue of his marriage with Elizabeth Fleming, of whom Catherine born 1495, became the wife of Ralph Collynson and had no children, and Elizabeth who married Henry Savile (1) third son of Nicholas Savile of New Hall, Elland. In 1553-4 Catherine Collynson de Wath, widow, conveyed her fourth part of the manor of Dalton to Nicholas Sayvell. On the death of Nicholas Savile about 1557 his grandson John son of Henry Savile, (1) inherited the Manor of Dalton, and became owner of the whole of the moiety that originally devolved upon Thurston Hall.

( John's son Henry Savile (2) succeeded him and had an only child Margaret who married Henry Tolson of Brydekirke.
Henry Tolson died 22/11/1807 in Papcastle, Cumbria, leaving to Margaret his widow all his real estate at Papcastle, Hameshill, Cleaty Bank, Brandling Gill, and Aspatria, to be sold to pay the legacies )

In 1601, Henry Savile (2) sold his moiety of the Manor to John Townley, whose,father Bernard, as already shown had purchased the other moiety from Robert Dalton. The Townleys thus held the whole of the lordship, which 'was handed down from father to son by several generations of the Townleys until 1704, when it passed by marriage to John Wilkinson of Huddersfield and later was again carried by marriage to the Kayes of Grange.



It would appear that the first coat of arms granted to the Tolson family was during the reign of King Edward 1

Henry Tolson was granted the manor of Bridekirk by letters patent by King Henry 8th at the dissolution of the monastries

There were several Tolson's with the Christian name - Henry

A Henry Tolson was Lord of the manor of Woodhale ( Woodhall ? ) 1/5/1694
he also bought the manor of Brundholme in 1649.

A Henry Tolson died 22/11/1807 in Papcastle, Cumbria leaving to Margaret his widow all his real estate at Papcastle, Hameshill, Cleaty Bank, Brandling Gill, and Aspatria, to be sold to pay the legacies


The conveyance for the preceding (William Poole of Whitehaven, corn factor, devisee in trust of the late Henry Tolson of Papcastle, gent., John Simpson of Redmain gent., Alice Frears of Ravenglass spinster, cousin and cust. heir of Jane Head of Brandling Gill spinster deceased and of Margaret Tolson of Papcastle widow deceased, and Mary Poole of Maryport widow and sister of Henry Tolson deceased, to Henry Allason [sic] of Mosser, yeo.) reciting re Cleaty Bank from the late Henry Tolson's time (both parts, the 3s. 11d. and the 4s. 0d.), and that Henry Tolson died on 22 Nov. 1807 leaving to Margaret his widow all his real estate at Papcastle, Hameshill, Cleaty Bank, Brandling Gill, and Aspatria, to be sold to pay the legacies etc.; Royal Arms at head, dealer's name beneath



In 1691 Elizabeth the wife of Roger Tolson applied for Poor Relief on behalf of herself and children

It is recorded in Legh Tolson's work "The Annals and History of Kirkheaton" that George Tolson was of Dewsbury

Tomb inscriptions at Kirkheaton Parish Church.
50 KIRKHEATON.

No.9.
In affectionate remembrance of MARTHA Wife of Frederick Greenwood, Surgeon, Huddersfield and daughter of James and Mary Tolson of Dalton in this parish. She died June 23rd, 1858 aged 29 years.
" Him that cometh unto me I will in no wise cast out." John VI, 37.

No. 10.
In Memory of ELIZA The beloved wife of William George Wilks of Liverpool, who departed this life at Torquay on the 18th March 1860,
aged 26 years, daughter of James Tolson of Dalton
" Whosoever believeth in me shall never die." John XI, 26.
(Mrs. Wilks was buried at Sowerby near Halifax.)

No. 11.
Sacred to the memory of JOSEPH BEAUMONT of Dalton Green Who died Jan. 6th 1827, aged 50 years
Upright, intelligent and affectionate, the loss is deeply felt by survivors and lamented by the poor to whom he was a liberal benefactor.
His end was peace, his memory is blessed.
Also MARY eldest daughter of the said Joseph Beaumont. She died May 31st 1815 aged 15 years.
Also SARAH his wife who died at Huddersfield, Jan. 7th, 1857, aged 78 years.
" I know that my Redeemer liveth." Job XIX, 25.
Also AMELIA Wife of John Beaumont of Ravensknowle Who died February 22nd 1882 aged 64
Also Martha daughter of the above Joseph and Sarah Beaumont who died July 7th 1882 in her 78th year.
Also the above named John Beaumont of Ravensknowle Son of the above named Joseph and Sarah Beaumont born May loth 1808 died Sept. l0th, 1889.
John Beaumont of Ravenskowle had an only child Sarah Martha, who married Standish Grove-Grady. She died in 1925 and by an eccentric 'Will left some six
hundred thousand pounds for the suppression" of all sport involving the pursuit, or death of,any Stag, Deer, Fox, Hare, Rabbit, Bird, Fish or any other animal,"

MURAL INSCRIPTIONS. 53

No. 21.
In loving remembrance of
ROBERT HENRY TOLSON. OF OAKLANDS,
who died 21st July 1888 Aged 69 years.

See notes on John Tolson the son of George Tolson


It is recorded in Legh Tolson's work "The Annals and History of Kirkheaton" that George Tolson was of Dewsbury

Tomb inscriptions at Kirkheaton Parish Church.
50 KIRKHEATON.

No.9.
In affectionate remembrance of MARTHA Wife of Frederick Greenwood, Surgeon, Huddersfield and daughter of James and Mary Tolson of Dalton in this parish. She died June 23rd, 1858 aged 29 years.
" Him that cometh unto me I will in no wise cast out." John VI, 37.

No. 10.
In Memory of ELIZA The beloved wife of William George Wilks of Liverpool, who departed this life at Torquay on the 18th March 1860,
aged 26 years, daughter of James Tolson of Dalton
" Whosoever believeth in me shall never die." John XI, 26.
(Mrs. Wilks was buried at Sowerby near Halifax.)

No. 11.
Sacred to the memory of JOSEPH BEAUMONT of Dalton Green Who died Jan. 6th 1827, aged 50 years
Upright, intelligent and affectionate, the loss is deeply felt by survivors and lamented by the poor to whom he was a liberal benefactor.
His end was peace, his memory is blessed.
Also MARY eldest daughter of the said Joseph Beaumont. She died May 31st 1815 aged 15 years.
Also SARAH his wife who died at Huddersfield, Jan. 7th, 1857, aged 78 years.
" I know that my Redeemer liveth." Job XIX, 25.
Also AMELIA Wife of John Beaumont of Ravensknowle Who died February 22nd 1882 aged 64
Also Martha daughter of the above Joseph and Sarah Beaumont who died July 7th 1882 in her 78th year.
Also the above named John Beaumont of Ravensknowle Son of the above named Joseph and Sarah Beaumont born May loth 1808 died Sept. l0th, 1889.
John Beaumont of Ravenskowle had an only child Sarah Martha, who married Standish Grove-Grady. She died in 1925 and by an eccentric 'Will left some six
hundred thousand pounds for the suppression" of all sport involving the pursuit, or death of,any Stag, Deer, Fox, Hare, Rabbit, Bird, Fish or any other animal,"

MURAL INSCRIPTIONS. 53



Notes on the Tolson's in general.

It would appear that the first coat of arms granted to the Tolson family was during the reign of King Edward 1

Henry Tolson was granted the manor of Bridekirk by letters patent by King Henry 8th at the dissolution of the monastries


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