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Looking for additional info of the following civil war soldiers
Posted by: Mary Cureton (ID *****0530) Date: November 02, 2004 at 12:30:12
  of 282

Suydam, Jacob
Union Infantry 10th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry (3 months, 1861)
Suydam, James
Union Artillery 13th Regiment, New York Heavy Artillery (State Militia) (3 months, 1862)
Suydam, James
Union Infantry 53rd Regiment, Illinois Infantry
Suydam, James
Union Cavalry 1st Regiment, Illinois Cavalry
Suydam, James C.
Union Infantry 122nd Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry
Suydam, James C.
Union Artillery 3rd Regiment, Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery
Suydam, Jason
Union Infantry 30th Regiment, New Jersey Infantry
Suydam, John
Union Infantry 63rd Regiment, Illinois Infantry
Suydam, John H.
Union Infantry 23rd Regiment, Illinois Infantry
Suydam, John J.
Union 47th Regiment, New York State Militia (3 months, 1862)
Suydam, John L.
Union Infantry 28th Regiment, New Jersey Infantry
Suydam, Josiah W.
Union Infantry 136th Regiment, New York Infantry
Suydam, Luther
Union Infantry 88th Regiment, Ohio Infantry
Suydam, Oliver
Union Infantry 30th Regiment, New York Infantry
Suydam, Peter H.
Union Cavalry 1st Regiment, New Jersey Cavalry
Suydam, Peter S.
Union Infantry 53rd Regiment, Ohio Infantry
Suydam, Peter W.
Union Infantry 28th Regiment, New Jersey Infantry
Suydam, Seymone
Union Infantry 30th Regiment, New York Infantry
Suydam, Seymour
Union Infantry 57th Regiment, New York Infantry
Suydam, Seymour L.
Union Infantry 139th Regiment, New York Infantry
Suydam, Seymour L.
Union Infantry 67th Regiment, New York Infantry
Suydam, Sidney B.
Union Infantry 9th Regiment, New Jersey Infantry
Suydam, Simeon
Union Cavalry 8th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry
Suydam, Simon
Union Cavalry 8th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry
Suydam, Simon P.
Union Infantry 67th Regiment, New York Infantry
Suydam, William
Union Cavalry 1st Regiment, Colorado Cavalry
Suydam, William
Union Infantry 10th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry (3 months, 1861)
Suydam, William
Union Infantry 9th Regiment, New Jersey Infantry
Suydam, William
Union Infantry 79th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry
Suydam, William
Union Cavalry 20th Regiment, Pennsylvania Cavalry (6 months, 1863-1864)
Suydam, William
Union Infantry 65th Regiment, New York Infantry
Suydam, William
Union Infantry 46th Regiment, Indiana Infantry
Suydam, William H.
Union Infantry 128th Regiment, New York Infantry
Charles Suydam
He was born June 15, 1836 in NYC, the son of Henry and Almira Suydam.
Occupation: Lawyer. Charles C. Suydam was appointed lieutenant colonel of the Third and many of the junior officers had prior cavalry experience, such as William P. Reeves, who was discharged from the Fifth New York Cavalry to take a commission in Company B.". "After Morrison's resignation, the junior officers of the regiment petitioned Governor Parker to name Lieutenant Colonel Suydam colonel. Their pleas fell on deaf ears and Colonel Alexander Pennington, a regular, was named commander. Pennington did not remain in charge of the regiment for long, however. On October 1 he assumed command of the brigade and Suydam was elevated to command of the regiment." "As the campaign ebbed due to lack of effective opposition from the Rebels and the coming of winter, the Third's regimental headquarters found time to attend to some administrative details. Lieutenant Colonel Suydam wrote to New Jersey's Adjutant General Stockton with a request that commissions for new officers assigned to the regiment be cleared throught him. The awarding of commissions was often used by governors as a method of paying political debts. Although this practice, on more than one occasion, resulted in some very bad army officers, it was a power governors were unlikely to forfeit to lieutenant colonels. Suydam resolved what could have become a sticky problem by resigning his own commission at the end of November. Major Robeson assumed assumed regimental command.". Appearance: 5' 11 1/2"; blue-gray eyes; brown hair; scar on left check "from being bushwacked" in 1864.
H Suydam
H. L. Suydam, Esq., Quarter Master of the 33rd Regiment
( Letter)
CAMP GRANGER, near Washington
July 14, 1861
S. H. Parker, Esq., Editor Gazette
Dear Sir:
We - that is the bloody 33rd regiment N. Y. S. V. - have at last arrived on Meridian Heights, encamped about two and half miles from the Capitol, 829 strong. he boys are all in good spirits so far as I can hear, but I can assure you they have had a very trying time of it. We left Elmira July 8th, and had a most delightful ride through the country to this point, being cheered at every station - and especially at Williamsport where we were met by many an old Genevan, who did all in their power to relieve the wants of a hungry and tired body of soldiers. As soon as we crossed the line into Maryland, the Rail Road was, as you may say, one complete line of defense, being guarded by the 12th Penn. regiment at every point. Most of the bridges having been burned down are now rebuilt and strongly guarded, so that the travel on the road is perfectly safe. On arriving at Baltimore the regiment formed and marched through the city, making not a very bad appearance with their excellent Band from Elmira and all colors flying, leaving me in charge of the train of baggage with a guard of 20 men to meet them at the Washington depot. (It is now 12 o'clock at night, and Col. Walker calls at my tent and wants the Quarter Master to do his duty which is the "grand rounds" -- breaking off the thread of my discourse.) It took us nearly two hours to get through the city. One thing I could not help but notice, that when the ladies waved their handerkerchiefs at us, (which was frequently done,) they left the blinds partly open and stood so far back in their rooms that their neighbors could not see them -- rather a bad omen. But a number of citizens came to us and made enquiry as to where we came from, giving us the morning papers and wishing us God speed - and doing other acts of kindness. Quite a crowd of youths, however, followed us giving cheers for Jeff. Davis. I threw them a cop, and told them to give it to Jeff, he might want it before he got through with this unholy war. On the whole, I was not very much pleased with Baltimore. The guard on the platform of the car, with loaded guns, looked rather war-like for me. On arriving at Washington, it was found our men, who had been supplied with three days rations by our friend, Billie Post of Elmira, (who by the by is a perfect gentleman,) not having the fear of famine before their eyes had exhausted the amount in the twenty-four hours. The Quartermaster at once made his requisition on the Commissary, and drew on the next day two days' rations, consisting of hard sea-bread and dried bacon -- a very striking change from the princely fare of Mr. Post - then the Quartermaster must come in for his regular share of curses. Up to this time the fare has been very bad, but I must say the boys have acted with a feeling that has sometimes surprised me. It was raining when they left Elmira, and they arrived at Washington and went into camp without supper, tents or fire to comfort them, amid one of the severest pelting storms I ever passed through. It has rained nearly every day since we arrived here; and the thermometer at this writing stands at 64 in my tent. Washington is a city of magnificent distances, which if any one does not believe, let them take the appointment of Q. M. in a volunteer regiment, travel 2 1/2 miles to get a requisition for meat, 2 1/2 miles to get it signed by the proper officer, then break down his buggy and have to travel 2 1/2 miles in another direction on foot to the butcher shop, then home to camp to receive the curses of _________.
The men all think as much of their Colonel as ever; in fact he cannot be beat we think. We have received many calls from old friends today - among them O. G. Judd, who is looking well and hearty, Capt. Baird and others. Visited the forts on Arlington Heights, and today things look rather warlike. No more at present, but you may again hear from the


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