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Re: Johann Stocklein, dob 1875
Posted by: Michael Heart (ID *****0134) Date: February 13, 2003 at 19:02:02
In Reply to: Re: Johann Stocklein, dob 1875 by Jennifer motakef of 43

Descendants of Anna Ruder

Generation No. 1
1. Anna Ruder was born Abt. 1885. She married Vincent Stoecklein.
Anna Ruder was a Housewife and was "White"
Vincent Stoecklein was a farmer and was "White"

Children of Anna Ruder and Vincent Stoecklein is:
1. John Peter Stoecklein, born January 05, 1904 in Ellis County, Munjor, Kansas
2. Melvin Stoecklein who lived at some time in Brighton CO
3. Carl Stoecklein.

Generation No. 2
. John Peter Stoecklein was born January 05, 1904 in Ellis County, Munjor, Kansas. He married Julia "Jule" Josephine Marger, daughter of William Marger and Josephine Millucaavay?

More About John Peter Stoecklein:
Fact 1: AKA - Lem Stecklin, Lem Steckland, "Hill-Billy" Stecklin, "Hill-Billy Srecklin
Fact 2: Possibly married previously - wealthy spouse (we have a wedding picture with John Peter as the groom, but the bride is not anyone my husband's mother knows.....and it appears to be from a wealthy family...)
Fact 3: Occupation: Carnival/Pro Wrestler with pet raccoon and skunk!

More About Julia "Jule" Josephine Marger:
Fact 1: Occupation: Ferris Wheel Ticket Saleslady, Homemaker, loved to entertain and play cards.

Children of John Stoecklein and Julia Marger are:
1. deceased Stoecklein, born Abt. 1932.
2. Living Stoecklein, born 1938 in Springfield, Illinois

Children of deceased Stoecklein are:
1 Stoecklein.
2 Stoecklein.
3 Stoecklein.
4 Stoecklein.

Children of living Stoecklein are:
1 Sexton (my husband)
2 Sexton

Character study on Christof & Helen Stoecklein
The thoughts and recollections of them come to us through their youngest daughter, who at this writing was still living in Hays, Kansas. She is Catherine Zimmerman (Stoecklein). Both her parents, Christof and Helen came over to America on the same steam boat "SUEVIA" which landed in New York on AUGUST 3, 1876. With the help of guides and contacts there, they traveled westward, until they eventually landed in Victoria, KS. With this famous father, Peter Stoecklein, who was one of the five scouts to America from Russia before this trip took place, Christof and the Peter Stoecklein family finally moved to Munjor, Kansas.
Christof was 17 years old at the time they came to America. There were six children living, as they landed and Christof was the third oldest living, but the fourth oldest born, since the oldest daughter Anna died on the voyage, and had to be buried at sea.
The first job was to find work, and to. Raise money. Christof and his three brothers go some work on the United Pacific Rail4roaDIED His father, Peter Stoecklein, obtained a Homestead certificate # 991 in Wakeny, Kansas on AUGUST 1, 1883. He got 80 acres of land, seven miles south of Hays, KS. CHristof also got a Homestead Certificate #2854, adjacent to his fathers land, on AUGUST 7, 1888. He married Helena Herklotz on JANUARY 26, 1880, in Munjor, Kansas. With the Homestead Certificate, he obtained 180 acres of land right adjacent to his father, Peter Stoecklein. He farmed this land, as well as some plots of land near by, until his son Alexander went into the army for World War I. He then moved to Munjor, where he had a small home, and lived in their small Munjor home for the remainder of his life. He was always very quiet and never got overly excited He bore his burden of poverty graciously and his family honored him for it. He had cancer, and was sick quite a number of years. He died DECEMBER. 2, 1936, at the age of 76 years. He was married 56 years and reared their nine children.
She was commonly called by the endearing name of "Lehnya". Her parents were Gottfried Herklotz and Mary Catherine Boos. When the people were making ready to leave Russia for America, Helena desperately wants to come along to America with her brother Carl Anton. Carl gave his parents a solemn promise that he personally would take care of "Little Lehnya." So, with that assurance, she came along. According to church records, she was born in "Paninskojje", or Schoenchen Russia, on MARCH 2, 1859. She came on the same boat as Christof. When Helena's group went westward, they first land in Leibenthal, and from there to Schoenchen, KS.
Helena was by nature a kind girl and one who always helped others. She was happiest when she could do someone a favor. This story tells something about her spirit of congeniality. "She spent most of her life on her feet." This happened on the earliest times in Ellis County; the family needed jobs and money desperately. Her brother Carl told her that there were jobs in Salina, Kansas. "How do were eget there?" Henea asked "we walk there" was the answer. So they set our toward Salina, Kansas via the railroad tracks. When they finally got there, Helena's legs and feet were terribly sore and swollen. They took off their shoes but they couldn't get them back on again. So, Helena sat around the track, while her brother went to look for jobs. Luckily, after some time, he did return, with jobs for both of the MARRIED so they worked in Salina for a time.
Christof and Helen were married in Munjor and started their life of their own. This started a long fifty six years of married life for them on the farm, which was situated seven miles south of Hays, KS. Here she spent many years with busy hands and busy feet. She always had a nice garden on that farm She grew many vegetables. One time she had an exceptionally large watermelon. She took this melon and toted it on foot, to Hays and sold it. With the money she brought back several shirts for Christof and his younger brother and a few other little things. She was very tired, but when she was the happy faces on the men who got the shirts, she forgot her pains and was just as happy as they wren. It was harder to tell who was happier, the recipient or the giver.
Schooling was not open to all the children. The younger ones got to go, but not so the older ones, since they were needed on the far MARRIED after they moved down to Munjor, he did practically no work. His health was failing. It was common sight to see him on the porch, rocking him and smoking his pipe, while she kept rising around and in and out of the house. He finally died of cancer, and following this, she would stay with the children of her family, spending some time with all of the MARRIED she spent most of her years in Hays, where she died at the age of 92 years. All in Hays neighborhood where she stayed knew her and loved her. She never wore a hat in her life. She always wore dark clothes and a kerchief over her head called a "Babushka." After she died, the people missed that familiar figure, dressed in dark, walking to church, with the quick rapid steps.

Character study on Christof & Helen Stoecklein
the thoughts and recollections of them come to us through their youngest daughter, who at this writing was still living in Hays, Kansas. She is Catherine Zimmerman (Stoecklein). Both her parents, Christof and Helen came over to America on the same steam boat "SUEVIA" which landed in New York on AUGUST 3, 1876. With the help of guides and contacts there, they traveled westward, until they eventually landed in Victoria, KS. With this famous father, Peter Stoecklein, who was one of the five scouts to America from Russia before this trip took place, Christof and the Peter Stoecklein family finally moved to Munjor, Kansas.
Christof was 17 years old at the time they came to America. There were six children living, as they landed and Christof was the third oldest living, but the fourth oldest born, since the oldest daughter Anna died on the voyage, and had to be buried at sea.
The first job was to find work, and to. Raise money. Christof and his three brothers go some work on the United Pacific Rail4roaDIED His father, Peter Stoecklein, obtained a Homestead certificate # 991 in Wakeny, Kansas on AUGUST 1, 1883. He got 80 acres of land, seven miles south of Hays, KS. CHristof also got a Homestead Certificate #2854, adjacent to his fathers land, on AUGUST 7, 1888. He married Helena Herklotz on JANUARY 26, 1880, in Munjor, Kansas. With the Homestead Certificate, he obtained 180 acres of land right adjacent to his father, Peter Stoecklein. He farmed this land, as well as some plots of land near by, until his son Alexander went into the army for World War I. He then moved to Munjor, where he had a small home, and lived in their small Munjor home for the remainder of his life. He was always very quiet and never got overly excited He bore his burden of poverty graciously and his family honored him for it. He had cancer, and was sick quite a number of years. He died DECEMBER. 2, 1936, at the age of 76 years. He was married 56 years and reared their nine children.
She was commonly called by the endearing name of "Lehnya". Her parents were Gottfried Herklotz and Mary Catherine Boos. When the people were making ready to leave Russia for America, Helena desperately wants to come along to America with her brother Carl Anton. Carl gave his parents a solemn promise that he personally would take care of "Little Lehnya." So, with that assurance, she came along. According to church records, she was born in "Paninskojje", or Schoenchen Russia, on MARCH 2, 1859. She came on the same boat as Christof. When Helena's group went westward, they first land in Leibenthal and from there to Schoenchen, KS.
Helena was by nature a kind girl and one who always helped others. She was happiest when she could do someone a favor. This story tells something about her spirit of congeniality. "She spent most of her life on her feet." This happened on the earliest times in Ellis County; the family needed jobs and money desperately. Her brother Carl told her that there were jobs in Salina, Kansas. "How do were eget there?" Henea asked "we walk there" was the answer. So they set our toward Salina, Kansas via the railroad tracks. When they finally got there, Helena's legs and feet were terribly sore and swollen. They took off their shoes but they couldn't get them back on again. So, Helena sat around the track, while her brother went to look for jobs. Luckily, after some time, he did return, with jobs for both of the MARRIED so they worked in Salina for a time.
Christof and Helen were married in Munjor and started their life of their own. This started a long fifty six years of married life for them on the farm, which was situated seven miles south of Hays, KS. Here she spent many years with busy hands and busy feet. She always had a nice garden on that farm She grew many vegetables. One time she had an exceptionally large watermelon. She took this melon and toted it on foot, to Hays and sold it. With the money she brought back several shirts for Christof and his younger brother and a few other little things. She was very tired, but when she was the happy faces on the men who got the shirts, she forgot her pains and was just as happy as they were. It was harder to tell who was happier, the recipient or the giver.
Schooling was not open to all the children. The younger ones got to go, but not so the older ones, since they were needed on the farm after they moved down to Munjor, he did practically no work. His health was failing. It was common sight to see him on the porch, rocking him and smoking his pipe, while she kept rising around and in and out of the house. He finally died of cancer, and following this, she would stay with the children of her family, spending some time with all of the MARRIED she spent most of her years in Hays, where she died at the age of 92 years. All in Hays neighborhood where she stayed knew her and loved her. She never wore a hat in her life. She always wore dark clothes and a kerchief over her head called a "Babushka." After she died, the people missed that familiar figure, dressed in dark, walking to church, with the quick rapid steps.
Reflections on Carl and Anna (Doefler) Stoecklein
Carl H. Stoecklein was second oldest of the Christof and Helena Stoecklein family. The older children of Christof had to do a lot of heavy work in the family, since there was no help from any outside the family. The beginning years of the Stoecklin family were hard years. Carl was born SEPTEMBER 1, 1883, in Munjor, KS. He lived on his father's farm about seven miles south of Hays, KS. At the age of 21 years, on OCTOBER 25, 1904, he got married to Anna Dueler, in Munjor, Kansas. By this time, the ninth child was already born, and the Grandparents' family was already on handed
after this marriage with Anna, they moved a few miles south of Munjor, KS. They lived there until 1907. Their farming and family increased, so they sold this small farm and came to Ness City, of Ness County, and bought a quarter section of land south of Ness City. In a few years latter, they bought another quarter section. They also rented some land to farm Added to this, they had some cattle, mostly for their own use and hogs and chickens. Farming was a family affair, and with five healthy boys, he got the work done. Carl was remembered as a tall, lanky and quiet man, with good judgment and a good father. He died DECEMBER 8, 1970 in Ness County, Ness City, and age 66 years.
Anna Doefler, the mother, was born FEBRUARY. 16, 1886. She was the daughter of Conrad DOEFLER AND Elizabeth Schumacher. Elizabeth was the widow of Stanislaus Ruder and second wife of Conrad Doefler. This pair raised eleven children, one boy and one girl died young. The education of the parents was quite elemental, because the circumstances were quite different than they were for their children. They were all educated in the schools, and even high school.
Raising the folder on the farm was different from raising them in a city, where the father was in businesses. On the farms, both the father and mother were present to control and mold the family. This they did with equal authority. It was a busy farm, but a happy farm they were most generous hosts when relatives and friends visited the MARRIED Deep religious instructions were always top priority. As could be seen from their children, the Faith was deeply implanting Died Anna Died Augustus 5, 1971 in Ness City, age 85 years.
2. The John and Anna Margaret Schumacher Family
John Schumacher was born in Munjor, NOVEMBER 6, 1883. His parents were Anton Schumacher and Pauline (Ruder). John's father moved to Victoria, and had a General Merchandise store there in Victoria. He seemed to do well. John showed great interest in the business, so his father sent him to Salina, Kansas, to attend a business school there, so as to be able to run the affairs of the store. John married Anna Margaret Stoecklein on NOVEMBER, 22, 1904 in Victoria, KS. Business must have been good, because Johnís father opened another store in Ellis, KS which John was destined to manage. This he did with great energy and dedication. John was business and Anna Margaret took care of the family. The two first children, of the five were born in Victoria.
Those who vested at the Schumacher home were always met with a family that was enthusiastic and the welcome was warm and cordial. It was a real tragedy when John contacted a serious illness, and before toad long, died, living the mother the chore of raising the five children.
Anna Margaret, or "Ammagrate" as she was usually called, was the mother of this small and unfulfilled family. She was born in Munjor, KS, FEBRUARY 21, 1886. She was, as were many of the girls of the Stoecklein family, very calm, and quiet, but a very good mother. When her husband John died, she immediately inherited a bundle of responsibility. There were now five children, the last girl, Lietta, being born only three months after her father's death. How to finance a family of five children was a real problem the grandmother, Mrs. Pauline Schumacher was a fair Godmother to this family. She took care of the furnishing of the clothing of the children and also many other sundry needs of the children. Added to that, Anna Margaret inherited 320 acres of land out near Ogalla, Kansas, from her grandfather Schumacher. This helped to keep body and soul together.
Additional income was on hand through Anna Margaret's daily work as seamstress, which she built up into a business, but which was conducted from her home. She did not live far from the church, so when the priests needed someone who could cook for them, Anna Margaret was always glad to oblige. The priests paid MAY even social calls on her to encourage her in her big task. The children were in all agreement about their mother's character: She was extremely kind and never had an enemy. She was most generous with her help and work. She died at the age of 87 years, after a completed full life.

Adam Rohleder MARRIED to Eva Maria, migrated to Gross-Winternheim in 1670. Nowhere does it say where they came from He was a master tailor. He belonged to the Catholic parish. He was a respected man and elected major of the city.

Philip Rohleder
Son of Adam was born in 1673.

Johann Theodore Rohleder
Son of Philip was born in 1708 and died in 1793, at age 85 in OberIngelheim

Peter Rohleder
Born in 1732 died in 1779 at age 47 in Ober-Ingelheim

Dr. Hellriegel told me to write to Scwabenheim, Germany where he felt records would show those who in 1765 migrated from Germany.

Peter Rohleder married Catherine Niederquell. (Both lived in Russia) approx. 1800. The Niederquells were of the Lutheran faith. It is note-worthy that Niderquell is found today in Mainz, Germany near the village where the Rholeders live.

Anton Rohleder married Barbara Meier. (Both lived and died in Russia). Anton died JANUARY. 13, 1903 and Barbara died AUGUST. 24, 1907.

Nicholas Rohleder married Clementina Geier; 2 Mary Herman. The name was also spelled Herrmann, and Herman.

Nicholas was born MARCH 25, 1861 in Graf, Russia and died APRIL 14, 1939 in Victoria, Kansas.

His 1st wife Clementina was born in Graf, Russia and died in North Brothers Island, New York in Mar of 1892. Nicholas had 2 children from this wife: Mary born in 1888 and Peter or Pete in 1890.

Nicholas Rohleder and Clemintina and the 2 children left Graf, Russia for America in the early part of 1892. They boarded the S.S. Gelelrt in Hamburg, Germany and after a long trip landed in New York Mar 14, 1892. When they arrived Clemintina was sick with a contagious disease. She died shortly thereafter and in buried in North Brothers Island, New York.

Nicholas then came west with the 2 small children to Victoria, KS early in 1892. His aunt Catherine (Rohleder) Dreiling helped with the children. One can imagine the grief, the heartache as Nicholas left his young wife behind in a cemetery in New York and the train trip with the two small children must have seemed like an eternity until he reached Victoria, KS. He was a typical German man, stoic, religious and great faith. This is what sustained his difficult time.

On JANUARY. 16, 1893, Nicholas married Mary Herman, a single girl and daughter of Anton Herman and Elizabeth Dreiling. He was 32 years old and Mary was 20 years old Mary had a fairly good background She was the great-granddaughter of Barbara Goetz and John Dreiling III-2 fine families in the history of our people. Mary and Nicolas had 12 children together. Along with the 2 children from his 1st wife, they raised 14 children.

Nicolas and Mary lived on a far northwest of Emmer Married He purchased land from the railroaded they attended church in Emmer an, Kansas. At one time there was a church, school, and grocery store along with a number of small houses in the community. Nicolas and Mary owned one of these houses which were used on Sunday's but was an un-occupied during the remainder of the week.

Nicholas and Mary retired in 1924 and moved to Victoria, KS where they lived across from the cathedral of the Plains. Mary died MAY 9, 1931 in Victoria and Nicholas died APRIL 14, 1939.

Schumacher Genealogy
First Generation
John Schumacher BORN Russia DIED Russia MARRIED (1) Unknown MARRIED (2) Katherine (Wentler) DIED Munjor, Kansas, 19 Mar 1897. She was married first to? Exner. She immigrated from Wittman, Russia, by way of Hamburg, Germany, to Munjor, Kansas, in July 1876. Two children by Exner remained in Russia. Five children by Schumacher's sons by his firs wife accompanied her

Children of 2nd Generation (Schumacher)
Heinrich, c. ca 1846 DIED 12 September 1927
Johan Jacob BORN 1 NOVEMBER 1847; DIED 22 FEBRUARY 1909
Children of 2nd Generation
Elizabeth BORN 29 JUNE 1855; DIED 21 JUNE 1914
Anton BORN 8 SEPTEMBER 1862 DIED 4 SEPTEMBER 1929
Franziska BORN 16 MAY 1863 DIED 29 NOVEMBER 1933
Maria Katherine BORN 10 Mar 1867 DIED 19 JANUARY 1835
Clara BORN 8 NOVEMBER 1870 DIED 13 Mar 1953

Second Generation
Heinrich Schumacher (John)
BORN 1846 DIED 12 September 1927 MARRIED Maria Ann Depperschmidt BORN 1845 DIED 23 MAY 1909

Children of 3rd Generation (Schumacher)
Katherine BORN 1874 DIED 14 NOVEMBER 1943; MARRIED Andrew Wittman BORN 1871 DIED 23 NOVEMBER 1947
Anna BORN 17 AUGUST 1878 DIED 16 Mar 1951 MARRIED Jacob J. Land BORN Topeka, KS 25 Mar 1876 DIED 19 FEBRUARY 1941, son of Jacob Lang and Susan (Urban)
Rosa BORN 1884 DIED 13 SEPTEMBER 1966 (Sister Liberata)
Mary BORN 21 JUNE 1888 DIED 16 JULY 1946 MARRIED John J. Brungardt BORN 15 SEPTEMBER 1887 DIED 1 JULY 1968

Second Generation
Johan Jacob Schumacher (John)
BORN 1 NOVEMBER. 1847 DIED 22 FEBRUARY 1909 n. Anna Maria Derailing BORN 17 September 1851 DIED 14 APRIL 1940

Children of 3rd Generation (Schumacher
Pauline BORN 4 JULY 1888 DIED JUNE 1943 MARRIED Roney Dreher BORN 26 SEPTEMBER 1888 DIED 24 Mar 1974
Clifford BORN 1896 DIED 1929
Mary BORN 27 MAY 1906 MARRIED Joe Gerschner

Second Generation
Elizabeth Schumacher (John)
BORN 29 JUNE 1855 DIED 21 JANUARY 1914 MARRIED (1) Stanislaus Ruder
MARRIED (2) Conrad Doerfler BORN 1847 DIED 18 APRIL 1929, son of George Doerfler and Elizabeth (Seib)
Children of 3rd Generation (Ruder)
Anna Maria BORN 15 AUGUST 1875 DIED 14 APRIL 1949 MARRIED John Klaus BORN 25 AUGUST 1875 DIED 3 OCTOBER 1948
John S. BORN 2 APRIL 1884 DIED 10 OCTOBER 1918 MARRIED Margaret Rohr BORN 28 AUGUST 1887 DIED 30 JUNE 1966

Children of 3rd Generation (Doerfler)
Ann BORN 16 FEBRUARY 1886 DIED 5 AUGUST 1971 MARRIED Carl Steckline BORN 1 SEPTEMBER 1883 DIED 8 DECEMBER 1970
Alex BORN 23 Mar 1888 DIED 15 JULY 1951 MARRIED Crescentia (Schumacher), BORN 24 FEBRUARY 1902 DIED 10 DECEMBER 1983 daughter. of Anton Schumacher and Agnes (Leiker)
Clara BORN 12 APRIL 1889 DIED 20 Mar 1966 MARRIED JoSEPTEMBERh Rohr BORN 15 MAY 1894 DIED 23 Mar 1923
Anton BORN JULY 1891 DIED SEPTEMBER 1908
Albert BORN 15 NOVEMBER 1892 DIED 21 JUNE 1934 MARRIED Anna (Rohr) BORN 15 MAY 1894 DIED 23 Mar 1923
Agnes BORN 30 APRIL 1896 DIED 8 JULY 1974 MARRIED Jacob Urban BORN 24 DECEMBER 1891 DIED 29 MAY 1973
Philomena BORN 24 JULY 1900 MARRIED Fidelis Befort
Katherine BORN 5 APRIL 1902 MARRIED Lawrence Rohr

Second Generation

Anton Schumacher (John)
BORN 8 SEPTEMBER 1862 DIED 4 September 1929 MARRIED Pauline (Ruder) BORN Wittman, Russia 16 FEBRUARY 1866 DIED 22 SEPTEMBER 1935, august of Henry Ruder and Anna (Wasinger)

Children of 3rd Generation (Schumacher)
John BORN 6 NOVEMBER 1883 DIED 5 APRIL 1918 MARRIED Anna Margaret (Stoecklein) BORN 21 FEBRUARY DIED 26 NOVEMBER 1973
Joseph BORN 11 NOVEMBER 1887 DIED 23 On 1918 MARRIED Anna Dreiling BORN 20 NOVEMBER 1888 DIED 30 JUNE 1956, daughter. of Peter N. Dreiling and Elizabeth (Richmeier)
Rosa BORN 14 DECEMBER 1888 DIED 2 MAY 1971 MARRIED Fred Herman BORN MAY 1885 DIED 17 OCTOBER 1947
Anna BORN 12 OCTOBER 1890 DIED 9 Mar 1977 MARRIED Peter N. Dreiling BORN 10 SEPTEMBER 1888 DIED 8 OCTOBER 1979
Henry BORN 23 MAY 1892 DIED 10 DECEMBER 1949 MARRIED Pauline Dreiling
Emam BORN 12 APRIL 1894 DIED 5 September 1973 MARRIED Don Stansberry
Clem A BORN 4 AUGUST 1901 DIED 21 Mar 1964 MARRIED Charlotte (Markey) BORN 1 FEBRUARY 1901 DIED 10 SEPTEMBER 1967
Bena BORN 20 FEBRUARY 1905 DIED 6 DECEMBER 1959 MARRIED 5 NOVEMBER 1925 Wilma (Hamburg) BORN 23 APRIL 1908 daughter of Ernest Henry Frederick Hamburg and Louise (Huber)
Peter BORN 4 MAY 1907 DIED 15 September 1958
Edmund BORN FEBRUARY 1910 DIED 26 APRIL 1985


Second Generation
Franziska Schumacher (John)
BORN Wittman, Russia 16 MAY 1863 DIED 27 NOVEMBER 1933 MARRIED John Niernberger BORN Obermonjou, Russia 16 MAY 1862 DIED 6 JANUARY 1945, son of John Niernberger and Elizabeth (Sieb)
Children of 3rd Generation Niernberger
Alexander A
Nicholas N
JoSEPTEMBERh J
Katherine
Maria
Annamaria
Clara
Rosa
Anton
Edgar J
Mathilda
Adolph E

Second Generation
Maria Katherine Schumacher (John)
BORN 10 Mar 1867 DIED 19 JANUARY 1935 MARRIED Andreas Stoecklin BORN 18 APRIL 1865 DIED 13 MAY 1925
Children of 3rd Generation Stoecklien
Anton BORN 4 SEPTEMBER 1886 DIED 4 SEPTEMBER 1886
Anna BORN 24 SEPTEMBER 1887 DIED 21 NOVEMBER 1948 MARRIED John Ruder BORN 25 FEBRUARY 1885 DIED 26 OCTOBER 1935
Katherine BORN 15 OCTOBER 1889 DIED 23 OCTOBER 1918 MARRIED Alex E. Wert BORN 28 JUNE 1889 DIED 26 JULY 195
Anton BORN 7 DECEMBER 1890 DIED 3 DECEMBER 1973 MARRIED Rosa (Ruder) BORN26 JUNE 1891 DIED 24 OCTOBER 1956
Fred BORN 25 MAY 1892
Martin BORN 15 Mar 1894 DIED 19 AUGUST 1971 MARRIED Anna (Depperschmidt)
Joseph BORN 3 MAY 1896 MARRIED Clara (Werth) BORN 30 September 1898 DIED 3 MAY 1957
Rosa BORN 13 JUNE 1898 MARRIED John A. Werth
Agatha BORN 27, FEBRUARY 1900 MARRIED Alex E. Pfannenstiel BORN 28 FEBRUARY 1897 DIED 20 JULY 1969
Clara BORN 3 APRIL 1902 DIED 24 JANUARY 1940 MARRIED Jake Zimmerman
Seraphine BORN 15 OCTOBER 1903 MARRIED Leo Meis
Mary BORN 30 Mar 1905 MARRIED Paul Seib
Techla BORN 8 AUGUST 1908 DIED 8 AUGUST 1908
Ludwina BORN 26 June 1910 MARRIED Frank Boos
Nichodemus Stoecklein. He was born 9-27-1906 and died 12-26-1915 in Highpoint, KS. His burial was the first burial in St. John the Baptist Cemetery in Highpoint, KS, just south of Bazine, KS.
3. Anna Schumacher, you are right that Anna married Joseph Schreibvogel and Johann Jacob Pfannenstiel, but you have the order wrong. Anna married Joseph Schreibvogel first, had her children, then after Joseph died, she married Johann Jacob Pfannenstiel. For Anna and Johann Pfannenstiel, this was the second marraige for both. Johann' first wife was Margaret Yunker.
Descendants of Peter Johann Pfannenstiel


Generation No. 1

1 * PETER JOHANN PFANNENSTIEL was born 1732, and died 1774.
He was captured by the Khirgiz in a raid on Marienthal, Russia and never heard from again.

Children of PETER JOHANN PFANNENSTIEL are:

i. MARIA CATHARINA PFANNENSTIEL.

ii. SOPHIA MARGARITA PFANNENSTIEL.

iii. * JOHANN ADAM PFANNENSTIEL.

iv. MICHAEL PFANNENSTIEL.


Generation No. 2

1.3 * JOHANN ADAM PFANNENSTIEL married ANNA MARIA WEISBECKER.

Children of JOHANN PFANNENSTIEL and ANNA WEISBECKER are:

i. JOHANNES PFANNENSTIEL, b. 1792.

ii. * JOSEF PFANNENSTIEL, b. 1794.

iii. ANNA MARIA PFANNENSTIEL, b. 1797.


Generation No. 3

1.3.1 JOHANNES PFANNENSTIEL born 1792.

Child of JOHANNES PFANNENSTIEL is:

i. JOHANNES PFANNENSTIEL, b. 1816, Russia.

1.3.2 * JOSEF PFANNENSTIEL was born 1794. He married MARIA ? born 1794.

Child of JOSEF PFANNENSTIEL and MARIA ? is:

i. * JOHANNES JOSEPH PFANNENSTIEL, b. Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia; d. Bef. 1892.


Generation No. 4

1.3.1.1 JOHANNES PFANNENSTIEL born 1816 in Russia. He married (1) KATHARINA WENDELER (2) ANNA BEFORT (3) MARGARET FUCHS in Russia.

Child of JOHANNES PFANNENSTIEL and KATHARINA WENDELER is:

i. JOHN ALTERE PFANNENSTIEL.

Child of JOHANNES PFANNENSTIEL and ANNA BEFORT is:

ii. JOHN ANTON PFANNENSTIEL.

Children of JOHANNES PFANNENSTIEL and MARGARET FUCHS are:

iii. JOHN JACOB PFANNENSTIEL, b. August 15, 1855, Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia; d. September 02, 1914, Munjor, Ellis Co., Kansas U.S.A.

iv. JOHN GERHARDT PFANNENSTIEL, b. March 26, 1865, Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia; d. August 07, 1935, Munjor, Kansas U.S.A.

v. MARGARETHA PFANNENSTIEL, b. January 06, 1862, Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia; d. September 01, 1892, Munjor, Ellis Co., Kansas U.S.A.

vi. ROSA PFANNENSTIEL.

1.3.2.1 * JOHANNES JOSEPH PFANNENSTIEL born in Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia, and died Bef. 1892. He married MAGDALENE YUNKER born in Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia. Magdalene (Magdalena ?) Yunker (Younker, Younger, Junker, and Jounker?) came to United States in 1892 as a widow with the Johannes Boas' family. They were her daughter-in-laws, Adelheid Boas (wife of her son Elias'), parents.

Children of JOHANNES PFANNENSTIEL and MAGDALENE YUNKER are:

i. ELIAS PFANNENSTIEL, b. July 16, 1866, Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia; d. February 1949.

ii. * ANNA EVA PFANNENSTIEL, b. May 03, 1871, Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia.


Generation No. 5

1.3.2.1.1.4. JOHN GERHARDT PFANNENSTIEL born March 26, 1865 in Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia, died August 07, 1935 in Munjor, Kansas U.S.A. He married CATHERINE STOECKLEIN in Russia, born May 15, 1866 in Gattung (Zug), Russia, and died February 25, 1946 in Munjor, Kansas U.S.A. (daughter of PETER STOECKLEIN and ANNA ALBERT).

Children of JOHN PFANNENSTIEL and CATHERINE STOECKLEIN are:

i. JOSEPHINE PFANNENSTIEL.

ii. BARBARA PFANNENSTIEL, b. November 10, 1884, Munjor, Ellis Co., Kansas U.S.A.; d. March 04, 1932, Antonino, Kansas U.S.A.

iii. MAGDALENA PFANNENSTIEL, b. 1887.

iv. GREGORY PFANNENSTIEL, b. June 03, 1888, Munjor, Ellis Co., Kansas U.S.A.; d. April 04, 1965, Hays, Ellis Co., Kansas U.S.A., burial: St. Joseph Cemetery, Hays, Kansas U.S.A.

v. JACOB PFANNENSTIEL, b. 1890.

vi. ANDREW PFANNENSTIEL, b. August 04, 1891, Munjor, Kansas U.S.A.; d. March 04, 1941.

vii. JOHN PFANNENSTIEL, b. 1894.

viii. AGNES PFANNENSTIEL, b. About 1896.

ix. CATHERINE PFANNENSTIEL, b. 1898.

x. ANNA PFANNENSTIEL, b. About. 1900.

xi. SARAPHINE PFANNENSTIEL, b. About. 1902.

xii. ANTON PFANNENSTIEL, b. July 29, 1895, Munjor, Ellis Co., Kansas U.S.A.; d. December 17, 1973, Hays, Ellis Co., Kansas U.S.A..

1.3.2.1.1 ELIAS PFANNENSTIEL was born July 16, 1866 in Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia, died February 1949. He married ADELHEID BOAS, born June 24, 1869 in Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia, and died November 24, 1930, (daughter of JOHANNES BOAS and ANNA KRONEWITTER).

Child of ELIAS PFANNENSTIEL and ADELHEID BOAS is:

i. JOSEPH E. PFANNENSTIEL, b. October 16, 1890, Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia; d. January 24, 1961.

1.3.2.1.2 * ANNA EVA PFANNENSTIEL was born May 03, 1871 in Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia. She married JOSEPH DECHANT, born April 15, 1863 in Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia, and died January 24, 1957, (son of MICHAEL DECHANT and MARIA BEFORT).

Children of ANNA PFANNENSTIEL and JOSEPH DECHANT are:

i. MICHAEL DECHANT, b. Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia.

ii. PETER DECHANT.

iii. * ROSA DECHANT, b. July 31, 1893, Munjor, Kansas U.S.A.; d. March 19, 1968, Brighton, Colorado U.S.A.

iv. CHRISTINA DECHANT.

v. JOHN DECHANT.

vi. ALOYSIUS DECHANT.

vii. JAKE DECHANT.


Generation No. 6

1.3.1.1.4.1 JOSEPHINE PFANNENSTIEL married JOSEPH URBAN.

Children of JOSEPHINE PFANNENSTIEL and JOSEPH URBAN are:

i. JULIUS URBAN.

ii. LILLIAN URBAN.

1.3.1.1.4.2 BARBARA PFANNENSTIEL, born November 10, 1884 in Munjor, Ellis Co., Kansas U.S.A., and died March 04, 1932 in Antonino, Kansas U.S.A., burial: Antonino, Kansas U.S.A. She married JOHANNES E. WASINGER, born August 21, 1873 in Russia, (son of ANTON WASINGER and ELIZABETH LEIKER).

Child of BARBARA PFANNENSTIEL and JOHANNES WASINGER is:

i. ROSELLA WASINGER.

1.3.1.1.4.6 ANDREW PFANNENSTIEL, born August 04, 1891 in Munjor, Kansas U.S.A., and died March 04, 1941. He married MARY ROSE GASSMAN June 04, 1912 in Ellis, Kansas U.S.A., in St. Mary's Catholic Church. She was born September 29, 1893 in Munjor, Kansas U.S.A., and died October 12, 1984, (daughter of PETER GASSMAN and AGATHA DECHANT).

Children of ANDREW PFANNENSTIEL and MARY GASSMAN are:

i. FRANCIS PFANNENSTIEL, b. March 13, 1914; d. July 09, 1929, Ovid, Colorado U.S.A.

ii. HERMAN JOSEPH PFANNENSTIEL, b. October 06, 1915, Schoenchen, Kansas U.S.A.; d. May 19, 1978, Palo Alto, California U.S.A.

iii. ROSE PFANNENSTIEL.

iv. CECELIA PFANNENSTIEL, m. LEONARD LEIKAM.

v. ELEANORE PFANNENSTIEL, m. JEROME PIETZ.

vi. ALBERTA PFANNENSTIEL.

vii. WILFRED PFANNENSTIEL, m. DELORES MINTHORN.

viii. ARTHUR PFANNENSTIEL, m. MARTINA HERKLOTZ.

ix. CYRIL PFANNENSTIEL, m. MARIE ?.

x. EUGENE PFANNENSTIEL, m. JOSIE ?.

xi. MARY LOUISE PFANNENSTIEL.

xii. MILDRED KATHERINE PFANNENSTIEL, m. WILLIAM BECKER.

1.3.1.1.4.12 ANTON PFANNENSTIEL, born July 29, 1895 in Munjor, Ellis Co., Kansas U.S.A., and died December 17, 1973 in Hays, Ellis Co., Kansas U.S.A.. He married THERESA BERENS, born August 25, 1909 in Vincent, Kansas U.S.A. (daughter of HERMAN BERENS and ANNA RIEDEL).

Child of ANTON PFANNENSTIEL and THERESA BERENS is:

i. GILBERT PFANNENSTIEL.

1.3.2.1.1.1 JOSEPH E. PFANNENSTIEL, born October 16, 1890 in Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia, and died January 24, 1961. He married AMELIA RUDER, born September 12, 1889 in Munjor, Kansas U.S.A., and died May 10, 1954, (daughter of PAUL RUDER and ROSA PFANNENSTIEL).

Child of JOSEPH PFANNENSTIEL and AMELIA RUDER is:

i. HAROLD F. PFANNENSTIEL.

1.3.2.1.2.1 MICHAEL DECHANT, born in Obermunjor, Volga Region, Russia. He married DOROTHY FISHER, (daughter of JOHN FISHER and KATHERINE ?).

Children of MICHAEL DECHANT and DOROTHY FISHER are:

i. ANN DECHANT.

ii. ZACCHEUS DECHANT.

iii. PETER DECHANT.

iv. RICHARD DECHANT.

v. PAUL DECHANT.

vi. RALPH DECHANT.

vii. KATHERINE DECHANT.

1.3.2.1.2.3 * ROSA DECHANT, born July 31, 1893 in Munjor, Kansas U.S.A., and died March 19, 1968 in Brighton, Colorado U.S.A., burial: Mountain View Cemetery, Longmont, Colorado U.S.A.. She married CLEMENS STADLER June 20, 1912 in Victoria, Kansas U.S.A.

Children of ROSA DECHANT and CLEMENS STADLER are:

i. * CHRISTINA STADLER, b. Hays, Ellis Co., Kansas U.S.A. (My Grandmother)

ii. ADAM STADLER, m. KATHERINE ?.

iii. JACOB STADLER, m. JOSIE ?.

iv. JOSEPH STADLER, m. IRENE ?.

v. ALFRED STADLER.

vi. LEO STADLER.

vii. CLEMENS STADLER.

viii. EMMA STADLER.

ix. MARY STADLER, m. CHRIS DREILING.

x. ISADOR STADLER, d. 1956.

xi. ALBERT STADLER, b. February 05, 1923; d. November 22, 1994.

xii. ROSA STADLER.

1.3.2.1.2.6 ALOYSIUS DECHANT

Child of ALOYSIUS DECHANT is:

i. NORMA JEAN DECHANT.













http://www.myancestors.net
http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~george/index.html
A brief history taken from the Brungardt Genealogy, Volume I, by Helen Hall, tells us that a widow Brungardt, her two sons and a daughter migratted from Germany to Russia in 1767-68. They were of the Luthern Faith. The widow and one son settled in Herzog, Russia and accepted the Catholic Faith.

Here the assumption is made that Adam Brungardt, gradson to the widow Brungardt was born in 1780. He married Katharina Dreiling. Thanks to Helen L. Hall for her research many years ago, we can accept Adam and Katharina Brungardt as our ancestral grandparents.

Adam married Katharina Dreiling. He was born in 1780 in Russia and married in Russia. Katharina Dreiling was born in Russia also. They both died in Russia.

Children
Franz Brungardt married Anna Maria Riedel
Magdalena Brungardt married Peter Sander
John George Brungardt married Margaret Rome
Bathasar Brungardt married Margaret Schmamme
Katharina Brungardt married John Kuhn I
Elizabeth Brungardt married Christopher Wassinger
John Brungardt married Anna Appelhans

Only two of the above seven children of Adam and Katharina Brungardt came to America. They were Franz, married to Anna Maria Riedel, and Magdalena married to Peter Sander. However, all of the descendants of the above seven children came to America unless stated otherwise.

According to the Brungardt Genealogy Volume I the "Brungardts" left Herzog, Russia enroute to America on June 22, 1876, arrived in New York aboard the |North German Lloyd Line "Morsel". After going through customs at port of entry they were allowed to board a train enroute to western Kansas. They arrive in Ellis County on August 3, 1876.

I will begin my genealogy with the fourth child of Adam and Katharina Brungardt because of the direct bloodline. Therefore the following families will be direct descendants of Balthazar and Margaret Brungardt.

ADAM BRUNGARDT AND KATHARINA DREILING
BALTHASAR BRUNGARDT MARRIED MARGARET SCHMAME. THEY WERE BORN IN RUSSIA AND DIED THERE.
PETER BRUNGARDT MARRIED MARCH 7, 1844 TO KATHERINA VVONFELT
MARRIED KATHERINEA VONFELT NEE HOFFMAN
MSGR. ANDREW
It is believed that MSGR. Andrew stayed in Russia
Anton Brungardt married Susanna Riedel then Margaretha Bach
This family stayed in Russia.
John Brungardt was married JJune 30, 1850 to Katharina Rome
Michael Brungardt married Anna Richmeier
There is no information on this family.
Kathariina Brungardt was married in 1855 to Peter Riedel
Margaret Brungardt was married September 17, 1858 to Andreas Linenberger

ADAM BRUNGARDT
KATHARINA DREILING
BALTHASAR BRUNGARDT
MARGARET SCHMAME

PETER BRUNGARDT MARRIED KATHERINA VONFELT. He was born March 7, 1844 in Russia and married in Russia. She was bborn 1844 in Russia and died March 13, 1881
Katharina Vonfelt nee Hoffman was born May 17, 1846

Margaret Brungardt married John Peter Reider on April 4, 1865
Andreas Brungardt married Monica Brungardt on January 2, 1867
Anton Brungardt married Barbara Brungardt on November 10, 1868
Peter Brungardt married Catherine Appelhans on 1869
Michael Brungardt married Barbara Weigel on July 29, 1872
Balthasar Brungardt married Rosa Funk on September 29, 1874
Franz Brungardt married Maria Weigel on June 20, 1876
Johannes Brungardt married Susan Lang on August 20, 1879
Catherine Brungardt married John Lang on April 13, 1881

The next six children are from Peter's second wife Katherina Vonfelt nee Hoffman.

Anna Brungardt marrie John Hammerschmidt on December 24, 1883
Franz Peter Brungardt died in 1884
Alphonse Brungardt (No information)
Joseph Brungart married Amelia Kuhn on July 23, 1887 then Agnes Dinkel
Adam Brungardt married Margarert Weigel on July 25, 1889
Susannna Brungardt married Jacob Schoendaller on May 6, 1891

Stepchildren
Anna Mria Vonfeldt married John F. Brungardt
Margare;t Vonfelt married John F. Dreiling
Rosa Vonfeldt married Peter Knoll
Kthein Vonfeldt married Sr. M. Anna C.S.A

Peter and Kaatherina Vonfelt nee HOfffman were married at Victoria, Kansas.
Witness were Michael Quint and Josef Graf. P: were Antonius Maria Cap. officiated.

Peter Brungardt and his wife Katherina together with their seven children, Margaret, Andrew, Anton, Peter, Michael, Balthasar, and Frank left Saratov, Russia on July 8, 1876 and arrived in Victoria, Kansas on August 3, 1876.

Having been a farmer in Russia, Peter brought with him skills that he learned, such as tanninghides a\nd making harness for draft horses. Special tools wre erequired to make the harness, trimming knives, leather awls, harness-making bench, and no drought other tools of his own makking since he was also a skkilled blacksmith.

The first header used in the wheat fields was assembled by his sons. It was used to cut and stack the wheat in the fields and left to dry and then threshed with the threshing machine.

Peter Brungardt is buried in the church cememtery in Walker, Kansas. Katharina is sburied in the church cemetery at Victoria, Kansas.

This information was suppplied by Dan Hammersschmidt 213 E. 28th Street, Hays, Kansas 67601
Dan had a locksmith business in his home.











Andrew Linenberger our (Grandfather), Born 4-19-1858 in Herzog, Russia. He married Margaret Brungardt in 1877, (1877-1858) age 19.

When Andrew and Margaret came to America they homesteaded tow and 1/2 miles north of Victoria until 1893. In 1896 Andrew purchased land near Emmeram, Kansas.

On December 2, 1900, Margaret died. Thirteen boys were born to Andrew & Margaret Five sons died before they reached adulthood.

Andrew then married Barbara Quint, a widow with nine children, five girls and four boys.

From 1877 when Andrew married Margaret till 1900 when Margaret died. They had undertaken to come to America from Russia. Had lost five children, gave 8 children a home. Andrew was left widowed and had their youngest boy (Vince) burned to death. After those hardships Andrew undertook fatherhood for Barbara Quints 9 children.

I think we all know Victor remembers Grandpa Andrew Linenberger, filed for, or went bankrupt. But I don't know any details. So here I will tell what I was told by Frank Gilchrist, he is our cousin Bill Linenberger's step-son.

Anyway, Al I suppose your fingers still tingle. You remember when we was out plowing with the old Dodge, northwest of the house and it quit on us. You were doing the driving and I was to run the plow probably just ride along I reckon. Anyway it quit and just wouldn't start. You knew enough to know it had to have fire to start. So you told me to turn the crank while you held the plug wire to see if it had fire. Well fine you took the plug wire off and I turned the crank and it shocked you. And brother you grabbed me and you beat me, man you pretty near beat me to pulp because it shocked you. When we got done fighting the motor had cooled off enough so it started again. I don't remember how much plowing we done, but that is how it worked that time. I remember we used it several times.

You Al remember the time me and you were picking corn for Earl Nutter up there by Steel City and Earl Nutter and that other guy I don't know his name. But they were telling about their horses, runaways really I guess it was and this other guy told about his team he had. They could run fast enough that the chain tugs, he was using would float in mid air straight back.

Well Al I don't think you got Pat and Daze to run that fast.

Then I always windup not windup but I have to bring it to an end. Because by now I have laughed and balled myself half to death. And life must go on.

You remember the time when you took our pigs to Fairbury to the sale. I imagine Dad told us to sell'im, anyway you took them to the sale. Boy I was all set to see what it was going to be like to have a pocket full of money, that was going to be a thrill. But anyway that evening you told me well Omer I spent your half of the money to buy a ring for Josephine. And I remember I thought to myself, now that's a hell-of-a-note. I bought the ring and it's your girl. And you assured me you would pay me on your next payday. And you did I knew you would.

Al if you ever hear this (God Bless you) for the hundreds and hundreds of times that the thoughts of yours and my growing up days helped me through some lonely days. I suppose every widow or widower has their own way of doing it. But Al this has been such a wonderful thing to think back on and outside of exercising my lungs, it helped me lots and lots of times in keeping me from going crazy. I know it's just a bunch of foolishness. But I have no family but you guys, I don't know how else to say it and Al you are in the thoughts.

Al do you suppose our folks ever in their lifetime believed me and you that we didn't set that lousy fire over Southwest about a mile or whatever. But that is one time we didn't even attempt to lie to the folks did we. Because we just absolutely didn't start that fire that's all there is to it; isn't it.

Al am I right I often think about it, I guess it's just idle thoughts. But I got a feeling that's how you learned about Santa Claus, when we lived by Collyer and Dad sent you out to close the henhouse, granary or whatever and you stumbled over the toys on the step by the door. Santa Claus had left the toys there according to Dad. That's all I can remember about it. I do remember that you was the one Dad picked to go outside to do whatever you were to do.

I often wondered in my lifetime not having a family of my own just how children learn. Whether it's a natural thing for them to learn on their own. That its all just a make believe. Because for myself I remember when we lived by Grinnell, one Christmas Eve, mom sent me upstairs to change cloths before Santa Claus came. And she sent Isabell up with me and in reality Isabell was supposed to explain Santa Claus to me. And she did, she made a believer out of me I guess. Because I remember the next morning as Dad, Victor, you Al, me and Isabell were going out to milk. I can just plainly see Dad out there with mile pails hanging in his arm and getting himself a chew of tobacco out of his tobacco sack. If I remember right he smoked and chewed (Advertiser). But anyway he made sure he walked right next to me. Now whether he had asked if Isabell told me I don't know. And I spoke up and said Dad you've been lying to me and Dad said oh how come. And I said here I found out or Isabell explained (Santa Claus) to me last night. Brother I no more than had that said and boy he slapped me alongside the head. When I think about that I pretty near always, after I have my spell of balling or something whatever I do anything to pass my time. Of course then when I come to my senses, I am blessed by liking to write letters and read. So I am sure that's part of Bridget's training me for being left alone. Because she lost her mother when she was just a little girl and from then on she was pretty much the house mother. I am sure no one in the world could have done more for me to get me ready for this than Bridget did.

But I can recall when I was teaching Agnes to drive, I say I because it was me. She would agree. Anyway this one morning we were coming home from church in that 1948 Ford I had and Agnes was driving it was a new car, but she had driven all my car's before and she missed the drive like I did out there by (Orion) and run in the ditch and put a tiny little dent in the fender. And Agnes cried and wasn't ever going to drive again she couldn't eat that noon, she knew that I would be mad at her. I often think about them things it passes time.

When I think about Bridget driving after we came to Salina. She drove quite a little out on the farm. She never drove to town but she would drive to the neighbors. And in Salina she drove pretty often coming home from church or if we were out in the country, lots of times she could only drive a block or less she was that sick. And she would always stop and put the car in low gear before starting up our drive. That was real smart, but this one time she drove in and put the transmission from low to reverse without stopping and it damaged the gears. And Bridget swore she would never drive again and she never did. And it probably was a blessing.

All I have to say to you brother Al if you happen to be the one to get this tape after I am gone. And you don't like what's on here please throw it away because then you will do me a favor then. Otherwise I hope you also get a laugh out of it too. Maybe you think about those things too. I know it's just a bunch of foolishness. But it has sure done a lot of good for my time after I was a widower.

Al you remember the time me and you were coming home from Morrowville with your Model T Ford, at least I think you owned it. Boy we were going down the road lickity split, happy as a lark and a rod flew out through the block and brother we came to a screeching halt better then any brake could have done.

I remember a few of Bridget's memories. Bridget and brother John were papering their kitchen. John was hanging the paper and he walked off the bench. Bridget's family had a cousin that lived 1/2 mile from them, this cousin had a bull that he couldn't keep at home. One day Bridget's three brothers caught this (bull) in their barn. They got the bull down, tied his head down and started to drill a hole in his nose with a brace and wood bits. When this cousin walked in, he said hold everything. Let me do that, I want the fun drilling that hole. Bridget got a pleasure out of telling about her grandmother (being blind) would hold and carry Bridget upside down and try to feed or change Bridget.


December 3-1992

The reason for me writing the following is to have on paper, just in case (they) whoever they are come and ask me again whether I would share what I done to help pass my time after I was left a widower.

On December 9-1992 after the 6:30 mass as we came out of the church, I was asked by a lady to meet her at Hardies cafť for coffee. We did have coffee. Two other people were also asked to be there. But only me and the lady were there. The lady asked whether I would tell her what if anyone thing I done besides praying. I see you do about every morning. I told her after balling, walking, reading and whatever. But my thoughts of my growing up days always brought on a laugh for me. She said oh wouldn't that be wonderful. I wish the other two were here.

I told her Bridget and I used to write down some of our growing up memories.

On Tape #1A history Side A

After Bridget passed away I decided to put my part on tape and threw all our memories away. And that lady said again Oh I wish the other two were here. Then she asked if I would share that tape with others. I agreed to. She left for Texas that week.

Bridget and my married life according to my memory

In June 1951 I met my wife Bridget. We had written to each other as early as April 1951. We knew each other only from June till we got married September 24-1951, in the Catholic Church in St. Peter, Kansas. We spent our honeymoon in Wakeeny, Kansas in the hotel. From 12:30 a.m. till 8:45 a.m. September 25-1951. After Bridget was dressed that morning, she said Omer, I think if you don't mind, I should go back home and do Dad and Johns washing and clean house for them. Do you mind? I told her no if that is what she wants. So that's what we done. Her Dad was a widower. Dad and her brother John they were going to batch, till whenever. We went back home. Bridget washed, cleaned house done some cooking and changed all the bedding. I helped Bridget. We had planned on taking a week long trip. I had time off my job. I worked and lived in Washington, Kansas at the time. After Bridget done the cleaning etc at her home, we went back to Washington. We lived and worked there. In about Jan. 1952, Bridget's dad got sick, they put him in the hospital in Salina, Kansas. He lived 31/2 miles West and 3 North of St. Peter, Kansas. That is where Bridget was born. St. Peter is located about half way between Collyer, KS and Morland, Ks. Dad was in the Salina hospital a long time. Then when he was well, John got sick and developed rhumatic fever, he was put in the hospital and stayed in Salina a long time. We would drive out to visit her Dad a lot and came to Salina to visit John often. Bridget told me Omer I see the writing on the wall. Worse is coming for me and you. Soon after that John asked us to give up our job and house (we had bought a house) in Washington. John asked us to move back out home live with Dad & John and do their farming. He knew and said there isn't a house big enough on earth for 2 families to live in. We took John home, he was in a hospital bed a long time. In 1953 John got well enough that he said I have to try to do my own farming again. Do you mind if I pay you off. We were with Dad and John 11 months. So we went back to our house in Washington. I again worked for Car & Tractor dealers. I got ahead of my story the night before we got married, we were asked by the Parish Priest to come to St. Peter for a little instructions. He first asked us both in, he talked to us about married life in general. The good, bad etc. then he called Bridget in alone. Then he asked me in alone. He said Omer I don't want to hurt you, nor discourage you. But I want to know Bridget is sick. I know her condition, you can back out yet tonight if you want to, there is nothing wrong with that. I know Bridget is sick. But I am too, I said. I have a bad stomach, there's a lot of things I can't eat. Fr. said has Bridget told you. Sure she has, and I told her. Then I said Father I would rather do it this way. If I can make a home for Bridget isn't she entitle to that as much as anyone else. He said of course she is Omer, as long as you know there will be obstructions. And when I told Bridget about my stomach, she said Omer don't worry about that, cause I had to cook special for my dad for 10 years. Father asked Bridget to come back in. And told us if you can't have children, make real sure Bridget you are able to be a good adopted mother before you try to adopt. This Priest was a brother to Bridget's sisters husband. After John got well, we moved back to Washington. In July 1956 a cousin to Bridget died of a heart attack. His wife asked us to rent that farm, which we did. In November 1956 we moved on that farm 2 miles from Bridget's home place. During our time in Washington from 1953 thru 1956, two parish priests talked to us about adoption, which we had tried but didn't qualify. One Priest understood, the other priest told us do you want a baby, we thought we did but didn't qualify. Father John said no no just give me a little time. After a while he came and told me and Bridget, I can't get you a baby there are lots of babies but you don't qualify he said. Bridget spoke up and said well isn't that what we tried to tell you.

About 3 weeks or so after we moved out on the farm we rented. I had to take Bridget to Wakeeney Kansas, 30 miles away. That is where we were going to Doctor. The doctor examined Bridget. Then he explained how sick Bridget's heart was. He asked whether she knew. She knew. Then the doctor gave us a heck of a scolding for bringing Bridget out of a town. Not because he thought we shouldn't try farming. But surely in town we would have indoor plumbing and cloths dryer if we could. And surely a doctor would be pretty close. He knew we lived 30 miles from Wakeeney. In fact the man who owned the farm was a patient of this Doctor. We doctored with him going every 3 weeks, then every 2 weeks, then once and twice a week and several times twice a day till May 1960, the medicine kept getting stronger. Doc kept telling Bridget you have to give in to heart surgery. No way was All Bridget would say. During early spring in 1960, Doc kept saying Bridget me and you arenít getting along thereís no use of you coming back. But he would schedule appointments. We kept coming for help. This Doctor had scheduled me for hemorrhoid surgery the next Monday after he seen Bridget that time. Doc told us have John bring you in Omer, and stop at my office before going to the hospital. We done as Doc told us. I walked in and Doc said John bring you. I said he sure did. Then Doc said is Bridget here, no I said, she stayed home cause I am scheduled for surgery. Good Doc said I hoped she would stay home. Because Bridget has only about 2 months left if she doesnít give in to heart surgery. And Omer you can live with your trouble the rest of you life. You had them a long time, havenít you. I did since I was 10-12 years old. The Doctor then said Omer a Doctor Brungardt in Salina, Kansas, that has lived with a heart condition like Bridget has. I am going to call him and ask him to accept Bridget, to check her. He phone Dr. Brungardt, I heard him talk. He then turned to me and said Bridget has an appointment this Thursday, We came to Dr. Brungardt. Bridget got on the examining table. Soon Dr. Brungardt said (Bridget) Dr. Bise at Wakeeney is right, you have to have heart surgery if you want to live. But I think if you are only a few minutes away from a doctor you may have a chance. You will have an appointment here 3 weeks from now. And then your address must be Salina, Kansas, I mean in town. If you want to be my patient. But come back before 3 weeks if you need to. With that we decided on the way home to have a sale, let it be known why. In hopes we could have a sale and move to Salina in 3 weeks. May 19-1960 we had our sale, May 20. Bridget was to see Dr. Brungardt. On our way to Salina we decided to buy a house if we could with our means. Bridget said buy if we can, lets not rent. Then if I die soon like we were told then just walk off Omer and donít pay anymore. Dr. Brungardt had told us (Bridget) you have about 3 weeks left is all, if you donít give in to heart surgery. On May 20 1960 we bought our house we lived in the rest of Bridget's life. On May 20th we went home and on may 26-1960 we moved to Salina. We got to our house a little after 4 p.m. Between then and midnight I called Dr. Brungardt twice for help. He told me what to do. But bring Bridget in by 8 oíclock the next morning, which we done. From then on for about a year Bridget went to doctor Brungardt 3 times a week, lots of times once and twice a day. It did get better for Bridget, then she went every 2 weeks till Dr. Brungardt died in 1962. His wife asked us to go to another Dr here in Salina. This Dr. had us come in every 2 weeks some times sooner from 1962 till 1968 when Bridget was sent to the KU Med Center in Kansas City, KS knowing they would do heart surgery. They replaced her aorta valve that time June 1968. In 1970 Bridget had her gallbladder removed in 1980 Bridget was sent to St. Lukes Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri to have another heart surgery, the mitral valve was replaced. The aorta valve was a plastic valve ball in a cage, the mitral valve was a metal baffle type on a hinge. In 1986 Bridget was to have another valve replaced at St. Lukes. But the Doctors decided that would do more harm than good, so she was sent home to die. From May 1960 till April 27-1990 when Bridget and I (Omer) was asked by 2 priest, 2 Drs. and several nurses to pray Bridget can die, not that she will die for that is wrong. For the 1968 valve our insurance paid $41,000.00. People donated 26 pints of blood, for Bridget and for the 1980 valve the same insurance paid $141,000.00, we didnít know how much blood was donated. I retired in 1984 from the Postal Service at the age of 62Ĺ years.


The following is repeat Tape #1A some how

(Omer) remembering life this way

on Tape #2A, Side B

I am Omer the 5th child of the 13. I was born on Feb. 6-1922, on a farm northeast of Hays, Kansas about 20 miles. I donít remember anything about my birthplace. Our folks moved from there to a farm, about 8 miles Southeast of Collyer, Kansas when I was 3 years old. On this place I remember the poor house, and our Dad bringing a tree trunk home to put across the barn that had been dug in a bank. I think the tree trunk was about 40 foot long. The tree was used as the main roof support. I remember mom getting her new sewing machine and Dad trading their Model T Ford car for a used Chevy car I think in 1928. I remember our mail box was about 2 miles from our house. I started school, it was a little over 2 miles from our house. On this place I remember (my growing up days began) accidents, fights, serious playing, eating poison milkweed, play farming and fear,

For details listen to tape number 1 and 2

I remember moving from this farm to a farm southwest of Grinnell, Kansas, there our mailbox and school, both were about Ĺ mile from our house. I remember the teacher there gave me a good spanking. That was my second spanking, the teacher at Collyer also laid the ruler on me. Both times it was because I cried my eyes out, for no reason. On this place I learned how to skin (cats the animal) and haul feed.

For details listen to tape number 1 and 2.

I remember moving from this farm to a farm 20 miles southeast of Oakley Kansas or 3 miles west and 2 miles south of (Orion, Kansas our address). While we lived on this farm I helped or learned cow or cattle herding. Driving the cow herd, 2 miles morning and evening 6 and 7 days a week, 2 summers. I learned how to get home after the buggy wheel brakes down, how to use a buggy for fun. I remember the folks built all the buildings on this farm. It had no buildings or well when the folks bought it. Our mailbox was 2ľ miles from the house. Our schoolhouse was 2Ĺ miles from the house. On this farm we planted 4 crops of wheat and 3 plantings of corn and never got enough rain to sprot the kernels. The drought and dust storms caused mom and dad to lose this farm. From there I remember moving to a farm 1 mile east ľ mile north of Enosdale, Kansas or 6 miles south 1 mile east of Morrowville, Kansas. Our mailbox was ľ mile from this house, our schoolhouse was 1Ĺ miles from this house. I finished my schooling (8th grade) in that school. On this farm I remember me nursing a mule colt back to life. I remember also plowing with a 1926 Dodge car on this farm I had my last fight or beating.

For details listen to tape number 1 and 2.

From this farm I remember moving to a farm 2 miles West and 8Ĺ miles north of Morrowville, Kansas. On this farm I learned how it feels to be told after my brother and I sold our pigs. Well Omer I spent you half of the money to buy a ring.

For details listen to tape number 1 and 2.

From this farm I went to the Army. While I was in the Army, only 5 months. Dad and Mom moved to a farm 2Ĺ miles south of Washington, Kansas. On this farm I remember (me) saving a litter of 7 pigs. The mother died soon after giving birth. I took a pie tin with milk in it and somehow I got all 7 to drink out of the pie tin. They all 7 grew up. From this farm I went on my own working for other farmers, then car and tractor dealers in Washington till after me and Bridget got married at the age of 29Ĺ both the same age. In the St. Peters, Kansas Catholic Church. I remember in 1937 I was glad to go to my last day of my school classes. I remember the local draft board classified me 4F twice, then I asked the draft board to please put me in 1A. Then in Nov. 1942 I was drafted and inducted in the Army 104 Infantry. In April of 1943 I was medically discharged. I remember my major sickness in my life (71 years to date) besides a belly ache all my life. In 1934 appendicitis surgery, 1935 dust pneumonia, 1937 Dr. Bitzer sent me to K.U. Med Center for my stomach trouble, double hernia and vasectomy surgery to correct my hernia and testicle swelling, prostrate surgery, lower back surgery and left rotator cuff surgery and hemorrhoid surgery.

I being to young to have many responsibilities I have no right to explain the 1930ís dust storms or the 1930ís depression. I do remember the dust storms, I wore a cloth over my nose and mouth after I had dust pneumonia, I do remember the complete crop failures 4 or 5 years.

Our, the 13 brothers & sisters parent hardships can be heard on Tape

number 0, or what our mother wrote. In what Norman Moore wrote in 1977, or a book called (making do and doing without, Kansas in the Great Depression)

On page 3B I will go in detail on what I know about the move.


This is on side B, Tape #2A

I do remember the move from the farm 3 miles west and 2 miles south of Orion, Kansas, to the farm 1 miles East of Enosdale, Kansas in 1936. Dad had taken the farm machinery all apart. The 28 foot semi truck was sent out from Belleville, Kansas by August Nutsch. In that truck dad put the household items (what all I donít remember) the farm machinery, 4 cows, 1 or 2 calves, 5 horses, 2 pigs, 1 dog, 2 cats and 12 chickens. Brother Elmer and I 9Omer) got in with the driver and took off. Dad, mom, Irene, Edna, Haddie, Jack, Agnes, Phillip and Betty took off in a 1929 Chevy car with a 2 wheel trailer hooked on. We with the truck went 1 mile east of Enosdale there we should have turned north to get to the place the folds had rented. But we turned south and went Ĺ miles to a vacant place, there we unloaded the truck. The driver then took me and Elmer about 15 miles north to August Nutsch, we got there a little after midnight, the next morning me, Elmer, Richard and August Nutsch went to check on our goods. We didnít find it where it was to be. So we looked for and found it a mile South. So we moved our belongings to the place it belonged. Our parents came three days after that. I think it was 284 miles from Orion to Enosdale. I remember our parents never (ever) had indoor plumbing, never had electricity till 1945 or 1946. Cow chips (dry cow manure) was their fuel for cooking and heating till 1936. The first telephone we had was 1940 or 1941. Our parents bought their first radio in 1937 or 1938, powered by 1, 6 volt battery. When I say our folks never had electricity or running water I mean before the folks moved into town. There of course they had it.

This is on Tape #2 A Side B

Tape # 01 and side A

A few thoughts about the cattle herding that I played a part in. In the fore part of the 1930ís dad acquired the right to graze our cattle on ground 2 miles from where we lived. I think it was on 640 acres we could graze. Our folks had 110 of cattle. My brother Albinus and I would drive the herd 2 miles to graze in the morning. We would leave home anytime after sunup, we had 1 pony or saddle horse and 1 light weight work horse. We didnít have any saddle, we rode bare back. We stayed with the herd till around mid afternoon, then we drove them home. After a while another brother Elmer joined us two. From then on two of us rode the same horse. I donít remember us boys taking a lunch with us. We may have, water we took along, or go to a close neighbor for water.

I started working for farmers in the summer of 1937 for $2.50 a week and room and board. I worked full time for farmers starting in 1939. In 1941 I learned to pick corn. I had picked corn before. But in 1941 I hired out to pick corn for 4Ę a bushel. I hired out to Joe Weber and the first thing Joe said when I came to his place. He said I am going to go with you this first morning and show you how to pick so you can make good wages. And I did learn and had no problem picking up to 100 bushels a day and unloaded it by shoveling it in the corn crib. From then on I picked up to about 5000 bushels each fall. Then I would stop picking per bushel and go work for farmers by the month doing all kinds of farm work. I recall one guy hired me to pick corn. I had told him his wagon wheels are not good enough. He was a John Deere dealer. The second day about 4:00 I had a full wagon piled high but it would hold the rest of the 2 rows which is what you picked as you went. The one rear wheel broke down, as it went down it also broke the wagon box apart.

In November of 1942 I went to the Army 104th Infantry. I was in the Army only 5 months. I spent over 2 months of that time in the hospital. I was sick before, during, after and still have the same bad stomach. April 1943 I was discharged with a medical discharge. (In May 1943 I went to work for Uncle Tony Kinderknecht at Parks, Kansas. There we hauled 43 loads of sand to build their new house. After we shoveled the sand on Uncle Tony's 1931 Ford 1Ĺ ton truck we took it 8 miles to shovel the sand off, we made 2 trips a day. I done the farming when Uncle Tony wasnít able he was sick a lot at harvest Aunt Susan and I done the harvesting. Uncle Tony was out in the truck to watch and haul the wheat to town when he was able. When the wheat had to be shoveled in the bin, then I done that and Aunt Susan would go to the house till I was unloaded. After harvest we moved Uncle Tony and family into an old Butcher shop building setting in their yard, and we tore down their old house the house our Grandparents build. Uncle Tony got well enough to help tear down some and do some of his farming. When he wasnít able then I done most of the farming at night because I was to help tear down the house for time reasons. So the new house could be started. Since the butcher shop building was too small for all of us to sleep in. Uncle Tony and family slept in that place and I had the truck or barn to sleep in which is how it should be. Only 2 times I can remember I had any unwelcome guest. Both times I slept in the barn, when I woke up in the morning there was a rat sitting on my stomach. Neither time did the rat bite me. The new basement was dug and poured. We mixed the cement with an old type mixer the mixture was for each batch 40 shovels of sand and 10 shovels of Portland cement. The mixture was poured in a wheel-barrow, then the loaded wheelbarrow was pushed to the proper spot and dumped into the basement form. Digging the basement Uncle Tony and I done alone using 4 horses, a walking plow, spades, 1 fresseno. For tearing the old house down and running the cement, neighbors, Uncle Alex, 2 of his boys and the carpenter our Uncle Andrew Linenberger were there. I think in September 1943 I came back to Washington to pick corn. When I left Uncle Tony his new house was just the basement, it was done, but on hold.

In March or April 1944 I went back out to Uncle Tony to do his farming when he was not able and during the daytime I helped build the house to finish. Uncle Tony was in the Quinter, KS hospital and laid up about 2 months.

In 1944 while the new house was being build. Myself a nephew to Uncle Tony and a nephew to Aunt Susan worked there. The big difference I could see was from 8 to 5 the carpenter and the other nephew was part of the crew. But at 5:00 the other nephew and uncle Andrew Linenberger went to town to live. I helped do chores before 8:00 a.m., helped do chores and or done the farming after 5:00 p.m. and I got $60.00 a month plus room and board. The other nephew got $60.00 a month and dinner only. After the house was done, Uncle Tony and I set into digging 2 cesspools. One was 6 feet across and 31 feet deep and 1 on the other side of the house was 7 foot across 27 feet deep, plus 5-8 inch post holes beyond the 27 feet. I myself dug every inch of both. We put a tripod over the hole with an attached pulley and a rope tied to a 15 gallon barrel and attached the rope to a single tree so 1 horse hitched to it, would pull the barrel of dirt up to be dumped. Uncle Tony was able to handle the horse and at times he could dump the barrel other times other help handled that part. When the cesspools were done, we set out to dig the water line trench from the house to the well a little over 200 feet, for that we used a walking plow, 2 horses and long handled shovels. Uncle Tony was able to help some on that otherwise, I done it alone. After the fall work was pretty well done, I come back to Washington to pick corn in the fall of 1944. After that I started to work in town and farmers.

In 1945 I started to work for car and tractor dealer. In 1945 or 1946 I bougth the acreage that brother Victor and Katie lived on and they bought the acreage from me. In 1944 I slept in the basement instead of the barn or the truck. Uncle Tony, Alex and Felix Kinderknecht, helped each other in 1943 and 1944, so when Alex or Felix needed extra help, I was sent to help them. Which is how it should be. Uncle Tony had a 3 day limit for me to help the other two.

I do believe one of my most treasured thoughts I have of my single life is, knowing I gave 50Ę out of every dollar I earned to my parents, after I was out on my own till four years before I got married. Before that I like my sisters and brothers gave all our money earned to Dad and Mom.

The water line trench was 36 inches deep. I think I had to make it about 18 inches wide so I could dig and shovel out the ground.

Getting the sand for the new house

Uncle Tony and I took his farm tractor, his 1Ĺ ton 1931 Ford truck and a 6 foot freeseno, about 8 miles north to the Saline River to the sand bar. Uncle Tony drove the tractor hitched to the freeseno out on the sand bar to drag the sand out on the grass, put on windrows. I handled the freeseno by controlling the handle loaded and followed behind to the place where, by controlling the fresseno handle the sand was dumped on windrows. After a few days we would have enough sand windrows for several days of hauling. We would park the truck beside the windrow. Then shovel the sand up on the truck bed. Go home and shovel the sand off for latter use. We hauled enough sand on three piles so the whole house could be and was built.

After the room partitions or studs were in the house we nailed lath to the ceiling joist and wall studs. (Lath) are narrow strips of lumber 4 ft long to be nailed with 1 nail for each ceiling joists, which were 16 or 24 inches apart, and to each partition studding. The Lath nails were number 5 made for lath. Buted or treated so they wouldnít rust. The lath were spaced, the thickness of a lath apart the lath were 5/16 inch thick. That left an open slit between lath to let the plaster cement mixture to cling to, on the back side the cement would form a little roll like. The lath were used before sheetrock or drywall was used to enclose the inner walls or ceiling joists.

The plaster cement was prepared by screening the sand I think we used number 16 screen. For each batch we shoveled in 30 shovels of sand, 10 shovels of plaster cement, 3 shovels nunslacked lime and enough water. It was put in a mixing box ours was 24Ē wide, 6 ft long, 6 inches deep. It was mixed with a mortar hoe, which was a large hoe with a hole in the hoe on each side of the handle. The cement was mixed, then shoveled in a pail and carried in the house, dumped on a table. The man doing the plastering would take this cement to apply it to the lath with a plastering trowel. Putting on enough pressure so the cement mixture would go through the slits in between the lath and smooth it as you plastered. The thickness of the plaster or (mixture) plus the lath was to be ĺ inch, the lath 5/16Ē, the plaster 3/8Ē. When this layer was dry then a 1/16 in finish coat, cement, water, and sand that had been through or over a screen I think number 24 screen. For the basement walls and floor, the sand we hauled was used as it came. Then for laying up the brick the sand was shoveled over a number 10 screen, I think #10. The brick mortar was 20 shovels of sand, 5 shovels of mortar cement and water, that was mixed in a mortar box 2 ft wide, 6 ft long, 6 inches deep, then shoveled in a pail and taken to the brick layer. Myself and Aunt Susanís nephew took turns mixing the cement and carrying it and carrying the brick, and doing the jointing which is using a round iron to smooth out the cement between each two brick or joint. I do not remember the number of sacks of mortar cement we mixed each day. I do remember Uncle Andrew laid up to 1500 brick per day. And I remember when the house was

PREFACE
TO THE
LINENBERGER GENEALOGY
The purpose in establishing a record of the Linenberger family is to revive the history of our forebears who migrated from Germany to Russia and thence to America.
This compilation of historical material includes: Dates of births, marriages, and deaths of the older members together with a genealogical record of all generations from 1765 to the present time. In addition, some mention is made of their spiritual, financial, and educational advancements.
This compilation has been carried on for nearly four years, during which the authors have extended every effort to collect data and material to make accurate record possible.
In the pursuance of this research, a great deal of time, work, and money was spent in order to gather the required information. To contact the numerous families, there was a constant stream of correspondnece and telephone calls. Also, in connection with this work, there were frequent trips to librbaries, rectories, and cemeteries. Extensive research regarding the family line was being done in Germany; while also work was being done in exchange for information with the genealogical librbary at Salt Lake City, Utah.
It is the sincere wish of the authors that this book, which has been written in memory of the persistent struggle and hardships of our ancestors, will find a place in every home of the Linenberger descendants; and that they regard it with esteem to their predecessors.
The purpose of the Linenberger Genealogy is to establish a record for posterity. To the author's knowledge, there was only ne Linenberger family which migrated from Germany to Russia during the period 1766-68. It was the family of Joseph Linenberger, which located in Mariental, on the east side of the Volga River.
Joseph was a carpenter and contractor by trade. But the Linenbergers, like the Germans who settled in the volga region, were poor, and, to help make a living, established a Kavak (tavern). They also raised sheep and swine.
The Linenbergers had only one child, Hanjoerg. At the age of none years, while herding sheep and swine, Hanjoerg was take prisoner during one of the raids by Kirghiz from the East. Aftter living with them for eleven years, he escaped and returned to the home of his parents at Mariental.
Hanjoerg marred Margaret Fisher. At the time of his marriage, he was about thirty years old. Five children were born to Hanjoerg and Margaret--two sons and three daughters. Only descendants of the two sons came to America. The authors were unable to secure a record of the three daughters.
Hanjoerg's oldest son, Melchoir, married twice. His first marriage was to Katherine (Kattel) and Maria Eva. There was a record of the marriages of these three chidlren, but only descendants of Johannes came to America. One daughter of Johannes Linenberger and Maria Younger, Anna, came to America and married John Knoll.
Melchoir married a second time--this time to Katherine Margaret Klipphahn Schreiner von Riedel Salzman. It was her fourth marriage. To Melchoir and Katharine Margaret, six children were born. Five of these and their families came to America. Katharine (a daughter) married Nickolaus Schmamme and remained in Russia. However, Katherine's son, Gottfried, came to America with his family.
Katharine Margaet, before her union with Melchoir Linenberger, had married and had lost, through death, three husbands. The first of these was Peter Schreiner. She had only one son by him. His name was Joseph. Jospeh was married three times. There is a record of the marriages, but only Andreas, the son of Joseph Schreiner and Maria Schnell (his second marriage), came to America. The other descendants remained in Russia.
Katharine Margaret Klipphahn Schreiner then married Mathaeus von Riedel. It was the second marriage for both. They had one son, Johannes. Two of Johannes Riedel and Anna Richmeier's children and famileis and descendants of two others, came to America.
Katharine Margaret Klipphahn Schreiner von Reidel next married Johannes Salzman. One child lived to marry Johannes Goetz. Three children of Johannes Goetz and Margaret Salzman and descendants of a fourth one came to America.
John Michael Linenberger, second son of Hanjoerg, also married and had three sons. There is no record of daughters of this marriage, but Peter, a son of John Michael, married Margaret Legleiter and came to America with their son, John Michael. Later another son, Alex, was born in America.
The first Linenbergers who came to AMerica were the fourth and fifth generation descendants of the Joseph Linenberger who came to America, some going into the eighth and ninth generations.
The Linenbergers in America had correspondence with their relatives in Russia for many years, but, unfortunately, the connection was broken and the tracing of the family line in Russia was made impossible on account of the Red Russian revolution after World War I, the destruction of churches and records, the repatriation of the Germans from the Volga region to Asiatic Russia during the seige of Stalin grad in World War II, and the Iron Curtain since the war.
The authors were fortunate in being able to get most of the dates and the history from the time of the migration to Russia up to and including the migration to America. It was more difficult to obtain dates for later generations, and for that reason space has been provided in this book where each family may keep its own record.
It is the sincere hope of the authors that family pride will prompt each Linenberger descendant to expand this genealogy, and to keep a complete record of succeeding generations. And, who knows, but some future Linenberger will see fit to establish Linenberger archives to house the complete tree and other records to this tribe of stalwarts whose past reflects sacrifice, ability and stamina worthy of emulation by anyone who bears this honored family name.

Anna (Gottschalk) Wasinger
Anna was the oldest of the children born on board ship, on the way to America. Be that it may, we do know she was baptized in St. Augustineís Church in Pittsburg, Pa. When the family moved out west
1. FAMILY OF ANTON D. WASINGER
FATHER: Anton D. Wasinger Sept. 5, 1861 to May 30, 1943
MOTHER: Anna Elizabeth Gottschalk May 21, 1872 to May 8, 1942
MARRIED: Oct. 1, 1889 in Schoenchen, KS
CHILDREN:
9. Mary Wasinger Jul. 22, 1890
10. Katherine Wasinger Mar. 18, 1892
11. Bernadine Wasinger Jul. 15, 1893
12. Bathasar (Ballie) Wasinger Feb. 27, 1896
13. Henry Wasinger Nov. 4, 1898
14. William Wasinger Feb. 4, 1904
15. Antonius (Tony) Wasinger Jan 3, 1906
16. Augustina Wasinger Oct. 10, 1910
17. Josephine Wasinger Sept. 11, 1912
15a. Caroline Wasinger June 6, 1909

9. FAMILY OF ANTON WERTH
FATHER: Anton Werth
MOTHER: Mary Wasinger Jul. 22, 1890
MARRIED: Oct. 28, 1908 in Schoenchen, Kansas
CHILDREN:
18. eUGENE wERTH sEPT. 9, 1909
19. lAWRENCE wERTH Oct. 22, 1911
20. Marcellus Werth Jan. 27, 1914
21. Leoanrd Werth May 31, 1915
22. Cora Werth Jan. 1, 1917
23. Ralph Werth Jul. 15, 1918
24. Victor Werth Aug. 11, 1920
25. James Werth May 7, 1922
26. Esther Werth May 9, 1923
27. Irene Werth Apr. 12, 1925
28. Eadve Werth Apr. 8, 1927
29. Barbara Werth Jan. 25, 1929
30. Florence Werth Jul. 26, 1931
31. Wilfreda Werth Mar. 17, 1933
32. Agatha Werth June 19, 1934
Families of these children are not available (now)
Anna (Gottschalk) Wasinger
Anna was the oldest of the children born on board ship, on the way to America. Be that it may, we do know she was baptized in St. Augustineís Church in Pittsburg, Pa. When the family moved out west
1. FAMILY OF ANTON D. WASINGER
FATHER: Anton D. Wasinger Sept. 5, 1861 to May 30, 1943
MOTHER: Anna Elizabeth Gottschalk May 21, 1872 to May 8, 1942
MARRIED: Oct. 1, 1889 in Schoenchen, KS
CHILDREN:
9. Mary Wasinger Jul. 22, 1890
10. Katherine Wasinger Mar. 18, 1892
11. Bernadine Wasinger Jul. 15, 1893
12. Bathasar (Ballie) Wasinger Feb. 27, 1896
13. Henry Wasinger Nov. 4, 1898
14. William Wasinger Feb. 4, 1904
15. Antonius (Tony) Wasinger Jan 3, 1906
16. Augustina Wasinger Oct. 10, 1910
17. Josephine Wasinger Sept. 11, 1912
15a. Caroline Wasinger June 6, 1909

9. FAMILY OF ANTON WERTH
FATHER: Anton Werth
MOTHER: Mary Wasinger Jul. 22, 1890
MARRIED: Oct. 28, 1908 in Schoenchen, Kansas
CHILDREN:
18. eUGENE wERTH sEPT. 9, 1909
19. lAWRENCE wERTH Oct. 22, 1911
20. Marcellus Werth Jan. 27, 1914
21. Leoanrd Werth May 31, 1915
22. Cora Werth Jan. 1, 1917
23. Ralph Werth Jul. 15, 1918
24. Victor Werth Aug. 11, 1920
25. James Werth May 7, 1922
26. Esther Werth May 9, 1923
27. Irene Werth Apr. 12, 1925
28. Eadve Werth Apr. 8, 1927
29. Barbara Werth Jan. 25, 1929
30. Florence Werth Jul. 26, 1931
31. Wilfreda Werth Mar. 17, 1933
32. Agatha Werth June 19, 1934
Families of these children are not available (now)
5. FAMILY OF JOHN HERL
FATHER: John Herl Feb. 14, 1870 to June 15, 1953
in Wittmann, Russia
MOTHER: Lucy Gottschalk Nov. 14, 1881 to Nov. 13, 1953
MARRIED: Sept. 18, 1900 at Schoenchen, KS
CHILDREN:
619. Bernadine Herl Jul. 12, 1901
620. Katy Herl Jun. 11, 1903
621. Geroge Herl Dec. 27, 1905
622. Aloysius Herl Jan. 25, 1907
623. Barney Herl Mar. 5, 1908
624. John P. (Jack) Herl May 30, 1911
625. Eleanore Herl Apr. 30, 1913
626. Philip Herl May 27, 1915
627. Virginia Herl Oct. 22, 1918

621. FAMILY OF GEORGE HERL
FATHER: George Herl Dec. 27, 1905
MOTHER: Ethel York Dec. 26, 1903
MARRIED: Feb. 15, 1928 at Goodland, Kansas
CHILDREN:
679. Pauline Herl Feb. 24, 1929
680. John Herl Sept. 8, 1932
681. Edna Herl Jul. 16, 1934
679. FAMILY OF NOLAN MAUPIN
FATHER: Nolan Maupin Feb. 28, 1927
MOTHER: Pauline Herl Feb. 24, 1929
MARRIED: Jun. 12, 1949 at Rayton, New Mexico
CHIDLREN:
682. Nolan Maupin Jul. 12, 1950
683. Jackie Maupin May 16, 1953
684. Paula Maupin Nov.5, 1958

680. FAMILY OF JOHN HERL
FATHER: John Herl Sept. 8, 1932
MOTHER: Carlene Eckland May 22, 1934
MARRIED: Aug. 4, 1957 at Goodland, Kansas
CHILDREN: Jon Herl Jul 7, 1960
686. Jay Herl Sept. 20, 1962
2.


Adam Ruder b:1932 is the son of Margaret Orban and Adam Ruder (I don't know his birth date). Adam Sr is the son of Adam Ruider (First wife unknown) and step-son of Rose Orban. Adam Ruider was born 1884 in Paks Hungary and immigrated to the US in 1906. He settled in Indiana (East Chicago) until he died in 1961.



Descendants of Anna Ruder

Generation No. 1
1. Anna Ruder was born Abt. 1885. She married Vincent Stoecklein.
Anna Ruder was a Housewife and was "White"
Vincent Stoecklein was a farmer and was "White"

Children of Anna Ruder and Vincent Stoecklein are:
1. John Peter Stoecklein, born January 05, 1904 in Ellis County, Munjor, Kansas
2. Melvin Stoecklein who lived at some time in Brighton CO
3. Carl Stoecklein.

Generation No. 2
. John Peter Stoecklein was born January 05, 1904 in Ellis County, Munjor, Kansas. He married Julia "Jule" Josephine Marger, daughter of William Marger and Josephine Millucaavay??.

More About John Peter Stoecklein:
Fact 1: AKA - Lem Stecklin, Lem Steckland, "Hill-Billy" Stecklin, "Hill-Billy Srecklin
Fact 2: Possibly married previously - wealthy spouse (we have a wedding picture with John Peter as the groom, but the bride is not anyone my husband's mother knows.....and it appears to be from a wealthy family...)
Fact 3: Occupation: Carnival/Pro Wrestler with pet racoon and skunk!

More About Julia "Jule" Josephine Marger:
Fact 1: Occupation: Ferris Wheel Ticket Saleslady, Homemaker, loved to entertain and play cards.

Children of John Stoecklein and Julia Marger are:
1. deceased Stoecklein, born Abt. 1932.
2. living Stoecklein, born 1938 in Springfield, Illinois

Children of deceased Stoecklein are:
1 Stoecklein.
2 Stoecklein.
3 Stoecklein.
4 Stoecklein.

Children of living Stoecklein are:
1 Sexton (my husband)
2 Sexton

Jacob Herklotz (Rosa Dechant, Amelia Katherine Anna Ruder, Heinrich, Johannes, Ruder, Georg, Andreas) was born September 23, 1903 in Munjor, Kansas. He married Victoria Befort November 22, 1927 in St. Joseph Catholic CHurch-Hays, KS

More About Jacob Herklotz:
Baptism: September 24, 1903, St. Francis Catholic CHurch-Munjor, Kansas

Notes for Victoria Befort:
Baptism: September 23, 1903, Munjor, Kansas

Child of Jacob Herklotz and Victoira Befort:
Marietta Herklotz, born September 08, 1928

Anna Catherine Gassman was born July 20, 1887 in Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas and died March 01, 1964. She married Johann Peter Bieker October 17, 1905 in St. Francis Catholic Church, Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas, son of Phillip Bieker and Dorothea Siegel. He was born June 15, 1885 in Gorham, Russell County, Kansas, and died November 12, 1962.

Children of Anna Gassman and Johann Bieker are:
Franic Bieker, born July 30, 1906; died November 21, 1906
Eugene J. Bieker, born July 29, 1907; died February 14, 1979. He married Katherine E. Tillyer
Joseph W. Bieker, born August 30, 1917; died August 30, 1992
John Bieker, born December 10, 1919; died December 11, 1919
? Biekre, born June 15, 1921
John Bieker, born March 25, 1924; died March 25, 1924

Maria Rosa Gassman was born September 27, 1894 in Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas; and died October 12, 1984 in Wichita, Segwick County, Kansas. She married (1) Andreas Pfannenstiel June 04, 1912 in St. Anthony Catholic Church, Schoenchen, Ellis County, son of Johann Pfannenstiel and Catherine Stoecklein. He was born August 04, 1891 in Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas, and died March 04, 1941 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas. She married (2) Jerome Dreher July 27, 1946 in St. Joseph Catholic Church, Hays, Ellis County, Kansas, son of Johannes Dreher and Anna Unrein. He was born September 26, 1888 in Schoenchen, Ellis County, Kans, and died March 24, 1974 in Ellis County, Kansa

More about Maria Rosa Gassman:
Burial: Sacred Heart Cemetery, Ness City, Ness County, Kansas

More about Adreas Pfannenstiel:
Burial: Sacred Heart Cemetery, Ness City, Ness County, Kansas

Children of Maria Gassman and Andreas Pfannenstiel are:
Francis Pfannenstiel, born March 13, 1914 in Schoenchen, Ellis County, Kansas; died July 09, 1929 in Ovid, Sedgwick County, Colorado
Herman Joseph Pfannenstiel, born October 06, 1915 in Schoenchen, Ellis County, Kansas; died May 19, 1978 in Palo Alto, Santa Clara, California
Rose Pfannenstiel, born June 17, 1917 in Schoenchen, Ellis County, Kansas
Cecilia Pfannenstiel, born May 17, 1919 in Schoenchen, Ellis County, Kansas; died April 19, 1984 in Bethune, Colorado
Eleanore Pfannenstiel, born December 20, 1920 in Conrodia, Rush County, Kansas; died October 29, 1985 in Liberal, Kansas. She married Jerome Pietz September 23, 1941 in Garden City, Finney County, Kansas; born May 09, 1920 in Colwich, Kansas
Alberta Pfannenstiel, born May 21, 1923 in Concordia, Rush County, Kansas; died August 19, 1981 in Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kansas
Wilfred Pfannenstiel, born September 26, 1925 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas; died March 29, 1979

Andreas was born April 19, 1958. He married Renae?

Child of Steven Leiker and Renae? is:
Troy Joseph Leiker, born April 14, 1983

David Jame Pfannenstiel was born March 27, 1959 in Hutchinson, Reno County, Kansas. He married Jennifer Lea Kaff April 28, 1980. She wa born October 31, 1959 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Children of David Pfannenstiel and Jennifer Kaff are:
Ryan J. Pfannenstiel, born November 23, 1980 in Hutchinson, Reno County, Kansas
Meagan L. Pfannenstiel, born September 04, 1983 in Hutchinson, Reno County, Kansas
Adam M. Pfannenstiel, born April 02, 1985 in Hutchinson, Reno County, Kansas; died April 06, 1985 in Hutchinson, Reno County, Kansas

Aylene Kay Pfannenstiel was born August 06, 1947 in Ramson, Kansas. She married David E. Barret August 02, 1974 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas. He was born August 18, 1939 in McMennville, Oregon

Child of Aylene Pfannenstiel and David Barrett is:
Sean Barrett, born April 05, 1969 in Willinton, Kansas

Timothy Joseph Pfannenstiel was born October 13, 1954 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas. He married Patricia Ann Stenzel August 13, 1975 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas. She was born August 06, 1955 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas

Children of Timothy Pfannenstiel and Patricia Stenxela re:
Dustin Pfannenstiel, born October 19, 1980 in Wellington, Kansas
Joshua Pfannenstiel, born June 28, 1982 in Wellington, Kansas

Cheryl Stecklein was born August 07, 1945 in Ramson, Kansas. She married Larry Griffin April 24, 1965 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas. He was born February 02, 1943 in Hutchinson, Reno County, Kansas

Child of Cheryl Stecklein and Larry Griffin is:
Darrin Griffin, born September 25, 1970 in Hutchinson, Reno County, Kansas

Bradley C. Stecklein was born March 05, 1950 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas and died November 27, 1982 in Hartford, Kansas. HE married Denise Elaine Sigley November 30, 1974 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas. She was born January 26, 1952 in Ranson, Kansas, and died November 27, 1982 in Hartford, Kansas.

Children of Bradley Stecklein and Denise Sigley are:
Tiffany Stecklein, born October 25, 1979 in Emporia, Kansas
Garrett Stecklein, born November 20, 1982 in Emporia, Kansas; died November 27, 1982 in Hartford, Kansas.

Neil John Pfannenstiel was born December 15, 1958 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas. He married Betty Jo Schlegal August 01, 1981 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas. She was born February 13, 1962 in Dodge City, Ford County,Kansas

Children of Neil Pfannenstiel and Betty Schlegal are:
Trevor Jay Pfannenstiel, born March 02, 1985 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas
Brodie Joseph Pfannenstiel, born April 04, 1988 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas
Kendra Jane Pfannenstiel, born April 26, 1993 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas

Children of Clarence Stoecklein and Julia Rupp are:
Darold Gene Stoecklein, born April 05, 1948 in LaCrosse, Russh County, Kansas. She married Larry Ashcraft august 21, 1971 in Hutchinson, Reno County, Kansas.
Leslie Stoecklein, born November 09, 1949 in LaCrosse, Rush County, Kansas; died November 09, 1949 in LaCrosse, Rush County, Kansas

More about Leslie Stoecklein:
Burial: Sacred Heart Cemetery, Ness City, Kansas

Harold Steocklein was born September 14, 1925 in Bazine, Kansas. He married Lorena Agnes Leikam October 21, 1947 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas, daughter of Alphonse Leikam and Frances Krobe. She was born December 19, 1927 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansa, and died October 31, 1996 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas

Children of Harold Stoecklein and Lorena Leikam are:
Kenneth Harold Stoecklein, born November 19, 1950 in Ramson, Ness County, Kansas
Gerald Wayne Stoecklein, born April 28, 1952 in Ramson, Kansas
Steven Ray Stoecklein, born September 28, 1953 in Ramson, Kansas
Carol Sue Stoecklein, born February 28, 1956
David Joseph Stoecklein, born February 23, 1961 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas. He married Kristen Hotchkiss September 29, 1990; born Janurary 24, 1965

Elsie S. Ruder was born July 01, 1925 in Ellis County, Kansas and died January 30, 1985 in St. Francis Medical Center, Wichita, Kansas. She married Gilbert T. Linenberger January 20, 1947 in Hays, Ellis County, Kansas, son of Bonaventure Linenberger and Gertrude Brungardt. He was born August 07, 1924 in Victoria, Ellis County, Kansas, and died May 17, 1995 in Campus Meine, Illinois

Children of Elsie Ruder and Gilbert Linenberger are:
Jacqueline Linenberger
Mary Jacqueline Linenberger
Geraldine Linenberger, born August 11, 1948. She married Cole ?
Gilbert T. Linenberger, Jr. born January 13, 1950
Elsie Jane Linenberger, born April 16, 1960. She married ? Linenberger
Ruth Ann Linenberger, born July 14, 1961. She married Myron J. Sander, born Abt. 1958.

Clarence Miller was born September 27, 1921 in Hays, Ellis County, Kansas, and died January 22, 1990 in Hays, Ellis County, Kansas. He married Bernice Newland, January 17, 1942 in Hays, Ellis County, Kansas. She was born July 24, 1926 in Sharon Springs, Kansas, and died October 10, 1989 in Hays, Ellis County, Kansas

Children of Clarence Miller and Bernice Newland are:
Sheridan Ann Miller, born February 08, 1944; died June 30, 1963
Rita M. Miller, born May 17, 1947
Kenneth Miller, August 10, 1950
Richard Miller, born July 06, 1948
Dennis Miller, born May 18, 1956

Alice Miller was born September 03, 1923, and died September 30, 1969. She married Collie McCord, Sr.

Child of Alice Miller and Collie McCord is:
Collie McCord, Jr. born May 10, 1944; died April 30, 1983

Linus J. Miller was born July 22, 1925 in Hays, Ellis County, Kansas. He married Laurinda Pfannenstiel january 31, 1951 in Hays, Ellis County, Kansas, daughter of Clement Pfannenstiel and Rosa Befort. She was born January 28, 1930 in Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas.

Jacob Herklotz (Rosa Dechant, Amelia Katherine Anna Ruder, Heinrich, Johannes, Ruder, Georg, Andreas) was born September 23, 1903 in Munjor, Kansas. He married Victoria Befort November 22, 1927 in St. Joseph Catholic CHurch-Hays, KS

More About Jacob Herklotz:
Baptism: September 24, 1903, St. Francis Catholic CHurch-Munjor, Kansas

Notes for Victoria Befort:
Baptism: September 23, 1903, Munjor, Kansas

Child of Jacob Herklotz and Victoira Befort:
Marietta Herklotz, born September 08, 1928

Anna Catherine Gassman was born July 20, 1887 in Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas and died March 01, 1964. She married Johann Peter Bieker October 17, 1905 in St. Francis Catholic Church, Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas, son of Phillip Bieker and Dorothea Siegel. He was born June 15, 1885 in Gorham, Russell County, Kansas, and died November 12, 1962.

Children of Anna Gassman and Johann Bieker are:
Franic Bieker, born July 30, 1906; died November 21, 1906
Eugene J. Bieker, born July 29, 1907; died February 14, 1979. He married Katherine E. Tillyer
Joseph W. Bieker, born August 30, 1917; died August 30, 1992
John Bieker, born December 10, 1919; died December 11, 1919
? Biekre, born June 15, 1921
John Bieker, born March 25, 1924; died March 25, 1924

Maria Rosa Gassman was born September 27, 1894 in Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas; and died October 12, 1984 in Wichita, Segwick County, Kansas. She married (1) Andreas Pfannenstiel June 04, 1912 in St. Anthony Catholic Church, Schoenchen, Ellis County, son of Johann Pfannenstiel and Catherine Stoecklein. He was born August 04, 1891 in Munjor, Ellis County, Kansas, and died March 04, 1941 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas. She married (2) Jerome Dreher July 27, 1946 in St. Joseph Catholic Church, Hays, Ellis County, Kansas, son of Johannes Dreher and Anna Unrein. He was born September 26, 1888 in Schoenchen, Ellis County, Kans, and died March 24, 1974 in Ellis County, Kansa

More about Maria Rosa Gassman:
Burial: Sacred Heart Cemetery, Ness City, Ness County, Kansas

More about Adreas Pfannenstiel:
Burial: Sacred Heart Cemetery, Ness City, Ness County, Kansas

Children of Maria Gassman and Andreas Pfannenstiel are:
Francis Pfannenstiel, born March 13, 1914 in Schoenchen, Ellis County, Kansas; died July 09, 1929 in Ovid, Sedgwick County, Colorado
Herman Joseph Pfannenstiel, born October 06, 1915 in Schoenchen, Ellis County, Kansas; died May 19, 1978 in Palo Alto, Santa Clara, California
Rose Pfannenstiel, born June 17, 1917 in Schoenchen, Ellis County, Kansas
Cecilia Pfannenstiel, born May 17, 1919 in Schoenchen, Ellis County, Kansas; died April 19, 1984 in Bethune, Colorado
Eleanore Pfannenstiel, born December 20, 1920 in Conrodia, Rush County, Kansas; died October 29, 1985 in Liberal, Kansas. She married Jerome Pietz September 23, 1941 in Garden City, Finney County, Kansas; born May 09, 1920 in Colwich, Kansas
Alberta Pfannenstiel, born May 21, 1923 in Concordia, Rush County, Kansas; died August 19, 1981 in Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kansas
Wilfred Pfannenstiel, born September 26, 1925 in Ness City, Ness County, Kansas; died March 29, 1979
1. Anton Stoeckklein # 1 DECEMBEReased
2. Anna Stoeckllein MARRIED John P. Ruder
A) Dorothy Ruder single
B) Theobald Ruder, Sr. MARRIED Anna Sieb
C) Gus Ruder MARRIED Irene Leinmiller
D) Albina Ruder MARRIED Leo Boos
E) Catherine Ruder MARRIED Sr. Agnessa C.S. A
F) Robert Ruder DECEMBEReased
G) Nicodemus Ruder MARRIED DECEMBEReased
H) Florentine Ruder MARRIED Richard McCarthy
I) Marcella Ruder MARRIED Alvin Roth
J) Anna Marie Ruder MARRIED Sister Johnell C.S. A.
K) Edna Mae Ruder DECEMBEReased
L) Bernice Ruder .MARRIED Walter Klaus
M) Earl Ruder MARRIED Eva Mae Smith
3. Catherine Sttoecklien MARRIED Alex E. Werth
A) Isidore Werth MARRIED Alex E. Werth
B) Beatrice Werth MARRIED Celest Staab
C) Adolph Werth MARRIED Serbina Zimmerman
D) Ida Werth MARRIED Henry Unreain
4. Anton Stoecklein MARRIED Rosa Ruder
A) Marina Stoecklein single
B) Louise Stoecklein single
C) Olinda Stoecklein Sr. Isabella, A.DIED P.P. S.
D) Elmer Stoecklein MARRIED Katie Gross
E) Alfred Stoecklein MARRIED Geraldine Meier
F) Clarence Stoecklein MARRIED JULYie Rupp
G) Harold Stoecklein MARRIED Lorene Leikam
H) Eleanore Stoecklein single
I) Richard Stoecklein MARRIED Beatrice Corneal
J) Robert Stoecklein single
K) LeRoy Stoecklein MARRIED Dolores Kippes--DECEMBEReased
L) Mary Ann Stoecklein DECEMBEReased
5. Ferdinand Stoecklein single
6. Martin Stoeckllein MARRIED Anna depperschmidt
A) Virginia Stoecklein MARRIED Sr. Clarita, A.DIED PPS.
B) Harvey Stoecklein DECEMBEReased
C) LuVera Stoecklein MARRIEDIED Van Rohr
D) Cleo Stoecklein MARRIED Alfred Werth
E) Melvin STOECKLEIN MARRIED Francis Maeia
F) Leonard Stoecklein MARRIED Clarica Werth
G) James Stoecklein MARRIED Venita Stegman
H) Mary Ann Stoecklein MARRIED Anthony Pavlu
I) Dorothy Mae Stoecklein DECEMBEReased
J) Gerald Lee Stoecklein DECEMBEReased
K) Judith Ann Stoecklein DECEMBEReased
L) Darlene Stoecklein MARRIED Sr. Denise, A. DIED PPS
M) Betty Lou Stoecklein MARRIED Julius Gassman
N) Donna Stoecklein(twin) MARRIED Paul Werth
O) Donald Stoecklein (twin) MARRIED Lech Beth Hawkins
P) Baby Boy DECEMBEReased
Q) Martin Stoeckklein, Jr. MARRIED Peggy Krooft
7. Joepsh Stoecklein MARRIED Clara Werth
A) Lorene StoeckleinMARRIED Frank Roy
B) Edna Stoecklein MARRIED Sr. Thomasine A.DIED PPS
C) Lois Stoecklein MARRIED Celestine Pfannenstiel
D) Lester Stoecklein DECEMBEReased
E) Velma Stoecklein MARRIED Sr. Joyce, A.DIEDPPS
F) Earl Stoecklein MARRIED Vade Vogel
G) Genevieve Stoecklein MARRIED Anthony Wendler
H) Thomas Stoecklein MARRIED Virginia Hilmes
*. Rose Stoecklein MARRIED John A. Werth
A) Hubertine Werth single
B) Orlinda Werth single
C) Richard Werth single
D) Edwin Werth MARRIED Evelyn Garvert
E) Agnes Pfannenstiel MARRIED Sr. Constance, A.DIED PPS - dispensed
F) Hubert Pfannenstiel MARRIED Anna Leiker
G) Marvin Pfannenstiel MARRIED Ardis Fewers
10. Clara Stoecklein MARRIED Jacob Zimmerman
A) Harry Zimmerman MARRIED JoSEPTEMBERhinne ?? ??
11. Seraphine Stoecklein MARRIED Leo Meis
A) Mary Alice Meis DECEMBEReased
B) Cyrilla Meis MARRIED Clarence Stenzel
C) Melvin Meis MARRIED Lora Rohr
D) Raymond Meis MARRIED Vivian Hadle
E) Cecil Meis DECEMBEReased
F) Donald Meis MARRIED Carol Curran
G) Willard Meis MARRIED Elizabeth Shoup
H) Dennis Meis MARRIED JEANNE Falke
I) Gerald Meis MARRIED Jeannie Opperman
J) JULYie Meis MARRIED Boyd Buetler
K) Eleanor Meis MARRIED Vern Klaus
L) Delores Meis MARRIED Donald Mussoto
M) Arlin Meis MARRIED JULYie Frawley
12) Mary Stoecklein MARRIED Paul Seib
A) Eleanor Seib MARRIED Edwin Knoll
B) Anthony Seib MARRIED Velma Stoecklein
C) Benita Seib (twin) MARRIED Daniel Snyder
D) Lorita Seib (twin) MARRIED Leonard Franz
E) Florence Seib MARRIED Sr. Denissa, A.DIEDPPS
F) Eugene Seib MARRIED Joann Kosta
G) Mary Catherine Seib MARRIED James Hilmes
H) Robert Seib MARRIED Joanne Straws
I) Thomas Seib MARRIED Ellen Bible
J) Vernon Seib MARRIED Loa Beuckamp
K) James Seib DECEMBEReased
L) Jerry Seib (twin) MARRIED Judith Tanek
M) Garrry Seib (twin) single
13. Nichodemus Stoecklein DECEMBEReased age 9
14. Thekla Stoecklein DECEMBEReased as infant
15. Lidwina Stoecklein MARRIED Frank Boos
A) Mervilla Boos premature death
B) Mary Catherine Boos premature DECEMBEReased
C) Conrad Boos premature
D) Francis Boos premature
E) Donald Boos MARRIED Mary Cramer
F) Nichodemus Boos premature
G) Joann Boos MARRIED Lawrence Beier
H) Frank Boos #1 premature
I) Linda Boos MARRIED Gary Morris
J) Leroy Boos # 1 premature
K) Marilyn Boos premature
L) Larry Boos # 2 premature
M) Frank Boos ## 2 MARRIED Rebecca Boland
VII. CATHERINE STOECKLEIN (1866-1946) & J. GERHARDT PFANNENSTIEL (1869-1935)
1. Barbara Pfannenstiel MARRIED John Wasinger
2. Magdalena Pfannnenstiel MARRIED Paul Miller

3. George Pfannenstiel MARRIED Martha Haas
A) Joe Pfannenstiel
B) Isodore Pfannenstiel
C) Theresa Pfannenstiel MARRIED Sylvester Werth
D) Bertha Pfannenstiel
E) Pauline Pfannenstiel
F) Alfred Pfannenstiel
G) Irene Pfannenstiel
H) Florence Pfannenstiel
I) Evelyn Pfannenstiel MARRIED Eddie Frank
K) Melvin Pfannenstiel
4. Andrew Pfannenstiel MARRIED Mary Gassman
5. John Ppfannenstiel MARRIED Mary Kippes
6. Anton Pfannenstiel MARRIED Theresa Bernes
7. Agnes Pfannenstiel MARRIED Peter DECEMBER ant
8. Jakob Pfannenstiel MARRIED Anna Marie Gabel
9. Catherine Pfannenstiel MARRIED Peter Younger
10. Anna Pfannenstiel MARRIED Alois Korbe
11. Seraphine Pfannenstiel MARRIED AUGUSTust Gross
12. JoSEPTEMBERhine Pfannenstiel MARRIED JoSEPTEMBERh Urban
Character study on Christof & Helen Stoecklein
The thoughts and recollections of them come to us through their youngest dAUGUSThter, who at this writing was still living in Hays, Kansas. She is Catherine Zimmerman (Stoecklein). Both her parents, Christof and Helen came over to America on the same steam boat "SUEVIA" which landed in New York on AUGUSTust 3, 1876. With the help of guides and contacts there, they traveled westward, until they eventually landed in Victoria, KS. With this famous father, Peter Stoecklein, who was one of the five scouts to America from Russia before this trip took place, Christof and the Peter Stoecklein family finally moved to Munjor, Kansas.
Christof was 17 years old at the time they came to America. There were six children living, as they landed and Christof was the third oldest living, but the fourth oldest born, since the oldest dAUGUSThter Anna died on the voyage, and had to be buried at sea.
The first job was to find work, and to. raise money. Christof and his three brothers go some work on the United Pacific Rail4roaDIED His father, Peter Stoecklein, obtained a Homestead certificate # 991 in Wakeny, Kansas on AUGUSTust 1, 1883. He got 80 acres of land, seven miles south of Hays, KS. CHristof also got a Homestead Certificate #2854, adjacent to his fathers land, on AUGUSTust 7, 1888. He married Helena Herklotz on JANUARYuary 26, 1880, in Munjor, Kansas. With the Homestead Certificate,, he obtained 180 acres of land right adjacent to his father, Peter Stoecklein. He farmed this land, as well as some plots of land near by, until his son Alexander went into the army for World War I. He then moved to Munjor, where he had a small home, and lived in their small Munjor home for the remainder of his life. He was always very quiet and never got overly exciteDIED He bore his burden of poverty graciously and his family honored him for it. He had cancer, and was sick quite a number of years. He died DECEMBER. 2, 1936, at the age of 76 years. He was married 56 years and reared their nine children.
She was commonly called by the endearing name of "Lehnya". Her parents were Gottfried Herklotz and Mary Catherine Boos. When the people were making ready to leave Russia for America, Helena desperately wants to come along to America with her brother Carl Anton. Carl gave his parents a solemn promise, that he personally would take care of "Little Lehnya." So, with that assurance, she came along. According to church records, she was born in "Paninskojje", or Schoenchen Russia, on MARCH 2, 1859. She came on the same boat as Christof. When Helena's group went Westward, they first land in Leibenthal, and from there to Schoenchen, KS.
Helena was by nature a kind girl and one who always helped others. She was happiest when she could do someone a favor. This story tells something about her spirit of congeniality. "She spent most of her life on her feet." This happened on the earliest times in Ellis County, The family needed jobs and money desperately. Her brother Carl told her that there were jobs in Salina, Kansas. "How do were eget there?" Henea askeDIED "we walk there" was the answer. So they set our toward Salina, Kansas via the railroad tracks. When they finally got there, Helena's legs and feet were terribly sore and swollen. They took off their shoes but they couldn't get them back on again. So, Helena sat around the track, while her brother went to look for jobs. Luckily, after some time, he did return, with jobs for both of the MARRIED So they worked in Salina for a time.
Christof anDIED Helen was married in Munjor and started their life of their own. This started a long fifty six years of married life for them on the farm, which was situated seven miles south of Hays, KS. Here she spent many years with busy hands and busy feet. She always had a nice garden on that farMARRIEDIED She grew many vegetables. One time she had an exceptionally large watermelon. She took this melon and toted it on foot, to Hays and sold it. With the money she brought back several shirts for Christof and his younger brother and a few other little things. She was very tired, but when she was the happy faces on the men who got the shirts, she forgot her pains and was just as happy as they wren. It was harder to tell who was happier, the recipient or the giver.
Schooling was not open to all the children. The younger ones got to go, but not so the older ones, since they were needed on the far MARRIED After they moved down to Munjor, he did practically no work. His health was failing. It was common sight to see him on the porch, rocking himself and smoking his pipe, while she kept rising around and in and out of the house. He finally died of cancer, and following this, she would stay with the children of her family, spending some time with all of the MARRIED She spent most of her years in Hays, where she died at the age of 92 years. All in Hays neighborhood where she stayed, knew her and loved her. She never wore a hat in her life. She always wore dark clothes and a kerchief over her head called a "Babushka." After she died, the people missed that familiar figure, dressed in dark, walking to church, with the quick rapid steps.



The five Scouts, from Volga Region, who were sent to America, to look over the new territory, if it would be a suitable place to which to migrate, and make a new home in America.
The five men, were Peter Stoecklein, Jacob Ritter, Nicholas Schamne, Peter Leiker, and Anton Wasinger.

The First Family
Peter Stoecklein: He was born in Gattung (Zug), Russia, May 20, 1825. He was elected one of the five scouts, who were sent to Americ, to select a favorable place to which they might migrate. N.B. There were many other scouts , & groups. He died in Munjor, KS Nov. 21, 1908.
Anna Albert: Born in Russia, May 15, 1827. We have not the date of the marriage. She died in Munjor, Oct. 10, 1894.

Their Children:
There were seven children recorded in this union. We will record them in the order of birth, together with the person they married:
1) Anna Stoecklein: born in Gattung, Russia. The date missing. She died durign the ocean voyage, in 1876.
Anton Suer: her husband, born in Russia, June 11, 1847. He died in Antonino, KS June 19, 1921

2) Anna Margaret Stoecklin: born in Gattung, RUssia, Dec. 20, 1851. SHe died in Antonio, KS April 12, 1930
John George Sauer: born in Russia, March 10, 1850. He died in Antonio, KS May 11, 1907

3) John Peter Stoecklein: (Hans Peter) born in Gattung, Russia, March 15, 1855. He died in Munjor, KS Sept. 12, 191
Magdelena Schneider: born in Russia, Oct 20, 1855. She died in Munjor, KS Feb. 25, 1939

4) Christof Stoecklein: born in Gattung, Russia, Aug. 15, 1859. He died in Munjor, KS Dec. 2, 1936
Helena Herklotz: born in Schoenchen, Russia, March 2, 1859. Died in Hays, KS April 29, 1951

5) John Stoecklein: born in Gattung, Russia, April 5, 1861. He died in Munjor, KS Sept. 1, 1892
Catherine (Jacobs) Urban: widow if Jos. Urban (the second wife) Born in Russia, June 13, 1862. Died in Munjor, KS Jan. 9, 1929

6) Andrew Stoecklein: born in Gattung, Russia, April 18, 1865. Died in Bazine, KS May 13, 1925
Mary Catherine Schumacher: born in Wittman, Russia, March 10, 1867. Died in Bazine, KS Jan. 19, 1935

7) Catherine Stoecklein: born in Gattung, Russia, May 15, 1866. Died in Munjor, KS Feb. 25, 1946
John Gerhardt Pfannenstiel: born in Russia, March 26, 1865. Died in Munjor, KS Aug 7, 1935







The John and Anna Margaret Schumacher Family
John Schumacher was born in Munjor, NOVEMBER ember 6, 1883. His parents were Anton Schumacher and Pauline (Ruder). John's father moved to Victoria, and had a General Merchandise store there in Victoria. He seemed to do well. John showed great interest in the business, so his father sent him to Salina, Kansas, to attend a business school there, so as to be able to run the affairs of the store. John married Anna Margaret Stoecklein on NOVEMBER, 22, 1904 in Victoria, KS. Business must have been good, because Johnís father opened another store in Ellis, KS which John was destined to manage. This he did with great energy and dedication. John was business and Anna Margaret took care of the family. The two first children, of the five were born in Victoria.
Those who visited at the Schumacher home, were always met with a family that was enthusiastic and the welcome was warm and cordial. It was a real tragedy when John contacted a serious illness, and before told long, died, leaving the mother the chore of raising the five children.
Anna Margaret, or "Immigrate" as she was usually called, was the mother of this small and unfulfilled family. She was born in Munjor, KS, FEBRUARYruary 21, 1886. She was, as were many of the girls of the Stoecklein family, very calm, and quiet, but a very good mother. When her husband John died, she immediately inherited a bundle of responsibility. There were now five children, the last girl, Lietta, being born only three months after her father's death. How to finance a family of five children, was a real problem The grandmother, Mrs. Pauline Schumacher was a fair Godmother to this family. She took care of the furnishing of the clothing of the children and also many other sundry needs of the children. Added to that, Anna Margaret inherited 320 acres of land out near Ogalla, Kansas, from her grandfather Schumacher. This helped to keep body and soul together.
Additional income was on hand through Anna Margaret's daily work as seamstress, which she built up into a business, but which was conducted from her home. She did not live far from the church, so when the priests needed someone who could cook for them, Anna Margaret was always glad to oblige. The priests paid MAY even social calls on her to encourage her in her big task. The children wren in all agreement about their mother's character: She was extremely kind and never had an enemy. She was most generous with her help and work. She died at the age of 87 years, after a completed full life.








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