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Re: Phoebe Sailors 1770 North or South Carollina
Posted by: john merrell (ID *****4392) Date: May 03, 2007 at 09:42:47
In Reply to: Phoebe Sailors 1770 North or South Carollina by Barbara Vaillancourt of 342

I have some information on John his wife Phoebe, his son and descendants. I have tried to send you an email with some information. You can reach me at: johnmerrell@merrells.info

Mean while here is some info:

I have some information on John Collins and Phobe Sailors and their son
James. It is in a gedcom file in Family Tree Maker.

The GEDCOM file has over 6000 names in it. It has the Collins information
from John. I do not know who his father is. This information comes from my
mother. I am now researching to verify her information.

Do you want this GEDCOM?

Here is some of the information:

John Collins;
b. 09 dec 1760 Frederick County, Maryland
d. 08 Mar 1852 Cobb County, Ga.
Married Phoebe Sailors 30 Nov 1786 Burke County, Ga.

Collins, John
State of Georgia
Hall County Pension Papers

On this the _____day of September, 1832, personally appeared, in open court
before Ezechel Buffington, Joseph Dunegan and Thomas L. Tate, sitting a
court of ordinary judges of the Inferior Court of said County now sitting,
John Collins, a resident of Hall County, State of Georgia, aged seventy-one
years, who being duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the
following declaration in order too obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress
passed on the 7th day of June, 1832.

That he entered the service of the United States under the following named
officers, and served as herein stated, to wit, volunteered under the command
of Colonel Neal on the tenth day of May, 1776, he being fifteen years and
five months old, and continued in service until about the last of October in
the same year, the said Colonel Neal and Lieut. Colonel Watson being with
the regiment alternately, that after marching about and having some small
skirmishes he marched to what was then called Middle Settlement of the
Cherokee Indians, General Andrew Williamson having the command and Colonel
Sumpter, Thompson, Middleton and Thomas being along, that on the waters of
the Tennessee River they had a general engagement with the Indians.

That sometime about the last of October, 1776, he substituted in the place
of a man named Thomas Harrison in the regiment of drafted militia of South
Carolina under the command of the above mentioned Colonel Neal and marched
to the frontiers of Georgia to guard said frontier against the Creek Indians
and Tories. The term of the militia tour in South Carolina, applicant does
not distinctly recollect, but thinks it was two months. Having served out
his time,he returned to South Carolina and immediately substituted in the
place of one Moses Kemp in the Battalion of Horse militiamen under the
command of Major Frances Ross and marched towards the Georgia line,passing
General Williamson's army near Augusta, continued on and joined the army of
General Ashe of Brier Creek(Ga.), and in about three days after his(?) the
army was disgracefully defeated. Applicant obtained no knowledge of the
officers commanding at the place except he knows General Ashe had the
command, and that General Elbert was also there. After the defeat, Major
Ross, with much of his men as could be found, returned to where General
Williamson "lay"near Augusta. After being detained there sometime, they
were disbanded about the 16th of March, 1779. Immediately after getting
some____ deponent substituted in the place of a man by the name of McIntire
(he belives Daniel) and marched in the regiment commanded by Colonel Charles
McDowell and Lieutenant Colonel Hugh Tinnin, the former of Burke County,
North Carolina, the latter of Hillsborough in the same state. This tour was
for three months, after joining headmasters during this campaign deponent
was in some small skirmishes, and in the battle at Stono, General Lincoln
having the command of the army;General Pulaski was also there, together with
Colonel Lewis, Mayborn,and many other officers. General John Butler
commanded the regiment in which deponent was.

After being disbanded, deponent returned home sometime in September,1779,
and shortly after substituted in the place of a man by the name of Nichols
who was drafted in Lincoln County, North Carolina, to march to Charleston,
South Carolina. Deponent marched to Charleston and encamped within a mile
and a half of the city until the expiration of his tour, doing no active
service, nor mixing with any other troops during the time. Deponent further
states that there were four regiments of the North Carolina under the
command of General Lillington, Colonel Hampton, and Lieutenant Colonel
Hamright, Major Henry Dixon and Major Sharp? being there, deponent being
under the command of Colonel Hamright. Deponent acted during this last tour
as an Orderly Sergent. Deponent further states that about the time his tour
of service at this place expired four Captains turned out to raise a
regiment of volunteers to serve until the 24th day of June following, to
defend Charleston against a British armed fleet then lying off Charleston.
Colonel Archibald Lightti ( Lytle) of Hillsborough, North Carolina and Major
John Habersham took the command of these companys. Deponent enrolled
himself under Captain John Lowman of Sallisburg, North Carolina. The
companies were then marched into Charleton and regular discipline commenced,
when Colonel Lyttle took deponent from the ranks and appointed him Sergeant
Major in which capacity he acted as long as the regiment stood the seige,
having lasted about forty-two days, at which time General Lincoln
capitulated and made a surrender of Charleston, when the American army
became prisoners of war. The militia and volunteers being paroled, deponent
returned to Lincoln County in North Carolina, the place to which he was
paroled, and after the British over run all South Carolina, Colonel Ferguson
marched into the upper part of the State when deponent was taken and carried
to his camp, accused with a break of parole, tried for his life and
sentenced to be hung, but fortunately effected his escape. This
circumstance, and the confused state of the country, induced deponent to
-_______(missing text). Deponent inability to attach himself to a regular
army in manner he wished, he fell in with some scouting refugees from the
States of Georgia and South Carolina under no regularity of discipline, each
one coming and going as he pleased and remained with them until after the
Battle of Guilford Courthouse, North Carolina. During this time, he was at
the Battle of Kings Mountain where Ferguson was killed and all his men
killed or taken. At this battle Colonel Campbell, Cleveland, Shelby and
Sevier commanded with some other field officers. Deponent was also at the
Battle of Cowpens where General Morgan defeated Colonel Tarleton, deponent
and his party getting there after the engagement had commenced and leaving
the same night, knows but little of the officers. He recollects, however,
that General Morgan had the command and that Colonel Washington was there
with his Dragoons. Also recollects a Major Pickens who was there. At
Guilford Courthouse the case was pretty much the same. The party with whom
deponent went got there after the fighting commenced and left the army the
next morning. Deponent had now been about six months with a party of men
who(?) no regularity. Sometimes consisting of seventy or eighty men and
sometimes not more than ten, sometimes calling one man captain and sometimes
another. "Our practice was to keep as near the flank or rear ear of the
enemy as we dare do, occasionally taking a horse or prisoner from them.
Sometimes chasing a foraging party, and sometimes being chased in turn".
After the Battle at Guilford Courthouse,deponent, finding himself and horse
much emaciated and almost naked except a pair of buckskin breeches, quit the
army and went to Henry County, Virginia, where he soon became acquainted
with a colonel who informed him that the militia regiment which he commanded
was called for and that he would march in a few days, and if deponent would
substitute in the place of one of the drafted men, and get himself some
clothes, he Colonel Penn would keep his horse well at his own expense, and
when they started he would appoint him Adjutant to his regiment, which
proposition deponent acceded to, and substituted in the place of one Jones.
When arriving at the place of rendezvous, Colonel Penn gave deponent a
certificate that he was appointed Adjutant to the regiment with the rank of
Lieutenant and was to be obeyed accordingly under this appointment.
Deponent remained about six months with the Virginia militia, still acting
as Adjutant, though the officers and privates were relieved two or three
times. He being in the line commanded by Colonels Penn, Caloway, Jones,
Shippen, and Major Warless, Voger, and two others whose names he does not
recollect, remained, The brigade was under the command of General Lawson.
Deponent was in some slight skirmishes, one at old James Town where General
Wayne fought the British with an unequal force. Deponent was also at the
siege of York Town where Cornwallis was taken and deponent further states
that during this campaign they had General officers with them as General
Wayne, Steuben, Major Lafayette and General Washington. Shortly after
Cornwallis surrender, the Virginia militia was disbanded and deponent
received a certificate from Colonels Jones an Shippen and returned to what
is now called York District, South Carolina, the place of his infancy and
childhood and has never seen Virginia since. He remained in South Carolina
until the following March, 1782, when there being a call for the militia, he
was called on to stand a draft, which he refused to do, preferring to
volunteer and did so. Marched to the place of rendezvous at Orangeburg. The
South Carolina Militia was badly organized and disciplined, many squads
coming to their place of rendezvous without even a Sergeant with them;
Colonel Will and about three Captains and three or four Lieutenants had the
command of about three hundred men. Colonel Will ordered a part of the men
to hold an election among themselves for officers to command them. They did
and chose deponent Captain and one man named Black, Lieutenant. Colonel
Winn gave deponent a certificate similar to the ones he received in
Virginia. That he was elected Captain and was to be obeyed accordingly.
Under said certificate, he kept the command of some men until about the last
of October, though he knows of no good they did except to eat some beef and
rice lying about Orangeburg. Through Isenhole, Bridget and Dorchester he
remained with the army, merely for the name of being in the army and being
called Captain Collins. Colonels Winn, Britton and Lyons commanded these
militia occasionally.
John Collins, Senior

Georgia
Hall County

This day personally appeared before the undersigned William Carr, who being
duly sworn, saith that he was personally acquainted with John Collins, the
applicant in the foregoing declaration, in the Revolutionary War. Deponent
saith that he became acquainted with said Collins in the Cherokee Nations
when they went to war with that nation or tribe of Indians in the year of
1776. He was with him at the Battle with said Indians at the place called
Black Hole. He frequently saw said Collins during the war at other Places.
his
William X Carr
mark

Source:
Bibliography:
Tennessee and Kings Mountain Papers, Draper
copied from Microfilm
University of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill, N.C.
Obtained from Guilford Courthouse Ranger by Barbara Vaillencourt


MUCH THE SAME INFORMATION AS ABOVE:
John Collins Rev. War Patriot
Pension Application in Hall County Ga.

John Collins, Sr., on Jan. 27, 1832 in Hall Co., Ga., made his declaration
to obtain a Rev. soldier's pension under the Act of 1832, and stated that he
was a resident of Hall county and was 73 years of age on the 9th of
December, previously. He stated that he entered the service and served as
follows: On or about the 1st of April of 1776, the Cherokee Indians broke
out in the frontiers of South Carolina and committed many depredations, and
the militia was called out; that he volunteered on May 10, 1776, as a
private or militiaman under Capt. John McAfee for six months or during the
campaign, and was attached to Col. Neal's Regiment; they marched to a fort
on the Seneca River,which he thought was called Fort Independence, and was
there six or eight weeks during which time they had frequent skirmishes with
the Indians; "from there marched to what was then called the Middle
Settlement of the Cherokee Nation where we had a severe engagement with the
Indians and defeated them with a loss on our side of 27 killed and 73
wounded. General Andrew Williamson had command of the American Army at this
place; Cols. Neal, Thomas, Middleton and Sumter(afterwards Gen. Sumter)
were with the Army." After this engagement they marched through the Nation
several weeks in skirmishing, then returned to the white settlement and were
discharged, Oct. 26, 1776. Deponent stated that he then went to his
father's (unnamed) who lived in what was then called Camden District,S.C.,
where he remained until Oct. 1778. when he left his father's contrary to his
father's wishes, and went to where one Thomas Harrison lived, Harrison
being a drafted Militiaman, and hired himself to him as a substitute for a
two months' tour and was placed under command of Capt. Robert McAfee, Col.
Neals Regiment. They marched to Philips 'Fort on Little River in Wilkes Co.
Ga., and remained there "some weeks"; they then left a part of their
detachment there and he went with other part to a place called Powells Fort
now called Powelton near the high shoals of the Ogeechee River in Ga., where
they remained until relieved by other troops, was then discharged and he,
the applicant or deponent, then immediately re-entered the service as a
substitute for a man whose name was not recalled; the men had about a two
months term to serve. After serving this term out, he started home and on
the way met a battalion of drafted horsemen under Major Francis Ross, and he
enlisted in it as a substitute for Moses Kemp,who was serving at the time as
a private. This battalion was under Capt. Thomas Barron. They marched to
where General Ashe "lay" on Brier Creek in Georgia, and a few days later his
command was attacked by the British and was "shamefully defeated". After
this defeat, the South Carolina Militia including himself rambled in small
squad up the country to where General Williamson "lay" with a few men near
Augusta. Remained there until March 17, 1779. when he was discharged after
having served two months and ten days in 1778 and two months 17 days in
1779. He then started to go see his "acquaintances" who lived near the
North Carolina line having no home to go to, "just as I got into the
settlement where I intended going I met a man by the name of Daniel McIntire
who hired me to take his place in the North Carolina Militia for three
months". he (Collins) was placed under command of Capt. Benjamin Harden:
Co. Charles McDowell and Lt. Col. Hugh Tinningin charge of the Regiment.
"We then marched to the little village call Charlotte in Mecklenburg County
N.C., and rendezvoused eight or ten days there, waiting for other troops.
Then marched to Savannah opposite Augusta, Ga., and joined General Lincoln.
They then marched over into Georgia down to Brier Creek, then crossed the
river again and pursued the British who were on their march to Charleston.
After getting to Bacon's Bridge on the Ashley River they learned the British
had changed their route. Remained there several days waiting to learn the
enemy's intentions, then marched to Ferguson's Swamp and were there several
weeks. The enemy having entrenched themselves at Stono Inlet, they then
marched there and attacked the British and drove them out. Then returned to
the neighborhood of his friends on the N.C. line where he remained on two
nights when a man named James Nichols came and hired him as a substitute for
3-months tour of duty as a private.
Deponent was placed under the command of Capt. James Neal and was
immediately appointed Orderly Sergeant for his company and attached to the
regiment under Col. Hampton and Lt. Col. Hamright. They marched to
Charlotte, N.C. from there to Charleston, S.C., or the Smoke Camps near the
city where they remained until the company's time expired. General
Lennington commanded the brigade consisting of four regiments. The terms of
the four regiments having expired, four Captains "turned out, one from each
of the four regiments, to raise a company to be called the North Carolina
Volunteers",. These four companies thus raised, were raised for the express
purpose of defending Charleston against the British, who were then lying
near the town in their ships. Deponent, Collins, enrolled himself in one of
these companies under Capt. John G. Lowman; they were taken into Charleston
and put under strict discipline under command of Col. Archibald Little
(Lytle) of Hillsborough, N.C., Col. Little then appointed Collins as
Sergeant-Major to the regiment; he served in that rank until they were all
taken prisoners in the fall of Charleston. He was appointed about Dec. 1st,
and they were taken prisoners about May 12th following.

Several days after the surrender, deponent was paroled to Lincoln Co. N.C..
After being at home about two months he was taken by a "parcel of Tories"
and carried to where Col. Ferguson "lay" with a detachment of British and
Tories; and was there charged with violating his parole, was found guilty
and sentenced to be hanged. But by providential occurrences he effected his
escape. After this experience and due to the confused condition of the
country, he decided to seek refuge in the Army, and not having it in his
power to join in the manner he would have preferred, deponent "turned in"
with some South Carolina and Georgia refugees "whose practices it was to
harass the Tories and occasionally fire on the British regiments as they
passed through the country, frequently passing them and our troops; I
continued with these men until after the battle of Guilford Court House;
during which time I was at Tarleston's defeat at Cowpens, at Ferguson's
defeat at Kings Mountain and the battle of Guilford Court House. "After
this last battle, being about without clothes and my horse reduced, I went
to Henry Co. Va., where I soon became acquainted with a Col. Penn and
finding or believing that I possessed some knowledge of military matters,
proposed that if I would substitute in place of some one of the drafted
militiamen belonging to his Battalion and there by enable myself to get some
clothes he would undertake to put my horse in better condition and would
give me the appointment of Adjutant of the regiment. I accordingly
substituted in place of man named William Jones who had been drafted for two
months. Deponent stated that they then rendezvoused at one Hubbard's where
Col. Penn gave him his appointment as Adjutant with rank of Lieutenant.
They then marched to Powhaten Courthouse, Va., where Col. Penn's term of
service expired. Deponent was then recommended by Col. Penn to Col.
Calloway and he continued as adjutant under the latter until Calloway's term
expire; then Col. Jones succeeded Calloway and he retained Adjutant Collins
in his rank. After the siege had started at Little York(Yorktown?..editor)
he was recommended to Col. Skipper who retained him as adjutant of his
regiment until after Cornwallis' surrender.
Deponent stated he entered the service under Col. Penn April 12, 1781and was
discharged Oct. 24, 1781 and during that time was in the battle of old
Jamestown. After obtaining the discharge he procured a certificate from his
field officers as to his conduct and their opinion of him, and returned to
his old home community in Camden, S.C. where he was reared. He remained
there until March of 1782, when a call for S.C. Militia draft was sent out;
he volunteered as private for two months. He then found the S.C. Militia in
his command badly organized " and most wretchedly disciplined, many______ if
them without a sergeant to command them. He was elected Captain, and then
marched to Orangeburg Courthouse and then to Four-holes Bridge, later to
Dorchester, then to Bacons Bridge. He continues as Captain until Oct. 1782
when his command was disbanded and he returned home.
Deponent stated that he lost all his discharge and certificates of
character, etc. when his home burned on Christmas Day , 1825, losing all his
effects. He stated he was born in Frederick Co. Md., Dec. 9, 1760 and that
the record of his age was taken from the record his father kept(unnamed).
He was living when first called into service, in what was then called Camden
District but now York District, S.C. He remained in S.C. about 4 years after
the war, the moved to Elbert Co. Ga, living there nine years. Then removed
to Franklin Co. Ga.,lived there 18 years or until 1813 when he moved about
20 miles away to the place in Hall County where he was living at the time
(1834). The application was approved and he was granted a pension of $88.3
per year form March 4th , 1831, which he drew until his death. Pension
File # 28,812 Ga.

Pension of Phoebe Sailors Collins widow of John Collins, Sr.

On Jan. 31, 1853, In Cobb County, Ga., Mrs. Phoebe Collins of that County,
made her declaration to obtain a widow's pension, and deposed that she was
the widow of the above John Collins, Sr., and was 82 years of age; that she
and her said husband were married Nov. 30,1786 in Burke Co. Ga., and her
maiden name was Sailors; that her husband died in Cobb County, near the
village of Acworth, March 8,1852, age 91 years. Silas Prichard and Sanyek
Carruth, residents of Cobb Co., near Acworth, testify for the widow, and
said they knew her and her husband well and that the deceased and his wife
had resided in Cobb County for the past 20 years, and were highly esteemed
for their pure moral character and exemplary lives. They stated they had
examined the old family Bible in the handwriting of John Collins, Sr.,and it
shows his marriage as aforesaid.

As noted by the author the abstract is quite lengthily. This should be
further investigated. Johni.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------
Source:
North Carolina Biographical Sketched of Soldiers and Patriots in the Battle
of Guilford Courthouse...March 15, 1781
American Revolutionary War...Volume VIII presented by:
The Rachel Caldwell Chap0ter of D.A.R. Greensboro, N.C.
***** Abstracted from Georgia Genealogical Magazine April 1964Publication,
pages 713, 714, and 715 Rowan Public Library,Salisbury, N.C.

Note: The above information was forwarded from Guilford Courthouse
National Park, Ranger. To Barbara Vaillencourt a descendent of John H..
Collins a grandson of John
Collins, Sr.., son of James Collins and Elitha Sexton Collins.

Source:
This account is much as the above except in an abbreviated form.
The Patriots at the Cowpens..Revised Edition by: Bobby Gilmer Moss.

This was obtained from the Ranger at Guilford Courthouse National Park
System.
1820 Census for Hall County Ga. McCutcheons Dist.
page 132
Collins, John 46-100 b. 1720-1774
female 46-100 b. 1720-1794 (Phoebe)
female 16-26 b. 1794-1804
male 16-26 b. " "
male 16-26 b. " "
female 10-16 b. 1804-1810
female 10-16 b. " "
male 0-10 b. 1810-1820
male 0-10 b. " "
2 persons in agriculture
0slaves

page 133 Son James with wife(Elitha) and 1 female and 1 male both born
1810-1820.

1821 Cherokee Land Lottery:
John Collins residence McCutcheon Dist drew for Houston Co.
Charles Collins " " drew Monroe Co.

1827 Cherokee Land Lottery:
James Collins soldier residence Garrards Dist drew Coweta Co.
John Collins Rev. War. Soldier residence Garrards Dist drew Coweta Co.

1830 Census for Hall Co. Ga.
John E. Collins age 60-70

Charles Collins age 30-40

James Collins age 30-40

1832 Cherokee County Land Lottery:
John Collins res. Blackstock's Dist. Hall Co. Note. soldier granted
previous to Jan. 1, 1838
No# 223 20th Dist..2n Sect. Cherokee
Felix Collins res. Blackstock's Dist. Hall Co. # 245 25thDistrict 2nd
Section Cherokee

By the census of 1840 John Collins (Capt.) was listed in Cobb Co. Ga. where
he and Phoebe remained until their deaths.
Also listed on the 1840 Census was: John Jr., Daniel and Charles Collins.
By this census James and his family were listed on the Census in Chatooga
County, Ga..

1850 Census of Cobb County:
Felix Collins age 50 b. 1800 living in H/H of Charles Singleton....Felix
is presumed to be a son of John and Phoebe.
Daniel age 37 b. 1813 Ga. merchant and his wife Isabella (b.
1826d.<1859-1860)
Daniel married # 2 Mary Francis Buchanan

Buried in Mars Hill Cemetery....Acworth Ga. Cobb County. Located on Mars
Hill Church Road off Mars Hill Road, which runs between HWy 41 and ends at
Lost Mountain (HWy 20). Highway 20 runs between Marietta and Dallas, Ga..
The cemetery is approx. 3=4 miles from downtown Acworth.
John Collins b. Dec. 9, 1760 d. Mar. 8, 1853 Rev. War Marker...Capt.
SC. Militia Continental Lines

Daniel Collins b. June 13, 1813 d. Aug. 8, 1890 age 77 yr. 2 mo.
Felix Collins b. May 13m 1801 d. )ct. 13, 1873 age 72 yr. 5 mo.
Isabella dates un readable 1st wife of Daniel
Source: Cobb Co. Genealogy Society posted on the Cobb County website.

James C. Collins his son:

James was born 1789 in North Carolina or possibly Ga..

Military services:
War of 1812. He served with Captain Thomas f. Anderson's Company of the
Georgia Militia . Enlisting on November 21, 1814 and discharged on May 6,
1815. The war of 1812 was fought in 1814-1815.
Source of information War of 1812 Pensioneers Roll 20.

He married Elitha Saxon/Saxton in Hall County, Georgia. He was enumerated
on the 1820 and 1830 in Hall County Ga. census.
1840 He and his family were in Chatooga Co. Ga.

Listed on Cherokee County Land Lottery in Georgia as a soldier to qualify
for the drawing. Given his age he was in the War of 1812.Family history is
he served in the Georgia Militia with Captain Thomas F. Anderson's Company.
He enlisted November 21, 1814 and was discharged on May 6, 1815.(War 1812
pensioners roll 20).



John Merrell


------=_NextPart_000_0084_01C78D7B.62E977B0
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<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=3DContent-Type content=3D"text/html; =
charset=3Dus-ascii">
<META content=3D"MSHTML 6.00.6000.16414" name=3DGENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007>I have =
some=20
information on John Collins and Phobe Sailors and their son James. It is =
in a=20
gedcom file in Family Tree Maker. </SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN=20
class=3D128204715-03052007></SPAN></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007>The =
GEDCOM file has=20
over 6000 names in it. It has the Collins information from John. I do =
not know=20
who his father is. This information comes from my mother. I am now =
researching=20
to verify her information.</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN=20
class=3D128204715-03052007></SPAN></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007>Do you =
want this=20
GEDCOM?</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN=20
class=3D128204715-03052007></SPAN></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007>Here =
is some of the=20
information:</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN=20
class=3D128204715-03052007></SPAN></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007>John=20
Collins;</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007>b. 09 =
dec 1760 =20
Frederick County, Maryland</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007>d. 08 =
Mar 1852 =20
Cobb County, Ga.</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN =
class=3D128204715-03052007>Married Phoebe=20
Sailors   30 Nov 1786   Burke County,=20
Ga.</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN =
class=3D128204715-03052007></SPAN></FONT><FONT=20
face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN =
class=3D128204715-03052007></SPAN></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN =
class=3D128204715-03052007>Collins,=20
John<BR>State of Georgia<BR>Hall=20
County           &=
nbsp;           =20
Pension Papers</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007>On =
this the _____day=20
of September, 1832, personally appeared, in open court before Ezechel=20
Buffington, Joseph Dunegan and Thomas L. Tate, sitting a court of =
ordinary=20
judges of the Inferior Court of said County now sitting, John Collins, a =

resident of Hall County, State of Georgia, aged seventy-one years, who =
being=20
duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following =
declaration in=20
order too obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed on the 7th =
day of=20
June, 1832.</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007>That =
he entered the=20
service of the United States under the following named officers, and =
served as=20
herein stated, to wit, volunteered under the command of Colonel Neal on =
the=20
tenth day of May, 1776, he being fifteen years and five months old, and=20
continued in service until about the last of October in the same year, =
the said=20
Colonel Neal and Lieut. Colonel Watson being with the regiment =
alternately, that=20
after marching about and having some small skirmishes he marched to what =
was=20
then called Middle Settlement of the Cherokee Indians, General Andrew =
Williamson=20
having the command and Colonel Sumpter, Thompson, Middleton and Thomas =
being=20
along, that on the waters of the Tennessee River they had a general =
engagement=20
with the Indians.</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007>That =
sometime about=20
the last of October, 1776, he substituted in the place of a man named =
Thomas=20
Harrison in the regiment of drafted militia of South Carolina under the =
command=20
of the above mentioned Colonel Neal and marched to the frontiers of =
Georgia to=20
guard said frontier against the Creek Indians and Tories.  The term =
of the=20
militia tour in South Carolina, applicant does not distinctly recollect, =
but=20
thinks it was two months.  Having served out his time,he returned =
to South=20
Carolina and immediately substituted in the place of one Moses Kemp in =
the=20
Battalion of Horse militiamen under the command of Major Frances Ross =
and=20
marched towards the Georgia line,passing General Williamson's army near =
Augusta,=20
continued on and joined the army of General Ashe of Brier Creek(Ga.), =
and in=20
about three days after his(?) the army was disgracefully defeated. =
Applicant=20
obtained no knowledge of the officers commanding at the place except he =
knows=20
General Ashe had the command, and that General Elbert was also =
there. =20
After the defeat, Major Ross, with much of his men as could be found, =
returned=20
to where General Williamson "lay"near Augusta.  After being =
detained there=20
sometime, they were disbanded about the 16th of March, 1779.  =
Immediately=20
after getting some____ deponent substituted in the place of a man by the =
name of=20
McIntire (he belives Daniel) and marched in the regiment commanded by =
Colonel=20
Charles McDowell and Lieutenant Colonel Hugh Tinnin, the former of Burke =
County,=20
North Carolina, the latter of Hillsborough in the same state.  This =
tour=20
was for three months, after joining headmasters during this campaign =
deponent=20
was in some small skirmishes, and in the battle at Stono, General =
Lincoln having=20
the command of the army;General Pulaski was also there, together =
with =20
Colonel Lewis, Mayborn,and many other officers.  General John =
Butler=20
commanded the regiment in which deponent was.</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007>After =
being=20
disbanded, deponent returned home sometime in September,1779, and =
shortly after=20
substituted in the place of a man by the name of Nichols who was drafted =
in=20
Lincoln County, North Carolina, to march to Charleston, South =
Carolina. =20
Deponent marched to Charleston and encamped within a mile and a half of =
the city=20
until the expiration of his tour, doing no active service, nor mixing =
with any=20
other troops during the time.  Deponent further states that there =
were four=20
regiments of the North Carolina under the command of General Lillington, =
Colonel=20
Hampton, and Lieutenant Colonel Hamright, Major Henry Dixon and Major =
Sharp?=20
being there, deponent being under the command of Colonel Hamright.  =

Deponent acted during this last tour as an Orderly Sergent.  =
Deponent=20
further states that about the time his tour of service at this place =
expired=20
four Captains turned out to raise a regiment of volunteers to serve =
until the=20
24th day of June following, to defend Charleston against a British armed =
fleet=20
then lying off Charleston.  Colonel Archibald Lightti ( Lytle) of=20
Hillsborough, North Carolina and Major John Habersham took the command =
of these=20
companys.  Deponent enrolled himself under Captain John Lowman of=20
Sallisburg, North Carolina.  The companies were then marched into =
Charleton=20
and regular discipline commenced, when Colonel Lyttle took deponent from =
the=20
ranks and appointed him Sergeant Major in which capacity he acted as =
long as the=20
regiment stood the seige, having lasted about forty-two days, at which =
time=20
General Lincoln capitulated and made a surrender of Charleston, when the =

American army became prisoners of war.  The militia and volunteers =
being=20
paroled, deponent returned to Lincoln County in North Carolina, the =
place to=20
which he was paroled, and after the British over run all South Carolina, =
Colonel=20
Ferguson marched into the upper part of the State when deponent was =
taken and=20
carried to his camp, accused with a break of parole, tried for his life =
and=20
sentenced to be hung, but fortunately effected his escape.  This=20
circumstance, and the confused state of the country, induced deponent to =

-_______(missing text).  Deponent inability to attach himself to a =
regular=20
army in manner he wished, he fell in with some scouting refugees from =
the States=20
of Georgia and South Carolina under no regularity of discipline, each =
one coming=20
and going as he pleased and remained with them until after the Battle of =

Guilford Courthouse, North Carolina.  During this time, he was at =
the=20
Battle of Kings Mountain where Ferguson was killed and all his men =
killed or=20
taken.  At this battle Colonel Campbell, Cleveland, Shelby and =
Sevier=20
commanded with some other field officers.  Deponent was also at the =
Battle=20
of Cowpens where General Morgan defeated Colonel Tarleton, deponent and =
his=20
party getting there after the engagement had commenced and leaving the =
same=20
night, knows but little of the officers.  He recollects, however, =
that=20
General Morgan had the command and that Colonel Washington was there =
with his=20
Dragoons.  Also recollects a Major Pickens who was there.  At =
Guilford=20
Courthouse the case was pretty much the same.  The party with whom =
deponent=20
went got there after the fighting commenced and left the army the next =
morning.=20
Deponent had now been about six months with a party of men who(?) no=20
regularity.  Sometimes consisting of seventy or eighty men and =
sometimes=20
not more than ten, sometimes calling one man captain and sometimes=20
another.  "Our practice was to keep as near the flank or rear ear =
of the=20
enemy as we dare do, occasionally taking a horse or prisoner from =
them. =20
Sometimes chasing a foraging party, and sometimes being chased in =
turn". =20
After the Battle at Guilford Courthouse,deponent, finding himself and =
horse much=20
emaciated and almost naked except a pair of buckskin breeches, quit the =
army and=20
went to Henry County, Virginia, where he soon became acquainted with a =
colonel=20
who informed him that the militia regiment which he commanded was called =
for and=20
that he would march in a few days, and if deponent would substitute in =
the place=20
of one of the drafted men, and get himself some clothes, he Colonel Penn =
would=20
keep his horse well at his own expense, and when they started he would =
appoint=20
him Adjutant to his regiment, which proposition deponent acceded to, and =

substituted in the place of one Jones.  When arriving at the place =
of=20
rendezvous, Colonel Penn gave deponent a certificate that he was =
appointed=20
Adjutant to the regiment with the rank of Lieutenant and was to be =
obeyed=20
accordingly under this appointment.  Deponent remained about six =
months=20
with the Virginia militia, still acting as Adjutant, though the officers =
and=20
privates were relieved two or three times. He being in the line =
commanded by=20
Colonels Penn, Caloway, Jones, Shippen, and Major Warless, Voger, and =
two others=20
whose names he does not recollect, remained,  The brigade was under =
the=20
command of General Lawson.  Deponent was in some slight skirmishes, =
one at=20
old James Town where General Wayne fought the British with an unequal =
force.=20
Deponent was also at the siege of York Town where Cornwallis was taken =
and=20
deponent further states that during this campaign they had General =
officers with=20
them as General Wayne, Steuben, Major Lafayette and General =
Washington. =20
Shortly after Cornwallis surrender, the Virginia militia was disbanded =
and=20
deponent received a certificate from Colonels Jones an Shippen and =
returned to=20
what is now called York District, South Carolina, the place of his =
infancy and=20
childhood and has never seen Virginia since.  He remained in South =
Carolina=20
until the following March, 1782, when there being a call for the =
militia, he was=20
called on to stand a draft, which he refused to do, preferring to =
volunteer and=20
did so.  Marched to the place of rendezvous at Orangeburg. The =
South=20
Carolina Militia was badly organized and disciplined, many squads coming =
to=20
their place of rendezvous without even a Sergeant with them;  =
Colonel Will=20
and about three Captains and three or four Lieutenants had the command =
of about=20
three hundred men. Colonel Will ordered a part of the men to hold an =
election=20
among themselves for officers to command them.  They did and chose =
deponent=20
Captain and one man named Black, Lieutenant.  Colonel Winn  =
gave=20
deponent a certificate similar to the ones he received in Virginia. That =
he was=20
elected Captain and was to be obeyed accordingly.  Under said =
certificate,=20
he kept the command of some men until about the last of October, though =
he knows=20
of no good they did except to eat some beef and rice lying about=20
Orangeburg.  Through Isenhole, Bridget and Dorchester he remained =
with the=20
army, merely for the name of being in the army and being called Captain=20
Collins.  Colonels Winn, Britton and Lyons commanded these militia=20
occasionally.<BR>         &n=
bsp;           &nb=
sp;  =20
John Collins, Senior</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN =
class=3D128204715-03052007>Georgia<BR>Hall=20
County</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007>This =
day personally=20
appeared before the undersigned William Carr, who being duly sworn, =
saith that=20
he was personally acquainted with John Collins, the applicant in the =
foregoing=20
declaration, in the Revolutionary War.  Deponent saith that he =
became=20
acquainted with said Collins in the Cherokee Nations when they went to =
war with=20
that nation or tribe of Indians in the year of 1776.  He was with =
him at=20
the Battle with said Indians at the place called Black Hole.  He =
frequently=20
saw said Collins during the war at other Places.<BR>his<BR>William X=20
Carr<BR>mark</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN=20
class=3D128204715-03052007>Source:<BR>Bibliography:<BR>Tennessee and =
Kings=20
Mountain Papers,  Draper<BR>copied from Microfilm<BR>University of =
North=20
Carolina Library, Chapel Hill, N.C.<BR>Obtained from Guilford Courthouse =
Ranger=20
by Barbara Vaillencourt</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV><FONT><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007>
<DIV><BR><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>MUCH THE SAME INFORMATION AS =
ABOVE:<BR>John=20
Collins  Rev. War Patriot<BR>Pension Application in Hall County=20
Ga.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>John Collins, Sr., on Jan. 27, 1832 in =
Hall Co.,=20
Ga., made his declaration to obtain a Rev. soldier's pension under the =
Act of=20
1832, and stated that he was a resident of Hall county and was 73 years =
of age=20
on the 9th of December, previously.  He stated that he entered the =
service=20
and served as follows:  On or about the 1st of April of 1776, the =
Cherokee=20
Indians broke out in the frontiers of South Carolina and committed many=20
depredations, and the militia was called out; that he volunteered on May =
10,=20
1776, as a private or militiaman under Capt. John McAfee for six months =
or=20
during the campaign, and was attached to Col. Neal's Regiment; they =
marched to a=20
fort on the Seneca River,which he thought was called Fort Independence, =
and was=20
there six or eight weeks during which time they had frequent skirmishes =
with the=20
Indians; "from there marched to what was then called the Middle =
Settlement of=20
the Cherokee Nation where we had a severe engagement with the Indians =
and=20
defeated them with a loss on our side of 27 killed and 73 wounded.  =
General=20
Andrew Williamson had command of the American Army at this place;  =
Cols.=20
Neal, Thomas, Middleton and Sumter(afterwards Gen. Sumter) were with the =

Army."  After this engagement they marched through the Nation =
several weeks=20
in skirmishing, then returned to the white settlement and were =
discharged, Oct.=20
26, 1776.  Deponent stated that he then went to his father's =
(unnamed) who=20
lived in what was then called Camden District,S.C., where he remained =
until Oct.=20
1778. when he left his father's contrary to his father's wishes, and =
went to=20
where one Thomas Harrison lived,  Harrison being a drafted =
Militiaman, and=20
hired himself to him as a substitute for a two months' tour and was =
placed under=20
command of Capt. Robert McAfee, Col. Neals Regiment.  They marched =
to=20
Philips 'Fort on Little River in Wilkes Co. Ga., and remained there =
"some=20
weeks";  they then left a part of their detachment there and he =
went with=20
other part to a place called Powells Fort now called Powelton near the =
high=20
shoals of the Ogeechee River in Ga., where they remained until relieved =
by other=20
troops, was then discharged and he, the applicant or deponent,  =
then=20
immediately re-entered the service as a substitute for a man whose name =
was not=20
recalled;  the men had about a two months term to serve.  =
After=20
serving this term out, he started home and on the way met a battalion of =
drafted=20
horsemen under Major Francis Ross, and he enlisted in it as a substitute =
for=20
Moses Kemp,who was serving at the time as a private.  This =
battalion was=20
under Capt. Thomas Barron.  They marched to where General Ashe =
"lay" on=20
Brier Creek in Georgia, and a few days later his command was attacked by =
the=20
British and was "shamefully defeated".  After this defeat, the =
South=20
Carolina Militia including himself rambled in small squad up the country =
to=20
where General Williamson "lay" with a few men near Augusta. Remained =
there until=20
March 17, 1779. when he was discharged after having served two months =
and ten=20
days in 1778 and two months 17 days in 1779.  He then started to go =
see his=20
"acquaintances" who lived near the North Carolina line having no home to =
go=20
to,  "just as I got into the settlement where I intended going I =
met a man=20
by the name of Daniel McIntire who hired me to take his place in the =
North=20
Carolina Militia for three months".  he (Collins) was placed under =
command=20
of Capt. Benjamin Harden: Co. Charles McDowell and Lt. Col. Hugh =
Tinningin=20
charge of the Regiment.  "We then marched to the little village =
call=20
Charlotte in Mecklenburg County N.C., and rendezvoused eight or ten days =
there,=20
waiting for other troops.  Then marched to Savannah opposite =
Augusta, Ga.,=20
and joined General Lincoln.  They then marched over into Georgia =
down to=20
Brier Creek, then crossed the river again and pursued the British who =
were on=20
their march to Charleston.  After getting to Bacon's Bridge on the =
Ashley=20
River they learned the British had changed their route.  Remained =
there=20
several days waiting to learn the enemy's intentions, then marched to =
Ferguson's=20
Swamp and were there several weeks.  The enemy having entrenched =
themselves=20
at Stono Inlet, they then marched there and attacked the British and =
drove them=20
out.  Then returned to the neighborhood of his friends on the N.C. =
line=20
where he remained on two nights when a man named James Nichols came and =
hired=20
him as a substitute for 3-months tour of duty as a private.<BR>Deponent =
was=20
placed under the command of Capt. James Neal and was immediately =
appointed=20
Orderly Sergeant for his company and attached to the regiment under Col. =
Hampton=20
and Lt. Col. Hamright.  They marched to Charlotte, N.C. from there =
to=20
Charleston, S.C., or the Smoke Camps near the city where they remained =
until the=20
company's time expired. General Lennington commanded the brigade =
consisting of=20
four regiments. The terms of the four regiments having expired, four =
Captains=20
"turned out, one from each of the four regiments, to raise a company to =
be=20
called the North Carolina Volunteers",.  These four companies thus =
raised,=20
were raised for the express purpose of defending Charleston against the =
British,=20
who were then lying near the town in their ships. Deponent, Collins, =
enrolled=20
himself in one of these companies under Capt. John G. Lowman; they were =
taken=20
into Charleston and put under strict discipline under command of Col. =
Archibald=20
Little (Lytle) of Hillsborough, N.C.,  Col. Little then appointed =
Collins=20
as Sergeant-Major to the regiment;  he served in that rank until =
they were=20
all taken prisoners in the fall of Charleston.  He was appointed =
about Dec.=20
1st, and they were taken prisoners about May 12th =
following.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Several days after the surrender, =
deponent was=20
paroled to Lincoln Co. N.C.. After being at home about two months he was =
taken=20
by a "parcel of Tories" and carried to where Col. Ferguson "lay" with a=20
detachment of British and Tories;  and was there charged with =
violating his=20
parole, was found guilty and sentenced to be hanged.  But by =
providential=20
occurrences he effected his escape.  After this experience and due =
to the=20
confused condition of the country, he decided to seek refuge in the =
Army, and=20
not having it in his power to join in the manner he would have =
preferred,=20
deponent "turned in" with some South Carolina and Georgia refugees =
"whose=20
practices it was to harass the Tories and occasionally fire on the =
British=20
regiments as they passed through the country, frequently passing  =
them and=20
our troops;  I continued with these men until after the battle of =
Guilford=20
Court House;  during which time I was at Tarleston's defeat at =
Cowpens, at=20
Ferguson's defeat at Kings Mountain and the battle of Guilford Court=20
House.  "After this last battle, being about without clothes and my =
horse=20
reduced, I went to Henry Co. Va., where I soon became acquainted with a =
Col.=20
Penn and finding or believing that I possessed some knowledge of =
military=20
matters, proposed that if I would substitute in place of some one of the =
drafted=20
militiamen belonging to his Battalion and there by enable myself to get =
some=20
clothes he would undertake to put my horse in better condition and would =
give me=20
the appointment of Adjutant of the regiment.  I accordingly =
substituted in=20
place of man named William Jones who had been drafted for two =
months. =20
Deponent stated that they then rendezvoused at one Hubbard's where Col. =
Penn=20
gave him his appointment as Adjutant with rank of Lieutenant.  They =
then=20
marched to Powhaten Courthouse, Va., where Col. Penn's term of service=20
expired.  Deponent was then recommended by Col. Penn to Col. =
Calloway and=20
he continued as adjutant under the latter until Calloway's term =
expire; =20
then Col. Jones succeeded Calloway and he retained Adjutant Collins in =
his=20
rank.  After the siege had started at Little =
York(Yorktown?..editor) he was=20
recommended to Col. Skipper who retained him as adjutant of his regiment =
until=20
after Cornwallis' surrender.<BR>Deponent stated he entered the service =
under=20
Col. Penn April 12, 1781and was discharged Oct. 24, 1781 and during that =
time=20
was in the battle of old Jamestown.  After obtaining the discharge =
he=20
procured a certificate from his field officers as to his conduct and =
their=20
opinion of him, and returned to his old home community in Camden, S.C. =
where he=20
was reared.  He remained there until March of 1782, when a call for =
S.C.=20
Militia draft was sent out;  he volunteered as private for two=20
months.  He then found the S.C. Militia in his command badly =
organized "=20
and most wretchedly disciplined, many______ if them without a sergeant =
to=20
command them.  He was elected Captain, and then marched to =
Orangeburg=20
Courthouse and then to Four-holes Bridge, later to Dorchester, then to =
Bacons=20
Bridge.  He continues as Captain until Oct.  1782 when his =
command was=20
disbanded and he returned home.<BR>Deponent stated that he lost all his=20
discharge and certificates of character, etc. when his home burned on =
Christmas=20
Day , 1825, losing all his effects.  He stated he was born in =
Frederick Co.=20
Md., Dec. 9, 1760 and that the record of his age was taken from the =
record his=20
father kept(unnamed).  He was living when first called into =
service, in=20
what was then called Camden District but now York District, S.C. He =
remained in=20
S.C. about 4 years after the war, the moved to Elbert Co. Ga, living =
there nine=20
years.  Then removed to Franklin Co. Ga.,lived there 18 years or =
until 1813=20
when he moved about 20 miles away to the place in Hall County where he =
was=20
living at the time (1834). The application was approved and he was =
granted a=20
pension of $88.3 per year form March 4th , 1831, which he drew until his =

death.   Pension File # 28,812 Ga.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Pension of Phoebe Sailors Collins  =
widow of=20
John Collins, Sr.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>On Jan. 31, 1853, In Cobb County, Ga., =
Mrs. Phoebe=20
Collins of that County, made her declaration to obtain a widow's =
pension, and=20
deposed that she was the widow of the above John Collins, Sr., and was =
82 years=20
of age;  that she and her said husband were married Nov. 30,1786 in =
Burke=20
Co. Ga., and her maiden name was Sailors;  that her husband died in =
Cobb=20
County, near the village of Acworth, March 8,1852, age 91 years.  =
Silas=20
Prichard and Sanyek Carruth, residents of Cobb Co., near Acworth, =
testify for=20
the widow, and said they knew her and her husband well and that the =
deceased and=20
his wife had resided in Cobb County for the past 20 years, and were =
highly=20
esteemed for their pure moral character and exemplary lives.  They =
stated=20
they had examined the old family Bible in the handwriting of John =
Collins,=20
Sr.,and it shows his marriage as aforesaid.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>As noted by the author the abstract is =
quite=20
lengthily.  This should be further investigated. =20
Johni.<BR>---------------------------------------------------------------=
-------------------------------------------<BR>Source:<BR>North=20
Carolina Biographical Sketched of Soldiers and Patriots in the Battle of =

Guilford Courthouse...March 15, 1781<BR>American Revolutionary =
War...Volume=20
VIII   presented by:<BR>The Rachel Caldwell Chap0ter of =
D.A.R. =20
Greensboro, N.C.<BR>***** Abstracted from Georgia Genealogical Magazine =
April=20
1964Publication,  pages 713, 714, and=20
715       Rowan Public Library,Salisbury,=20
N.C.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Note:  The above information was =
forwarded=20
from  Guilford Courthouse National Park, Ranger.  To Barbara=20
Vaillencourt a descendent of John H.. Collins a grandson of =
John<BR>Collins,=20
Sr.., son of James Collins and Elitha Sexton Collins.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Source:<BR>This account is much as the =
above except=20
in an abbreviated form.<BR>The Patriots at the Cowpens..Revised Edition=20
by:  Bobby Gilmer Moss.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>This was obtained from the Ranger at =
Guilford=20
Courthouse National Park System.<BR>1820 Census for Hall County =
Ga.  =20
McCutcheons Dist.<BR>page 132<BR>Collins, John    =
46-100  b.=20
1720-1774<BR>         =20
female   46-100  b.  1720-1794 =20
(Phoebe)<BR>         =20
female   16-26    b.=20
1794-1804<BR>         =20
male      16-26    =
b.  =20
"      =20
"<BR>         =20
male      16-26    =
b.  =20
"      =20
"<BR>          =
female  =20
10-16    b.=20
1804-1810<BR>         =20
female   10-16    b.   =20
"    =20
"<BR>         =20
male       0-10     b. =

1810-1820<BR>         =20
male       0-10    =20
b.   "      "<BR>2 persons in=20
agriculture<BR>0 slaves</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>page 133  Son James with =
wife(Elitha) and 1=20
female and 1 male both born 1810-1820.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>1821 Cherokee Land Lottery:<BR>John=20
Collins   residence McCutcheon Dist drew  for Houston=20
Co.<BR>Charles Collins  =20
"           =20
"            =
            &=
nbsp;=20
drew Monroe Co.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>1827 Cherokee Land Lottery:<BR>James=20
Collins   soldier    residence Garrards=20
Dist    drew  Coweta Co.<BR>John Collins  Rev. =
War.=20
Soldier   residence Garrards Dist    drew =
Coweta=20
Co.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>1830 Census for Hall Co. Ga.<BR>John E. =
Collins age=20
60-70</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Charles  Collins  age =
30-40</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>James Collins  age =
30-40</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>1832 Cherokee County Land =
Lottery:<BR>John Collins=20
res.  Blackstock's  Dist.  Hall Co.  Note.  =
soldier=20
granted previous to Jan. 1, 1838<BR>  No# 223  20th Dist..2n =
Sect.=20
Cherokee<BR>Felix Collins  res.  Blackstock's Dist.  Hall =

Co.   # 245  25thDistrict  2nd Section =
Cherokee</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>By the census of 1840  John =
Collins (Capt.)=20
was listed in Cobb Co. Ga. where he and Phoebe remained until their=20
deaths.<BR>Also listed on the 1840 Census was:  John Jr., Daniel =
and =20
Charles Collins.  By this census James and his family were listed =
on the=20
Census in Chatooga County, Ga..</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>1850 Census of Cobb County:<BR>Felix =
Collins age 50=20
b. 1800   living in H/H of Charles Singleton....Felix is =
presumed to=20
be a son of John and Phoebe.<BR>Daniel age 37 b. 1813 Ga.  merchant =
and his=20
wife Isabella (b. 1826d.<1859-1860)<BR>    Daniel =
married # 2=20
Mary Francis Buchanan</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Buried in Mars Hill Cemetery....Acworth =
Ga. =20
Cobb County.  Located on Mars Hill Church Road off Mars Hill Road, =
which=20
runs between HWy 41 and ends at Lost Mountain (HWy 20).  Highway 20 =
runs=20
between Marietta and Dallas, Ga..  The cemetery is approx. 3=3D4 =
miles from=20
downtown Acworth.<BR>John Collins b. Dec. 9, 1760    =
d. =20
Mar. 8, 1853   Rev. War Marker...Capt. SC. Militia Continental =

Lines</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Daniel Collins b.  June 13,=20
1813    d.  Aug. 8, 1890  age 77 yr. 2 =
mo.<BR>Felix=20
Collins  b. May 13m 1801   d. )ct. 13, 1873  age 72 =
yr. 5=20
mo.<BR>Isabella    dates un readable    =
1st wife=20
of Daniel<BR>Source:  Cobb Co.  Genealogy Society  posted =
on the=20
Cobb County website.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV></SPAN></FONT><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007><FONT face=3DArial =
size=3D2>James=20
C. Collins  his son:</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007><FONT face=3DArial=20
size=3D2></FONT></SPAN> </DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>James =
was born 1789=20
in North Carolina or possibly Ga..</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007><FONT face=3DArial =
size=3D2>Military=20
services:<BR>War of 1812.  He served with Captain Thomas f. =
Anderson's=20
Company of the Georgia Militia . Enlisting on November 21, 1814 and =
discharged=20
on May 6, 1815.  The war of 1812 was fought in 1814-1815.<BR>Source =
of=20
information War of 1812 Pensioneers Roll 20.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>He =
married Elitha=20
Saxon/Saxton in Hall County, Georgia.  He was enumerated on the =
1820 and=20
1830 in Hall County Ga. census.<BR>1840 He and his family were in =
Chatooga Co.=20
Ga.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=3D128204715-03052007><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Listed =
on Cherokee=20
County Land Lottery in Georgia as a soldier to qualify for the =
drawing. =20
Given his age he was in the War of 1812.Family history is he served in =
the=20
Georgia Militia with Captain Thomas F. Anderson's Company.  He =
enlisted=20
November 21, 1814 and was discharged on May 6, 1815.(War 1812 pensioners =
roll=20
20).</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV align=3Dleft><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>John Merrell</FONT></DIV>
<DIV align=3Dleft> </DIV></BODY></HTML>



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