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Rhineharts/Reinharts, Chester Co., PA to Champaign Co., IL
Posted by: Charlene Reinhart (ID *****9421) Date: May 12, 2003 at 13:34:33
  of 1074

I went to the Champaign Library and found several articles on Matthias Rhinehart and his son, Martin Rhinehart who arrived in Champaign County in 1830.

MATTHIAS AND MARTIN RHINEHART

       The Rhinehart family was prominently identified with the early period of the county's development. Matthias, the ancestor in these parts, brought his family from Chester County, Pennsylvania, in 1828 or 1829, and made a settlement in the west half of the southwest quarter of Section 26, Somer Township. In association with his son-in-law, Walter Rhodes, he entered that tract in February, 1930. The first postoffice in what is now Champaign County, called Van Buren, was established thereon. Mr. Rhodes lived upon that tract until about 1857, when he sold to A.M. Fauley. There the son, Martin Rhinehart, reached manhood. When he was twenty years of age, he enlisted in the Black Hawk War for service in Captain Brown's company of Mounted Rangers. He furnished his own horse, gun and clothing, and received for his services $1 per day. For many years he shared with Thomas L. Butler, who had settled near Homer at about the same time as the Rhinehart family farther to the northwest, the honor of being the only survivor who participated in that campaign from what is now Champaign County. Martin Reinhart became a prominent and a wealthy citizen. When he came as a youth to the central part of the county there were but thirty-five families living within its borders.

INCIDENTS RELATED BY RHINEHART

       "The year 1831," he once related, "was almost without a summer; the cold weather continued until late in the spring and a hard frost set in on September 20th, it being so severe that it froze the corn, cob and all. In consequence of the loss of the crop, times got close and money was extremely scarce. The following year settlers were compelled to send to Kentucky for their seed corn. In December, 1836, a deep snow lay upon the ground. It began to rain and continued all day, when suddenly it turned intensely cold, making ice over the ground and freezing very hard. The sudden change caught many persons unprepared and they were frozen to death. Two men named Hildreth and Frame were crossing Four Mile Prairie on that day; they became bewildered, lost their way and were out when the change came. They killed their horses and Frame crawled inside the body of his horse for protection against the cold. But it proved his tomb, as he was found there frozen to death. Hildreth wandered around all night, and when found in the morning was so badly frozen that he lost his toes and fingers."

       Mr. Rhinehart also spoke of the early doctors of that day. Dr. Saddler was one of the first physicians of the county and was accounted a good one. It is related of him that he attended a family east of Urbana. This family had a large patch of fine, ripe and juicy watermelons. The doctor continued his visits long after the patient was convalescent, and the family dropped upon the idea that the watermelon patch was the chief attraction and the cause of the repeated visits. They gently broke the news to him that his patient was entirely well, and hinted that further visits were entirely superfluous. The doctor went home and sent in a bill that covered all the visits. The family refused payment. Suit was brought to recover the amount, when the family rendered an account of watermelons devoured by the doctor as an offset, and obtained a small judgment against him. All neighbors declared that the decision was a most just one."

From The History of Champaign County, Pages 107-109.


MARTIN RINEHART

Fifty-seven years ago Martin Rinehart first set foot upon Champaign County soil. Then he was a lad of seventeen years, with his life before hi. Today, he is here. He has passed the mile-stone of his boyhood and early manhood, and is rapidly approaching the one across whose face is written "mature age." The three score years and ten allotted to mankind have been his, and nearly all these years have been passed within the borders of this county. To write the history of this county os simply to tell his story. The hardships and privations endured, the hopes and fears, that alternatively chased each other flitted across the pathway of this sturdy old pioneer as he marched from boyhood down to old age in this county. Martin Rinehart was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, Dec. 18, 1812. His parents, Matthias and Elizabeth (March) Rinehart were natives of the same county and state. They came west in the fall of 1829, and made a settlement on the farm now owned by A. M. Fauley in Somer Township. There young Rinehart grew to manhood. In 1832 during the Black Hawk war he enlisted in Capt. Brown's company of Mounted Rangers, and served for one year. He furnished his own horse, gun and clothing. He received for his services one dollar per day. He and Thomas Butler are the only survivors of that war living in Champaign county. After this war was ended he returned home. In 1835, he married Miss Sena, daughter of Wm. Corray. She died in 1878. The offspring of that union were the following named children; Elizabeth, who married William Hill, of Somer Township; William M., who married Miss Mary Trickle, they reside in Monroe, Green county, Wis. Albert, who took to wife Elizabeth Truman, and also live in the place last mentioned. Mary, is the wife of T. J. Drake, they reside in Seward county, Neb. Isaac married Mary J. Frame, and live in the latter named place. Seberry, married Jenny Morton, and are residents of Monroe, Green county, Wis. Jennie, is the wife of William H. Brownfield and lives in St. Joseph township.

Mr. Rinehart united with the M. E. church in 1843, and still holds his membership in that religious denomination. Politically he votes with the republican party.

At the time Mr Rinehart came to this section of the state there were but thirty-five families living within, what is now, called Champaign county. He relates many things that occurred here in those early days. We give a few. The year 1831was almost without a summer; the cold weather continued until late in the spring and a hard frost set in on September 20th, and it was so severe that it froze the corn, cob and all. In consequence of the loss of the crop, times got close and money was extremely scarce. The following year settlers were compelled to send to Kentucky for their seed corn. In December 1836, a deep snow lay upon the ground. It began to rain and continued all day, when suddenly it turned intensely cold, making ice over the ground and freezing very hard. The sudden change caught many persons unprepared and they were frozen to death. Two men named Hildreth and Frame were crossing Four Mile Prairie on that day; they became bewildered, lost their way and were out when the change came. They killed their horses and Frame crawled inside the body of his horse for protection against the cold. But it proved his tomb, as he was found therein frozen to death. Hildreth wandered around all night, and when found in the morning was so badly frozen that he lost his toes and fingers.

       Mr. R., also speaks of the early doctors of that day. Dr. Saddler was one of the first physicians of the county and was counted a good one. It is related of him that he attended a family east of Urbana. This family had a large patch of fine, ripe and juicy watermelons. The doctor continued his visits long after the patient was convalescent, and the family dropped upon the idea that the watermelon patch was the chief attraction, and the cause of the doctors repeated visits. They gently broke the news to him that his patient was entirely well and hinted that further visits were entirely superfluous. The doctor went home and sent in a bill that covered all the visits. The family refused payment. Suit was brought to recover the amount when the family rendered an account for watermelons devoured by the doctor as an offset, and obtained a small judgment against the doctor. All of the neighbors declared that the decision was a most righteous one. Many other incidents might be mentioned of a similar character, illustrative of the times we speak of, but space forbids.

Mr. Rinehart was very successful in life. He secured a competency and now in the declining years of his life, he takes things easy.

From the book PIONEERS OF CHAMPAIGN COUNTY PAGES 64-65.              

From the information, this is what their family tree would look like:
                                   
1       Matthias Rinehart (Rhinehart)
       Elizabeth March
       2       Martin Rinehart (Rhinehart), born Dec 18, 1812 in Chester County, Pennsylvania
              Sena Corray, daughter of Wm. Corray, d. 1878
              3       Elizabeth
                     William Hill of Somer Township
              3       William M. Rinehart
                     Mary Trickle of Monroe, Green county, Wis
              3       Albert Rinehart
                     Elizabth Truman of Monroe, Green county, Wis
              3       Mary Rinehart
                     T. J. Drake of Seward county, Neb.
              3       Isaac Rinehart
                     Mary J. Frame of Seward county, Neb.
              3       Seberry Rinehart
                     Jennie Morton of Monroe, Green county, Wis
              3       Jennie Rinehart
                     William H. Brownfield, of St. Joseph Township


Census Records

Page 228

393 RINEHART       Martin              38       M       Farmer       800       Ohio       Somer
                     Asenath       30       F                            Ohio       "
                     Elizabeth L.       15       F                            Ill.       "
                     Oliver              13       M                            Ill.       "
                     William       11       M                            Ill.       "
                     Albert              7       M                            Ill.       "
                     Mary              3       F                            Ill.       "

399 RINEHART       Mathias       68       M       Farmer       None       Pa.       Somer
                     Phebe              50       F                            Va.       "
                     Walter              21       M        (Idiot)                     Ohio       "
Page 229
399 RHINEHART       Julian R.       16       M                            Ky.       Somer

Page 229

403 RINEHART       Elhanan       35       M       Farmer       1400       Pa.        Somer
                     Margaret       28       F                            Ohio       "
                     Angeline        10       F                            Ill.       "
                     Matilda       7        F                            Ill.       "
                     Amanda       4m       M                            Ill.       "
                     Louisa              8/12       M                            Ill.       "
                     





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