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Re: Let's not forget Potato Hole
Posted by: crolholmes (ID *****8092) Date: March 11, 2007 at 21:28:08
In Reply to: Re: Let's not forget Potato Hole by Gay Mathis of 15140

If you are asking how Thomas Jefferson is realted to Jesse James you will find that through the Turpin line.

Peter Jefferson as you know was the father of Thomas Jefferson.
Peter Jefferson is the son of Thomas Jefferson II who married Mary Field.

Lt. Col. Thomas Turpin married Mary Jefferson daughter of Captian Thomas Jefferson II and Mary Field.

Peter Jefferson son of President Thomas Jefferson who married 1. Salley Hemmings and 2. Martha Wayles

Mary Jefferson sister to President THomas Jefferson married 1. John Bolling 2. Thomas Turpin.

Mary Jefferson and Thomas Turpin are the parents of Obedience Turpin who married MAJOR John Crittenden

Major John Crittenden and Obedience Turpin are the parents of Henry Crittenden.
The wives of Henry I don't have at this time but he was the father of:
Governor Thomas T Crittenden
Crittenden's are realted to the Woodson Family.

Elizabeth Woodson Moss "the Widow Ashley"

Mother of John Jordon Crittenden U.S.Attny Gen. NPFX: Gov. of Ky., Sen. 1 Sex: M Birth: 10 SEP 1787 in Woodford Co., Ky. 1 Birth: 10 SEP 1786 in Woodford Co., Ky. Note: in a log house 2 Birth: 1787 in Woodford Co., Ky. Death: 26 JUL 1863 1 Burial: Frankfort, Franklin Co, Ky. 1 Residence: Corner of Main & Washington, Frankfort, Franklin Co., Ky. Note: built in 1800 by Charles Sprole 2 Occupation: Attny practicing in Russellville & later Frankfort, Ky. 3 Education: studied law under George M. Bibb 4 5 6 Education: attended Washington Academy (later Wash & Lee), grad Wm. & Mary 4 Education: attended Pisgah Academy 1 OFC: U.S. Attny Gen'l under Presidents Harrisone and Fillmore 7 OFC: 1848-1850: Gov. of Ky. 1 OFC: Elected to Ky. legislature 10 times, elected Speaker 4 times. OFC: 1809-11: Attny Gen. of the Illinois Territory1809-11 OFC: US Senator 5 terms(?) 6 OFC: member of the cabinet of Presidents Wm.Henry Harrison and Millard Filmore 8 Note: 9 Photograph on p. 90. Text: p.90 Military: 1 War of 1812: Served as Aide-de-camp to Gov. & Gen. Isaac Shelby receiving a commendation. Previously was Aide-de-camp to Gov. Charles Scott in the First Ky. Malitia and to Ninian Edwards, then governor of the Illinois Territory. Text: p.64 Military: 7 In War for Southern Independence one son "became a brigadier general in the Union army and one a major general on the Confederate side." Text: p.11 Change Date: 11 DEC 2005 Father: John Crittenden Va Burgess for Ky(1783-4)

The T in Thomas Crittenden stood for Turpin
He is not to be confused with Thomas Theodore who brought an end to outlaw activity in the state, especially by breaking up the Jesse James gang.

Thomas Turpin Crittenden's father was John Lee CRITTENDEN
Major in Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Virginia House of Burgesses, 1790-1805

He came to Virginia in about 1770. In 1783 he became an early pioneer settler
of Woodford Co., Ky. He was an adjutant-major with General George Rogers Clark in the Northwest. He became a member of the House of Burgesses of Virginia in 1784.

John Jordan CRITTENDEN was Thomas Turpin Crittenden's brother.
BIOGRAPHY: Crittenden Compromise,
in U.S. history, unsuccessful last-minute effort to avert the Civil War.
It was proposed in Congress as a constitutional amendment in Dec., 1860,
by Sen. John J. Crittenden of Kentucky with support from the National
Union party. Basically, it accepted the boundary between free and slave
states that had been set by the Missouri Compromise (1820-21), extended
the line to California, and assured the continuation of slavery where it
already existed. In addition, it advocated slavery in the District of
Columbia, upheld the fugitive slave law (1850) with minor modifications,
and called for vigorous suppression of the African slave trade. At a
peace conference called by the Virginia legislature in 1861, the
compromise gained support from four border state delegations.
Nevertheless, it failed in the House of Representatives in Jan., 1861, by
a vote of 113 to 80 and in the Senate in March by a vote of 20 to 19. Its
defeat made clear the inevitability of the Civil War.
Crittenden, John Jordan (1786-1863) of Russellville, Logan County, Ky.;
Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky. Son of John Crittenden; brother of Robert
Crittenden; uncle of Thomas Theodore Crittenden; granduncle of Thomas
Theodore Crittenden, Jr.. Born near Versailles, Woodford County, Ky.,
September 10, 1786. Illinois territory attorney general, 1809-10; member
of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1811-17, 1825-29; served in
the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Senator from Kentucky,
1817-19, 1835-41, 1842-48, 1855-61; Presidential Elector for Kentucky,
1824; U.S. District Attorney for Kentucky, 1827-29; U.S. Attorney
General, 1841, 1850-53; Governor of Kentucky, 1848-50; U.S.
Representative from Kentucky 8th District, 1861-63. Two of his sons were
generals on opposite sides in the Civil War; a grandson of his was killed
in Gen. Custer's expedition against the Sioux in 1876. Died in Frankfort,
Franklin County, Ky., July 26, 1863. Interment at Frankfort Cemetery,
Frankfort, Ky. Crittenden County, Ky. is named for him. See also:
congressional biography.
CRITTENDEN, John Jordan, 1786-1863

Your Lee Connection will take you to the family of Robert E Lee.

Jordan Crittenden married Sarah O. LEE

Sarah was the daughter of John LEE
John Lee came to KY in 1792 where he patented over 5000 acres on military grants (5333 1/3
Note that John Lee died in Woodford Co. Ky
John Lee was the son of Hancock Lee

Hancock Lee married Mary Willis of "Willis Hall", Fredericksburg.
Check into the WIllis family. There are surprise there too

Hancock Lee was the son of Hancock Lee who married first to Mary Kendall

m. (2) Sarah Allerton (ggd/o Isacc Allerton who came on the"Mayflower". Hancock was the founder of the "Ditchley" Lee line.
Their daughter Elizabeth Lee married Zachary Taylor son of James Taylor and Martha Thompson.

Zachary Taylor and Elizabeth Lee were the parents of Richard Lee Taylor and Sarah Dabney Strother. More of the James family tree will surface here with Steptoe

Richard Lee Taylor and Sarah Dabney Strother were the parents of Zachary Taylor 12th President of the USA
Descends from Charlemagne

Also descends from Mayflower passenger, William Brewster
from http://www.mayflowerhistory.com/Genealogy/famousdescendants.php
Zachary Taylor > Richard Taylor > Elizabeth Lee > Sarah Allerton > Isaac Allerton > Fear Brewster > WILLIAM BREWSTER

Zachary Taylor 12 president married Margaret MacKall "Peggy" Smith 21 FEB 1788 in Calvert Co., Maryland
After the election of 1848, a passenger on a Mississippi riverboat struck up a conversation with easy-mannered Gen. Zachary Taylor, not knowing his identity. The passenger remarked that he didn't think the general qualified for the Presidency--was the stranger "a Taylor man"? "Not much of one," came the reply. The general went on to say that he hadn't voted for Taylor, partly because his wife was opposed to sending "Old Zack" to Washington, "where she would be obliged to go with him!" It was a truthful answer.
Moreover, the story goes that Margaret Taylor had taken a vow during the Mexican War: If her husband returned safely, she would never go into society again. In fact she never did, though prepared for it by genteel upbringing.

"Peggy" Smith was born in Calvert County, Maryland, daughter of Ann Mackall and Walter Smith, a major in the Revolutionary War according to family tradition. In 1809, visiting a sister in Kentucky, she met young Lieutenant Taylor. They were married the following June, and for a while the young wife stayed on the farm given them as a wedding present by Zachary's father. She bore her first baby there, but cheerfully followed her husband from one remote garrison to another along the western frontier of civilization. An admiring civilian official cited her as one of the "delicate females...reared in tenderness" who had to educate "worthy and most interesting" children at a fort in Indian country.

Two small girls died in 1820 of what Taylor called "a violent bilious fever," which left their mother's health impaired; three girls and a boy grew up. Knowing the hardships of a military wife, Taylor opposed his daughters' marrying career soldiers--but each eventually married into the Arm

The second daughter, Knox, married Lt. Jefferson Davis in gentle defiance of her parents. In a loving letter home, she imagined her mother skimming milk in the cellar or going out to feed the chickens. Within three months of her wedding, Knox died of malaria. Taylor was not reconciled to Davis until they fought together in Mexico; in Washington the second Mrs. Davis became a good friend of Mrs. Taylor's, often calling on her at the White House.

Though Peggy Taylor welcomed friends and kinfolk in her upstairs sitting room, presided at the family table, met special groups at her husband's side, and worshiped regularly at St. John's Episcopal Church, she took no part in formal social functions. She relegated all the duties of official hostess to her youngest daughter, Mary Elizabeth, then 25 and recent bride of Lt. Col. William W.S. Bliss, adjutant and secretary to the President. Betty Bliss filled her role admirably. One observer thought that her manner blended "the artlessness of a rustic belle and the grace of a duchess."
Lived: 1788-1852

Mrs. Zachary Taylor.

If I am not mistaken you line descends intoRobert the Bruce, William the Conqueror, Charlemagne, the House of Windsor.

I will answer more on Woodson's later. Something in the garage just crashed. I wonder if I left the car in gear again.

Carol



his tombstone has 1729.





Note:
"Peter moved to Albemarle Co. and built 'Shadwell' which his son, President Jefferson, inherited. In 1751 prepared map of Va. and surrounding territory."
Alvahn Holmes, 1979, Some Farrar's Island Descendants



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