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Home: Surnames: Gines Family Genealogy Forum

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Guynes, Goyne, Goins, Guinn, Gwin etc. research
Posted by: janet guynes (ID *****0324) Date: November 07, 2004 at 10:11:31
  of 15

Hi,

There has been a huge research genealogy project undertaken by the Gowen research foundation during the past ten years. People with gu-wine sounding last names did not know where they came from, and there are thousands in the US. The spelling was often done phonetically, and the same person could have his last name spelled in different ways on deeds, war pensions, wills, court appearances, etc., so the spelling of the name means almost nothing in the 1700's.

The spellings of last names began to solidify in the 1800's. The Gowen research foundation just lumped them all under the collect-all name of "Gowen". There are about 30 different last names related to, or pronounced similar to, Gu-wine, or go-ing, or go-wine that appear in the Gowen Research manuscript (and cousins newsletters) which I believe is online for free now.

One "gowen" name is Goyne. My ancestor changed his last name from Goyne to Guynes, and it is believed that all Guynes descend from John Goyne/Guynes and Matilda Hall of Copiah Co. Missippie (prior to the civil war). Much of this family and their descendants have been "charted" in family trees that are on the web. There is also a Goyne genealogist from Louisiana who I believe has charted as much of the Goyne that he can. His research articles are in the Gowen Research foundation newsletters, or in the Gowen research foundation manuscript.

My particular branch of the Guynes family pronounces it Ginz with a long "i", but we may be the only ones who do. I am wondering if, however, another branch of the Guynes family pronounces it Ginz as well, instead of Gu-winz. This might explain the Gines spelling.

A majority of the Guynes moved to Texas after the civil war. Since John Guynes and Matilda Hall had 14 children, many of them sons, and countless grandchildren, there a lot of Guynes in Texas!

I do not recognize the "Gines" names on this message board, but when I have time I will run them by the Guynes and Goyne genealogists and see what I can find. Or you can contact me and I will get you in touch with them.

I would also recommend doing a regular google wordsearch on these names. However, go to advanced search after you do an initial search, and type in the first name as required and then in the "any of these words" section, type in Gines, Gowen, Guynes, Goyne, etc. as the last name. If they are in the Gowen research foundation archives, they should appear. Check out the Guynes family trees wherever you can find them, and I think there is probably a Goyne family tree.

Also, if any ancestors were known to have olive skin and dark hair, or dark or chocolate skin and dark hair, this may be of some help, as some Goins and Going are melungion or mixed race and as far as we know, the Goyne and Guynes are not. People with dark ancestors should start with the Goin and Goins family webpages, and do a search on melungion. There are articles on melungion and other mixed race or olive or dark skinned Goin/Going etc.

Some Goyne and other "Gowen" may be dark, however, because some Goyne/Going in England and Ireland are dark because of dark Spanish blood from invading Spaniards I think it was, during the middle ages. Some "Gowen" are believed to be dark Welch.

Some however, have medittereanean, mid-eastern or African ancestors going back to the very beginning of the colonies in the south. This is documented. You can find all this in the Gowen research foundaiton newsletters or manuscript, but contact me if you are interested.

There were Scots and Irish and English "Gowen" in America too.

If you need some help doing a search on the internet for your ancestors, I may be able to help. Let me know.

When I have time I will look and see if I can find any of these people in the Guynes or Goyne genealogy.

A location where your ancestor came from would be of help too. The Goyne and Guynes pretty much are in MS, LA and TX, while the Goins were more likely to go into Tennesee or Kentucky. However, these families were huge and there are hundreds of families, so location is not conclusive.

I stumbled across your page by accident. I hope I am of some help.

The Gowen Research foundation has over 10,000 pages, so it is quite extensive. Unfortuntately, I think that they stopped doing the manuscript and letters about two years ago, so any information you find at their site may be two years old. I don't know if they are keeping their written (paper) letters or manuscript current. I haven't been to a genealogy library yet. The manuscript is not complete or even completely accurate, but it is a good place to start.

I stumbled across your page by accident. I hope I am of some help.

By the way, there are most likely many origins of "Gowen" sounding names. "Gowen" means "smith" in Scotland and "white" in Ireland, if I recall, and Goyne most likely comes from a medieval settlement on the Seine river which arose around the castle of Sir Hugh De Goy, a Norman nobleman during the Norman Invasions. That castle is still there or near there at Guyon, France. My research shows that it is likely that intermmarriage between Normans and French produced "French" Huguenots (protestants) who fled France/Normandy during the religious persecutions. People with last names of Goyne, Goyen, de Goyne or de Goyen are all over the world. However, it is only a theory that they derived from Norman/Franch protestants in the river Seine over six hundred years ago. (However, it is documented in ancient manuscripts that a town of de goyne did exist on the Seine river in the early history of France)

You may never find out who your ancestors are, but trying to find out is half the fun!

I am having fun with this genealogy. Please let me know if I can help you look.

Janet Guynes


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