Starting Sept. 30, 2014, Genealogy.com will be making a big change. GenForum message boards, Family Tree Maker homepages, and the most popular articles will be preserved in a read-only format, while several other features will no longer be available, including member subscriptions and the Shop.
 
Learn more


Chat | Daily Search | My GenForum | Community Standards | Terms of Service
Jump to Forum
Home: Surnames: Flewelling Family Genealogy Forum

Post FollowupReturn to Message ListingsPrint Message

Re: 1782 to '83, Carleton's Loyalist Index: Adam, John, Phebe, Thomas, Abell, Jason
Posted by: Thomas Murray (ID *****5502) Date: May 26, 2005 at 10:19:21
In Reply to: 1782 to '83, Carleton's Loyalist Index: Adam, John, Phebe, Thomas, Abell, Jason by Rebecca Walch of 738

There are some interesting indications in Rebecca's findings, and some peculiarities. In particular, the mentions of a Jason Fluelling and a Phoebe Fluelling. In Phoebe's case, an assumption might be made that she was Phoebe Worden, wife of Joseph Flewelling; but I do not believe this is the case. Some of my ramblings on these matters follow, and I would be interested in any ideas. There are indications of members of the family after the Revolution, especially around Orange/Ulster Counties, NY; but nothing conclusive. Here, we also have suggestions that members of the family, apart from Robert Flewelling's family in North Castle, Westchester Co., NY; may have remained after the Revolution.

Thomas

Rebecca Walch (Flewelling GenForum # 636, 25MAY2005), came across some other records of interest. A version is in the Loyalist Collection of the University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, and is described as:

MIC-Loyalist FC LMR .D6G8B7 Index
Dorchester, Guy Carleton, 1st Baron, 1724-1808.
Carleton's Loyalist Index: 1747-1783.
3 computer disks, 3.5
The original records are held by the Public Record Office, London, England. The National Archives of Canada and several other institutions hold positive copies of the microfilm edition of the Papers.
PRO CO30/55. NAC/PRO : CO30/55. NAC microfilm reels M-341 - M-370.

The, British Headquarters Papers, commonly referred to as the Carleton or Dorchester Papers, contain records of successive British Commanders-in-Chief in America during the American Revolution. Sir Guy Carleton, the last British Commander-in-Chief, had the difficult and unpleasant duty of supervising the evacuation of all military personnel and civilian Loyalists from New York City.
Carleton entrusted the Papers to his private secretary, Maurice Morgan. He in turn passed them to Robert Symmons, who donated them to the Royal Institute of Great Britain, which called them, The American Manuscripts. A calendar of four volumes was produced, which until the Loyalist Index was compiled, provided the only access to the material. Many years later the Carleton Papers were sold to John D. Rockefeller, reorganized by the New York Public Library, microfilmed, and deposited in the Rockefeller Museum at Colonial Williamsburg. In 1957, President Dwight Eisenhower presented the collection to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth during a visit to Canada and the United States, and the Papers were returned to England to be preserved in the Public Record Office. As there was no index to the Papers, the Sir Guy Carleton Branch (Ottawa) of the United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada, with the financial assistance of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research of Canada and other government agencies and departments, sponsored the King's Names Project, which produced an index to the material that relates to Loyalists. The database contains over 54,568 records.

From this, Rebecca Walch extracted several notes, including:

1. Fluellin, Adam
Destinat3: NS
Origin1: Lloyds Neck
Document: Return of Loyalists
Date: 1782/09
Subject: Loyalists willing to go to Nova Scotia; by himself
Sex: M
Page: 5760(3,7)
ID Code: F415
Reel: M-357

2. Fluellin, John
Destinat3: NS
Origin1: Lloyd's neck
Document: Return of Loyalists
Date: 1782/09
Subject: Loyalists willing to go to Nova Scotia; by himself
Sex: M
Page: 5760(3,7)
ID Code: F417
Reel: M-357

3. Fluellin, Phebe
Residence3: NY
Document: Return of Loyalists
Date: 1783/06/30
See also: Fluelling
Subject: Loyalists recommended for allowance; period 1783/04/01 to 1783/06/30
Sex: F
Page: 8253(3)
ID Code: F420
Reel: M-36

4. Fluellin, Phebe
Residence3: NY
Document: Return of Loyalists
Date: 1783/06/30
See also: Fluelling
Subject: Loyalists recommended for allowance; period 1783/04/01 to 1783/06/30
Sex: F
Page: 8252(2)
ID Code: F420
Reel: M-363

5. Fluellin, Phebe
Residence3: NY
Document: Return of Loyalists
Date: 1783/09/30
See also: Fluelling
Subject: Loyalists recommended for allowance; period 1783/07/01 to 1783/09.30
Sex: F
Page: 9232(1)
ID Code: F420
Reel: M-365

6. Fluellin, Phoebe
Document: Account
Date: 1783/10/24
Subject: Balances remaining in the hands of the paymaster; distressed Loyalist never applied for pay
Sex: F
Place: NY
Page: 9429(1)
ID Code: F420
Reel: M-366

7. Fluellin, Phoebe
Residence3: NY
Document: Return of Loyalists
Date: 1783/03/31
Subject: Recommended allowances for Loyalists come to NY; period 1783/01/01 to 1783/03/31
Sex: F
Place: NY
Page: 7258(3)
ID Code: F420
Reel: M-361

8. Fluellin, Thomas
Destinat3: NS
Origin1: Lloyd's Neck
Document: Return of Loyalists
Date: 1782/09
Subject: Loyalists willing to go to Nova Scotia; with one woman, nine children
Sex: M
Page: 5760(2,6)
ID Code: F421
Reel: M-357

9. Fluelling, Abell
Destinat3: Canada
Document: Return of Loyalists
Date: 1783/05/03
Subject: On a list of persons who wish to go to Canada; had been employed in the Engineer's Dept; with one woman and four children
Sex: M
Page: 7622
ID Code: F414
Reel: M-361

10. Fluelling, Jason
Residence3: NY
Residence1: New York
Document: Return of property
Date: 1783/05
Subject: Tenant, Ferry Street, New York; Vestry Houses in New York
Sex: M
Page: 7842(11)
ID Code: F416
Reel: M-362

11. Fluelling, John
Residence3: NY
Residence1: New York
Document: Return of property
Date: 1783?
Subject: Barrack Houses in New York; 66 Bowery Lane, New York; Refugee
Sex: M
Page: 10349(10)
ID Code: F418
Reel:M-368

12. Fluelling, Phebe
Document: Return of Loyalists
Date: 1782/12/31
See also: Fluellin
Subject: Paylist of Provincial Officers' widows; pay for period 1782/10/01 to 1782/12/31
Occupation: Widow
Sex: F
Page: 6585(2)
ID Code: F420
Reel: M-359

13. Fluelling, Phoebe
Residence3: NY
Residence1: New York
Document: Return of Loyalists
Date: 1782/12/12
Subject: List of persons taking refuge within British lines seeking for relief; from 1782/09/30; widow with children
Occupation: Widow
Place: New York
Page: 6390(1)
ID Code: F420
Reel: M-359

Most relevant to this writing is the indication that Thomas Flewelling and his family lived, in SEP1782, at Lloyd’s Neck, Long Island, NY. Also, that he had with him his wife and nine dependent children. These would be those listed on the manifest of the “Cyrus” as: George, William, Elizabeth, Josh, Sarah, Caleb, Jacob, Thomas and Jane. Adam is (SEP1782) indicated as an adult in these notes. Enos apparently joined them later. This indicates that Those members of Thomas’ family who arrived with him in New Brunswick in 1783 were the same (except for Enos) who were with him in SEP1782; and that, at least for the younger children, we seem to have a fair notion of whom all of them were. It also indicates that, as much as a year before their arrival, they knew their destination, and would have made preparations (i.e., the advance purchase of property) during the subsequent year.
Item 2 of these notes mentions (SEP1782) John ‘Fluelling’, at Lloyd’s Neck. Apparently an adult, possibly un-married (no mention of wife or children), and (by location and time) closely connected to Thomas’ family. The first conclusion that this would be Thomas’ son, John, does not follow. While there is no clear indication of John’s date-of-birth, a reasonable guess would be early 1770’s, with ca. 1772 being plausible. This means that, in 1782, he is unlikely to have been much over 10 years of age. For reasons given above, I assume that ‘Jane’ in the ship’s manifest is John, and there he is indicated as under 10 years of age. These notes do suggest that, if John were older than estimated he may have been about 18-21 years of age in 1782, and that ‘Jane’ actually was a daughter. However, since Adam and Enos clearly accompanied their father’s family aboard ship, it would be expected that John did as well, and would be listed on the ship’s manifest at least separately. Since this was not the case, my first assumptions, that he was one of the younger children, seems far more likely. An assumption that might be made is that ‘John’, in SEP1782, is actually a mis-read ‘Enos’, and that Enos has, by then, rejoined his family.
Item 11, John ‘Fluelling, living at Barrack Houses in New York; 66 Bowery Lane, New York, in 1783?; is more likely Thomas’ brother, John Flewwelling, Jr. It is intriguing to get an exact location of his residence. The term, ‘Barrack Houses’, might suggest that he was, or had been, in some form of military service; but designating him as a ‘Refugee’, makes this speculation remote. As early as AUG1777, John had fled Patriot persecution to New York. John’s wife and children appear to have joined him in New York as early as DEC1779; and it is curious they are not mentioned as being with him in this note.
Item 10, regarding Jason ‘Fluelling’, MAY1783, living as a tenant at Ferry Street, New York; Vestry Houses in New York, is most perplexing. On the basic assumption that all Flewelling’s (and ‘F’ variations) are members of the same family, this Jason could be assumed to be a member of the Newburgh family of John Flewelling, Sr. or of the North Castle family of Robert Flewelling, Sr. I have, however, never heard of a ‘Jason’ as a member of the family. It seems unlikely that a family which was Quaker (as was Robert’s) or influenced by Quakers (as was John’s) would use a classical (therefore too close to heathen gods) nature. The tendency would be (and was) to Biblical names (i.e., Enos, Adam, Sarah, etc.) The questions arise: was Jason a previously unknown member of the family?; is ‘Jason’ a misspelled version of Joseph, Enos, or another name?; was Jason one of the two ‘missing’ sons of Thomas Flewelling?; or was Jason totally unconnected.
A similar problem arises with Phoebe ‘Fluelling’. Items 3-7 indicate that she lived in the city, New York; and that she received financial assistance 1JAN1783-31MAR1783, 1APR1783-30JUN1783, 1JUL1783-30SEP1783 and 24OCT1783. Item 12 indicates that 31DEC1782 she was a widow, on the “Paylist of Provincial Officers’ widows; pay” for 1OCT1782-31DEC1782. This indicates that her deceased husband was an officer in a colonial (i.e., Loyalist) regiment, and that he died before OCT1782. Item 13, dated 12DEC1782, indicates that she had taken refuge within British Lines as early as 30SEP1782, and was a widow with children. The only Phoebe Flewelling I can think of who might have been in those circumstances was Phoebe (Worden) Flewelling, wife of Joseph Flewelling, son of Robert and Maplet Flewelling of North Castle, Westchester Co., NY; however, Joseph was later, in New Brunswick, quite alive, and it is unlikely that he was an officer as during the War of 1812-14, he was only a sergeant in the militia. It is possible that Joseph, at the time (assuming he was in military service, and there is no immediate indication that he was so involved) was though to be dead, but was actually a prisoner; but there has been no suggestion of this. It is also possible that a sergeant, as a petty officer, would be listed as an officer; but again, this seems unlikely. Other suggestions is that Phoebe was the widow of one of the two unknown sons of Thomas Flewelling; or that she was the widow of Thomas’ brother, James Flewelling who had been hung several years before. Joseph and Phoebe appear to have arrived in New Brunswick about 17OCT1783. The Phoebe in these items appears to still be in New York as late as 24OCT1783; although this is not certain. They arrived with four children, of whom only one survived the winter. Joseph also, in his claim, states he arrived in New York 1781, and by APR1781, his wife and four small children joined him. His only ‘crime’ appears to have been an unwillingness to make a declaration on the Patriot side; unlike his brother, Francis, who served at least three months under DeLancey. Thus, the Phoebe in these items appears to be a different person, apart from Phoebe (Worden) Flewelling; but whom she might be is unclear.


Notify Administrator about this message?
Followups:
No followups yet

Post FollowupReturn to Message ListingsPrint Message

http://genforum.genealogy.com/flewelling/messages/638.html
Search this forum:

Search all of GenForum:

Proximity matching
Add this forum to My GenForum Link to GenForum
Add Forum
Home |  Help |  About Us |  Site Index |  Jobs |  PRIVACY |  Affiliate
© 2007 The Generations Network