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Genealogy of Catherine Dachsteder (1781-1856)
Posted by: Charles Julian (ID *****7539) Date: January 10, 2006 at 23:31:25
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GENEALOGY OF CATHERINE DACHSTEDER (1781-1856)
Daughter of Frederick Dachsteder UE, Wife of Captain John DeCou

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I. Paternal

Although the genealogy of Catherine Dachsteder's father Frederick Dachsteder remains to some degree uncertain, it is wholly safe to assume that Frederick was a grandson on his father's side of Georg Dachsteder and Anna Elizabeth {Unknown} in light of his brother John's having been born about 1751 and his brother Henry's having been born previous even to that. The parents of Georg Dachsteder and of his wife Anna Elizabeth back in Germany are unknown.

If the father of Henry, John and Frederick Dachsteder UE was Henry Dachsteder (b. about 1714), then Catherine Dachsteder's paternal grandmother was Catherine Van Antwerp (baptised at Schenectady on January 28, 1716).

Catherine Van Antwerp was the daughter of Daniel Danielse Van Antwerpen (b. about 1670 in Schenectady) and Ariaantje Veeder (baptised November 16, 1695 at Schenectady). Daniel Danielse Van Antwerpen was the son of Daniel Janse Van Antwerpen (b. about 1635 in the Netherlands) and Maria Groot (b. about 1650 in New Amsterdam). Ariaantje Veeder was the daughter of Gerrit Simonse Veeder (b. about 1670 in Schenectady) and Tryntje Otten (b. about 1670 in Albany). Maria Groot was the daughter of Simon Simonse Groot (b. about 1620 in the Netherlands) and Rebecca DuTrieux or Truax (b. about 1625 in New Amsterdam). Gerrit Simonse Veeder was the son of Simon Volkertse Veeder (b. about 1625 in the Netherlands) and an unknown wife at Schenectady. Tryntje (Catherine) Otten was the only daughter of Helmer Otten (b. about 1620 in the Netherlands) and Ariaantje Bradt (b. about 1650 in Albany). Rebecca DuTrieux was the daughter of Philip Du Trieux (b. about 1585 in Belgium) and Susanne DeScheene (b. about 1600 in Belgium). Ariaantje Bradt was the daughter of Arent Andriese Bradt (b. about 1605 in Norway) and Catalyntje De Vos (b. about 1620 in the Netherlands). Catalyntje De Vos was the daughter of Andries De Vos (b. about 1600 in the Netherlands) and Margaretje {Unknown} (b. about 1600 in the Netherlands). [1]

If, however, the father of Henry, John and Frederick Dachsteder UE was a John Dachsteder Senior, then the identity of Catherine Dachsteder's paternal grandmother is not known. Primary evidence for the existence of a John Dachsteder Senior has not been forthcoming, however, and the names 'Henry' (for the eldest of these three sons) and 'Catherine' (for the first daughter born to each of three brothers) point to Henry Dachsteder and Catherine Van Antwerp as the most likely parents. This hypothesis is rendered all the more feasible in light of an absence of surviving baptismal records for any children of this couple, including those known from primary documentation such as military service records (such as e.g. those for Jellis Dockstader). Additionally, contemporary historical references which allude to 'John Dockstader Senior / Junior' may in fact be making reference to the son of Lieutenant John Dockstader UE and an Iroquois woman, a John Dockstader Junior, who it would seem was already grown by the time the Niagara Provisions List was taken in 1786, c.f.

Dacksteder, John Lt . . . Home District, Indian Department, Niagara stamped book, S.P.L.N. 1786.
Docksteder, John Jr . . . Home District, son of John, S.P.L.N. 1786.

Given these findings it would appear that Lieutenant John Dockstader UE was more than likely married, whether formally or informally, by age 18 (1768), and that his eldest son John Junior was consequently old enough to have been enumerated as a head during the 1786 provisions list (i.e. about 18 years of age). The "Lt. John Dacksteder" listed here, the father of John Jr, can only have been John Dockstader of the British Northern Indian Department. [2]

The close link between the family of John, Henry, and Frederick Dachsteder UE and the Six Nations remains unexplained, but First Nations ancestry for the Dachstaders (or at least for the generation of John, Henry and Frederick Dachsteder) seems less key to an explanation at this point than it did previously. There are also numerous historical references to Lieutenant John Dachstader, written by friends and enemies alike, who mention various of the marriages to Six Nations women and his position at the head of the Indian Department, but fail ever to describe him as anything other than a German settler from the Mohawk (cf. e.g. the account of Jacob Schermerhorn).

For all of the above-stated reasons it seems reasonable to conclude that Frederick Dachsteder UE and his brothers Henry and John were sons of Henry Dachsteder Senior and Catherine Van Antwerp, and we can therefore assume with a comfortable degree of certainty that Catherine Dachsteder's paternal grandparents were Henry Dachsteder (b. about 1714) of Stone Arabia and Catherine Van Antwerp (b. 1716) of Schenectady.

[1] More extensive coverage of personas in Catherine Van Antwerp's lineage can be found in Jonathan Pearson's "Contributions for the Genealogies of the Descendants of the First Settlers of the Patent and City of Schenectady, 1662 to 1800." Albany, NY: Munsell's Sons Printers, 1873.

[2] According to his will, Lieutenant (later Captain) John Dockstader's children included John, Adam, Joseph, Wari, Mary and Catherine. The youngest, Mary and Catherine, lived at Dachsteder's Inn on the Grand River; Joseph and Warri lived at Mohawk Castle (presumably Six Nations); Adam lived at Buffalo Creek (New York); the residence of John Dockstader Junior is not given. Of Captain John's various wives, only the name of the last, Sarah Montour, is known.

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II. Maternal

Lines of descent on Catherine Dachsteder's maternal side are presented here in the following order: Van Slyck, Owisto'k, Claase, Hall, Stevens.


1) VAN SLYCK

Generation No. 1

Cornelis Antonisse Van Slyck was born in the early seventeenth century, settled in Schenectady after arriving in the New World in 1634, and died in 1676. [1, 2] A fur trapper by trade, he married Owisto'k, an Iroquois woman from the Mohawk Castle at Canajoharie, in about 1637. [1, 2, 3] For many years Cornelis served as an Indian interpreter and mediary between the Dutch and their Indian allies, and in gratitude for his services he received several landgrants at Katskill from the Dutch colonial authority. [2]

Children of Cornelis Antonisse Van Slyck and Owisto'k are:

i) Marten Mouris Van Slyck. [2]
ii) Jacob Cornelisse Van Slyck. Called Jacques, his Mohawk name was Itsychosaquachka, and he was also sometimes referred to as Aques Cornelyssen Gautsh. [2] He married Grietje Ryckman and was given one half of the Mohawk River Island by the Mohawk elders. [2] He wrote his will on May 8, 1690, and died shortly after, aged 50. [2]
iii) Hillitje Van Slyck, b. about 1644 in Canajoharie, New York, d. February 10, 1707. [2] She married Peter Danielse Van Olinda and often served as interpreter for the Five Nations. [2]
iv) Lea Van Slyck. [2] See Generation No. 2.

Generation No. 2

Lea Van Slyck was born in the mid-seventeenth century, the youngest daughter of Cornelius Van Slyck and Owisto'k. [2] She married first Claas Willemse Coppernoll, who died in 1692. [2] On July 24, 1693 she married Jonathan Stevens of New England. [2]

Children of Claas Willemse Coppernoll and Lea Van Slyck are:

i) William Coppernoll. [2]

Children of Jonathan Stevens and Lea Van Slyck are:

i) Annetje Stevens, b. March 27, 1695 in Schenectady, New York. [4] She married Hendrick Haagedorn in October of 1716 at the Schenectady Reformed Church in New York. [4]
ii) Hendrick Stevens, b. November 10, 1697 in Schenectady, New York. [4] He married Maria Phoenix on May 29, 1730 in Schenectady, New York. [4]
iii) Dina Stevens, b. May 5, 1700 in Schenectady, New York. [4] She married Samuel Haagedorn on February 3, 1717 at the Schenectady Reformed Church in New York. [4]
iv) Arent Stevens, b. July 26, 1702 in Schenectady, New York. [4] More usually called Aaron, he served as an interpreter for Sir William Johnson for over twenty years, and held great influence with the Mohawks. [1] He married Maritje Hall on February 3, 1726 in Schenectady, and following her death married Mary Burrows Griffiths, the widow of Lieutenant Thomas Burrows. [2, 4]

References:

[1] J. Pearson, A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times; Being Contributions Toward a History of the Lower Mohawk Valley. Albany, NY: Munsell's Sons Printers, 1883.
[2] A. A. Yates, Schenectady County, New York: Its History to the Close of the Nineteenth Century.
[3] The Journal of Jaspar Danckaerts, 1679-1680. New York: Charles Scribner, 1913.
[4] Schenectady Reformed Church Records.


2) OWISTO'K

Generation No. 1

The name Owisto'k, typically rendered Ots-toch or Alstock in New Netherland sources, means "Snowbird" in Mohawk, and belonged to the wife of Cornelis Antonisse Van Slyck. [1] Owisto'k lived at the Mohawk Castle at Canajoharie, and Jasper Danckaerts, writing in 1680, shows that she was a fullblood in detailing her familial relations. [2] A mythology has grown up around Owisto'k since the mid nineteenth century, in which it is claimed that she and a beautiful sister named Kenutje were the daughters of Samuel de Champlain's interpreter Jacques Hartell and an "Indian Queen". However there has never been primary historical evidence to support this story, and no mention is made in Jasper Danckaerts interview with Owisto'k's daughter Hillitje either of a French Roman Catholic father or of a sister named Kenutje (which, incidently, is clearly the Dutch name Knutje, and is neither French nor Iroquoian). [2, 3]

Children of Cornelis Antonisse Van Slyck and Owisto'k are:

i) Marten Mouris Van Slyck. [1]
ii) Jacob Cornelisse Van Slyck. Called Jacques, his Mohawk name was Itsychosaquachka and he was also sometimes referred to as Aques Cornelyssen Gautsh. [1] He married Grietje Ryckman and was given one half of the Mohawk River Island by the Mohawk elders. [1] He wrote his will on May 8, 1690, and died shortly afterward, aged 50. [1]
iii) Hillitje Van Slyck, b. about 1644 in Canajoharie, New Netherland, d. February 10, 1707. [1] She married Peter Danielse Van Olinda and often served as interpreter for the Five Nations. [1]
iv) Lea Van Slyck. [1] Lea married first Claas Willemse Coppernoll, who died in 1692. [1] On July 24, 1693 she married Jonathan Stevens. [1]

References:

[1] A. A. Yates, Schenectady County, New York: Its History to the Close of the Nineteenth Century.
[2] The Journal of Jaspar Danckaerts, 1679-1680. New York: Charles Scribner, 1913.
[3] C. B. Biasca, "Jacques Hertel and the Indian Princesses". In The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record Volume 1, 128.2: 91-97.


3) CLAASE

Generation No. 1

Tryntje Claase was born about 1643 in New Netherland to unknown parents and lived at Schenectady. [2, 3] She married first Elias Van Gyseling, a farmer and French interpreter, in the early or mid 1680s. [2, 3] Elias immigrated from Zeeland in 1659 aboard the ship Boente Coe, or "Spotted Cow" and settled at Beverwyck, modern Albany, before purchasing land at Schenectady in 1670. [2, 3] Following the death of Elias, Tryntje next married William Hall on April 13, 1695 at the Schenectady Reformed Church. [2]

Children of Elias Van Gyseling and Tryntje Claase are:

i) Jacomyntje Van Gyseling, baptised April 11, 1686 in Albany. [3]
ii) Myndert Van Gyseling, baptised October 25, 1691, d. September 1771. [3] He married Suster Viele in April of 1721. [3]

Children of William Hall and Tryntje Claase are:

i) Thomas Hall. [2] He married Cornelia Christianse at the Schenectady Reformed Church in the 1720s. [2]
ii) Nicholas Hall. [2] He married Maria Van Antwerpen on July 11, 1724 at the Schenectady Reformed Church. [2]
iii) Maritje Hall. [2] She married Arent Stevens on February 3, 1726 in Schenectady, and died before 1750, when her husband remarried. [2]
iv) William Hall. [2] He married Anna Cowper of New York on April 10, 1730 at the Schenectady Reformed Church. [2]
v) John Hall. [2] He married Gellesje Van Der Bogart on September 30, 1743 at the Schenectady Reformed Church. [2]

References:

[1] J. Pearson, A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times; Being Contributions Toward a History of the Lower Mohawk Valley. Albany, NY: Munsell's Sons Printers, 1883.
[2] Schenectady Reformed Church Records.
[3] C. Reynolds, Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs. New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911.


4) HALL

William Hall, an English soldier stationed at the New Netherland garrison, lived in Schenectady in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. [1, 2, 3] He married Tryntje Claase, widow of Elias Van Gyseling, on April 13, 1695 at the Schenectady Reformed Church. [2] Often refered to as "Willem", he was one of only seven English heads of households when the Schenectady census was taken in June of 1697. [3]

Children of William Hall and Tryntje Claase are:

i) Thomas Hall. [2] He married Cornelia Christianse at the Schenectady Reformed Church in the 1720s. [2]
ii) Nicholas Hall. [2] He married Maria Van Antwerpen on July 11, 1724 at the Schenectady Reformed Church. [2]
iii) Maritje Hall. [2] See Generation No. 2.
iv) William Hall. [2] He married Anna Cowper of New York on April 10, 1730 at the Schenectady Reformed Church. [2]
v) John Hall. [2] He married Gellesje Van Der Bogart on September 30, 1743 at the Schenectady Reformed Church. [2]

Generation No. 2

Maritje Hall was born in the late seventeenth century in Schenectady, New York. [2] She married Arent Stevens on February 3, 1726 in Schenectady, and died before 1750 when her husband remarried. [2]

Children of Arent Stevens and Maritje Hall are:

i) Jonathan Stevens, b. December 1, 1726, d. September 7, 1755. [2]
ii) Catherine Stevens, b. about August 1, 1729, d. Aug 27, 1790. [2]
iii) William Stevens, b. before September 10, 1732 in Schenectady, New York, d. December 7, 1793 in Schenectady, New York. [2] He married Geertruy Van Epps. [2]
iv) Nicholas Stevens, b. November 14, 1734 in Schenectady County, New York, d. September 19, 1788 in Upper Canada. [2] Nicholas married Margerita Mebie and was an interpreter in the British Northern Indian Department during the revolution. [2, 4]
v) John Stevens, baptised July 21, 1736 in Schenectady, New York. [2] He was a loyalist during the war, an Indian Interpreter in John Butler's Rangers, and in the Old United Empire List is listed as having had a wife and four children at the time the Niagara provisions list was taken in 1786. [4]
vi) Jacob Stevens, b. December 13, 1739 in New York. [2]

Additional Information

(From the Schenectady Census of June 16, 1697):

HALL, WILLIAM ( English [ i.e. as opposed to Dutch ] )
Men: 1, Women: 1, Children: 5.

References:

[1] J. Pearson, A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times; Being Contributions Toward a History of the Lower Mohawk Valley. Albany, NY: Munsell's Sons Printers, 1883.
[2] Schenectady Reformed Church Records.
[3] Schenectady Census of June 16, 1697.
[4] Old United Empire Loyalist List.


5) STEVENS

Generation No. 1

Jonathan Stevens was born about 1675 in New England, and was baptized on July 26, 1702 at the Schenectady Reformed Church, aged 27. [1, 2] He arrived in the Dutch community of Schenectady with fellow New Englander and farmer Thomas Smith in 1690. [1] On July 24, 1693 Jonathan married a widowed Mohawk Dutchwoman, Lea Van Slyck, and in addition to being a farmer he served as an Indian interpreter for many years, as did several of his descendants. [1, 2]

Children of Jonathan Stevens and Lea Van Slyck are:

i) Annetje Stevens, b. March 27, 1695 in Schenectady, New York. [2] She married Hendrick Haagedorn in October of 1716 at the Schenectady Reformed Church in New York. [2]
ii) Hendrick Stevens, b. November 10, 1697 in Schenectady, New York. [2] He married Maria Phoenix on May 29, 1730 in Schenectady, New York. [2]
iii) Dina Stevens, b. May 5, 1700 in Schenectady, New York. [2] She married Samuel Haagedorn on February 3, 1717 at the Schenectady Reformed Church in New York. [2]
iv) Arent Stevens, b. July 26, 1702 in Schenectady, New York. [2] See Generation No. 2.

Generation No. 2

Arent Stevens was born July 26, 1702 in Schenectady, New York, and died May 15, 1758. [2, 3] More usually called Aaron, he served as an interpreter for Sir William Johnson for more than twenty years, and held influence with the Mohawks. [2, 3] He married Maritje Hall on February 3, 1726 at the Schenectady Reformed Church, and following her death he married Mary Burrows Griffiths, the widow of Lieutenant Thomas Burrows, on February 4, 1750, also at the Schenectady Reformed Church. [2, 3] When the revolutionary war broke out his family sided with the loyalist cause, and at least two sons served in the British Northern Indian Department. [4]

Children of Arent Stevens and Maritje Hall are:

i) Jonathan Stevens, b. December 1, 1726, d. September 7, 1755. [2]
ii) Catherine Stevens, baptised August 1, 1729, d. Aug 27, 1790. [2]
iii) William Stevens, baptised September 10, 1732 in Schenectady, New York, d. December 7, 1793 in Schenectady, New York. [2] He married Geertruy Van Epps. [2]
iv) Nicholas Stevens, b. November 14, 1734 in Schenectady County, New York, d. September 19, 1788 in Upper Canada. [2] Nicholas married Margerita Mebie and was an interpreter in the British Northern Indian Department during the revolution. [2, 4]
v) John Stevens, baptised July 21, 1736 in New York. [2] See Generation No. 3.
vi) Jacob Stevens, b. December 13, 1739 in New York. [2]

Children of Arent Stevens and Mary Burrows Griffiths are:

i) Maria Stevens, b. October 20, 1750 in Schenectady, New York. [2] She married John Stuart. [2]
ii) Richard Stevens, b. December 10, 1752, d. 1800. [2]
iii) Lea Stevens, b. April 22, 1755. [2]
iv) Anaatje Stevens, b. April 22, 1755. [2] She married Philip Fransikkel. [2]

Generation No. 3

John Stevens was baptised on July 21, 1736 at the Schenectady Reformed Church in Schenectady, New York. [2] He was a loyalist during the war, an Indian Interpreter in John Butler's Rangers, and in the Old United Empire List he was listed as having a wife and four children at the time the Niagara provisions list was taken in 1786. [3] He resided with his wife and children in Stamford in Welland County, Upper Canada following the revolutionary war. [5]

Children of John Stevens and Mary {Unknown} are:

i) Elizabeth Stevens, b. December 14, 1764, d. September 6, 1851 in Upper Canada. [5, 6] See Generation No. 4.
ii) Mary Stevens. She married Jacob Cochenour of Flamborough West, an Indian trader who had migrated north from Pennsylvania in 1786. [5]

Generation No. 4

Elizabeth Stevens was born December 14, 1764, and died September 6, 1851 in Upper Canada. [6] In about 1780 she married Frederick Dachsteder of Butler's Rangers and the British Northern Indian Department, who was killed on maneuvers shortly after the birth of their only daughter, Catherine. [6] Elizabeth later remarried and is buried in Warners Cemetery near St. Davids as "Elizabeth Van Every", wife of William (1765-1832).

Children of Frederick Dachsteder and Elizabeth Stevens are:

i) Catherine Dachsteder, b. January 9, 1781 at Fort Niagara, Upper Canada, d. December 5, 1856 at Decewsville in Haldimand, Upper Canada. [5, 6, 7]

Additional Information:

(From the Schenectady Census of June 16, 1697):

STEVENS, JONATHAN ( English [ i.e. as opposed to Dutch ] )
Men: 1, Women: 1, Children: 3.

(From the Old United Empire Loyalist List):

STEVENS, Aaron – Home District, Issue Commissary, Indian Department, O.I.C. February 4, 1797. [ Grandson of Arent ]
STEVENS, John – Home District, Butler's Rangers or Forrester's Interpreter, Niagara stamped book, wife 4 children, P.L.N. 1786.
STEVENS, Nicholas – Interpreter Indian Department.

References:

[1] J. Pearson, A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times; Being Contributions Toward a History of the Lower Mohawk Valley. Albany, NY: Munsell's Sons Printers, 1883.
[2] Schenectady Reformed Church Records.
[3] J. Pearson, Contributions for the Genealogies of the Descendants of the First Settlers of the Patent and City of Schenectady, from 1662 to 1800. Albany, NY: Munsell's Sons Printers, 1873.
[4] Old United Empire Loyalist List.
[5] W. D. Reid, The Loyalists in Ontario: Sons and Daughters of American Loyalists.
[6] E. Cruikshank, The Story of Butler's Rangers and the Settlement of Niagara. Welland: Tribune Printing House, 1893.
[7] D. Dockstader Rooney, The Dockstader Family: Descendants of Georg Dachstätter, Palatine Emigrant of 1709 Who Settled in the Mohawk Valley of New York. Privately Published.

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III. Catherine Dachsteder

Frederick Dachsteder UE, son of Henry Dachsteder and Catherine Van Antwerp, brother of Hendrick, John, Jellis, and Barbara Dachsteder, was born in the Mohawk Valley, New York, New England, some time in the mid-1700s, and died October 19, 1781 on maneuvers at Otsego Lake, New York, of an unknown illness or affliction, probably dysentery. [1, 2, 3] He joined the British Northern Indian Department in 1776, later transferred to Butler's Rangers, and was promoted to the rank of 2nd lieutenant of the Rangers on February 19, 1781. [4, 5]. He married Elizabeth Stevens, daughter of John and Mary Stevens, at Fort Niagara in about 1780. [1, 6]

Catherine Dachsteder, only daughter of Frederick Dachsteder and Elizabeth Stevens, was born January 9, 1781 at Fort Niagara, Upper Canada, and died December 5, 1856 at Decewsville in Haldimand, Upper Canada. [1] The only child of Frederick Dachsteder, she married John DeCou on August 9, 1798 in Upper Canada. [1]

Children of John DeCou and Catherine Dachsteder are:

i) Elizabeth DeCou, b. 1799 at DeCew Falls in Thorold, Upper Canada, d. 1804. [1]
ii) John DeCou, b. 1801 at DeCew Falls in Thorold, Upper Canada, d. 1886. [1] He married Sarah Ann Cowel on June 28, 1824 in Upper Canada, and later married Maria Larraway. [1]
iii) Catherine DeCou, b. 1803 at DeCew Falls in Thorold, Upper Canada, d. 1881. [1] She married William Young in Upper Canada. [1]
iv) Mary DeCou, b. 1805 at DeCew Falls in Thorold, Upper Canada, d. 1806 at DeCew Falls in Thorold, Upper Canada. [1]
v) Robert DeCou, b. February 5, 1807 at DeCew Falls in Thorold, Upper Canada, d. September 12, 1878. [1] He married Margaret McLellan in Upper Canada on March 3, 1836. [1]
vi) Frederick DeCou, b. 1809 at DeCew Falls in Thorold, Upper Canada, d. 1884 in Decewsville, Haldimand, Upper Canada. [1] He married Elizabeth Lacey on October 30, 1830 in Thorold Township, Haldimand, Upper Canada. [1]
vii) Edmund DeCou, b. 1812 at DeCew Falls in Thorold, Upper Canada, d. April 22, 1892. [1] Edmund, a surveyor, married Sarah Ann Fawell on September 17, 1833, and following her death in 1855 he married Eliza Summers. [1]
viii) Phoebe DeCou, b. 1814 at DeCew Falls in Thorold, Upper Canada, d. 1876. [1] She married Robert Wilde in Upper Canada. [1]
ix) William DeCou, b. 1818 at DeCew Falls in Thorold, Upper Canada. [1] He married Caroline Van Loon. [1]
x) Eva Caroline DeCou, b. November 15, 1820 at DeCew Falls in Thorold, Upper Canada. [1] She married Robert George Hagar. [1]
xi) Eliza Jane DeCou, b. 1823 in Decewsville, Haldimand, Upper Canada. [1] She married Henry Young in Upper Canada. [1]

References:

[1] D. Dockstader Rooney, The Dockstader Family: Descendants of Georg Dachstätter, Palatine Emigrant of 1709 Who Settled in the Mohawk Valley of New York. Privately Published.
[2] Last Will and Testamant of Henry Dachstetter, April 9, 1809.
[3] E. Cruikshank, The Story of Butler's Rangers and the Settlement of Niagara. Welland: Tribune Printing House, 1893.
[4] Great Britain, Public Record Office, War Office, Class 28, Vol IV, p. 15.
[5] Memorial of John Docksteder for Frederick Docksteder, December 7, 1781, Fort Niagara.

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APPENDIX: Previous References to Catherine Dockstader's Ancestry

Excerpts from Ernest Green (1925), "John DeCou, Pioneer". In Ontario Historical Society Papers and Records Volume XXII. Reprinted 1975 in Millwood NY: Kraus Reprint Co. pp. 92-116.

"We must now turn back two years in order to record a most important event in John DeCou's career – his marriage, which took place on August 9, 1798. Although the date is a matter of family record, the place and the name of the clergyman or magistrate officiating at the ceremony are unknown. The lady of John DeCou's choice came of stock typical of the times and the people. Catherine Docksteder was born at Fort Niagara on January 9, 1781, the daughter of Frederick Docksteder, a Loyalist soldier, then newly-appointed to a commission in Colonel John Butler's famous corps of Rangers. Before she was a year old her father lost his life while on service against the enemy, leaving his widow and infant in impoverished circumstances. To the care of an uncle, Lieutenant John Docksteder of the Indian Department, these helpless ones owed protection in the later years of the Revolution, for a pension had been denied them. Where the orphan spent her girlhood years is now unknown. Her mother married again (date unknown) to John Vanevery, also a Loyalist. John DeCou's seventeen-year-old bride, born amid the tragic circumstances of the Revolution, was destined to experience, as a soldier's wife and the mother and protector of a young family in the enemy's hands, all the trials and anxieties that war brings to women." (p. 96)

"Lieutenant (later Captain) John Docksteder married a woman of the Six Nations and was adopted into one of the tribes. His children (cousins to the wife of Captain John DeCou) were, of course, half-breeds. From this circumstance, probably, arose the old tradition of 'Indian blood in the DeCous,' which the closest search has failed to substantiate (at least, so far as Captain John's branch is concerned) and which the best informed among the oldest living members of the family declare to be without any foundation in fact. The tradition has, quite possibly, been strengthened by the physical characteristics of many of the family. Their French ancestry is reflected in the dark skins and hair and brilliant black eyes. 'The DeCou eyes' are well-known, but they are characteristically French and lack the peculiarities of Indian eyes." (p. 114)

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