Posted By:Deborah Atchley
Email:
Subject:Re: PAF data file
Post Date:October 06, 2011 at 11:28:08
Message URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/paf/messages/4670.html
Forum:Personal Ancestral File Forum
Forum URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/paf/

I found the answer to my question. I had NOT copied the wrong file. I had copied the .PAF file from the familysearch/paf directory as I had always done under XP [for YEARS I might add]. The problem/difference is that my new computer is running Windows 7. Windows 7 does NOT write the data back out to the .PAF file in the familysearch directory, but puts it in a VIRTUAL FILE DIRECTORY. Windows logic for this is that it's keeping the originally installed application (and initial data file) in pristine condition the way it was installed. In order to get a good backup of the data (if I want a .PAF and not a .ZIP), I have to do a SAVE AS for the current file in which I'm working. I put it on the desktop and then copy it to my backup drive. The one further step you have to do is to close out that file in PAF, because it will then start working off of the new location where you placed the file. Then REOPEN the .PAF file that was under the familysearch directory. It will then start again using the stupid VIRTUAL DIRECTORY. Supposedly you can go in and disable the UAC and delete the virtual folder and it will force PAF to start using the data file the way we're used to it [in the PAF directory under familysearch], but that will affect the way ALL applications work on your Windows 7 drive and you won't have any RESTORE POINTS for the system. Well, at least I learned something new today!! I'm going to pull my data into RootsMagic (and another more RECENT application) and see if they also update the file in the application directory (or wherever I'm expecting the data to be). Windows 7 is FAST and I've been pleased with it except for this problem. Had I not discovered how it was operating, I would NOT have had a good backup of my data and would have been EXTREMELY unhappy if/when I had a hard drive failure.
Deb