Posted By:Patricia Morrow, Windham Town Historian
Email:
Subject:Catskill Mountains Book Sigining - July 5, 2008
Post Date:June 29, 2008 at 17:17:48
Message URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/ny/delaware/messages/700.html
Forum:Delaware County, NY Genealogy Forum
Forum URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/ny/delaware/

There will be a book signing at the Windham Civic Center on Main Street in Windham, NY this Saturday, July 5, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. A portion of the proceeds from the books sold that day will be donated to the Town of Windham Historical Society.

Author John M. Ham will autograph copies of his latest book, "One Hundred Years on 'Resort Ridge' - The Legendary Mountain Hotels of the Northern Catskills." John, who is best known for his books on local railroads, has published this work under his own Stony Clove & Catskill Mountain Press.

Area historians and collectors John Duda, Peg Ellsworth, Lonnie Gale, Justine L. Hommel, Suzanne C. Hudson, Timothy J. Mallery, Patricia Morrow, Larry Tompkins and Robert Uzzilia, along with many others, have contributed their writing talents and loaned hundreds of old photographs, postcards, maps and vintage advertisements.

This hardcover, 8.5" x 11" tome contains 448 pages and some 700 black and white images pertaining to the early hotels, boarding houses and resorts of Delaware, Greene and Ulster counties.

A book about the hotels of the Northern Catskill Mountains has been a vision of the author for decades. John Ham was born and raised in Hunter, New York--the virtual heart of "Resort Ridge"--and fondly remembers many of the old hotels and boarding houses that used to dot the region's landscape. Today, all that remains of most of them are photographs and postcard images. With the capable assistance of nine of the region's leading historians, he has been able to produce this pictorial documentation of more than four hundred Catskill Mountain hotels in their prime.

From the early 1880s until the 1920s, the Ulster & Delaware and Catskill Mountain railroads transported more than twenty million passengers to and from the region that was home to these fine old summer houses. Return with us now to those glory days and see why the Northern Catskills were called the summer playground of the world during the late Nineteenth and early Twentieth centuries.