Posted By:Bobbie Ledbetter
Email:
Subject:THE EULOGY OF WILLIAM HENRY DABBS
Post Date:May 16, 2005 at 11:24:15
Message URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/nc/richmond/messages/360.html
Forum:Richmond County, NC Genealogy Forum
Forum URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/nc/richmond/

I had been given this eulogy by Ella (Dabbs) Lawrence, who was the daughter of my great-uncle,WALTER SANFORD and LILLIAN ELVIRA (McMULLEN) DABBS. Uncle Walter was the fifth child of WILLIAM HENRY & SUSAN ELLEN (LILES) DABBS.
Uncle Walter was born 23 Nov. 1876 in Anson Co., N.C., and found dead from a heart attack on 27 September 1947 at his home in St. Petersburg, Florida (Pinellas County). He and Aunt Lillian were married 12 May 1905 in Largo, Florida (Pinellas Co.) Aunt Lillian was born in Largo on 19 March 1886 in Largo, the daughter of JOHN JAMES & JOSEPH DRAYTON (RAMAGE) McMULLEN. The McMullen Clan had been one of the original families to come down into this part of Florida, and had a large and prosperous family.
Ella (Dabbs) was born 16 March 1906 in Largo, Florida. She married RAYMOND PETERS LAWRENCE on 5 January 1924 in Largo, Fla., at the Baptist Church. Ray was born 3 October 1903 in Wappinger Falls, New York, the son of WILLIAM PETERS & KITTY (JOHNSON) LAWRENCE.
The Eulogy, by J. Henry Booth of Rose Hill, N.C., as follows, is copied faithfully:

IN MEMORY --- W. H. DABBS

December 24th, 1926, ended a long unassuming and useful life in the going back to God of the spirit of WILLIAM HENRY DABBS, who was a faithful member of Pleasant Grove Baptist Church in Richmond County (N. C,).

This writer was brother Dabbs pastor about three years. During my pastorate at Pleasant Grove he was too feeble to attend church, but frequently I found my way over the rough roads and deep sand to his hospitable home. It delighted the pastor to be with him and his good family in their good home, and on hot summer days it especially delighted me to sit with brother Dabbs under the shade of the mulberry trees in the yard which he humorously called "his porch". To me it was sad parting when I told brother Dabbs goodbye last, for I knew that I was going to leave Rockingham and I did not expect to see him on earth again. While it shocked me when I heard he had passed away I was not suprised for I knew that according to nature he must soon go. Brother Dabbs first saw the light of this old world, October 6, 1841. Till he was nineteen years of age he lived with his parents in Anson County. Then the war between the States existing he Volunteered and joined Company K., 26th N. C. Regiment, July 4th, 1862. He was wounded while in battle in the right Arm. Being incapable for service in the Army for a while because of the Wound, he was allowed to return home on furlough. Before returning to the army to fight for what he believed was a just cause, he was converted and joined Gum Springs Baptist Church. After the war was over and the old South had settled down to business and work, brother Dabbs on the 28th day of February, 1869, married Miss Susan Ellen Liles, a good Christian woman. God blessed this union with sixteen children, nine of them fine boys and four girls and their mother survive him.
May the Triune God strengthen, comfort and keep them through the time of their unavoidable grief and prepare, equip and qualify all of them for enjoying with him the home which Jesus has prepared for them in the Father's House.

Sometime in the year 1888, brother Dabbs with his family moved from Anson County to Richmond County, and moved his church membership from Gum Springs to Pleasant Grove, where it was when the death angel summoned him home. A good man is gone, but he will not be forgotten. He will be greatly missed and gladly remembered. Brother Dabbs loved his Lord, his Bible, his Church, his home, his family and his neighbors. He was quiet of manner, earnest of spirit and devoted to his family and friends.

The funeral service was conducted at the Dabbs home on December 25, 1926 by his pastor, Rev. T. W. Hearn. Interment was made in the Pleasant Grove Cemetery in the presence of a large concourse of people whose sympathies go out to the bereaved family and friends. As a token of their sympathy for the family and their admiration of the nobel character of brother Dabbs, the U. D. C. of Rockingham sent a beautiful wreath of white lilies and white carnations.

J. Henry Booth
Rose Hill, N.C.