Posted By:Pauline Pierce
Email:
Subject:Re: Thomas Dulany
Post Date:October 04, 2008 at 18:40:24
Message URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/nc/onslow/messages/488.html
Forum:Onslow County, NC Genealogy Forum
Forum URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/nc/onslow/

No, Daniel M. Dulaney & Alice Ward Loomis did not have any children. She was the widow of Nathaniel Loomis and never had any children, but was the guardian of my g.g.grandfather Nathaniel Loomis Mitchell. Daniel & Alice were married on 6 June 1826 in Onslow.

This information is taken from a court case tried in MS.

       In error from the superior chancery court; Hon. Stephen Cocke, chancellor.
       This was a suit originally instituted by bill in the superior chancery court by Ward and others, claiming to be the heirs of Mrs. Loomis, to annul a marriage contract which Mrs. loomis had before her death entered into with Daniel M. Dulaney, the defendant
                            *411
in error, and also to obtain possession *of all the property Dulaney obtained by his marriage with Mrs. Loomis in her lifetime. The facts of the case as shown by the record are, that in the state of North Carolina, in June, 1826, Dulaney was married to Mrs. Loomis, who had been a widow of considerable property; and the parties lived together after marriage as man and wife, for about nine months, when they separated, Dulaney making provision for the comfort and support of his wife, until her death, which took place in 1836, and he subsequently removed to the state of Mississippi.

This case shows that Daniel M. Dulaney left the state in 1836, but he actually left in 1832 with most of her property. See Onslow Co, NC, Deed Book 19, page 190.

       Several depositions were taken, which proved defendant's high character for honor and integrity as well in Mississippi as North Carolina. Defendant also read in evidence a bond executed on the 5th of November, 1822, by Alice Loomis, and sureties for the guardianship of Nathaniel L. Mitchell, and also the record of a suit brought in the year 1829, by Dulaney and wife against Eli W. Ward, the father of complainants, on two bonds made by him, payable to her before her marriage to Dulaney. One dated the

This case is 15 single spaced pages and is very interesting.