Posted By:Lanceor duLac
Email:
Subject:Re: Questions in Greek language
Post Date:June 22, 2005 at 22:09:52
Message URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/cyprus/messages/225.html
Forum:Cyprus Genealogy Forum
Forum URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/cyprus/

While it is true that the last generation of the pagan priests of the Lake became Christians, Sir Launcelot and Sir Galahad were hardly the last generation of their dynasty!
Lohengrin the Swan-Knight, a real historical character from whom many noble European families trace their lineages, was the direct descendant and heir of Sir Launcelot's bloodline. He actually became the duke of Bouillon by defeating the enemy of its duchess and marrying her, and was the father of Sainte Ide or Saint Ida (d. 1113). Eustache II Count of Boulogne, as St.Ide's husband, was priveleged to carry the papal gonfanon at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 because Pope Alexander II had given his blessing to Duke William to take the kingdom of England. William's expedition had papal blessing and approval and was generally regarded by the rest of Western Europe as having the nature of a crusade. This gonfanon bore a gold cross upon a silver field, the papal colours. It is seen poorly represented in the Bayeux Tapestry as a field white with a yellow cross couped at the ends which splay out very slightly and four blue roundels between the arms of the cross with a yellow bordure around the edge of the gonfanon. Two of the tails are green and one yellow. Thirty-three years later two sons of St.Ide and Eustache II, Godfroi and Baudouin Bouillon, were given this gonfanon to carry on the First Crusade in 1099 and when in 1100 the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem was established it became the royal arms of the house of Bouillon.
It should be noted that the male line of Launcelot, of the Lake, only ended as recently as Lohengrin but that the descent continued matrilineally through Lohengrin's daughter St.Ide.
It should also be noted that the senior representation of this line is not even through the kings of Jerusalem. The eldest son of St.Ide, senior to Godfroi and Baudouin, was Eustache III. This Count of Boulogne married Marie of Scotland, and their daughter Mathilde married Stephen of England, the only English monarch of the House of Blois before Henry fitzEmpress drove him into exile.
This line has always been Gallic and so is the line of the kingdom of England. St.Ide lived until 1113, thirteen years after the kingdom of Jerusalem was established. Five years after her death her third son, King Baudouin I died without an heir, in 1118. A grandson of St.Ide, Eustache LeBourg, was elected to succeed his uncle and took the throne-name Baldwin II. This is the line that continued until the fall of Jerusalem in 1187.