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Reynolds Families of Patrick County, VA
Posted by: Rod Stucker, Professional Genealogist Date: August 28, 2001 at 10:47:28
  of 43073

       Research Report (99038-Reynolds)
       24 Jul 2001

       Hamilton Reynolds, was born on 8 Jun 1810, possibly in Buncombe County, North Carolina. He was the son of Joseph Reynolds, Sr., and Sarah Perkins who resided in Floyd County, Kentucky; Buncombe County, North Carolina; and Patrick County, Virginia. According to an estate deed of Patrick County, Virginia, Joseph Reynolds, Sr., appears to have died in Floyd County, Kentucky prior to 1834. His widow, Sarah Perkins, died in Floyd County, Kentucky prior to1847 when her estate was probated.

       Joseph Reynolds, Sr., was born about 1760 in Virginia, the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Mary. Joseph Reynolds, Sr., married Sarah Perkins about 1784 in Virginia. Sarah Perkins was born on 9 Aug 1763 in Goochland County, Virginia. She was christened on 12 Sep 1763 at St. James Church in Northam Parish, Goochland County, Virginia. She was the daughter of William Perkins, Sr., and Susannah Holland. Based on the available records and subject to further research and verification, we have compiled the following for Joseph Reynolds, Sr., and his family:

       Joseph Reynolds, Sr., born about 1760 in Virginia, resided in Henry and Patrick Counties of Virginia. He died about 1832, in Floyd County, Kentucky.

       Married: Sarah Perkins about 1784, probably in Virginia. Sarah was the daughter of William Perkins, Sr. and Susannah Holland.

              Children:

              1) Caty Reynolds, born about 1786 in Henry County, Virginia; married Shadrack Hall on 27 Sep 1804 in Patrick County, Virginia

              2) James Reynolds, born about 1791 in Patrick County, Virginia; married Milly McAlexander in 1819 in Montgomery County, Virginia. Resided in Patrick County, Virginia and had a son William Reynolds who represented his father in Joseph Reynold’s estate in Floyd County, Kentucky in 1832

              3) Milley Reynolds, born about 1793 in Patrick County, Virginia; married Jeremiah Moles, Jr. on 10 Jan 1809 in Patrick County, Virginia

              4) William Reynolds, born about 1795 in Patrick County, Virginia; married Nancy Burnett on 16 Mar 1820 in Patrick County, Virginia

              5) Polly Reynolds, born about 1797 in Patrick County, Virginia; married Isham Slone on 26 Oct 1815 in Floyd County, Kentucky

              6) Betsy Reynolds, born about 1803 in Patrick County, Virginia; married Lawrence Stambaugh on 26 Mar 1821 in Floyd County, Kentucky

              7) Joseph Reynolds, Jr., born about 1805 in Rockbridge County?, Virginia; married Queentina Amburgey on 12 Dec 1833 in Perry County, Kentucky

              8) Hamilton Reynolds, born 8 Jun 1810 in North Carolina; married Malinda Justice on 17 Feb 1834 in Floyd County, Kentucky

              9) Sarah Reynolds, born about 1814 in Floyd County, Kentucky; married James Hubbard on 24 Apr 1832 in Floyd County, Kentucky

              10) Elizabeth Reynolds, born about 1818 in Floyd County, Kentucky; married William Harris, Jr., on 17 Mar 1836 in Floyd County, Kentucky

       Richard Reynolds, Sr., was born about 1727 in Virginia. He was a very wealthy land owner who purchased thousands of acres of land and obtained several Virginia land Patents in the south west Virginia Counties of Botetourt, Montgomery, Henry and Patrick, as well as additional land in North Carolina; Madison, Hardin, Lincoln and Jefferson Counties of Kentucky. He was close friends of William Perkins, Sr., the father-in-law to his son Joseph Reynolds, Sr. Richard Reynolds, Sr., and William Perkins, Sr., were among the early settlers of the area of Pittsylvania and Henry Counties which became Patrick County, Virginia, in 1791. Richard Reynolds, Sr., made out his will in 1813 and it was proved on 11Mar 1816 in Jefferson County, Kentucky. From the will of Richard Reynolds, Sr., as well as marriages and other records of Virginia and Kentucky which are listed in this report, we have compiled the following for Richard Reynolds, III, and his family:

       Richard Reynolds, Sr., born about 1727 in Virginia. Resided in Pittsylvania, Henry and Patrick Counties of Virginia. Richard Reynolds, Sr., and William Perkins, Sr., were among the early settlers of the area of Pittsylvania and Henry Counties which became Patrick County, Virginia, in 1791. Richard Reynolds, Sr., made out his will in 1813 and it was proved on 11Mar 1816 in Jefferson County, Kentucky.

       Married: Mary, maiden name unknown, about 1701, probably in Virginia

              Children:

              1) Joseph Reynolds, Sr., born about 1760 in Virginia and resided in Henry and Patrick Counties of Virginia. He died about 1832, in Floyd County, Kentucky. He married Sarah Perkins about 1784 in Virginia. Sarah was the daughter of William Perkins, Sr. and Susannah Holland.

              2) Samuel Reynolds, born about 1762 in Virginia; married Sarah Kuykendall on 1 Jun 1804 in Jefferson County, Kentucky

              3) George Reynolds, born about 1764 in Virginia; married Morning Wade on 14 Sep 1791 in Patrick County, Virginia where they resided

              4) Edward Reynolds, born about 1766 in Virginia

              5) Charles Reynolds, born about 1768 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia; married Margaret Kuykendall on 1 Jun 1811 in Jefferson County, Kentucky

              6) Lourina Reynolds, born about 1770 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia; married a Mr. Perkins

              7) Eleanor Reynolds, born about 1772 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia

              8) Mary Reynolds, born about 1774 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia; ; married John Noor

              9) Sally Reynolds, born about 1776 in Henry County, Virginia; married Joel Goodman

              10) Betsey Reynolds, born about 1778 in Henry County, Virginia; married a Mr. Peck

              11) Richard Reynolds, IV, born about 1780 in Henry County, Virginia

              12) Cartherine Reynolds, born about 1782 in Henry County, Virginia

       Sarah Perkin’s father, William Perkins, Sr. also owned land in Surry County, North Carolina and possibly in Kentucky where some of his sons lived. In addition to Joseph, other sons and daughters of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and William Perkins, Sr., appear to have intermarried according to estate records for Richard Reynolds, Sr., which are recorded in the Chancery Court records of Jefferson County, Kentucky. We have connected into a rather extensive Perkins genealogy which extends your Perkins and related line back several additional generations in Colonial Virginia. Subject to further research and verification during our next research session, we are enclosing pedigree and family group charts for your Perkins genealogy.

       We have exhausted most practical sources of information in Patrick and Henry Counties of Virginia, including Pittsylvania County from which Henry County was created in 1776. There were several early Reynolds families that settled in Henry County including three named Richard Reynolds. However, your Richard Reynolds was the most influential and wealthy of these Reynolds families. He along with John Reynolds, Richard Spencer Reynolds, Spencer Reynolds, Nathaniel Reynolds, Sr., and Reynolds brothers Bartlett Reynolds, Moses Reynolds, Jesse Reynolds, David Reynolds, Archelaus Reynolds, Bartimus Reynolds, Reuben Reynolds and Foster Millington [Millenton] Reynolds, who appear to have been sons of the widow Susannah Reynolds who were among the first settlers of Henry County, Virginia. There was also a Hugh Reynolds who obtained a survey for a land patent in 1768 in Pittsylvania who appears related to the above Reynolds families.

       Spencer Reynolds and his father, Richard Spencer Reynolds as he is listed in various sources, appear to have been named after the Spencer family who are also listed among the early settlers of Henry County, Virginia. Name and residence patterns of these early families and the Reynolds families of Henry and Patrick Counties suggests that your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, Sr., descends from the Richard Reynolds families of Isle of Wight, Surry and Essex Counties of Virginia.

       Subject to further research, name and residence patterns indicate that your Richard Reynolds, Sr., who was born about 1727 in Virginia, was the son of Richard Reynolds, II, and his wife, Mary Anderson. According to The Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster, by Col. Steve F. Tillman, Richard Reynolds, II, known as Richard Reynolds, Jr., resided in Surry County, Virginia. However, we have been unable to verify that information. Isle of Wight County records indicate that Richard Reynolds, Jr. was born about 1668, in Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia. He appears to have married 1) Elizabeth Williams about 1688, daughter of George Williams. Richard Reynolds, Jr., appears to have left Isle of Wight County after the 1704 Quit Rent, which is the last record we have located for him in Isle of Wight County. Name and residence patterns indicate that he married secondly to 2) Mary Anderson about 1701, from whom your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, III and his siblings appear to descend. Though not documented, The Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster, by Col. Steve F. Tillman lists a group of children for Richard Reynolds and Mary Anderson. This information appears to have been obtained from family records obtained by Tillman which have since been destroyed. Though your ancestor Richard Reynolds, Sr., born about 1727, was not originally listed among these children by Tillman, name and residence patterns indicate that he was born during the right time period to have been a son of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and Mary Anderson. Subject to further research, Hugh Reynolds was also of the right age to have been a member of this family as was the father of Moses Reynolds and his siblings of Pittsylvania, Henry and Patrick Counties of Virginia.

       Richard Reynolds, Jr., born about 1668, Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe. Elizabeth was the daughter of Richard Sharpe, Sr., of Isle of Wight County, Virginia

       Married: 1) about 1683, Elizabeth Williams, daughter of George Williams of Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia; 2) about 1701, Mary Anderson

              Children:

              1) William Reynolds, born about 1702

              2) Thomas Reynolds, born about 1706

              3) George Reynolds, born about 1708

              4) James Reynolds, born about 1715

              5) Barbara Reynolds, born about 1722

              6) John Reynolds, born 10 Feb 1725

              7) Richard Reynolds, III, born about 1727, married a woman named Mary and resided in Henry & Patrick Counties of Virginia. He was a very wealthy land owner who purchased thousands of acres of land and obtained several Virginia land patents in the south west Virginia Counties of Botetourt, Montgomery, Henry and Patrick, as well as additional land in North Carolina; Madison, Hardin, Lincoln and Jefferson Counties of Kentucky. He was close friends of William Perkins, Sr., the father-in-law to his son Joseph Reynolds, Sr. Richard Reynolds, Sr., and William Perkins, Sr., were among the early settlers of that area of Pittsylvania and Henry Counties which became Patrick County, Virginia, in 1791. Richard Reynolds, Sr., made out his will in 1813 and it was proved on 11Mar 1816 in Jefferson County, Kentucky.

              8) ? Reynolds, born about 1729

              9) Hugh Reynolds, born about 1731

       Richard Reynolds, II, was the son of Richard Reynolds, I who was born about 1642 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia. He was known as Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe, the daughter of Richard Sharpe, Sr., of Isle of Wight County, Virginia. Isle of Wight County, Virginia records list the following for the family of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Elizabeth Sharpe:

       27 Jul 1711, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 536; Will of Richard Reynolds, of Newport Parish, lists: Legatees - Wife Elizabeth; son Richard; son Sharpe; son Christopher the land on which Richard Jackson lives; grandson ------Reynolds; what is due Elizabeth Lewis one of the daughters of Richard Lewis to be paid. Executors my wife and sons. Recorded 26 May 1712. Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Giles Driver and Jane Benn (Doc.#132q-132r)

       26 May 1712, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, 1661-1719, p. 536-8; Will Proved for Richard Reynolds, of Newport Parish (Doc.#143c)

       Name and residence patterns in Isle of Wight County, Virginia reveal that these last two probate records, which list the dates that the will of Richard Reynolds’ was recorded and proved, were for Richard Reynolds, Sr., (the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant) who married Elizabeth Sharpe. Name and residence patterns contained in the above will confirm that the Richard Reynolds, Sr., who died testate in 1712 in Newport Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, who named a son Sharpe in his will, is the same Richard Reynolds, Sr., who was a first cousin of Richard Sharpe and who married Elizabeth Sharpe! The following records support the marriage between Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe: 1699, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 422; Richard Reynolds married a woman with the maiden name of Sharpe, daughter of Richard Sharpe (Doc.#138f). This is the first reference for the marriage of Richard Reynolds to a woman named Sharpe. Many family genealogists have interpreted this reference to refer to the Elizabeth who married Richard Reynolds, Sr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., of Newport Parish. According to the will of this Richard Reynolds, who resided in Newport Parish, he had a wife named Elizabeth and sons named Christopher, Richard and Sharpe, etc. Hence, name and residence patterns appear to confirm that the Richard Reynolds, Sr., who resided in Newport Parish was married to Elizabeth Sharpe. Hence, according to the above reference, Richard Reynolds, Sr., married Elizabeth Sharpe prior to 1699, probably about 1667 according to the estimated dates of their births and their children. According to the will of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and the information listed above, we have calculated the births for his family as follows:

       Richard Reynolds, Sr., born about 1642, Cypress Creek, Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant

       Married: about 1667, Cypress Creek, Lower Parish, Isle Of Wight County, Virginia; Elizabeth Sharpe, born about 1647, Lower parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, daughter of Richard Sharpe, Sr.

              Children:

              1) Richard Reynolds, Jr., born about 1668, Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, appears to have married 1) Elizabeth Williams about 1695, daughter of George Williams. Richard Reynolds, Jr. appears to have left Isle of Wight County after the 1704 Quit Rent, which is the last record we have located for him in Isle of Wight County. Name and residence patterns indicate that he married secondly to 2) Mary Anderson from whom your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, III descends. Though not documented, The Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster, by Col. Steve F. Tillman, lists a group of children for Richard Reynolds and Mary Anderson as listed above in our report.

              2) Elizabeth Reynolds, born about 1670, Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, married married John Nevill about 1688

              3) Sharpe Reynolds, born about 1672, Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia

              4) Christopher Reynolds, born about 1674, Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia

              5) John Reynolds, born about 1676, Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia

       Notice that Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Elizabeth Sharpe, named one of their sons Sharpe Reynolds after Elizabeth’s maiden name. This was a popular naming pattern for this time period. Notice also that this is the same Richard Reynolds, Sr., who was appointed the guardian for Elizabeth Lewis, the daughter of Richard Lewis as listed above: 13 Dec 1691, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 314; Richard Reynolds and his wife Elizabeth appointed guardians of Richard Lewis’ daughter named Elizabeth. Overseers were Thomas Joyner, Jr., and Richard Reynolds, Jr. Richard Lewis’ will was recorded 26 Mar 1692. Richard Lewis resided in the Lower Parish (Doc.#132h).

       Previous records which are listed above, particularly the will of Richard Sharpe, corresponds as follows: 15 Jan 1699, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 422; Richard Sharpe’s will lists: Legatees - Anne Harris in case she recovers from this present sickness; cousin Richard the son of my cousin Richard Reynolds the full term of my lease from Col. Arthur Smith; Christopher and Sharpe Reynolds, the sons of my cousin Richard Reynolds. Executor, Richard Reynolds. Recorded 9 Apr 1700. Witnesses were Henry Applewhaite, John Hood and John Watson (Doc.#132n). This will of Richard Sharpe appears to list second cousins named Richard Reynolds, Jr., Christopher and Sharpe Reynolds, the sons of his first cousin, Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe. This relationship between Richard Sharpe and Richard Reynolds, Sr., along with the previous reference above which lists that Richard Reynolds, Sr., married a woman named Sharpe, supports the above documentation for listing Elizabeth Sharpe as the wife of this Richard Reynolds, Sr. This Richard Reynolds, Sr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., died testate in 1711 and his will, which is listed below in this chronology, lists the following: 27 Jul 1711, Richard Reynolds, of Newport Parish: Legatees - Wife Elizabeth; son Richard; son Sharpe; son Christopher the land on which Richard Jackson lives; grandson ----Reynolds; what is due Elizabeth Lewis one of the daughters of Richard Lewis to be paid. Executors my wife and sons. Recorded 26 May 1712. Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Giles Driver and Jane Benn (Doc.#132r). Hence, the name and residence patterns listed in the will of Richard Reynolds, Sr., of Newport Parish supports the information that he was married to Elizabeth Sharpe. Note that Richard and Elizabeth named a son Sharpe, after Elizabeth’s maiden name. This is a popular naming pattern, i.e. naming a son after the wife’s maiden name. Notice that Richard Sharpe’s will lists: Legatees... cousin [son of first cousin] Richard the son of my cousin Richard Reynolds [Sr.] the full term of my lease from Col. Arthur Smith; Christopher and Sharpe Reynolds, the sons of my cousin Richard Reynolds [Sr.]. Executor, Richard Reynolds. Recorded 9 Apr 1700. Witnesses were Henry Applewhaite, John Hood and John Watson. From this information, it is clear that Richard Sharpe was a first cousin of Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe. However, Richard Sharpe appears to have actually been a cousin of Elizabeth Sharpe who married Richard Reynolds, Sr. Hence, the reference to Richard Reynolds, Sr., as his first cousin appears to be by marriage, i.e. as the result of Richard Reynold’s marriage to Richard Sharpe’s cousin, Elizabeth Sharpe. As confirmed below, Richard Sharpe appointed Richard Reynolds, Jr., as his executor: 9 Apr 1700, Richard Reynolds, Jr., appointed executor of the estate for Richard Sharpe, deceased, according to the will of Richard Sharpe. Probate entry recorded 18 Dec 1700 (Doc.#132z).       As emphasized throughout this report, name and residence patterns are important criteria for establishing relationships in genealogical records. It is important to note that the witness named Henry Applewaite in Richard Sharpe’s will also appears as a witness to a deed as follows; 9 Feb 1708, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.137; Christopher Reynolds, John Browne and Thomas Calecott witnessed a deed between Thomas Sawyer of Chuckatuck Parish in Nansemond County to John Frizell, cooper of Newport Parish in Isle of Wight County, 80 acres in Newport Parish bounded by John Duke, James Bragg and Capt. Henry Applewhaite, recorded 9 Feb 1708 (Doc.#135ah). This Newport Parish deed, which occurred in 1708 between Christopher Reynolds and others to John Frizell, confirms that Capt. Henry Applewhaite was a neighbor and friend of the Sharpe and Reynolds families of Newport Parish. This confirms that Richard Sharpe and Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married his cousin Elizabeth Sharpe, resided in Newport Parish. According to deeds, probate and vestry records, several members of the Applewhaite family are listed frequently in these records along with Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his brother, Richard Reynolds, Sr., and their families of Newport Parish in Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

       In addition to the family of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe, we also located the following for Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant who was the father of Richard Reynolds, Sr.:

       Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant was born in England. In 1622 he emigrated to Virginia as an indentured servant of Mr. Edward Bennett arriving aboard the John & Francis and settled in Warrosquyoake Bay, Warrosquyoake County, Virginia (Doc.#131w). On 16 Feb 1623 Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was among thirty three inhabitants listed in a census for Warrascoyack [Warrosquyoake County], Virginia (Doc.#131v).

       16 Feb 1623, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 37, Chr. Reinholds [Christopher Reynolds] was among 33 inhabitants listed in a census for Warrascoyack [Warrosquyoake County], Virginia (Doc.#131v):

       John Batt, Henry Pinffe, Wassell Weblin, Anthony Read, Frances Woodson, Henry Phillips, Peter Collins, Chr. Reinold’s, Edward Mabin, John Maldman, Thomas Collins, George Rushmore, Thomas Spencer, George Clarke, Rich. Bartlett, Frances Anthony, Franse, Margrett, negroes; John Bennett, Nicholas Skinner, John Atkins, John Pollentin, Margrett Pollentin, Mary, a maid, Henry Woodward, Thomas Sawyer, Thomas, a boye. Total 33, including 4 negroes (Doc.#131v,169a)
       
       Notice that there is a boy named Thomas listed in this 1623 census. However, Christopher Reynolds, Sr.,who is listed as “Chr. Reinold ” (similar to the 1635 listing on the Speedwell) in this census, is not listed as a boy even though he would have been only thirteen years old. This is based on the information that he was born in 1610 as indicated by his age in the passenger ship list for the Speedwell which arrived in Virginia in 1635. However, the term “boye” as it used above appears to refer to a Negro boy named Thomas. Notice that no surname was listed for Thomas. This corresponds with the listing of the other three Negroes named Franse, Margrett and Mary the maid, none of whom are listed with surnames. Since Christopher Reynolds was not a Negro, he was not listed as a “boy” even though he was only twelve years old according to the Speedwell. The fact that this census lists all inhabitants indicates that it was not concerned with either the age or the color of the inhabitants, i.e. all inhabitants were listed regardless of age or race.

       A few years later on 25 Feb 1625, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was listed in a muster of the inhabitants of Wariscoyack [Warrosquyoake County], Virginia, who were servants of Mr. Edward Bennett (Doc.#131v):

                     1625 - Total inhabitants of Virginia - 1,095
              Muster of the Inhabitants at Wariscoyack, Virginia, Taken 7 Feb 1625
       
              The Muster of Mr. Edward Bennett’s Servants.
              Henry Pinke came in the London Marchannt 1619, John Bate in the Addam 1621, Peter Collins in the Addam 1621, Wassell Webbling, Antonio, a negro, in the James 1621, Christopher Reynold’s, Luke Chappman, Edward Maybank, in the John & Francis 1622, John Attkins, William Denum, Francis Banks, in the Guifte 1623, Mary, a negro woman, in the Margrett & John 1622 (Doc.#162a)

       This muster reveals that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., began residing in Warrosquyoake County within a year after arriving in the Colony of Virginia. Since he was a servant or “employee” of Mr. Edward Bennett, who owned a considerably large amount of land in Warrosquyoake County, it appears he originally settled in the Warrosquyoake Bay settlement which was located on the Pagan River. Christopher Reynolds, Sr., or his family may have known Edward Bennett and resided in the same general area of England prior to emigrating to Virginia as one of Mr. Bennett’s servants. These records reveal that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., began residing in Warrosquyoake County in 1622 after arriving in the Colony of Virginia. Further research into the origins of Edward Bennett and his servants may allow us to confirm Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s place of origin in England.

       The fact that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was listed in the 1625 military muster for Warrosquyoake reveals that he survived the prior Indian attacks on the Colonial Virginia settlements and was an active member of the Colonial Virginia militia in Warrosquyoake.

       13 Mar 1625/6, Minutes of the Council and General Court of Virginia, 2nd Edition, published in 1979, Richmond, Edited by H.R. McIlwaine; Before the General Court at Jamestown, Virginia: "Christopher Reighnalls, sworne and examined sayeth that he did see and read Peter Collins indenture and that he was bound to serve Mr. Bennett four years."

       Notice the spelling of Christopher’s name in this deposition: "Christopher Reighnalls, sworne and examined sayeth that he did see and read Peter Collins indenture and that he was bound to serve Mr. Bennett four years." Notice that it is an unusual spelling for the Reynolds surname which no doubt many previous researchers had not discovered.

       The above deposition indicates that at least some, possibly all of the servants of Edward Bennett’s tobacco plantation at Warrosquyoake were indentured to him for a period of about four years in order to pay for their passage to Virginia and provide employment once they arrived. No doubt Christopher Reynolds was also an indentured servant. According to the 1625 muster listed above which lists: “Peter Collins in the Addam 1621," Peter Collins immigrated to Virginia as an indentured servant of Edward Bennett in 1621. Hence, Peter Collins would have fulfilled his indenture agreement in 1625, the same year that Christopher Reynolds provided his deposition. This indicates that Christopher Reynolds’s deposition was in favor of Peter Collins who appears to have recently completed his indentured service to Mr. Edward Bennett.

       Though some Reynolds family genealogists have interpreted the fact that Christopher Reynolds “...did see and read Peter Collins indentures...” to indicate that he was the secretary to Mr. Bennett, Christopher Reynolds merely provided his testimony in this deposition. As indicated above, this testimony appears to have been against Mr. Edward Bennett and in favor of Peter Collins who appears to have recently completed his indentured service to Mr. Edward Bennett. There is no reference to Christopher as having been the secretary to Mr. Bennett. There is also no reference to Christopher Reynolds traveling to England with Mr. Bennett as his secretary to secure a monopoly in the tobacco trade as suggested by some Reynolds family genealogists.

       It is interesting to note that according to the above deposition, Christopher Reynolds appears to have been able to read. This indicates that he received some education. If this was the same Christopher Reynolds who was born in 1611, i.e. age twenty four when he transported nine servants to Virginia aboard the Speedwell in 1635, then he would have been age fourteen or fifteen when he provided this deposition. Provided that Christopher Reynolds was also bound to Edward Bennett for four years of indentured service, from the date of his original arrival in Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant would have fulfilled his indentured service sometime in 1626/7. However, it is possible that he was obligated for a period longer than four years.

       On 21 Dec 1634, Christopher Reynolds of Warwickqueak [Warrosquyoake County] obtained a 100 acre patent from Robert Sabine of Warrisquick Bay, [Warrosquyoake County] (Doc.#131ac,135b)

       This is the first record of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant obtaining land in Virginia. From the year of Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s arrival in Virginia in 1622, it was twelve years later in 1634 before he purchased land. This information and the information above appears to confirm that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, was an indentured servant of Mr. Edward Bennett. This also appears to support the theory that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., originally immigrated to Colonial Virginia as an eleven year old child, who was possibly an orphan, in 1622 aboard the John & Francis. Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant appears to have sold this land five years later: 1 May 1639, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. A, p.103; Christopher Reynolds sold 100 acre patent in Warrisquack [Warwicke Squeake or Warrosquyoake] Bay to Peter Hull [Hill], Witnesses: John Spackman and John Oliver (Doc.#131ac, 135b). In a patent issued to John Mungoe (Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 7, p. 417), dated 21 Oct 1684, it lists that this 100 hundred acres which Robert Sabine originally sold to Christopher Reynolds on 21 Dec 1634, was located on the south side of Hutchinson’s Creek: 21 Oct 1684, Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 4, p. 417; Christopher Reynolds of Isle of Wight County, Virginia listed as having bought land from Robert Sabine on 21 Dec 1634, 100 acres located on the south side of Hutchison’s Creek, which Christopher Reynolds then sold to Peter Hill/Hull on 1 May 1639.

       On 28 May 1635, Christopher Reynolds, Sr. appears to have been listed as a passenger aboard the ship Speedwell as follows:

       “Theis under-written names are to be transported to Virginia imbarqued in the Speedwell of London JO: Chappell Mr: being examined by the Minister of Gravesend of their conformitie to the orders & discipline of the Church of England & have taken the oath of Allegeance.

       [Chri: Reinolds group]
       Kathryn Richard’s...19
       Marie Sedgwick.....20
       Elizabeth Biggs......10
       Dorothie Wyncott..40
       Ann Wyncott..........16
       Phillipp Biggs.........6 mo.
       Elizabeth Pew.........20
       Francis Langworth..25
       Chri: Reinholds.......24
       Abram Poore..........20
       Elizabeth Tuttell.....25
       (Doc.#161a)

       It is interesting to note that the majority of these passengers were woman, most of them in their early twenties. The only two males are listed as Christopher Reinholds [Reynolds] and a six month old child named Phillipp Biggs. Phillip may have been the younger brother of Elizabeth Biggs, age ten, both of whom appear to have been orphans. As indicated throughout this report, the Biggs families resided in the same area as the Reynolds families in Isle of Wight County. The majority of these passengers aboard the Speedwell appear to have been brought to Virginia in order to provide wives for the men of the Warrosquyoake Bay settlement. Notice that three of these females were named Elizabeth, i.e. the same name listed as the wife of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., in his will dated 1654. Hence, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., may have married one of these female passengers named Elizabeth.

       From the passenger list of the Speedwell which arrived in Virginia in 1635, The Reynolds Family Association and others have calculated Christopher Reynolds, Sr., as having been born in 1611 in Gravesend, County Kent, England. This is based on the listing of “Chri: Reinhold - 24" indicating that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was age twenty four in 1635. If Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was the same individual as the Chris. Reinhold, age 24, who arrived aboard the Speedwell in 1635, he would have been only eleven years old when he arrived in Colonial Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622. Though this seems unlikely since Christopher Reynolds, Sr., is listed the following year in the 1623 census as one of the thirty three original residents of Warrosquyoake County, notice that the 1623 census, which is listed above, lists children as well as adults. Though censuses usually refer to tithables, i.e. white persons above age twenty one years of age, that was not the case in these early colonial Isle of Wight censuses and muster rolls. Hence, it is possible that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who arrived in Colonial Virginia in 1622 aboard the John & Francis, is the same person as “Chri: Reinhold,” age 24, who arrived in Virginia in 1635 aboard the Speedwell with nine other persons. Notice that the time period in which “Chri: Reinhold” and his group of nine persons arrived in Virginia in 1635 aboard the Speedwell corresponds with the 450 acre patent that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., received the following year in Warrosquyoake County “for transporting nine servants” as listed below.

       On 15 Sep 1636, less than a year after the arrival of “Chris: Reinhold, age twenty four and his group of nine servants aboard the Speedwell,” Christopher Reynolds, Sr., obtained a 450 acre patent on the waters of Pagan Shore “for transporting nine servants” to the Virginia Colony: 15 Sep 1636, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 659; The Library of Virginia, Virginia Land Office Patents No. 1, 1623-1643, p.382; Christopher Reynolds obtained a 450 acre patent “bounded with a back creek running eastward behind Pagan Shore some three miles upward, the land lying on the south side of the creek in Warrasquinoke [Warrosquyoake ] County for transporting 9 servants (Doc.# 131w,131ay, 142h).

       Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, appears to have been a Burgess for Isle of Wight County in 1652 according to the following: On 25 Nov 1652, Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. VI, p. 253; Statues at Large, by William W. Henning, Vol. I, p. 373; “The names of the Burgesses for the several plantations, Nov 25, 1652...Isle of Wight County - Mr. Charles Reynolds” (Doc.#170b). This listing for Charles Reynolds as a Burgess in Isle of Wight County is interesting since there are no other references to a Charles Burgess in the Colonial Isle of Wight County records. The Virginia Magazine of History & Biography reference to Charles Reynolds as Burgess appears in connection with the wills of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his descendants. However, the original source for this information is found printed in Statues at Large, by William W. Henning, Vol. I, p. 373. This reference by Henning was obtained from the Thomas Jefferson Manuscript Collection, apparently part of the Rand Manuscript collection according to the source information. Thomas Jefferson is listed as having purchased his collection from the estate of William Bland. Thomas Jefferson’s Manuscript Collection is currently held at the Library of Congress. Our research reveals that there are no references to Charles Reynolds listed in the Library of Virginia’s online index to Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County and only two references in the Virginia Land Office Patents & Grants data base for the years 1789 and 1793 in Amherst County which appear unrelated. Since the given name of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., is often abbreviated as “Chr:,” which could have been misinterpreted as an abbreviation for Charles, this reference to Charles Reynolds was probably for Christopher Reynolds, Sr., Burgess of Isle of Wight County, Virginia in 1652. In Colonial Virginia, a Burgess was a representative in the popular branch of the legislature. The Thomas Jefferson Manuscript Collection at the Library of Congress should be examined in order to verify this information.

       Christopher Reynolds, Sr., wrote his will on 1 May 1654 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, a copy of which is transcribed above from Isle of Wight County, Virginia Wills, Bk. 1, pp. 46-8, (Doc.#148, 170a-b).

       In the name of God, Amen. The first day of May 1654. I Christopher Reynolds [Sr.]of the Isle of Wight County in Virginia, planter, being healthful in body and sound in mind & memory make this my last Will and Testament in manner and form as followeth. First, I give and bequeath my soul unto the hands of God my Creator and Maker and my body to be buried in sure and certain hope of Resurrection and Eternal Life through the only merit and satisfaction of Jesus Christ my only Savior and Redeemer. Impremis: I give and bequeath unto my son Christopher Reynolds [Jr.] all my land on the southerly side of the Freshest swamp that Richard Jordan [son-in-law who married daughter Elizabeth Reynolds] now liveth upon. And I give unto my son John, all my lands on the northerly side of the Freshest Swamp, and one cow, and he to enjoy the said land at Twenty one years of age. And unto my son Richard, I give all my land I now liveth upon and one cow and he to enjoy the said land at Twenty one years of age. And my daughter Abbasha, I have give her a portion already which was two cows and two calves. And I give unto my daughter Elizabeth one heifer of two years old besides the stock I gave her formerly. And unto my daughter Jane I give one cow and one yearling heifer. And I give to [step son] George Rivers one yearling heifer. And I give unto the child my wife now goeth with if it lives two cows to enjoy them at three years old. And if any of my children dye my will is that the other should succeed what estate they leave. And unto Elizabeth my loving wife, I give all the rest of my estate both goods and chattels moveable and unmoveable and debts that are due to me from any person or persons whatsoever and my two servants she paying all my debts truly and justly. And I do constitute and ordain Elizabeth my loving wife my whole and sole Executrix. And my will is that my wife Elizabeth shall have the ordering and bringing up John and Richard my sons until they be sixteen years of age, and Elizabeth and Jane until they be fifteen years of age. In witness whereof I Christopher Reynolds do hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written.

       Signed: Christ. Reynolds

       Witnesseses: Sylvester Bullen, Anthony Matthews
       Isle of Wight County, Virginia Wills, Bk. 1, pp.46-8, (Doc.#148, 170a-b)

       According to the above will, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., married Elizabeth Rivers, the widow of Mr. Rivers and the mother of George and Elizabeth Rivers. This appears to have been a second marriage for both Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and widow Elizabeth Rivers. Some individuals list that Elizabeth Rivers was the widow of George Rivers, Sr.

       Isle of Wight County probate records reveal that Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s step son, George Rivers whom he lists as an heir in his will, married a woman named Mary. George and Mary had two daughters, Mary & Sarah Rivers. George Rivers made out his will on 16 Mar 1706/7 and it was recorded on 9 Apr 1707 in Isle of Wight County (Doc.#163a-b).

       According to Isle of Wight County records and the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., he had the following children:

       1) Christopher Reynolds, Jr., born about 1632, Warrosquyoake Bay, Warrosquyoake, Virginia

       2) Abbasha Reynolds, born about 1634, Warrosquyoake Bay, Warrosquyoake, Virginia

       3) Elizabeth Reynolds, born about 1638, Cypress Creek & Pagan River, Warrosquyoake, Virginia, married Richard Jordan about 1653/1654

       4) John Reynolds, born about 1640, Cypress Creek & Pagan River, Warrosquyoake, Virginia, will dated 11 Mar 1668 and proved on 3 May 1669 in Isle of Wight County
              
       5) Richard Reynolds, Sr., born about 1642, Cypress Creek & Pagan River, Warrosquyoake, Virginia, married Elizabeth Sharpe, daughter of Richard Sharpe, Sr. Richard Reynolds, Sr., died testate in 1712 in Newport Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia

       6) Jane Reynolds, born about 1644, Cypress Creek & Pagan River, Warrosquyoake, Virginia


       Research began with reviewing your Reynolds genealogy and then conducting a preliminary survey in order to ascertain what previous research has been conducted on your Reynolds line. According to the Ancestral File, name and residence patterns indicate that your ancestor, Hamilton Reynolds, possibly descends from Hamilton Reynolds and Rachel Clements of North Carolina. This Hamilton Reynolds who married Rachel Clements, is listed as a descendant of Christopher Reynolds of Colonial Virginia and England. Many of the early Reynolds families of Virginia descend from Christopher Reynolds. In order to determine which Reynolds lineage your ancestors descend from, we began tracing your ancestors through the Federal Censuses and other records of Floyd County, Kentucky where your ancestors resided.

       In 1920, your ancestor Joseph Reynolds was residing in Antioch Precinct #9 of Floyd County, Kentucky near his father, Riley Reynolds:

1920 FC, Antioch Precinct #9, Floyd County, Kentucky, ED-11, sh.11 (Doc.#1)
       #       Names
       SEX              Age       Relationship to household head       Occupation       Birthplace
[Language]       Father's Birthplace
[Language]              Mother's
       Birthplace
[Language]
185       Joseph Reynolds       M       28              Farmer - Merchant       Kentucky       Kentucky       Kentucky
       Francis “       F       23       Wife               “        ”        “
       Clifford “       M       4       Son               “        ”        “
       Effort “       M       9/12        “               ”        “        ”

187       Riley Reynolds       M       52              Farmer - Merchant       Kentucky       Virginia       Kentucky
       Rena F. “       F       52       Wife               “        ”        “
       Rosa Holt       M       12       Step-Son               “       Kentucky        “
       Cecil Reynolds       M       1       Grandson               “        ”        “


       In addition to the above households, there were also several other Reynolds households residing near Joseph and Riley who are related (Doc.#1-1a).

       In 1910, Joseph was 18 years old and residing at home with his father and step-mother. Residing nearby was his grandmother, Polly Reynolds with one of her daughters and a grandson:

1910 FC, Clear Creek, Painter Harue Precinct, Floyd County, Kentucky, ED-59, sh.16A (Doc.#2)
       #       Names
       SEX              Age       Relationship to household head       Occupation       Birthplace
              Father's
       Birthplace
              Mother's
       Birthplace

236       Polly Reynolds       F       66       Widowed              Kentucky       Kentucky       Kentucky
       Slofare Brown       F       30       Dau               “        ”        “
       Hatler “       M       8       Grandson               “        ”        “

239       Riley Reynolds       M       42              Farmer       Kentucky       Kentucky       Kentucky
       Rena F. “       F       42       Wife               “        ”        “
       Joseph “       M       18       Son               “        ”        “


       Notice in 1910 that Riley was listed with his second wife, Rena F., and son Joseph from his first marriage to Emma Henson.

       In 1900, Riley Reynolds was residing with his second wife, listed as Reny, and children Joseph and Elce B. They were residing near the households of Christina Reynolds and James Reynolds:

1900 FC, Precinct No.4, Hat Creek, Converse Co., WY, ED-19, sh.10A (Doc.#8)
(Rel.=Relationship to household head)
       #       Names
       SEX              Age
[Born]              Rel.       Occupation       Birthplace
              Father's
       Birthplace
              Mother's
       Birthplace

40       Riley Reynolds       M              32
Jul 1867              Farmer       Kentucky       Kentucky       Kentucky
       Reney “       F              32
Oct 1867       Wife               “       Virginia       Virginia
       Joseph “       M              8
Jan 1892       Son               “        Kentucky       Kentucky
       Elce B. “       F              5
Sep 1894       Dau               “        ”        “

41       Christina Reynolds       F              43
Sep 1856       Widow       Farmer       Kentucky       Kentucky       Kentucky
       Heenes? “       M              14
Apr 1886       Son               “        ”        “
       William “       M              9
Sep 1890        “               ”        “        ”

44       James Reynolds       M              51
Feb 1849              Farmer       Kentucky       Kentucky       Kentucky
       Silvanus F. “       F              26
Mar 1874       Wife               “        ”        “
       Festus “       M              18
Aug 1882       Son               “        ”        “
       Evaline “       F              15
Jun 1884       Dau               “        ”        “
       Jarvey “       M              12
Dec 1887       Son               “        ”        “
       Andy S. “       M              7
Jul 1892        “               ”        “        ”
       William “       M              6
Sep 1893        “               ”        “        ”
       Haradone “       M              4
Jun 1895        “               ”        “        ”
       Darcus “       F              3
Feb 1877       Dau               “        ”        “
       Lee “       M              1
Mar 1899       Son               “        ”        “


       Christena, who is listed as a widow in 1900, appears to have been married to Riley’s brother, William Hamilton Reynolds. According to earlier census records listed below, Christena’s maiden name appears to have been Blankenship. In addition to these families, there were other Reynolds households residing nearby, i.e. John Reynolds, Leeds? Reynolds and Ham Reynolds who resided next to James Reynolds who is listed above (Doc.#3a-3d).

       Though most of the 1890 Federal census was destroyed by fire, we located Riley listed as a child in the household of his father, William R. Reynolds, in Voting Precinct #9, Floyd County, Kentucky next to his brother, William Hamilton Reynolds, and his father, Hamilton Reynolds:

1880 FC, Voting Precinct#9, Floyd County, Kentucky (Doc.#4)
       #       Names
       SEX              Age       Relationship to household head       Occupation       Birthplace
              Father's
       Birthplace              Mother's
       Birthplace

198       William R. Reynolds       M       44              Farmer       Kentucky       Kentucky       Kentucky
       Mary “       F       39       Wife               “       Virginia        “
       Jefferson “       M       18       Son               “       Kentucky        “
       Marion “       M       15        “               ”        “         ”
       Riley “       M       11        “               ”        “        ”
       Alafaro “       F       3       Dau               “        ”        “

199       William H. Reynolds       M       21              Farm Labor       Kentucky       Kentucky       Kentucky
       Christena “       F       19       Wife               “        Virginia       Virginia
       Jemima Blankenship       F       24       Sister-in-Law               “        Kentucky       Kentucky

205       Hamilton Reynolds       M       70              Farmer       North Carolina       North Carolina       North Carolina
       Malinda “       F       68       Wife              Tennessee       Kentucky       Tennessee
       Ferdinand C. “       M       22       Son              Kentucky       North Carolina       Tennessee
       William H. K. “       M       14       Grandson               ”       Kentucky       Kentucky
       Cathalena “       F       3       Grandaughter               “        ”        “


       Notice that in 1880, Hamilton Reynolds was listed as having been 70 years old and born in North Carolina as were his parents according to the above census. Hamilton and his wife appear to have died sometime after 1880 in Floyd County. However, we have been unable to locate a cemetery, death record, will or probate file for your Hamilton Reynolds in Floyd County records. We have searched the will index for Floyd County, Kentucky and we requested that the probate clerk also double check their index, but with negative results. However, the probate clerk did locate a court record authorizing Hamilton Reynolds to perform Floyd County marriages which is dated 1855.

       According to your records, Hamilton Reynolds was born on 8 Jun 1810 in North Carolina, which corresponds with Hamilton’s age as listed in the 1880 and earlier censuses of Floyd County, Kentucky listed below. However, we have no source for your information which documents or verifies this birth date for Hamilton Reynolds. Is it possible it came from a family Bible or cemetery headstone?

       In 1870, Hamilton Reynolds was residing near Prestonsburg in Precinct #9 of Floyd County, Kentucky near an Elias Reynolds and your ancestor William Hamilton Reynolds, the father of your ancestor Riley Reynolds who was age three in 1870:

1870 FC, Prestonsburg, Precinct# 9, Floyd County, Kentucky, p.626 (Doc.#5)
(RE$ = Value of Real Estate; PE$ = Value of Personal Estate)
       #       Names       SEX       Age       Occupation       RE$       PE$       Birthplace              Foreign Born

Father Mother
47       Hamilton Reynolds       M       60       Farmer       1500       1000       North Carolina              
       Malinda “       F       60                             Tennessee              
       James P. “       M       21                             Kentucky              
       John G. “       M       15                             “              
       Ferdinand “       M       13                             “              
       Sarah M. “       F       25                            Virginia              
       William H. F. “       M       4                            Kentucky              

53       Elias H.? Reynolds       M       31       Farmer              350       Kentucky              
       Margaret “       F       26                             “              
       Elizabeth “       F       4                             “              
       Sarah A. “       F       1                             “              
       Susannah Hall       F       8                             “              

54       William Reynolds       M       35       Farmer              350       Kentucky              
       Mary “       F       31                             “              
       Hamilton “       M       13                             “              
       William “       M       11                             “              
       Jefferson “       M       9                             “              
       Marion “       M       5                             “              
       Riley “       M       3                             “              
       Elizabeth “       F       5/12                             “              


       Though not listed in your records, Elias was of the right age to have been a son of Hamilton Reynolds. Name and residence patterns appear to confirm this. However, there is no son named Elias who is listed in the earlier census records in the household of Hamilton Reynolds.

       In 1860, Hamilton Reynolds and his oldest son, William, were residing near Prestonsburg in Floyd County, Kentucky:

1860 FC, Prestonsburg, Floyd County, Kentucky, p.482 (Doc.#6)
(RE$ = Value of Real Estate; PE$ = Value of Personal Estate)
       #       Names       SEX       Age       Occupation       RE$       PE$       Birthplace

482       Hamilton Reynolds       M       50       Farmer       1100       500       North Carolina
       Malinda “       F       50                            Tennessee
       Louisa J. “       F       22                            Kentucky
       Phebe “       F       20                             “
       Lewis W. “       M       19                             “
       Remas F. “       M       16                             “
       Franky “       F       13                             “
       James P. “       M       11                             “
       Polly A. “       F       9                             “
       John “       M       5                             “
       Fordin A.C. “       M       3                             “

486       William Reynolds       M       25       Farmer              75       Kentucky
       Mary “       F       20                             “
       Hamilton “       M       3                             “
       William H. “       M       1                             “


       Hamilton’s child listed as Fordin A. C. Reynolds is obviously the same person as Ferdinand according to the 1870 census listed above.

       In 1850, Hamilton Reynold’s household was listed in Floyd County, Kentucky as follows:

1850 FC, My District, Floyd County, Kentucky, p.426 (Doc.#7)       #       Names       SEX       Age       Occupation       Real Estate Value       Birthplace
241       Hamilton Reynolds       M       40       Farmer              Kentucky
       Malinda “       F       40                      “
       William R. “       M       14                      “
       Jane “       F       13                      “
       Phoebe “       F       10                      “
       Lewis “       M       9                      “
       Remas F. “       M       6                      “
       Frances “       F       4                      “
       James “       M       1                      “


       Though earlier census records list Hamilton was born in North Carolina, this census lists he was born in Kentucky. However, the later census records are more consistent and they appear most accurate. Unfortunately, the 1850 census film was barely legible and we were unable to make a readable photocopy.

       From the names of Hamilton’s children, note that his oldest son was named William R. [Riley] Reynolds. Naming the first son after the father of the husband was a common naming practice for this time period. However, the name Riley appears to have been a surname and hence, in this case the oldest son of Hamilton does not appear to have been named after Hamilton’s father? In addition, Hamilton had sons named Lewis, Remas F., James P., and John G.

       In 1840, Hamilton Reynold’s household appears for the first time in Floyd County, Kentucky:

Hamilton Reynolds Household
       1840 FC, Floyd County, Kentucky, p.252 (Doc.#8)
Free White Males       Ages       Free White Females              Other Information       Slaves
       0-5       2              
1       5-10                     
       10-15                     
1       15-20                     
       20-30       1              
1       30-40                     


       Aside from this 1840 census record, the earliest record we have located for Hamilton Reynolds in Floyd County is the marriage record for Hamilton Reynolds and Malinda Justice, dated 17 Feb 1834. In addition to Hamilton Reynolds, there were several other Reynolds marriages which occurred in Floyd County, Kentucky:

       26 Oct 1815, Polly Reynolds to Isham Slone (Doc.#42e)
       26 Mar 1821, Betsy Reynolds to Lawrence Stambaugh (Doc.#42d)
       24 Apr 1832, Sarah Reynolds to James Hubbard (Doc.#42c)
       20 Feb 1834, Hamilton Reynolds to Malinda Justice (Doc.#42f)
       17 Mar 1836, Elizabeth Reynolds to William Harris, Jr. (Doc.#42b)
       
       The marriage dates for Polly, Betsy, Sarah and Elizabeth Reynolds indicate that they were of the right age to have been sisters of Hamilton. Other than Joseph Reynolds, there were no other Reynolds families residing in Floyd County during this time period. Notice, as listed below, that Isham Slone was later one of the administrators of Sarah Reynold’s estate. This indicates that Isham’s wife, Polly Reynolds, was related to Joseph and Sarah Reynolds. Polly Reynolds’ marriage in 1815 indicates that Joseph and Sarah Reynolds resided in Floyd County, Kentucky prior to 1815.

       There was a death recorded for a Lewis Reynolds, a son of Hamilton Reynolds, in Floyd County, Kentucky which lists the following:

       12 Jan 1876, Lewis Reynolds, age 33 years, married, born in Floyd County, Kentucky, son of Hamilton and Malinda Reynolds, father born in North Carolina, mother born in Tennessee (Doc.#16a)

       According to the Floyd County deeds, “Hambleton Reynolds” of Floyd County first purchased land there on 2 Jun 1844 from Jarvey Hall of Pike County, a tract of land containing seven acres on Clear Creek, a branch of the left hand fork of Beaver Creek (Doc.#17b).

       In addition to the above deed for Hamilton Reynolds, we also located a Power of Attorney for a James Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, son of Sarah Reynolds, the widow of Joseph Reynolds. This Power of Attorney appoints James’ son, William, as his attorney to represent his share of his mother, Sarah Reynold’s estate of whom Isham Slone and Joseph Reynolds were the administrators, dated 14 Dec 1847 (Doc.#17-17a):

       Floyd County, Kentucky Deed Bk. E, pp. 318-9

       To all to whom these presents shall come, I James Reynolds of Patrick County and State of Virginia send greeting whereas Sarah Reynolds widow of Joseph Reynolds, deceased, my mother lately died intestate by marria whereof and by virtue of the statutes made for better distributing intestates estates I am become legally entitled to a distributive share of my others personal estate as well as real. Now know ye that I the said James Reynolds having and reposing great confidence in my son, William Reynolds of Patrick County and State of Virginia have made constituted and appointed and by these presents do make constitute and appoint said William Reynolds my true and lawful attorney for me and in my name to sue for and ask and demand recover and receive of and from Isham Slone and Joseph Reynolds administrators of the said Sarah Reynolds or of any other person or persons who are or may be administrators of the said Sarah Reynolds all my distributive share of the said real or personal estate of my said mother which I am by law entitled unto and all other sum or sums of money goods chattles and personal estate whatsoever which my said mother dieing intestate or on any other account belonging or of right ought to belong to me and upon receipt thereof acquaintances and other legal discharges for me and in my name to give to the administrators of my said mother for what my said attorney shall receive or composition for my said distributive share of my said mothers real and personal estate or any other matter or thing due to me from his estate and whatsoever my said attorney shall do or cause to be done in and about the premises I do hereby ratify and confirm the same fully to all interests and purposes as if I was personally present and did the same.
              I witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this 14th day of December in the year 1847.
              Signed: James Reynolds

       As indicated above in the Floyd County marriage records, this power of attorney regarding the estate of Sarah Reynolds, which was recorded in the Floyd County, Kentucky deeds, confirms that Isham Slone was a son-in-law to Joseph Reynolds, Sr., and his widow, Sarah Reynolds.

       This Power of Attorney strongly indicates that Sarah Reynolds and her sons, Joseph Reynolds [administrator] James Reynolds, and her grandson, William Reynolds (the son of James) of Patrick County, Virginia, are related to your ancestor, Hamilton Reynolds. There were several Reynolds families from Patrick County which migrated south to North Carolina according to a Reynolds family history for Patrick County, Virginia. Name and residence patterns indicate that your ancestor, Hamilton Reynolds, was related to these Reynolds. Note that Hamilton named his oldest son William Riley Hamilton and another son James P. Reynolds, etc. Though they are common names, these are the same names used by Joseph and Sarah Reynold’s son and grandson. In order to confirm that your ancestor, Hamilton Reynolds, was a son of Joseph and Sarah Reynolds, we conducted an extensive search of the deed, land, probate and court records for Floyd County, Kentucky.

       According to Floyd County, Kentucky survey books, “Hamilton Reynold” first obtained 50 acres of land on Beaver Creek in 1847. Notice that this is the same year that Sarah Reynolds’ estate was probated as listed above. Unfortunately, there are no probate records filed in Floyd County for Sarah Reynold’s estate. Hence, we searched a statewide index to Kentucky probate records prior to 1851, but nothing is listed for either Joseph or Sarah Reynolds (Doc.#43). Though Floyd County, Kentucky does not require intestate estates to be probated, in light of the above Power of Attorney filed in Floyd County deeds, the administration of Sarah Reynold’s estate should have been recorded. Hence, we requested that Floyd County conduct a search of their court and deed records. However, they were unable to locate the administration records for Sarah Reynold’s estate or any other additional information regarding this matter.

       The earliest Floyd County, Kentucky survey of land for an individual named Reynolds was for Joseph Reynolds who obtained 50 acres on Beaver Creek, which was recorded in 1834 (Doc.#11c). Name and residence patterns indicate that this was the same Joseph Reynolds who was the husband of Sarah Reynolds. Sarah Reynold’s estate was probated in 1847 in Floyd County. The fact that this Joseph Reynolds obtained land on Beaver Creek prior to 1834, and your ancestor, Hamilton Reynolds, married in Floyd County on 17 Feb 1834, in the same year the survey was recorded, indicates that Hamilton Reynolds was the son of Joseph and Sarah Reynolds. Notice that Hamilton didn’t purchase land there until thirteen years later in 1847, the same year that the estate of Sarah Reynolds was probated and he appears to have received his inheritance. Hence, Hamilton Reynolds appears to have lived on land originally owned by his parents until he received his inheritance in 1847 from the administration of the estate of his mother, Sarah Reynolds, the widow of Joseph Reynolds.

       In addition to the above surveys and land records, surveys also list that Hamilton Reynolds obtained 50 acres on Clear Creek in 1858, 1042 acres on Beaver Creek in 1871, and another 235 acres on Beaver Creek later in the same year, 1871. (Doc.#11c).

       Other Floyd County, Virginia deeds reveal that there was a John and Margaret Reynolds of Crawford County, Illinois (Doc.#45), who sold 100 acres of land on Big Paint Creek in 1838 (Doc.#44a). There was also a Joseph Reynolds of Letcher County, Kentucky (Doc.#46) who sold land on Caney Fork in 1845 (Doc.#44a). This same Joseph Reynolds then purchased 50 acres on Caney Creek in 1846 (Doc.#44). However, neither John or Joseph Reynolds of Letcher County appear to have resided in Floyd County for any length of time. Though John and Margaret Reynolds were from Crawford County, Illinois, they appear to have moved there from Floyd County, Kentucky where they bought land prior to 1838. However, there is no record of their original purchase of land according to Floyd County deeds.

       Notice that the Joseph Reynolds of neighboring Letcher County, Kentucky, has the same given name as Sarah Reynold’s husband according to the Floyd County, Kentucky Power of Attorney which was recorded in the Floyd County deeds. This Joseph was of the right age to have been a son of Joseph Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Sarah Perkins, who owned land in Floyd County, Kentucky. Hence, this Joseph Reynolds, Jr., appears to have been Hamilton Reynold’s older brother. According to a Letcher County history, Joseph Reynolds was born in 1805 in Rockbridge County, Virginia. As indicated below, he married Queentina Amburgey on 12 Dec 1833 in Perry County, Kentucky. Joseph and Queentina, also listed as “Tina,” resided in neighboring Letcher County, Kentucky and owned land in Floyd County, Kentucky. Since Patrick County, Virginia deeds listed below reveal that Joseph Reynolds, Sr., died in 1833, the land surveyed in Floyd County, Kentucky, in 1834, may have been surveyed for Joseph Reynolds, Jr. unless it was recorded after Joseph Reynolds, Sr.’s death.

       Though the information for the birth of Joseph Reynolds, Jr., indicates that he was born in 1805 in Rockbridge, it doesn’t list his parents. Hence, the source of this information can not be verified without conducting further research. However, his age as listed in the 1850 census below, confirms that he was born in 1804/5 in Virginia. This supports name and residence patterns listed above which strongly indicate that he was the son of Joseph Reynolds, Sr., and Sarah Perkins, i.e. the older brother of your ancestor, Hamilton Reynolds.

       We located Joseph Reynolds, Jr., residing in the 1850 census of Fletcher County, Kentucky, which lists the following:

1850 FC, 1st District, Letcher County, Kentucky, p.152 (Doc.#47)       #       Names       SEX       Age       Occupation       Real Estate Value       Birthplace
132       Joseph Reynolds       M       45       Farmer       370       Virginia
       Tena “       F       38                     North Carolina
       Elizabeth “       F       15                     Kentucky
       Sarah “       F       14                      “
       John “       M       12                      “
       Nancy “       F       10                      “
       Wesley “       M       8                      “
       Polly “       F       7                      “
       Rebecca “       F       5                      “
       Martha “       F       3                      “
       William “       M       1                      “


       Notice that Joseph named his second daughter Sarah, apparently after his mother. This was a common naming pattern. In order to confirm that this Joseph was a son of Joseph and Sarah, we conducted a search of the Letcher County, Kentucky records and discovered information on Joseph Reynolds and several other Reynolds families which descend from Christopher Reynolds of Colonial Virginia (Doc.#48). As referenced above, the Letcher County genealogy lists that Joseph Reynolds was born in 1805 in Rockbridge County, Virginia and that he married Queentina Amburgey on 12 Dec 1833 in Perry County, Kentucky (Doc.#48b). Notice that this information corresponds with the 1850 census information listed above. However, as indicated above, there are no parents listed for this Joseph Reynolds. He appears to have been the same Joseph Reynolds who was an administrator of the estate of Sarah Reynolds according to the Floyd County, Kentucky Power of Attorney which is listed above.

       Since Floyd County was created in 1800 from Fleming, Montgomery and Mason Counties, it is possible that Joseph and Sarah Reynolds originally obtained land in one of these counties. However, there are no Joseph Reynolds listed in any of these counties according to the 1820-1840 censuses of Kentucky. In 1810 through 1840, there were Joseph Reynolds residing in Muhlenburg and Lincoln Counties beginning in 1810, but none residing in eastern Kentucky through 1840 (Doc.#37, 38, 39,40). We also searched the 1810 census index for North Carolina, but there were no Joseph Reynolds listed (Doc.#34). However, there were listings for J. Reynolds Jr. and Sr., residing in Guilford County, North Carolina in 1810.

       Name and residence patterns of your Hamilton Reynolds, from our search of the IGI and Ancestral File records, revealed that he may have been related to a Hamilton Reynolds and his wife, Rachel Clements (Doc.#13, 15, 29, 31, 32, 35). However, after extensive research we have not been able to find a connection. Hence, this supports the above information which indicates that your ancestor, Hamilton Reynolds, was the son of Joseph Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Sarah Perkins, who died in Floyd County, Kentucky, in 1847. After Joseph Reynolds, Sr.’s death in 1833, his widow, Sarah Reynolds, appears to have moved in with one of her children in Floyd County, Kentucky.

       Since there are no listings for a Joseph Reynolds in North Carolina in 1800-1810 which corresponds with your ancestors, we searched the reconstructed tax lists for Virginia in 1787 and 1810. The 1810 Virginia tax lists several Joseph Reynolds including one of Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#55g), where James Reynolds resided according to the Floyd County, Kentucky, Power of Attorney which was filed in connection with the widow of Joseph Reynolds, i.e. Sarah Reynold’s estate. In addition to Joseph, there were several other Reynolds families also listed in Patrick County, Virginia in 1810: Richard, Thomas, Jesse, George, Moses, Abraham, Thomas and Henry Reynolds (Doc.#55g). Though the 1787 tax list for Virginia lists no Joseph Reynolds in Patrick County, Patrick County wasn’t created until 1791 from Henry County. There is a Joseph Reynolds who was tithed in Henry County in 1787 along with Mary, Moses, Bartlett, Jesse and David Reynolds (Doc.#56d). Notice the similarity of name patterns between the 1810 tax list for Patrick County and the 1787 tax list for Henry County. This appears to confirm that the Reynolds families of Patrick County resided in that portion of Henry County from which Patrick County was created in 1791.

       In order to confirm that your Joseph and Sarah Reynolds are related to the Reynolds families of Patrick and Henry Counties of Virginia, we searched the Patrick County, Virginia records. According to published abstracts of Patrick County, there are several listings for Joseph Reynolds including the following:

       12 Feb 1813 - Patrick County, Virginia Wills, pp. 111-2
       Will of William Perkins
       ...being sick and weak...The land I now live on sold and money equally divided among my sons, Christian, William, David and Thomas Perkins. The land I own on the mountain is to be equally divided amongst my daughters. Son Christian Perkins three negros. Son, William Perkins 1 negro and 15 pounds cash. Son, Thomas Perkins 2 negros. Son David Perkins, 2 negros. Daughter Sarah Reynolds, 2 negros. Daughter, Susanah 2 negors, 2 feather beds and furniture, 1 horse and side saddle. Daughter Elizabeth 2 negros, one feather bed and furniture and 2 mares. Daughter Nanny Boyd 2 negros. I lend to Mary Ann Moss one negro. It is my desire that the land that Joseph Reynolds lives on to be sold and money divided amongst all of his children. What I have not given away is to be sold and the money divided among my sons and daughters. The money coming to Sarah Reynolds to be put out to interest until her last child comes of age, then divided among them. The same to apply to Nanny Boyd. One daughter is mentioned as Suky.
       Witnesses: Richard Stokes, Fanney Stokes & Sarah Hall
       Executor: John Hall and Samuel Houston
       Returned: March Court, 1813 (Doc.#50b, 101-101e)

       Notice in this will that William Perkins, Sr., refers to his daughter as Sarah Reynolds. She was the wife of Joseph Reynolds according to William Perkins, Sr.’s will. According to the Ancestral File, Sarah Perkins was born on 9 Aug 1763 at Goochland, Goochland County, Virginia. She was christened on 12 Sep 1763 at St. James Church in Northam Parish, Goochland County, Virginia.

       The actual will of William Perkins, Sr., lists much more information than the abstract which is listed above. A copy of the original is included with this report along with the estate inventory and administration records (Doc.#101-101e). The information from the will and probate records correspond with the names of your ancestors, Joseph and Sarah Reynolds, as well as with the probate of Sarah Reynold’s estate in Floyd County, Kentucky in 1847. Additional abstracts of the court records regarding the above will and administration of the estate of William Perkins, Sr., reveal the following:

       1814 - Patrick County, Virginia Wills, pp. 160-1
       Estate of William Perkins, deceased, John Hall the acting Executor
       Taxes paid in Franklin County. Proportions made among legatees of William Perkins: Christian Perkins, William Perkins, David Perkins, Thomas Perkins, Sarah Reynolds, Susannah Perkins, Nancy Boyd and Elizabeth Perkins.
       Bonds on: Elizabeth Moss, Warren Massey, Benjamin Hickman, Thomas Perkins, James Cox, Susannah Perkins, Thomas R. Hall, Col. George Hairston, John McAlexander, William Burnett, Col. Samuel Hairston, John Shively, Joseph Reynolds, Charles Thomas, Jr., Francis Wilks, Samuel Saunder, James Cannaday, Nathan Cockram, Phillip Williams, William Moore, Absalom Hancock, John Spaulden, William Newberry, Ebenezer Watkins, Peter Guerrant, Elijah Dehart, John Rakes, John Alexander, Reuben Harris and William Via.
       Due to the estate: 484.6.17 [pounds]
       Each male legatee to receive: 64 pounds, 8 shillings, 9 pence
       Each female legatee to receive: 56 pounds, 12 shillings, 9 pence
       Signed: Geo. Penn, Brett Stovall, Ad. Turner, M. Sandefur
       Returned: May Court, 1814 (Doc.# 50d-e)
       
       According to the amount owed to the estate of William Perkins, Sr., this was a very large estate for this time period. Notice that taxes were paid in Franklin County revealing that William Perkins, Sr., owned land there and may have previously resided there. Notice also that William Perkins, Sr., had dealings with Col. George Hairston, a very wealthy and prominent citizen and Revolutionary War Patriot of Patrick County, Virginia as will be discussed later in this report regarding the history and settlement of Patrick and Henry Counties of Virginia. According to the Ancestral File data, Col. George Hairston married Elizabeth Perkins who was born 1 May 1749 and died 7 Jan 1818 in Henry County, Virginia (Doc.#113b-c). She is listed as the daughter of Nicholas Perkins according to the Ancestral File. Hence, Col. George Hairston’s wife, Elizabeth Perkins, was possibly related to William Perkins, Sr.

       Further evidence in Patrick County, Virginia which confirms that Joseph and Sarah Reynolds resided there before coming to Floyd County, Kentucky is contained in the 1850 Federal Census which lists their son James, and his son, William (who was appointed Power of Attorney for his father, James Reynolds, during the administration of the estate for James’ mother, Sarah Reynolds, in Floyd County, Kentucky):

1850 FC, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#54a)       #       Names       SEX       Age       Occupation       Real Estate Value       Birthplace
66       James Reynolds       M       58       Farmer       2500       Virginia
       Milly “       F       48                      “
       William “       M       26       Farmer               “
       Allen Merideth       M       22       Laborer               “
       Bradley “       M       20        “               ”


       Notice that this James Reynolds, who appears to have been a son of Joseph Reynolds, Sr., and Sarah Perkins, was born in 1791/2 in Virginia. This reveals that Joseph and Sarah were married prior to 1790 in Virginia. According to the Ancestral File, James Reynolds married Milly McAlexander in 1824 in Montgomery County, Virginia. However, Patrick County records listed below reveal that they were born earlier than 1824. Milly McAlexander was born 1801/2 in Patrick County, Virginia. According to the Ancestral File, she was the daughter of William McAlexander and Tamar Booth. Tamar Booth was the daughter of George Booth who was born in 1737 at Sandwich, Kent, England.

       Though Patrick County, Virginia marriage records list several Reynolds and Perkins who married there beginning in 1791, there is no listing for the marriages of James Reynolds to Milly McAlexander which supports the Ancestral File information that lists they were married in Montgomery County, Virginia. There is also no marriage listed for Joseph Reynolds to Sarah Perkins. However, there were several related Reynolds who were married in Patrick County, Virginia:

       Patrick County, Virginia, Marriage Records

       7 Sep 1791, Millinton/Middleton Reynolds married Elizabeth Murry, Surety Moses Reynolds and Joseph Reynolds, Min. William Dodson (Doc.#51b, 88s)

       According to Henry County probate and deed records listed below, Millinton [Millington]Reynolds was a brother of Moses Reynolds. Notice that your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds, is listed along with Moses Reynolds as sureties for the marriage of Millington. This appears to confirm that Moses, Millington and their siblings were related to your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds. Name and residence patterns suggest that they were first cousins. The date of this marriage indicates that Millington Reynolds was born about 1771. Since Patrick County was created in 1791 from Henry County, which was created in 1776 from Pittsylvania County, Millington Reynolds appears to have been born about 1771 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia.

       14 Sep 1791, George Reynolds married Morning Wade, Consent of her sister Elizabeth Hilton and her husband Numan Hilton, Surety Joseph Reynolds, by Min. Robert Jones (Doc.#51b, 88a)

       Notice that a Joseph Reynolds who is listed as the surety, appears to have been your ancestor according to Patrick County deeds, etc. Joseph Reynolds, Sr., appears as surety for the first two Reynolds marriages in Patrick County, Virginia. This strongly indicates that your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds, Sr., was related to George Reynolds, probably a brother or first cousin. Probate records of Joseph’s father, Richard Reynolds, Sr., confirms that Joseph had a brother named George Reynolds. Hence, name and residence patterns appear to confirm that the George Reynolds who married Morning Wade was the brother of your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds, who was the surety for George Reynold’s marriage. Assuming that this was his first marriage, the date of this marriage indicates that George Reynolds was born abt 1771, probably in Pittsylvania or surrounding counties of Virginia.

       An early bill of sale recorded in Henry County deeds listed below and the fact that they settled in different areas of Patrick County indicates that Joseph Reynolds was a cousin rather than a brother of Millington Reynolds. Patrick County deeds reveal that Moses, Jesse, Millington and Bartemus Reynolds all settled in the Mayo River area of Patrick County. Your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds, settled in the Rockcastle Creek and Smith River area.

       As will be discussed later in this report, there was also a George Reynolds and Susanna Lansford who settled in the Leatherwood Creek area before migrating to Williamson County, Tennessee according to the Ancestral File. The Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster, by Col. Steve F. Tillman, which has been an authoritative compilation for the Reynolds families of Virginia and England since 1948, lists the following for this George Reynolds and his father, James Reynolds:

       George Reynolds, born 1750 in Caroline County, Virginia, son of James Reynolds, born 1715 in Surry County, Virginia, and Sukie Lindsay. George died 1813 in Williamson County, Tennessee. He was appointed Lieutenant and Chaplain of the Virginia State Line in Oct 1779. He married Susannah Lansford on 12 Jun 1779. DAR membership #122998. Issue: Elizabeth, born 1780; Pryor, born 30 Sep 1783; Susannah, born 1784; Jency, born 7 Mar 1789; Nancy, born 11 Dec 1781; Mary; Sallie; Bethenia, who married Walter C. Haley in August 1817; George; Thomas; and Richard born 1790 (Doc.#117s)

       James Reynolds, born 1715 in Surry County, Virginia, son of Richard Reynolds and Mary Anderson. James married Sukie Lindsay about 1748. James settled in Caroline County, Virginia and had issue: Richard Spencer, born 1749; George, born 1750; Jesse David, born 1754; David; Robert; William; and Bernard born 12 Nov 1763 (Doc.#117p, 117m)

       Unfortunately, there are few sources listed in the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster, by Col. Steve F. Tillman. This information about George Reynolds and Susannah Lansford lists that they resided in Caroline County, Virginia, before coming to Pittsylvania and Henry Counties of Virginia. Hence, Caroline County, Virginia, which is also listed as a residence for other Reynolds families, should be searched for additional information related to your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, Sr.

       Notice the name patterns for James Reynold’s children, i.e. Richard Spencer Reynolds, Jesse Reynolds, David Reynolds and George Reynolds, all of which correspond with the Reynolds families of Pittsylvania, Henry and Patrick Counties where your ancestors resided. Subject to further research, name and residence patterns indicate that your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, may have been a younger brother of James Reynolds, i.e. the son of Richard Reynolds and Mary Anderson of Surry County, Virginia.

       Henry County deeds reveal that a George Reynolds of Pittsylvania County sold his property which was located on the Bold Branch of Leatherwood Creek to a Richard Reynolds of Henry County in 1803 (Doc.#65e). Richard Reynolds then sold 300 acres of that property later in the same year. Hence, this Richard Reynolds appears to have been related to the George Reynolds who married Susanna Lansford. This information corresponds with the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster, by Col. Steve F. Tillman, listed above which indicates that George Reynolds and Richard Spencer Reynolds were brothers. Early Henry County tax records, which are listed below, reveal that there was a Richard Reynolds who resided on the waters of Leatherwood Creek as early as 1778.

       From the records listed above, the George Reynolds who married Susanna Lansford on 12 Jun 1779 in Henry County does not appear to have been the same person as the George Reynolds who married Morning Wade in 1791 in Patrick County, eleven years later.

       6 Jul 1792, Nancy Reynolds married Isham Goard, Sureties Bartlett and Charles Hibbert, Minister George Dodson (Doc.#88h)

       The date of this marriage indicates that Nancy Reynolds was born about 1774 in Pittsylvania or a surrounding county in Virginia. Unfortunately, there is no indication of who Nancy’s father was according to this marriage record.

       18 Oct 1794, Polly Reynolds, daughter of Susannah Clark, married Henry Chiles, Surety Jesse Reynolds, Minister George Dodson (Doc.#88f)

       According to the above marriage record, Jesse Reynolds appears to have been surety for his sister or niece, Polly Reynolds, according to this marriage record. The fact that Susannah Clark is listed as Polly Reynold’s mother indicates that Polly may have been a sister or mother of Jesse Reynolds. Name and residence patterns indicate that Susannah Clark may have been the same person who appears listed as widow Susannah Reynolds in early Henry County tax lists from 1777 to 1786. Though she appears to have remarried in 1786/7 to a man named Clark, there is no record of this marriage in Henry County records. Similarly, Nancy Reynolds who married two years earlier in 1792, appears to have been related to Jesse and Polly Reynolds. Since these early marriage records were performed by a Minister George Dodson, locating the church records where Rev. George Dodson officiated could provide us with additional information about the parents of Nancy and Polly Reynolds. Hence, we have asked Desmond Kendrick, the Henry County Archivist who is also a descendant of Joseph Reynolds and Margaret Devin, to assist us with locating the original church records if they still exist.

       5 Feb 1795, Martha (Patsey) Reynolds married William Thomas Vaughan, Surety Bartlett Reynolds, Minister Isaac Adams, recorded 11 Feb 1795 (Doc.#88w)

       This marriage record indicates that Martha/Patsey Reynolds was the daughter of Bartlett Reynolds who was surety. Hence, Martha Reynolds, who was born about 1777, would have been born in Henry County, Virginia.

       5 Feb 1799, Bartemus Reynolds married Mildred Taylor, Surety was David Taylor (Doc.#51b, 88s)

       According to a deed from Moses Reynolds, who acted as the administrator for his brother, David Reynold’s 1788 estate in Henry County which is listed below, Millington, Jesse, and Bartemus Reynolds were brothers of Moses Reynolds.

       The Reynolds Homestead and Patrick County Historical Society lists the following for Bartemus Reynolds:

       Bartemus Reynolds was born 25 Aug 1769 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. He was the son of William Richard Reynolds, born about 1712 in Surry County, Virginia, and his wife, Elizabeth Mossom, born about 1722 in Surry County, Virginia. He married Mildred Taylor on 5 Feb 1799 in Patrick County, Virginia. She was the daughter of David Taylor. Bartemus Reynolds died on 22 Nov 1854 in Hall County, Georgia. (Doc.#118c-d)

       Notice the exact date of birth listed for Bartemus Reynolds. This date of birth along with his date of death indicates that this information came from family records, perhaps a family Bible. There are no sources of information listed. Notice that the marriage information corresponds with Patrick County, Virginia marriage records as listed above. Though no children are listed for Baretmus Reynolds and Mildred Taylor in this information, the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster by S.F. Tillman lists that Bartemus Reynolds was born on the same date, but in Richmond County, Virginia, the son of William Archelius Reynolds (Doc.#117g). Hence, both Richmond and Surry Counties of Virginia should be searched for additional information on your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, Sr., who appears related to Bartemous Reynolds and the other Reynolds families which inhabited early Henry and Pittsylvania Counties of Virginia.

       In regards to the names of the parents listed for Bartemus Reynolds, the Reynolds Homestead and Patrick County Historical Society lists the following information:

       William Richard Reynolds, born about 1712, Surrey County, Virginia, married about 1745, in Virginia, Elizabeth Mossum, born about 1722, Surrey County, Virginia, died in Pittsylvania County, Virginia.
       Note: This family is listed temporarily until such time as more concrete records are located. Use this lineage with caution. (Doc.#118c)

       Since there are no sources listed, the Reynolds Homestead information appears to be basing the parentage of Bartemus Reynolds and his siblings merely on speculation. However, they have omitted Bartlett Reynolds as a brother and listed Susannah Reynolds as a sister. This is in contrast to Henry County records which reveal Bartlett Reynolds was in fact a brother and strongly indicate that Susannah Bartlett was their widowed mother, not their sister. The Reynolds Homestead also speculates that:

        Richard and William Reynolds are the same person and reference is made to a listing for a William Richard and vast tracts of land that were claimed by Richard Reynolds from 1746-49. They also located a legal paper dated 1775 in which there was a property settlement between Richard and Elizabeth Reynolds. Richard then disposed of his property and relocated to Georgia (Doc.#118c)

       Though the property settlement between Richard and Elizabeth is familiar to the one located for your ancestors, Richard Reynolds and his wife, Mary, as listed in Henry County deeds below, we have found no documents supporting the above information for William/Richard Reynolds and his wife, Elizabeth. William Richard Reynolds is listed as the son of Richard Reynolds, III, who was born 1669 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia. Richard Reynolds, III, married Mary Anderson. Interestingly, the Reynolds Homestead makes no reference to Hugh Reynolds who obtained a survey in 1768 for land in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. This is the earliest record for an individual named Reynolds in Pittsylvania County from which Henry and Patrick Counties were created in 1776, and 1791, respectively.

       27 Sep 1804, Caty Reynolds married Shadrack Hall, alias Sloan, Minister Jesse Jones (Doc.#88k)

       The date of this marriage indicates that Caty Reynolds was born in 1786 in Henry County, Virginia. She may have been an older daughter or younger sister of your ancestors, Joseph Reynolds and Sarah Perkins. Subject to further research, we are listing her as an older daughter of your ancestors, Joseph Reynolds and Sarah Perkins.

       8 Nov 1804, David Perkins married Amelia Banks (Doc.#62b)

       David Perkins was a brother to your ancestor, Sarah Perkins, who married Joseph Reynolds. This was David’s first marriage. He appears to have married Amelia’s younger sister, Polly Banks, in 1816, fourteen years later as listed below.

       11 May 1805, Susannah Reynolds married Jedediah Carter, Surety Moses Reynolds (Doc.#88c)

       This marriage record indicates that Susannah Reynolds was the daughter of Moses Reynolds who was the surety. This name pattern, i.e. the fact that Moses named his oldest daughter Susannah, supports the name and residence patterns which indicate that the Susannah Reynolds who is listed in early Henry County tax records, was the widowed mother of Moses and his siblings. The date of marriage indicates that Susannah Reynolds who married Jedediah Carter was born about 1787 in Henry County, Virginia. Though the Patrick County Historical Society lists that Susannah was born in Pittsylvania County (Doc.#118e), Moses Reynolds and his family resided in that portion of Pittsylvania County which became Henry County in 1776, and Patrick County in 1791. Hence, Susannah Reynolds, who was born about 1787, would have been born in Henry County, Virginia.

       12 Jan 1807, Celey Reynolds married Micajah Martin, Surety Abraham Reynolds (Doc.#88o)

       According to the patterns in the marriage records listed above, this marriage record indicates that Celey Reynolds was the daughter of Abraham Reynolds who was the surety. However, Abraham Reynolds didn’t marry until 19 May 1809, nearly two years later. Hence, this indicates that Celey Reynolds was probably Abraham’s sister, i.e. the daughter of Moses Reynolds. The date of marriage indicates that Celey Reynolds was born about 1789 in Patrick County, Virginia.

       30 Jul 1807, Polly Reynolds married Phillip Anglin, Surety Moses Reynolds (Doc.#88c)

       The fact that Moses Reynolds was listed as the surety for Polly Reynolds indicates that Moses was her father. Polly is a nick-name for Mary who is listed as the daughter of Moses Reynolds according to the Patrick County Historical Society (Doc.#118e). According to the date of her marriage and her sister’s marriage above, Polly Reynolds was born about 1791 in Patrick County, Virginia. Though the Patrick County Historical Society lists that Polly was born in Pittsylvania County (Doc.#118e), Moses Reynolds and his family resided in that portion of Pittsylvania County which became Henry County in 1776, and Patrick County in 1791. Hence, Polly Reynolds, who was born about 1791, would have been born in Patrick County.

       23 Mar 1807, Arsey Perkins married Samuel O’Neal (Doc.#62a)

       Arsey Perkins appears to have been related to your ancestor, Sarah Perkins. However, she is not listed in the will of William Perkins, Sr. Hence, Arsey may have been a nick-name for one of Sarah Perkin’s younger sisters.

       4 Feb 1808, Henry Reynolds married Susanna Clay, Surety Daniel Edmonds, Min. Thomas Whitlock (Doc.#51b, 88s)

       This marriage record indicates that Henry Reynolds was born about 1788 in Henry County, Virginia. However, Henry Reynolds first appears in the Patrick County tax records in 1800, indicating that he was actually born in 1779 in Henry County, Virginia. Though the Patrick County tax records do not indicate the father of Henry Reynolds, he was born the right time period to have been the son of either Bartlett, Moses, Jesse or Joseph Reynolds, all of whom resided in Patrick County, Virginia in 1800 when Henry Reynolds first appears on the Patrick County tax lists. However, if Henry Reynolds was a son of one of these individuals, he should have been listed as a white male above age 16 in the previous tax years, which he was not.

       20 Dec 1808, Lucinda Reynolds married Thomas Sharp, Surety Abraham Reynolds, Minister Peter Frans, recorded 12 Jan 1809 (Doc.#88t)

       The date of this marriage indicates that Lucinda was born about 1790 in Henry County, Virginia. The fact that Abraham Reynolds was the surety for this marriage indicates that she was related to Abraham. Since Abraham Reynolds was born in 1781, he was the right age, twenty seven, to have been a brother of Lucinda. Hence, Lucinda appears to have been a younger daughter of Moses Reynolds.

       10 Jan 1809, Milley Reynolds married Jeremiah Moles, Jr., Surety Jeremiah Moles, Sr., Minister John Conner, recorded 12 Jan 1809 (Doc.#88p)

       The date of this marriage indicates that Milly/Milley Reynolds was born about 1791 in Patrick County, Virginia. Since Jesse Reynold’s daughter, who is also named Milly, married a few years later, this marriage appears to have been for a daughter of either Moses Reynolds, or your ancestors, Joseph Reynolds and Sarah Perkins. Since we have identified several daughters of Moses Reynolds who were born during this same time period, Milly appears to have been an older daughter of Joseph Reynolds and Sarah Perkins. According to the birth dates calculated for Joseph Reynold’s children, Milly Reynolds was probably born in 1793 in Patrick County, Virginia.

       30 Mar 1809, Elizabeth Reynolds, daughter of Moses Reynolds, married Benjamin Harbour, Surety Thomas Morrison, Minister William H. Robertson, recorded 11 Apr 1809 (Doc.#88l)

       This marriage record reveals that Elizabeth Reynolds was the daughter of Moses Reynolds. The date of marriage indicates that Elizabeth Reynolds was born about 1791 in Patrick County, Virginia. Though the Patrick County Historical Society lists that Matilda was born about 1785 in Pittsylvania County (Doc.#118e), Moses Reynolds and his family resided in that portion of Pittsylvania County which became Henry County in 1776, and Patrick County in 1791. Hence, Elizabeth Reynolds was born about 1793 according to this marriage record and the marriage records of her sisters.

       19 May 1809, Abraham Reynolds married Polly [Mary] Harbour, by Min. Stephen Hubbard (Doc.#51a, 88a)

       According to this marriage record, Abraham Reynolds would have been born prior to 1789 in Henry County, Virginia, which corresponds with the Patrick County tax records listed below which indicate he was born in 1781. According to information obtained from the Patrick County Historical Society, Abraham Reynolds was born1 Mar 1781 and died on 3 May 1838 (Doc.#118). This information appears to have been obtained from a Family Bible, however no source is listed. Deeds and tax records listed below confirm that Abraham Reynolds was born on 1 Mar 1781in Henry County, Virginia, the son of Moses Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia.

       After 1802, Abraham Reynolds does not appear listed on subsequent tax lists for Patrick County until 1807. This indicates that he left the county for about four or five years. On 15 Feb 1814, Patrick County deeds reveal that Abraham Reynolds bought 50 acres of land on Nobusiness Fork of Mayo River. By 1831 the Patrick County Historical Society lists that Abraham Reynolds owned 1038 acres on the waters of the North Mayo River (Doc.#118a). This the same area on Nobusiness Fork of the North Mayo River where Moses Reynolds obtained several land tracts and where he resided until his death.

        The Patrick County Historical Society lists that Abraham Reynolds and Mary Harbour were the parents of two children: Hardin William Reynolds, born 20 Apr 1810 and died 30 May 1882 in Patrick County; and David Harbour Reynolds, born 15 Jun 1811 and died 20 Sep 1836. Abraham’s wife, Mary Harbour, was born 7 Mar 1784, probably in Henry County, and died 30 Apr 1853, presumably in Patrick County. She was the daughter of “David Harbour who was born in 1769.” (Doc.#118-118a) Though name and residence patterns appear to confirm that David Harbour was the father of Mary Harbour, David would have been born closer to 1759 rather than 1769 according to the date of birth, 1784, for his daughter Mary Harbour. Most of this information for Abraham Reynolds and his family appears to have come from Reynolds family records or Abraham Reynold’s family Bible.

       6 Jun 1809, Jenny (Jean) Reynolds, daughter of Gessy [Jesse] Reynolds, married Thomas Morrison, Surety James Morris, Minister William H. Robertson (Doc.#88q)

       This marriage record reveals that Jenny/Jean Reynolds was the daughter of Jesse Reynolds. Notice that Jesse’s name is spelled “Gessy” in this marriage record. The date of the marriage indicates that Jenny was born about 1791. Though the Patrick County Historical Society lists she was born about 1804, in order to have been married in 1809 she would had to have been born about 1791.

       20 Mar 1811, Milley Reynolds married Barnabas Balisle, Surety Jesse Reynolds (Doc.#88d)

       This marriage record indicates that Milley Reynolds was the daughter of Jesse Reynolds who was the surety. According to her date of marriage, she was born about 1792 in Patrick County, Virginia. She appears to have been the same person as Mildred Reynolds, the daughter of Jesse Reynolds, according to the Reynolds Homestead and the Patrick County Historical Society (Doc.#118e).

       25 Feb 1813, Nancy Reynolds married Benjamin Carter, Surety Moses Reynolds, Minister Lewis Foster, recorded 29 Feb 1814 (Doc.#88e)

       This marriage record indicates that Nancy Reynolds was the daughter of Moses Reynolds who was the surety. The date of marriage indicates that Nancy Reynolds was born about 1796 in Patrick County, Virginia. Though the Patrick County Historical Society lists that Nancy was born in Pittsylvania County (Doc.#118e), Moses Reynolds and his family resided in that portion of Pittsylvania County which became Henry County in 1776, and Patrick County in 1791. Hence, Nancy Reynolds, who was born about 1796, would have been born in Patrick County.

       12 Oct 1814, Leviny Reynolds married John Nunn, Surety Jesse Reynolds (Doc.#62a, 88r)

       This marriage record indicates that Leviny Reynolds was the daughter of Jesse Reynolds who was the surety. The date of marriage indicates that Leviny Reynolds was born about 1796 in Patrick County, Virginia. Though the Patrick County Historical Society lists that “Luvina” Reynolds was born in 1792 (Doc.#118e).

       27 Dec 1816, David Perkins married Polly Banks (Doc.#62b)

       David Perkins appears to have been a younger brother of your ancestor, Sarah/Sally Perkins who married Joseph Reynolds. However, since Sally Perkin’s brother was born about 1769, this was probably for a second marriage or for David Perkins, Jr.

       13 Mar 1817, Ruth Reynolds married Jared Harbour, Surety Moses Reynolds and Thomas Sharp, Minister Brett Stovall, recorded 14 Mar 1817 (Doc.#88l)

       This marriage record indicates that Ruth Reynolds was the daughter of Moses Reynolds who was one of the sureties. The date of marriage indicates that Ruth Reynolds was born about 1799 in Patrick County, Virginia. Though the Patrick County Historical Society lists that Ruth was born in Pittsylvania County (Doc.#118e), Moses Reynolds and his family resided in that portion of Pittsylvania County which became Henry County in 1776, and Patrick County in 1791. Hence, Ruth Reynolds, who was born about 1799, would have been born in Patrick County.

       25 Jan 1820, Meeking [Meekins or Meeken] Reynolds married Polly Reynolds, Surety Jesse Reynolds, Min. Peter Franz (Doc.#51b, 88a)

       Notice that in this marriage record, Meeking Reynold’s uncle is listed as the surety for this marriage between Meeking and Polly Reynolds. This indicates that Polly was the daughter of Jesse Reynolds. Hence, Meeking and Polly Reynolds appear to have been first cousins. The date of marriage indicates that Polly Reynolds was born about 1802, and Meeking Reynolds in 1799. Meeking/Meekin Reynolds date of birth, as calculated from this marriage record, corresponds with Patrick County tax records listed below. Though the Patrick County Historical Society lists that “Meeken” Reynolds was born about 1795 (Doc.#118e), his marriage and tax records confirm that he was actually born in 1799 in Patrick County, Virginia.

       16 Mar 1820, William Reynolds married Nancy Burnett, Surety Isham Burnett, Minister Stephen Hubbard (Doc.#51b, 88s)

       This marriage record indicates that William Reynolds was born about 1800. However, William and his brother James Reynolds first appear on the Patrick County tax lists in 1817. This indicates that William was born in 1795/6 in Patrick County, Virginia. The Patrick County tax records, which are listed below, also indicate that William was the son of your ancestors, Joseph Reynolds and Sarah Perkins.

       6 Oct 1825, Matilda Reynolds, daughter of Moses Reynolds, married James Duvall, Surety Meeking Reynolds (Doc.#88g)

       This marriage record reveals that Matilda Reynolds was the daughter of Moses Reynolds. Her brother, Meeking [Meeken] Reynolds, was the surety. The date of marriage indicates that Matilda Reynolds was born about 1807 in Patrick County, Virginia. Though the Patrick County Historical Society lists that Matilda was born about 1794 in Pittsylvania County (Doc.#118e), Moses Reynolds and his family resided in that portion of Pittsylvania County which became Henry County in 1776, and Patrick County in 1791. Hence, Matilda Reynolds, who was born about 1807 according to this marriage record, would have been born in Patrick County.

       30 Sep 1827, John Reynolds married Ann Harbour, who resided with David Harbour, Surety Joshua Harbour (Doc.#51b, 88s)

       Though in 1793, a John Reynolds first appears in the tax records of Patrick County, Virginia, that John Reynolds was born prior to 1772. Unfortunately, there is no listing of a white male over age sixteen in previous tax lists of Patrick County from which to determine the father of John Reynolds. However, he appears to have been a different John Reynolds than the one who married Ann Harbour almost thirty years later.

       25 Feb 1830, Leony Reynolds married James Adams, Surety Barnabas Baliles, Minister Joshua Adams (Doc.#88b)

       Though there is no indication as to who was the father of Leony Reynolds, notice that Barnabas Baliles, the son-in-law of Jesse Reynolds, was the surety for this marriage. This indicates that Leony was related to Jesse Reynolds, possibly his daughter. According to this marriage record, Leony would have been born prior to 1812 in Patrick County, Virginia. In a comparison with the birth dates of her older brothers and sisters, she appears to have been born about 1808.

       22 Jun 1830, Susannah Reynolds married William Griffith, Surety Micajah Martin, Minister Joshua Adams, recorded 24 Jun 1830 (Doc.#88j)

       Though there is no indication as to the father of Susannah Reynolds, notice that Micajah Martin, the son-in-law of Moses Reynolds, was the surety for this marriage. Hence, this Susannah Reynolds appears to have been a granddaughter of Moses Reynolds.

       6 Oct 1831, C. H. Reynolds married Elizabeth Smith, Surety W. F. Smith, Minister Joshua Adams, recorded 6 Oct 1831 (Doc.#51b)

       2 Apr 1832, Frances Reynolds married Thomas Lawless, Surety Elisha Anglin, Minister Joshua Adams (Doc.#88n)

       These two marriages could be for either James or Thomas Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia. The fact that Elisha Anglin was surety for Frances Reynolds indicates that she was the daughter of Thomas Reynolds whose son married Charlotte Anglin in 1839.

       24 Nov 1833, William Perkins married Malinda Carter (Doc.#62b)

       This marriage for William Perkins appears to have been for a descendant of William Perkins, Sr., the father of your ancestor, Sarah Perkins.

       2 Dec 1834, Rozanah J. Reynolds, daughter of Thomas Reynolds, married John H. Washburn, Surety Thomas J. Reynolds, Minister John Washburn, Sr., recorded 4 Dec 1834 (Doc.#88x)

       Thomas J. Reynolds appears to have been a brother of Rozanah J. Reynolds. The 1850 census for Patrick County, Virginia should be searched to determine their birth years. Five years later, Thomas J. Reynolds got married:

       4Apr 1839, Thomas J. Reynolds married Charlotte Anglin, Surety John H. Washburn, Minister John Washburn, recorded 7 Apr 1839 (Doc.#88s)

       5 Feb 1840, James Reynolds married Roxanna Shelton/Shelor, daughter of John Shelor, Surety Andrew Jackson Edens, Min. William Lawson (Doc.#51b, 88a)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this James Reynolds was the son of James Reynolds and Milly McAlexander, i.e. the grandson of your ancestors Joseph Reynolds and Sarah Perkins. James’ date of marriage indicates that he was born about 1820 in Patrick County, Virginia. Hence, James Reynolds and Milly McAlexander were actually married about 1819 rather than in 1824 as indicated by the Ancestral File.

       5 Feb 1842, Fleming Reynolds married Tempy Joyce, Surety James Joyce, Minister Joshua Adams (Doc.#51b, 88s)

       7 May 1842, Sarah Reynolds, daughter of James Reynolds, married Perry Graham. Surety Thomas Shelton, witness William Reynolds. Minister Jesse Jones, recorded 21 May 1842 (Doc.#88i)

       Sarah Reynolds was the daughter of James Reynolds, the son of your ancestors, Joseph Reynolds and Sarah Perkins. She was named after her grandmother, Sarah Perkins. Her date of marriage, and birth dates estimated for siblings, indicate that she was born about 1825 in Patrick County, Virginia.

       6 Dec 1846, Rebecca E. Reynolds, daughter of Thomas Reynolds, married William H. Wimbush, Surety Peter M. Reynolds, Minister Joshua Adams, recorded 10 Dec 1846 (Doc.#88y)

       Similar to Thomas J. and Rozanah Reynolds, this marriage record indicates that Rebecca E. Reynolds and Peter M. Reynolds were children of Thomas Reynolds who resided in Patrick County. The 1850 census should be searched to locate the household of Thomas Reynolds and confirm his date of birth and parents names. Patrick County tax records listed below reveal that Thomas Reynolds was born in 1783 in Henry County, Virginia. As listed below, Thomas appears to have been the son of Jesse Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia.

       10 Dec 1846, Nancy S. Reynolds married Hardin Spencer, Surety Peter Spencer, Minister Joshua Adams (Doc.#88u)

       27 Nov 1848, Alexander P. Reynolds married Ruth Spencer, Surety William Spencer, Minister Joshua Adams, recorded 7 Dec 1848 (Doc.#88s)

       24 Sep 1849, Andrew J. Reynolds married Mary Conner, Surety Peter Conner, Minister John Conner, recorded 11 Oct 1849 (Doc.#88s)

       18 Dec 1849, Susan J. Reynolds, daughter of Thomas Reynolds, married John S. Koger, Surety William A. Reynolds, Minister Joshua Adams, recorded 19 Dec 1849 (Doc.#88m)
       
       According to the will of William Perkins, Sr., he was the father of the David Perkins who married Amelia Banks in 1804, and also her sister, Polly Banks, in 1816. Another William Perkins married Malinda Carter in 1833. Though the Perkins line extends back through several more William Perkins, we have yet to confirm this lineage beyond William Perkins, Sr. In the meantime, we are referring to Sarah Perkins’ father as William Perkins, Sr., the same name by which he is referred to in Henry and Patrick County records listed below.

       We have asked Desmond Kendrik, the Henry County Archivist and descendant of Joseph Reynolds and Margaret Devin, to locate th church for Rev. Joshua Adams who performed many of the Reynolds marriages listed above from 1842-1849.

       A search of the IGI and Ancestral File data reveals that Bartemus Reynolds was born on either 25 Aug 1776, or 25 Aug 1769 at Richmond, Virginia. According to this data, he was the son of George Reynolds and Frances Barber (Doc.#57, 58). Notice that there was a George Reynolds residing in Patrick County, Virginia in 1810 as listed above, as well as in Patrick and Henry Counties of Virginia as listed below. According to the Ancestral File, the ancestry of George Reynolds, who married Frances Barber, extends back several generations to Christopher Reynolds of County Kent, England. Though we have yet to verify the parents listed for the Bartimous Reynolds of Patrick and Henry Counties, name and residence patterns, particularly for Bartemus Reynolds, indicate that your ancestors, Joseph and Richard Reynolds, Sr., descend from the same ancestors.

       There is also a listing for Bartlett Reynolds, born about 1752 in Henry County, Virginia. The Ancestral File lists that Bartlett was the son of David Reynolds of Henry County, Virginia. David had a son named Joseph who was born about 1750 in Henry County, Virginia. This Joseph Reynolds was about the right age to have been your ancestor who married Sarah Perkins. However, as indicated below, David Reynolds was a brother of Bartlett Reynolds, not his father. David Reynolds never married and his estate, which was probated in 1788, was divided among his brothers and a younger sister named Mary Reynolds, who was a minor (under age twenty-one) according to Henry County deeds and probate records.

       Patrick County, Virginia deeds reveal that a Joseph Reynolds first sold land there on 7 Feb 1795. From 1795 to 1838, there are several deeds listing land sold by Joseph Reynolds including three for Joseph and Sally Reynolds in 1804, 1806, and 1813. Joseph Reynolds also sold land to his father-in-law, William Perkins, in 1811. In 1833 and 1838, there were estate deeds recorded for Joseph Reynolds. These dates correspond with the time period in which Joseph Reynolds, Sr., first bought land in Floyd County, Kentucky, which wasn’t recorded until 1834, and also when he appears to have died about 1833, possibly in Floyd County, Kentucky. (Doc.#49c) In order to learn more about Joseph Reynolds, Sr., particularly the estate deed dated 1833, we searched the actual Patrick County, Virginia deeds, patents, Virginia Commonwealth grants, court records, and tax lists which reveal the following for Joseph Reynolds and other Reynolds families which appear related:

       Patrick County, Virginia Records

       1791 Tax List, property within the district of Edward Tatum commissioner of the upper district of Henry County being that part of said county called Patrick after the first day of June next for the year 1791. (Doc.#115a-b)

Date       



Tithables        males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules       stud horses        Comments
May 9       William Perkins, Sr.       2       5       2       11              





“       William Perkins, Jr.       1       1              2              
“       Thomas Perkins       1                     1              
                                                 
Apr 20       Moses Reynolds                            4              
Apr 26       Millenton Reynolds       1                     1              
Apr 28       Joseph Reynolds       1       2              1              
Apr 29       Bartlett Reynolds       1                     3              
Apr 30       Jesse Reynolds       1                     1              
May 11       Mary Reynolds                            1              


       A male person who was tithable was considered to be over age 16. Once they reached age 21, they were usually listed independently for tax purposes. Though females, such as Joseph Reynold’s mother, Mary Reynolds, were listed as taxable households, it was for the purpose of property tax only. In this case, Mary Reynolds was taxed for her horse. The first column lists the number of white males over 16, the second column lists the number of Negroes over 16, the third column lists the number of Negroes between 12 and 16 years, the fourth column lists the number of horses, colts and mules and the fifth column lists the number of stud horses per household. According to Henry County deeds listed below, the Mary Reynolds household listed here in 1791 appears to have been for the mother of your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds. Henry County deds reveal that she was the wife of Richard Reynolds. William Perkins, Sr., who appears on this tax list, was the father of Sarah Perkins who married Joseph Reynolds. William Perkins, Sr., was also a close friend of Joseph’s father, Richard Reynolds.
       
              1792 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115c-d)

Date       



Tithables        males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules       stud horses        Comments
Mar 24       William Perkins, Sr.       2       5       1       11              





                                                 
Mar 13       Moses Reynolds       1                     4              
“       Reubin Reynolds       1                     1              
“       Jesse Reynolds       1                     1              
May 14       Joseph Reynolds       1       2              2              
Jun 30       Millington Reynolds       1                                   
Jul 2       Anne Reynolds                            1              


       This is the last tax list which lists Joseph Reynolds’ mother, Mary Reynolds. Hence, she appears to have moved or died after 1792. The fact that she is listed in Patrick County in 1792 indicates that she resided in that portion of Henry County which became Patrick County on 1 Jun 1791.

       Notice that Bartlett Reynolds was listed in 1791, but not in this tax list for 1792. Since Bartlett reappears in the 1795 tax list for Patrick County, this indicates that Bartlett Reynolds traveled out of the county in 1791 and didn’t return until 1795. In his place, Anne Reynolds, appears in the 1792 tax list. Hence, Anne Reynolds may have been Bartlett Reynolds’ wife.

       Sep 1792, Court, Joseph Reynolds listed as a Juryman (Doc.#92b)

       13 Sep 1792, Court, Joseph Reynolds listed as a Juryman (Doc.#92c)

       1793 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115e-f)

Date       



Tithables        males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules       stud horses        Comments
Mar 24       William Perkins, Sr.       2       5       1        11              





                                                 
Mar 11       Joseph Reynolds       1       2              3              
Mar 18       Moses Reynolds       1                     2              
May 14       Jesse Reynolds       1                     2              
May 22       Millenton Reynolds       1                                   


       Notice that William Perkins, Sr., had eight horses for which he was taxed in 1793 which are listed in the fifth column in 1793. He also owned 11 slaves. Your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds, owned 2 slaves and three horses. Notice that Bartlett Reynolds is not listed on this tax list.

       12 Mar 1793, Court, Joseph Reynolds as a Juryman (Doc.#92d)

       13 May 1793, Court, Joseph Reynolds listed in case Kimzey vs. Morris (Doc.#92f)

       11 Nov 1793, Court, Moses Joseph Reynolds listed in Pulliam vs. Cranch (Doc.#92h)

       This is the only listing for a Moses Joseph Reynolds in the court records. It indicates that Moses Reynolds’ middle name was Joseph if this court entry is accurate. This appears to confirm that Moses was related to your ancestors, Joseph Reynolds, Sr., and his father, Richard Reynolds, Sr.

       13 Nov 1793, Court, Joseph Reynolds as a Juryman (Doc.#92i)

       1794 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115g-h)

Date       



Tithables        males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules       stud horses        Comments
Jul 23       William Pirkins       1       8       2        8              





                                                 
May 23       John Reynolds       1                     1              
“       Moses Reynolds       1                     6              
Jul 15       Joseph Reynolds       1       2              2              
“       Jesse Reynolds       1                     3              


       This is the first listing for a John Reynolds in Patrick County tax lists. This indicates that John Reynolds was born prior to 1773. Since there is no listing of a white male over age sixteen in previous tax lists of Patrick County, John appears to have been older than twenty one when he came to Patrick County. According to Patrick County marriage records, a John Reynolds married Anne Harbour on 30 Sep 1827. At the time of the marriage, Anne was residing with David Harbour. The surety for the marriage was Joshua Harbour. However, since this marriage occurred almost thirty years later, these appear to have been two different John Reynolds. As listed below, Buncombe County, North Carolina deeds indicate that your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds, had a brother named John Reynolds from whom he purchased 86 acres on Turkey Creek in Buncombe County, North Carolina on 22 Oct 1828 in Deed Book 23, p. 285 (Doc.#100a).

       There were several early Reynolds families that settled in Henry County, from which Patrick County was created, including three named Richard Reynolds. However, your Richard Reynolds was the most influential and wealthy. He along with John Reynolds, Spencer Reynolds, Nathaniel Reynolds, Sr., and brothers Bartlett Reynolds, Moses Reynolds, Jesse Reynolds, David Reynolds, Archelaus Reynolds, Bartimus Reynolds, Reuben Reynolds and Millenton [Millington] Reynolds which appear to have been sons of the widow Susannah Reynolds of early Henry County, Virginia, were the first Reynolds settlers of Henry County, Virginia according to early tax records of Henry County.

       31 Jul 1794, Court, Joseph Reynolds listed in Burnett vs. Mayo (Doc.#92j)

       1795 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115i-j)

Date       



Tithables        males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
Jul 20       William Perkins       1       8       2        8       





                                          
Jun 6       Joseph Reynolds       1       2              4       
Jun 26       Bartlett Reynolds       1                            
Jul 13       Jesse Reynolds       1                     1       
“       Moses Reynolds       1                     6       
“       Foster Millenton Reynolds       1                            


       Notice that Millington Reynolds is listed as Foster Millenton Reynolds in this tax list. Millington appears to have been named after Foster Millenton. Locating a residence for Foster Millenton/Millington could aid further research on your Reynolds line. Hence, we searched the Family Search and Internet data bases for Millington. Though we found several listings for the Millington surname, we found nothing for a Foster Millington.

       18 Feb 1795, Court, Joseph Reynolds as a Juryman (Doc.#92k)

       28 Apr 1795, Deed Bk. 1, p.282, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia sold to James Turner of the same county, for five pounds, a tract of land located on the water of Rockastel Creek containing 50 acres (Doc.#73i)

       30 Apr 1795, Court, acknowledged Deed from Joseph Reynolds to James Turner (Doc.#92l)

       Though this appears to be the first tract of land obtained by Joseph Reynolds in Patrick County, other patents reveal he obtained land as early as 1792, a few years after Patrick County was created from Henry County in 1790. Notice that the water way on which this tract was listed is actually spelled “Rockcastle” or “Rock Castle” Creek in subsequent deeds listed below.

       31 Jul 1795, Court, Joseph Reynolds as a Juryman in Clark vs. Rowan (Doc.#92m)

       1796 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115k-l)

Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules       
Jul 14       William Perkins       1       9       1        9       





                                          
May 26       Joseph Runnals       1       1              4       
May 30       Jesse Runnals       1                     2       
May 16       Dotter Runnals       1                     1       
“       Moses Runnals       1                     5       


       The name listed for “Dotter Runnals” was difficult to read due to poor filming. Notice that the Reynolds surname was spelled “Runnals” for all of the Reynolds listings in this tax year.

       4 Feb 1796, Deed Bk. 1, p. 382, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia bought from John Breden of same county, for ten pounds, a tract of land containing 88 acres by survey located on the south side of Smith River (Doc.#73h)

       31 Mar 1796, Court, acknowledged Deed from John Breden Sr., and wife, to Joseph Reynolds (Doc.#92n)

       13 Apr 1796, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 35, #39, p. 152, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained grant for 18 acres on north waters of Smith’s River adjoining Mathew Small, etc. (Doc.#84, 106h)

       This is the same tract of land which Joseph Reynolds’ father, Richard Reynolds, obtained a patent for on 1 Mar 1781, almost fifteen years earlier in Henry County, Virginia. Note that Patrick County was created from Henry County in 1791.

       13 Apr 1796, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 35, #40, p. 164, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained grant for 150 acres on north waters of Smith’s River adjoining Joel Harbour, etc. (Doc.#84a, 106h)

       28 Apr 1796, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 35, #41, p. 169, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained grant for 312 acres on north waters of Smith’s River adjoining William Isam [Isham], Joel Harbour, etc. (Doc.#84b)

       26 May 1796, Court, Joseph Reynolds receives pay for 2 days witness (Doc.#92p)

       17 Aug 1796, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 35, p. 517, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained grant for 209 acres on the head waters of Wegan Creek adjoining William Lee (Doc.#84c)

       27 Oct 1796, Court, Joseph Reynolds as a Juryman in Tatum vs. Adams (Doc.#92q)

       1797 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115m)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       Jesse Reynolds       1                      2       





       Moses Reynolds       1                     5       
       Joseph Reynolds       1       1              4       


       27 Jul 1797, Court, Joseph Reynolds listed in Breden vs. Morgan (Doc.#92r)

       5 Aug 1797, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 36, #47, p. 484, Patrick County, Bartemus Reynolds obtained grant for 232 acres on the North Mayo River, adjoining Smith, Taylor, etc. (Doc.#106h)

       1798 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115n-o)

Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
Jul 22       William Perkins, Sr.       1       7       7        6       





                                          
Mar 25       C. Pleasant Reynolds       1                            
May 24       Moses Reynolds       2                     2       
“       Jesse Reynolds       1                     2       
Jul 21       Bartlett Reynolds       1                            


       This is the first year that C. Pleasant Reynolds appears in the Patrick County tax lists. Name and residence patterns indicate that he may have been the son of Moses, Jesse or Bartlett Reynolds. However, he was not listed as a tithable male over age sixteen in the previous tax years. Based on the fact that he was at least age twenty one in 1798, he was born prior to 1777. C. Pleasant’s birth date indicates that he was born too early to have been the son of Moses or Jesse Reynolds based on the birth dates for their other children. Hence, C. Pleasant Reynolds appears to have been the son of Moses and Jesse Reynold’s older brother, Bartlett Reynolds. Notice that your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds, was not listed on this 1798 tax list even though he appears in the following court record for that year:

       23 Feb 1798, Court, Joseph Reynolds listed as Juryman in Cummings vs. Going, Jesse Reynolds, Susanna Sharp and Moses Reynolds all received pay for 2 days witness (Doc.#92s)

       Notice the listing of Joseph Reynolds as a juryman in this case with Jesse and Moses Reynolds who are listed as witnesses along with Susanna Sharp. The Sharp family married into the Reynolds family according to the 1669 marriage for Richard Reynolds and Elizabeth Sharp of Isle of Wight County (Doc.#111). These name and residence patterns indicate that your ancestors and the other Reynolds families of Patrick, Henry and Pittsylvania Counties of Virginia, may descend from Richard Reynolds and Elizabeth Sharp of Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

       27 Jul 1798, Court, Joseph Reynolds receives pay for 2 days witness in John Breden vs. Commonwealth, 1 day witness in Breden vs. Clark (Doc.#92u-v)

       1799 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115p)

Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       William Pirkins       1       7       7        4       






                                          
       Moses Reynolds       2       1       1       2       
       Bartlett Reynolds       1                            
       Joseph Reynolds       1       1       1       5       


       Notice that Jesse Reynolds is not listed in this 1799 tax list. These tax lists appear to occasionally omit tithable households. In the same year that he was omitted from the tax lists, Jesse Reynolds obtained a grant in Patrick County from the Virginia Commonwealth:

       19 Mar 1799, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 42, #153, p. 273, Patrick County, Jesse Reynolds obtained grant for 140 acres on the South Fork of the North Mayo River, adjoining Reynolds and Pullins land (Doc.#106i)

       28 Mar 1799, Court, Joseph Reynolds listed as security for George Booth (Doc.#92w)

       25 Apr 1799, Court, Joseph Reynolds received pay for 1 day witness in Harbour vs. Corn (Doc.#92x)

       30 May 1799, Court, Joseph Reynolds and others appointed to view a road around Nathan Hall plantation and report (Doc.#92x)

       10 Oct 1799, Deed Bk. 1, p. 697, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia bought from Thomas & Sucky Gee of Grayson County, Virginia, for $120, a tract of land containing 118 acres by survey located on the north side of Rock Castle Creek (Doc.#73d)

       26 Nov 1799, Court, Deed of Trust acknowledged between Joseph Reynolds and Obadiah Burnett (Doc.#92z)

       1800 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115q)

Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       Bartlett Reynolds       1                            
       Moses Reynolds       3       1       1       3       
       Jesse Reynolds       1                     4       
       Henry Reynolds       1                     1       
       C. Pleasant Reynolds       1                            
       Joseph Reynolds       1                     4       


       This is the first listing for Henry Reynolds indicating that he turned twenty one in 1800. This indicates that he was born in 1779. Patrick County marriage records lists that Henry Reynolds married Susanna Clay on 4 Feb 1808. Surety was Daniel Edmonds, the Minister was Thomas Whitlock as listed above. Though the Patrick County tax records do not indicate the father of Henry Reynolds, he was born the right time period to have been the son of either Bartlett, Moses, Jesse or Joseph Reynolds, all of whom resided in Patrick County, Virginia in 1800. If Henry Reynolds was a son of one of these individuals, he should have been listed as a white male above age sixteen in the previous tax years, which he was not. However, similar to C. Pleasant Reynolds, Henry Reynolds early date of birth indicates that he was a son of Bartlett Reynolds and brother of C. Pleasant Reynolds who is listed above.

       7 Feb 1800, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 43, #178, p. 556, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained grant for 379 acres on the waters of Rockcastle and Jills Creek adjoining McAlexander, Denny, etc. (Doc.#84d, 106i)

       Notice that Joseph Reynolds is listed purchasing land next to the McAlexander family. As listed above, the Ancestral File lists Joseph’s son, James Reynolds, as marrying Milly McAlexander in 1824 in nearby Montgomery County, Virginia. The fact that the marriage date is not complete indicates that the original marriage record does not exist or it was calculated by the submitter of this information. Though we searched the Montgomery County marriage records, we were unable to locate the marriage record.

       7 Mar 1800, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 43, #165, p. 445, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained grant for 441 acres on the waters of Rock Castle Creek adjoining Patterson and Callaway, etc. (Doc.#84e, 106i)
       
       7 Mar 1800, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 43, #166, p. 447, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained grant for 223 acres on the waters of Smiths River adjoining Ward and Breden, etc. (Doc.#84f, 106i)

       7 Mar 1800, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk.43, # 167, p. 462, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained grant for 109 acres on the waters of Joint Crack Creek adjoining Ratliff and Harbour, etc. (Doc.#84g, 106i)

       7 Mar 1800, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 43, # 169, p. 471, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained grant for 1479 acres on the waters of Rockcastle Creek adjoining Walton, Kimsey and Denny, etc. (Doc.#84h, 106i)

       10 Mar 1800, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 43, #177, p. 540, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained grant for 672 acres on the waters of Jonet [Joint] Crack Creek adjoining Brammer and Lee, etc. (Doc.#84i, 106i)

       10 Mar 1800, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 43, #179, p. 561, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained grant for 193 acres on the waters of Big and Little Wedgon [Wegan] Creeks adjoining Ward , McBride, etc. (Doc.#84j, 106i)

       10 Mar 1800, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 45, #183, p. 208, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained grant for 18 acres on the north waters of Smiths River, adjoining Joel Harbour. (Doc.#84k, 106j)

       27 Mar 1800, Court, Deeds acknowledged between Joseph Reynolds and Isaac Collings, and between Joseph Reynolds and Stephen Harper (Doc.#92ab)

       29 May 1800, Court, View for a road form ford on Smiths River next to Joseph Reynolds into the road next to Widow Foley’s (Doc.#92ac)

       25 Jun 1800, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 44, #182, p. 599, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained grant for 211 acres on the north waters of Smiths River, adjoining Charles Rake, Burnett and others, etc. (Doc. 106j)

       The Burnett family which resided next to Joseph Reynolds land in 1800 appears to be the same Burnett family of whom Joseph’s son, William Reynolds, married Nancy Burnett on 16 Mar 1820 in Patrick County, Virignia. The surety for this marriage was Isham Burnett, the Minister was Stephen Hubbard (Doc.#51b, 88s). A Patrick County history lists that the Burnett family was among the earliest of families, similar to the Reynolds, Harbour and Hairston families, etc., to settle in Patrick and Henry Counties.

       31 Jul 1800, Joseph Reynolds received pay for 1 day witness in Breden vs. Morgan (Doc.#92ad)

       The large number of tracts of land which Joseph Reynolds obtained in 1796 and 1800 indicate that he was a very wealthy and successful land owner of Patrick County, Virginia, particularly for this time period.

       26 Mar 1800, Deed Bk. 2, p, 695, Joseph Reynolds and his wife, Sally, of Patrick County, Virginia, sold to Stephen Harper for fifteen pounds, a tract of land (no acreage listed) located on the south side of Rock Castle Creek (Doc.#73c)

       This is the first deed to list Joseph Reynolds’ wife, Sally. Sally is a nick-name for Sarah which corresponds with her name as it is listed in the power of attorney filed in Floyd County, Kentucky for their son James Reynolds who was still residing in Patrick County, Virginia. Sarah’s name also corresponds with the will of her father, William Perkins, Sr., which lists Joseph and Sarah Reynolds as heirs.

       7 Apr 1800, Deed Bk. 2, p. 25, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, bought from James and Margaret Patterson of Franklin County, Virginia, for sixty pounds, a tract of land containing 345 acres by survey located on the north branch of Smith’s River bounding Richard Reynold’s line, etc. (Doc.#73e)

       Notice that Joseph Reynolds resided next to Richard Reynolds who was living in 1800 according to this deed. This corresponds with the above reference to Richard Reynolds who was living in 1802.

       25 Jun 1800, Virginia Patents, Grants 44, p. 599, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained grant for 211 acres on the north side of Smiths River, adjoining Charles Rake, Burnett and others, etc. (Doc.#84l)

       1801 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115t)

Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       Pleasant C. Reynolds       1       1                      





       Bartlett Reynolds       1                            
       Joseph Reynolds       1                     3       
       Jesse Reynolds       1                     3       
       Moses Reynolds       3       1       1       5       
       Henry Reynolds       1                     1       


              1802 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115t)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       Joseph Rynolds       1                      9       





       Jesse Rynolds       1                     4       
       Moses Rynolds       2       1       1       5       
       Henry Rynolds       1                     1       
       Abraham Rynolds       1                     1       


       This is the first year that Abraham Reynolds was listed, indicating that he was born in 1781 in Henry County, Virginia which corresponds with the Reynolds Homestead information listed above. Patrick County marriage records, which are listed above, reveal that Abraham Reynolds married Polly Harbour on 19 May 1809. The marriage was performed by Minister Stephen Hubbard. Notice that in the previous tax year for 1801 that only Moses Reynolds was listed with more than one male tithable over 16 years that could have been Abraham. As listed above, Abraham Reynolds also obtained land on the Nobusiness Fork of the North Mayo River next to Moses Reynolds. This confirms that Abraham Reynolds was the son of Moses Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia.

       21 Mar 1802, Deed of Trust, Deed Bk. 2, p. 502, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, sold to his trusting friends Charles Foster and John Hall (trustees for Peter Saunders) of the same county, for 533 pounds, 18 shillings and 10 pence paid by Peter & Polly Saunders, whom Joseph Reynolds is justly indebted to by bond, the following tracts of land: 165 acres known by the name of the Old Survey being the land deeded from Pallatiah Shelton to me, also one half of 355 acres of deed from James Patterson, also 150 acres deeded from Richard Reynolds, also 88 acres from John Breden, also one half of 440 acres patented in the name of the said Joseph Reynolds, also four other tracts of land containing 500 acres and located on both sides of the Smith’s River being the lands that Joseph Reynolds currently lives on, all of which lands are included in a survey made by William ? containing 1628.5 acres (Doc.#73l)

       Notice that a Richard Reynolds appears as a previous owner of land which Joseph Reynolds obtained according to this Deed of Trust. This indicates that Joseph Reynolds was related to this Richard Reynolds who was living in 1802 according to this deed. Later deeds reveal that Joseph Reynolds, Sr., was a son of Richard Reynolds, Sr. According to the Ancestral File, there was a Richard D. Reynolds who was born on 27 Mar 1755 in Henry County, Virginia, the son of David Reynolds and Mary Anderson (Doc.#80b). He served in the Revolutionary War and married Nancy Grisham on 2 Mar 1785 in Henry County, Virginia. He died on 21 Aug 1836 in Muhlenburg County, Kentucky. Neither his will or his Revolutionary War pension records list a son named Joseph (Doc.#68, 80). In addition, as Henry County, Virginia deeds illustrate below, this Richard Reynolds does not appear to have been born early enough to have been the father of your Joseph Reynolds. However, name and residence patterns suggest that they were cousins.

       In regards to Revolutionary War records, we also searched the pension abstracts and the DAR Patriot Index for Joseph and Richard Reynolds. Though we located a Joseph Reynolds born 1750 in Virginia, he married a Susanna Wright and does not appear to have been related to your ancestors (Doc.#67).

       5 Nov 1802, Deed Bk. 2, p. 298, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, bought from Ezekiel Morris of the same county, for 30 pounds, a 149 acre tract of land located on Rock Castle Creek (Doc.#73f)

       1803 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115u-v)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       Joseph Rynolds       1                      7       





       Bartus Rynolds       1                            
       Moses Rynolds       2                     6       
       James Rannolds       1                     4       
       Jesse Rynolds       1                     4       


       This appears to be the first census to list a James Reynolds. However, notice that it is not spelled the same way as the other Reynolds households indicating that he may not have been a Reynolds. This is the first year that Bartus is listed in this tax list. This appears to have been for Bartimous Reynolds who married Mildred Taylor, surety was David Taylor, on 5 Feb 1799 in Patrick County as listed above.

       1804 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115w-x)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       Henry Reynolds       1                      2       





       Bartlett Reynolds       2                            
       Moses Reynolds       1                     6       
       Jesse Reynolds       2                     4       
       Thomas Reynolds       1                     1       


       This is the first year in which Thomas Reynolds is listed in the Patrick County tax lists which indicates he was born in 1783 in Henry County, Virginia. This year of birth corresponds with the Patrick County marriage records listed above. The residence pattern in this tax record indicates that Thomas was the son of Jesse Reynolds who he is listed next to on this tax list. Although the Patrick County Historical Society lists a Thomas Reynolds, born 1785, as the son of a Jesse David Reynolds of Bedford County, the Patrick County tax list above indicates that the Thomas Reynolds who was born in 1783 in Henry County was the son of Jesse Reynolds, the brother of Moses Reynolds, all of whom resided on the waters of the Mayo River in Patrick County, Virginia.

       23 Mar 1804, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 52, #243, p. 275, Patrick County, Henry Reynolds obtained grant for 70 acres on the head waters of Loving’s Creek on the east side of the Blue Ridge, adjoining Ogle (Doc.#106k)

       29 Mar 1804, Power of Attorney, Deed Bk. 2, p.345, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, appointed Benjamin Kimzey of Buncum [Buncombe] County, North Carolina his true and lawful attorney, to ask, demand, sue for money and receive all such sums of money, demands and debts which are owing to him whereas he has sundry debts owed to him according to books and accounts in possession of his attorney, Benjamin Kimzey (Doc.#73g)

       This deed reveals that Joseph Reynolds owned land in Buncombe County, North Carolina. As illustrated by other deeds, Benjamin Kimzey was Joseph’s neighbor and he acted as Joseph’s power of attorney to collect debts for him in Buncombe County, North Carolina. Hence, Benjamin Kimzey apparently owned land in Buncombe County, North Carolina. It appears that your ancestor, Hamilton Reynolds, according to Kentucky census records and this deed, was most likely born in Buncombe County, North Carolina. Buncombe County is located in western North Carolina, not far from Floyd County, Kentucky. Hence, we searched the will index for North Carolina and located a will for a Joseph Reynolds dated 1867 (Doc.#22a, 99a). Though this is too late to have been for your ancestor, this will may have been for a relative named Joseph Reynolds.

        We also searched the 1800-1810 census indexes for North Carolina but there are no listings for any Reynolds families residing in Buncombe County when Hamilton Reynolds would have been born (Doc.#34). There was, however, a deed of purchase by Joseph Reynolds from John Reynolds on 22 Oct 1828 in Deed Book 23, p. 285, for 86 acres on Turkey Creek in Buncombe County, North Carolina (Doc.#100a). John Reynolds, whom he bought the land from, may have been a brother of Joseph Reynolds. There was a John Reynolds listed in the early Henry County tax lists as listed below.

       20 Nov 1804, Deed Bk. 2, p. 464, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, bought from Mary Foley and Crestyer Foley her son of the same county, for 24 pounds, a tract of land containing ? acres and located on waters of “unknown” creek (Doc.#73k)

       1 Nov 1804, Deed of Trust, Deed Bk. 2, p.463, between Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia and James Turner of same county, whereas Joseph Reynolds is justly indebted to James Croty of the same county, for the sum of 85 pounds, 10 shillings and 34 pence of which Joseph Reynolds is desirous to pay unto the said James Croty and the said Joseph Reynolds having a legal right to a tract of land containing 345 acres by survey, it being the land that Joseph Reynolds purchased from James Patterson, also one other tract containing 262 acres adjoining Cpt. Turner and Jeremiah Burnett, assigned and confirmed these tracts to James Turner (Doc.#73j)

       1805 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115y-z)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       Jesse Reynolds       2                      5       





       Thomas Reynolds       1                     1       
       Moses Reynolds       1                     6       
       Joseph Reynolds       2                     6       
       Henry Reynolds       1                     3       
       Bartlett Reynolds       2                     1       


       In both this and the previous tax list, residence patterns indicate that Thomas, who appears next to Jesse on both of these tax lists, was a son of Jesse Reynolds.

       13 Sep 1805, Deed Bk. 2, p. 508, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, bought from Jonathan Isam of Montgomery County, Virginia, for $50, a tract of land containing 6 acres located on the fork of Rockcastle Creek (Doc.#73a)

       1806 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115aa-ab)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       Joseph Reynolds       2                      6       





       Bartlett Reynolds       2                            
       Henry Reynolds       1                     2       
       Jesse Reynolds       2                     5       
       Thomas Reynolds       1                     1       
       Moses Reynolds       1                     5       


       15 Jan 1806, Deed Bk. 2, p. 562, Joseph and Sally Reynolds, Charles Foster and John Hall, all of Patrick County, Virginia sold to Peter Saunders of Franklin County, Virginia, for 200 pounds, nine tracks of land including a tract containing 260 acres patented in the name of Richard Reynolds in Mar 1781 and deeded to Joseph Reynolds by Richard Reynolds in Mar 1801 and 441 acres patented in the name of Joseph Reynolds on 7 Mar 1800 and two tracts of 18 acres patented to Joseph Reynolds in 1796 and 1800 (Doc.#73b)

       This deed reveals that Joseph Reynolds received from Richard Reynolds a tract of land containing 260 acres which was originally patented in the name of Richard Reynolds in Mar 1781. However, since Patrick County wasn’t created until 1790 from Henry County, this patent appears to have been originally granted in Henry County which was created from Pittsylvania County in 1776. However, there are no patents listed for Richard Reynolds in Henry County, Virginia according to the on-line records which we searched. According to Patrick County, Virginia deeds, there were at least three patents issued to Joseph Reynolds in Patrick County which are not listed in the Patrick County deeds or patent records. It is possible that their marriage record was recorded under a variant spelling of the Reynolds surname such as Runnolds, etc.

       17 Apr 1806, Virginia Patents, Grants 55, p.411, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained patent for 350 acres on the north side of Rockcastle Creek at the mouth of a Branch and adjoining his own land (Doc.#84m)

       17 Apr 1806, Virginia Patents, Grants 55, p.414, Patrick County, Joseph Reynolds obtained patent for 90 acres on the south waters of Smiths River adjoining Barnett, Fuson, etc. (Doc.#84n)

       10 Nov 1806, Deed of Trust, Deed Bk. 3, p. 7, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, sold to John Hall and James Turner of the same county, for 110 pounds, which the said Joseph Reynolds is indebted to Peter Saunders, Sr., sold to John Hall and James Turner a tract of land containing 1243 acres consisting of the following tracts of land; 672 acres patented in the name of Joseph Reynolds dated 14 Nov 1796; 312 acres patented in the name of Joseph Reynolds dated 17 Oct 1792; 152 acres patented in the name of Joseph Reynolds dated 16 Oct 1792; 109 acres patented in the name of Joseph Reynolds dated 17 Feb 1795 (Doc.#72f-g)

       Notice that according to the above patents listed for Joseph Reynolds, that there are none dated in the years 1792 as listed in this Patrick County, Virginia deed. Hence, there must be additional patents recorded for Joseph Reynolds beginning as early as 1792 according to this deed.

       31 Dec 1806, Deed Bk. 3, p. 2, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, sold to John Seay of the same county, for $123, a tract of land containing 223 acres and located on the north side of Rockcastle Creek (Doc.#72h)

       1807 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115ae-ag)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       David Perkins       1       1       1        2       





       William Perkins       1       7       7       6       
       Susanna Perkins                            1       
       Elizabeth Perkins                            1       
                                          
       Joseph Reynolds       2                     3       
       Jesse Reynolds       2                     5       
       Abraham Reynolds       1                     1       
       Moses Reynolds       1                     9       
       Pleasant C. Reynolds       1                     1       
       Henry Reynolds       1                     1       
       Stephen Reynolds       1                            


       This was the first year that Stephen Reynolds appears on the tax list indicating that he was born in 1786. He may have been the son of Bartlett Reynolds who is listed with two white males above age 16 in the previous tax year. Bartlett was not listed in this 1807 tax list which indicates he may have died or moved. We listed the Perkins in this tax list for the purpose of showing William Perkins, Sr., with son David and daughters Susanna and Elizabeth whose horses were taxed. Notice that this information corresponds with William Perkins, Sr.’s will. There is no 1808 tax list which is extant.

       20 Apr 1808, Deed Bk. 3, p. 192, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, sold to Jesse Corn of the same county, for $21, a tract of land containing 193 acres by survey and bounded by Wards and McAlexander, etc. (Doc.#72e)

       1809 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115ai)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       Moses Reynolds       1                      7       





       Jesse Reynolds       1              1       4       
       Abram Reynolds       1                     1       
       George Reynolds       1                     1       
       Thomas Reynolds       1                     1       


       1810 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115ak)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       Jesse Reynolds       1              1        3       





       George Reynolds       1                     1       
       Moses Reynolds       1              1       6       
       Abram Reynolds       1                     2       
       Thomas Reynolds       1                            
       Henry Reynolds       1                     2       


       Residence patterns according to this tax list suggest that George was the son of Jesse Reynolds. Notice that Joseph Reynolds was not residing in Patrick County in 1810, the year that his son Hamilton was born in North Carolina. Hence, Joseph Reynolds appears to have been residing in North Carolina in 1810 which corresponds with the birth place for your ancestor, Hamilton Reynolds.

       27 Oct 1810, Deed of Trust, Deed Bk. 3, p. 363, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, sold to Samuel Staples, with desire to settle debt to Robert Rowan for 26 9/6 pounds with interest a tract of land located on the north side of Rock Castle Creek at the mouth of a branch (Doc.#72c-d)

       1811 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115am)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       Abram Reynolds       1                      1       





       Moses Reynolds       1              1       5       
       Jesse Reynolds       1              1       5       
       George Reynolds       1                            
       Joseph Reynolds       2                     1       
       Thomas Reynolds       1                     1       


       1812 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115ao)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       Moses Reynolds       1              1        5       





       Jesse Reynolds       1              1       4       
       George Reynolds       1                     1       
       Abram Reynolds       1                     2       
       Joseph Reynolds       2                     1       
       Thomas Reynolds       1                     4       


       1813 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115aq-ar)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       William Perkins              9       2        7       





                                          
       Joseph Reynolds       2                     1       
       Jesse Reynolds       1       1              4       
       George Reynolds       1                            
       Abraham Reynolds       1                     2       
       Moses Reynolds       1              1       4       
       Thomas Reynolds       1                     1       


       11 Nov 1813, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 64, #356, p. 118, Patrick County, Moses Reynolds obtained grant for 80 acres on the North Mayo River adjoining Abraham Reynolds (Doc.#106l)

       11 Nov 1813, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 64, #357, p. 119, Patrick County, Jesse Reynolds obtained grant for 50 acres adjoining Deel and Anglin’s land (Doc.#106l)

       1814 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115as-at)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks over 16       blacks 12-16       horses and mules        Comments
       Jesse Reynolds       1       1               4       





       Thomas Reynolds       1                     2       
       Joseph Reynolds       1       1              1       
       Abraham Reynolds       1       1              2       
       Moses Reynolds       1              1       4       
       George Reynolds       1                            


       20 Dec 1814, Deed Bk. 4, p. 171, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, sold to Humphrey Smith of Montgomery County, Virginia, for $91, a tract of land located on the waters of Sycamore containing 43 acres formerly belonging to Elizabeth Law adjoining John Burnett and the other tract formerly owned by Eleanor Foley, one of the heirs and legatees of Bartlett Foley, deceased, etc. (Doc.#72a-b)

       1815 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115au-aw)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks 9-12 yrs       blacks 12-       horses and mules       cattle        Comments
Feb 4       Abram Reynolds       1              1        2       7       





“       Joseph Reynolds       2              1       1       2       
Feb 23       Thomas Reynolds       1                     2       7       
Feb 24       Jesse Reynolds       1       1       1       4       10       
Mar 17       George Reynolds       1                     1              
May 1       Moses Reynolds       1              1       5       11       


       1816 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115ax-az)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks 12-       horses and mules        Comments
Feb 23       George Reynolds       1               1       





Mar 6       Joseph Reynolds       3              1       
Mar 14       Abram Reynolds       1       1       2       
“       Moses Reynolds       1       1       4       
“       Jesse Reynolds       1       2       4       
“       Thomas Reynolds       1              2       


       3 Apr 1816, Deed Bk. 4, p. 305, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, sold to Redey Graham of the same county, for another lot of land, a tract of land, Foley’s listed in this deed (Doc.#72)

       30 Dec 1816, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 66, #369, p. 248, Patrick County, Moses Reynolds obtained grant for 47 acres on the Nobusiness Fork of the North Mayo River adjoining Gabriel Penn, Cameron and others (Doc.#106l)

       1817 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115aaa-aab)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks 12-       horses and mules        Comments
Feb 13       Jesse Reynolds       1       2        4       





“       George Reynolds       1              1       
“       Thomas Reynolds       1              2       
“       Abram Reynolds       1       1       3       
Mar 8       Moses Reynolds       2       1       4       
Mar 19       Joseph Reynolds       1              1       
“       James Reynolds       1                     
“       William Reynolds       1                     


       This is the first year that James and William appear on the tax lists for Patrick County, Virginia. The dates and residence patterns for this tax list indicate that Joseph Reynolds, who was listed with three white males above 16 in the previous year, was the father of James and William Reynolds. Since 1817 is the first year in which James and William Reynolds appear on the tax list, this indicates that they were born in 1796. However, the 1850 census for Patrick County reveals that James Reynolds was actually born in 1792 even though he wasn’t taxed until 1817. Notice that the value of Joseph Reynold’s personal property had decreased in value considerably since the beginning of these tax records. These tax records also indicate that Jesse Reynolds was the father of George, Thomas and Abram/Abraham.

       1818 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115aac-aad)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks 12-       horses and mules        Comments
Feb 6       Thomas Reynolds       1       1        1       





Feb 7       Jesse Reynolds       2       2       4       
“       George Reynolds       1              1       
“       Moses Reynolds       2       1       3       
Mar 12       James Reynolds       1              1       
Mar 21       Abram Reynolds       1       1       3       
Mar 25       Joseph Reynolds       1              1       
“       William Reynolds       1              1       


       13 May 1818, Deed Bk.5, p. 234, Joseph Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, sold to Rubin Harris of the same county, for 59, a tract of land containing 59 acres joining a tract of land owned by William Perkins, deceased, etc. (Doc.#71)

       1819 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115aae-aag)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks 12-       horses and mules        Comments
Feb 11       George Reynolds       1               1       





“       Thomas Reynolds       1       1       1       
Mar 6       Abram Reynolds       1       2       2       
“       Moses Reynolds       2       1       3       
“       Jesse Reynolds       2       1       3       
Apr 10       Joseph Reynolds       1              1       
“       James Reynolds       1              1       
“       William Reynolds       1              2       


       1820 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115aah-aai)
Date       



Tithables       males above 16       blacks 12-       Blacks 16-       horses & m ules        Comments
Feb 16       Moses Reynolds       1               1       3       





“       Meekin Reynolds       1                     1       
“       Jesse Reynolds       2       1              3       
“       George Reynolds       1                     1       
Mar 1       Abram Reynolds       1       1       1       2       
Mar 16       Thomas Reynolds       1              1       1       
“       James Reynolds       1                     1       
“       William Reynolds       1                     2       


       This tax list reveals that Meekin Reynolds, who appears on the 1820 tax list for the first time, was born in 1799. According to Patrick County marriage records listed above, Meekins Reynolds married Polly Reynolds on 25 Jan 1820. Surety was Jesse Reynolds who appears to have been Polly’s father. Notice that Meekins was taxed on the same date as Moses Reynolds who was taxed for two males over age 16 in 1819, but only for one male over 16 in 1820. This confirms that Moses Reynolds was the father of Meekins Reynolds. Hence, Meekins and Polly Reynolds were first cousins. Their marriage was performed by Minister Peter Franz (Doc.#51b, 88a).

       Notice that Joseph Reynolds is not listed with his sons, James and William Reynolds. This indicates that Joseph Reynolds was residing elsewhere, perhaps North Carolina or Kentucky where he also owned land.       

       1821 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115aaj-aak)
Date       



Tithables       Blacks 12-       horses & mules        Comments
Feb 1       Abram Reynolds       2       3       





Feb 6       James Reynolds              1       
Feb 13       Thomas Reynolds       1       1       
Mar 2        Jesse Reynolds       4       4       
“       Meekins Reynolds              1       
“       George Reynolds              2       
“       Moses Reynolds       1       3       


       1822 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115aal-aam)
Date       



Tithables       Blacks 12-       horses & mules        Comments
Feb 2       George Reynalds              2       





Feb 7       Abram Reynalds       2       5       
Feb 11       James Reynolds              1       
Feb 14        Thomas Reynalds       1       2       
Feb 16       Moses Reynalds       1       4       
“       Meekins Reynolds              1       
Mar 14       Jesse Reynolds       4       3       

       
       1823 Tax List, Patrick County, Virginia (Doc.#115aan-aao)
Date       



Tithables       Blacks 12-       horses & mules        Comments
Feb 1       William Reynalds              1       





Feb 4       Abram Reynalds       2       3       
Feb 14       James Reynalds              2       
Feb 25        Jesse Reynalds       4       4       
“       Meekins Reynalds              2       
“       Thomas Reynalds       1       2       
“       Moses Reynalds       1       4       
3 Mar       George Reynalds              3       


       6 Jun 1825, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 74, #419, p. 78, Patrick County, James Reynolds obtained grant for 248 acres on Rock Castle Creek (Doc.#106m)

       This is the same James Reynolds who was a son of Joseph Reynolds and Sarah Perkins. He was residing in Patrick County with his wife and son William in the 1850 census as listed above. This is the same James Reynolds who recorded a Power of Attorney for his son, William Reynolds, regarding the estate of their mother, Sarah Reynolds, in Floyd County, Kentucky.

       24 Oct 1832, Virginia Patents & Grants Bk. 81, #482, p. 98, Patrick County, Abram Reynolds obtained grant for 22 acres on the headwaters of Mill Creek (Doc.#106n)

       3 Aug 1833, Deed Bk. 8, p. 252, Joseph Reynolds estate, William Ayres appointed by the Chancery Court for Patrick County, Virginia, at Jun term 1831 to sell the lands of Joseph Reynolds, deceased, and Samuel Boyd of the same county, for $90, sold to Samuel Boyd , a tract of land containing 211 acres located on Smiths River and Shooting Creek, etc. (Doc.#70)

       15 Feb 1838, Deed Bk. 10, p. 58, Joseph Reynolds estate, William Ayres appointed by the Chancery Court for Patrick County, Virginia, at Jun term 1831 to sell the lands of Joseph Reynolds, deceased, sold to James Reynolds of the same county, for $40, a tract of land containing 90 acres and located on the south waters of Smiths River formerly adjoining land owned by John Burnett, etc. (Doc.#69)

       According to these last two deeds and the Power of Attorney filed in Floyd County by Joseph and Sarah Reynolds’ son, James Reynolds of Patrick County, Virginia, it is apparent that Joseph Reynolds died prior to Jun 1831 when the Chancery Court of Patrick County, Virginia appointed William Ayers to administer the estate of Joseph Reynolds. Hence, we searched the Patrick County Chancery Court records beginning with the Jun 1831 session. Though the Patrick County Chancery Court records do not begin until Sep 1831, we located an entry for Reynolds vs. Reynolds in which William Ayres was appointed a commissioner to sell land and resolve the matter, but no names or genealogical information is listed in this Chancery Court entry, which was actually recorded in the Patrick County Order Books (Doc.#86).

       We also located a few deeds for William Perkins and his wife, Cesly, who sold land in 1798.

       18 Dec 1798, Patrick County, Virginia, Deed Bk. 1, p. 620, William Perkins, and Cesly his wife, of Surry County, North Carolina, sold to Palmer Crutchfield of Patrick County, for 120 pounds, 130 acres of the ancient composition lying on the waters of Stuart Creek.... (Doc.#120)

       Notice that William and Cesly Perkins and their family were residing in Surry County, North Carolina in 1798. As revealed from Patrick County, Virginia records, this William Perkins, who married Cecelia Moss, was the son of your direct line ancestor, William Perkins, Sr. Your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds, was a son-in-law of William Perkins, Sr., who was also a close friend of Joseph’s father, Richard Reynolds. Richard Reynolds was a large and successful land owner, who similar to William Perkins, Sr., probably owned land in North Carolina. Henry County deeds reveal that Richard Reynolds also owned land in Madison County, Kentucky prior to Kentucky obtaining statehood in 1792. Hence, further research in the Kentucky and North Carolina records should provide us with additional information for your ancestors, Richard and Joseph Reynolds.

       There were also two deeds for the estate of William Perkins, Sr., filed by the executor of the estate in 1813 and 1818 (Doc.#49a):

       19 Jun 1813, Patrick County, Virginia, Deed Bk. 4, p. 46, William Perkins estate, John Hall executor, sold land to Pleasant Thomas of Patrick County for $390, 492 acres on Poplar Camp Creek (Doc.#121-121a)
       
       13 May 1818, Patrick County, Virginia, Deed Bk. 4, p. 395, William Perkins estate, John Hall executor, sold land to Reuben Harriss for $200, 350 acres (Doc.#118a)

       From the information that William Perkins’ wife was named Cesly, we conducted a search of the IGI for their marriage and located it listed in neighboring Franklin County, Virginia:

       Franklin County, Virginia, Marriage Records

       20 Nov 1786, William Perkins married Sicily Moss
       
       Notice that according to William Perkins Sr.’s will that he loaned a Negro to a Mary Ann Moss who was probably a sister of his daughter-in-law, Cesly/Sicily Moss. According to the Ancestral File, her actual name appears to have been Cecelia Moss. She was born about 1759 in Goochland County, Virginia where the Perkins also resided prior to migrating to Franklin, Henry and Patrick Counties. Cecelia Moss was the daughter of John Moss and Elizabeth Massey whose ancestries have been included in your genealogical data base.

       After locating the marriage of William Perkins and Cecelia Moss, we conducted a search of the Ancestral File data and located the ancestry of William Perkins. This data lists that William Perkins was born 22 Aug 1759 in Goochland County, Virginia. He was the son of William Perkins, Sr., and Susanna Holland whose ancestries extend back several additional generations in Colonial Virginia according to the Ancestral File data. Subject to further research and verification of this information, it appears to be accurate even though it lacks proper documentation (Doc.#52).

       According to the Ancestral File, there was a Joseph Reynolds who was born about 1750 in Henry County, Virginia. He was of the right age to have been the father of your Joseph Reynolds who married Sarah Perkins. According to the Patrick County deeds listed above, Joseph was the son of Richard Reynolds of Henry County, Virginia. Hence, the Ancestral File erroneously lists this Joseph Reynolds as a son of David Reynolds who was born about 1720 in Surry County, Virginia. The Ancestral File also lists David Reynolds with two different sets of parents and there is no documentation or evidence to support the existence of a David Reynolds who married Mary Anderson. According to the Henry County, Virginia records listed below, the 1788 estate record filed in Henry County for David Reynolds (Doc.#66c) was for a younger brother of Moses Reynolds, Jesse Reynolds, Archalus Reynolds, Bartus [Bartemus/Bartimus] Reynolds, Reuben Reynolds and Millenton [Millington] Reynolds, not their father. Subject to further research, name and residence patterns of Patrick and Henry County indicate that these individuals may actually have been sons of George Reynolds and Frances Barber of Richmond County, Virginia (Doc.#108).

       Most Patrick County deeds and other records begin in 1791, confirming that Patrick County was created from Henry County in 1791. According to a History of Patrick and Henry Counties Virginia, by Virginia G. and Lewis Pedigo, Henry County was named after the famous statesman, Patrick Henry, who resided there. Subsequently, Patrick County was also named after Patrick Henry’s first name when it was created in 1791. The genealogy of Henry County reveals that is was created in 1776, just prior to the Revolutionary War, from Pittsylvania County. Prior to 1776, all of the Virginia counties were named after the English during the colonial time period. Pittsylvania County was named after Sir William Pit, Earl of Chatham. Pittsylvania County was created in 1767 from Halifax County, which was named after George Montague Dunk, the Earl of Halifax. Halifax was created in 1752 from Luneburg County, which was named in honor of King George II. (Doc.#107b). The following is an excerpt from the above history which summarizes the evolution and history of Henry and Patrick Counties:

       Evolution and History of Henry and Patrick Counties

              Isle of Wight and James City Counties were two of the original eight shires under Royal Virginia Government:

              Surry was taken from James City County in 1652.
              Brunswick from Isle of Wight and Surry in 1720.
              Lunenburg from Brunswick in 1748.
              Halifax from Lunenburg in 1752.
              Pittsylvania from Halifax 1767.
              Henry from Pittsylvania 1776.
              Patrick from Henry 1791.


       EARLIEST INHABITANTS AND THE BUILDING OF FORTS

              There are evidences that Henry and Patrick Counties were the homes of numerous Indians of the Algonquin family. The Cherokees were their neighbors on the south in North Carolina. The flints and other implements of Indian warfare prove that many conflicts took place along the banks of the Marrowbone and Smith Rivers. Crockery remaining intact near Ridgeway, Henry County, around soapstone bill, indicates some skill in that handiwork.
              The General Assembly, March, 1776, ordered a chain of forts to be built along the frontier, the last, of course, near the state line. George Washington left Winchester, September 29, 1756, to visit these forts and wrote later that he visited Fort Trial on Smith River. The fort is situated on an eminence that commands a very fine view of Smith River for several miles and of the confluence of Beaver Creek with that river, but at the time it was built only the low ground along river and creek could be perceived, the lofty timber on the opposite bank of the river effectually preventing any greater distance being seen.
              The fort was built in the form of a square, the walls were ,made of split trees planted in the earth four feet deep and very close together, the height was sixteen feet above the ground, with holes cut at the proper height to use firearms. There was a bastion at each corner, and a log house, bullet proof, at each side of the gate. Within the area of the fort near the center was a common framed house and between the outer and inner walls it was filled with stones and earth to the height of six feet as an additional defense.
              The fort was not used by soldiers alone in protecting the frontier but, in time of serious alarm, to this the entire population scurried for protection.
              A distinguished British traveler and writer traversed the country in 1774, and described the appearance of the central section when the people were in a panic over a report that the Indians had taken up the hatchet. He wrote, “There were several large plantations on the rich low grounds of Leatherwood and Beaver Creeks deserted, not a single inhabitant to be seen; the cattle, horses and other animals were wandering about their master’s habitations, conveying the most mournful, melancholy and dismal ideas that can be easily conceived.” He told of finding a mill on Beaver Creek with the hopper half full of corn, the miller having left in such haste, and finally finding the populace in Fort Trial, on Smith River, huddled together in the most woeful and unsanitary condition. It was only by searching the country for miles around without finding an Indian that he could allay the fears of the inhabitants. The same writer reported traveling a long distance prior to reaching Sauratown settlement, on Dan River, opposite Leaksville’s present site, without seeing a habitation.
              In those days land was cheap in that section and it was an age of pioneers, so men, through love of adventure or desire to own homes, gradually made their way into this region, braving dangers, difficulties and hardships.
              The settlers, as far as our knowledge goes, escaped serious trouble with the Indians, though reports of Indian raids caused such consternation as that described by the English traveler. Later on the Indians were driven back and the Fort (Trial), being needed no longer, was abandoned with time other fourteen of its era. As the site of Fort Trial is across the creek from the National highway, about four or five miles northwest of Martinsville, it is destined to be one of the county’s places of historical interest. A marker has been placed so that travelers may read the inscription.

COLONEL BYRD‘S SURVEY

              In 1728, during the month of October, Colonel William Byrd wrote of locating the state line between Virginia and North Carolina. They crossed the River Irvin, so named in honor of the professor in his party, and surveyed six miles during the day and camped on the west side of Matrimony Creek, so called by an unfortunate “mary’d” man because it was exceedingly noisy and impetuous. From here, looking to the northwest about four miles, he saw a round point which he named Wart Mountain. This was evidently Holt Knob, the last spur of the Chestnut Knob highlands. He made no note of any inhabitants along here nor at any place to the Stokes line. The following day they traversed five miles, killed a turkey and a hear, and camped next about where Price, North Carolina, is today. After describing the rough hills at the junction of north and south Mayo, named in honor of one of the engineers, he stated that they brought into camp six bears. He said they pitched their camp on the west side for the purpose of being lulled to sleep by the cataract.

              FORMATION OF HENRY COUNTY
       
              Henry County was formed by an Act of October, 1776 (first year of the commonwealth), which enacted “That from and after the last day of December next ensuing the said county of Pittsylvania be divided into two counties, by a line beginning at the mouth of Blackwater on Staunton River and running parallel with the line of Halifax County till it strikes the county line, and that all that part of the said county which lies to the westward of the said line shall be one distinct county and be called and known by the name of henry, and all the other part thereof which lies to the eastward of the said line shall be one other distinct county and retain the name of Pittsylvania.”
       The surface of Henry County is hilly with a few high points such as the Chestnut Knob, Nance’s Mountain, and bluffs along Smith River. From the summits of eminences, especially the latter, views of the surrounding country with its farms and valleys are very beautiful.
              The county lies in southern Virginia, a little west of the center; its southern line bordering North Carolina. The soil conditions are most favorable, hillside and meadow yielding most bountiful returns to husbandry, bringing forth fruits, flowers, grains, grasses and the choicest tobacco of the southland.
              By an Act of the Assembly of October, 1776, the county court of Henry County was held at the borne of John Rowland on the third Monday in January. The records show that six hundred and thirty citizens took the oath of allegiance to the United States and about forty refused to renounce their allegiance to Great Britain. Many had joined the army under Washington, many were away hunting or trading at this time, for there was a much larger citizenry in the county than these figures would indicate.
       From the scattered homes the county furnished only one organized body of troops to the nation. This was (as noted in another chapter before) under Colonel Abram Penn and began the march from Beaver Creek. March 11,1781, crossed Rowland’s Ford just below Fontaine, about two miles from Martinsville’s present site, following the old road (deep cuts now show the location) up the Marrowbone Valley, crossing the creek where Ridgeway now stands, thence along the ridge two miles, then crossing Matrimony Creek half a mile to the state line.
              From the line south, their route is not known, however they marched o rapidly they soon reached General Greene and took part in the Battle of Guilford Court House, March 25, 1781.

FORMATION OF PATRICK COUNTY

              Patrick County was formed by an Act of November ~26, 1790, which enacted “That from and after the first day of June next County of Henry shall be divided into two distinct counties, that is to say, that all hat part of the said county lying west of a line beginning on the line dividing the County of Henry one mile above where it crosses Town Creek, branch of Smith River, thence a parallel line to the Pittsylvania line o the county line, shall be one distinct county and called an4 be known )y the name of Patrick County, and all the residue of the said county retain he name of henry County.”
       By an Act passed November 30, 1791, a part of Henry County was added to Patrick. The Act provided “That all that part of Henry County lying to the south of a line beginning one mile above Town Creek on the me dividing the Counties of Franklin and henry and running thence a Direct course to the North Carolina line at the lower crossing of Crooked Creek, a branch of Mayo River, shall be arid the same is hereby added to, and made a part of the County of Patrick.”
              By an Act of March 13, 1848, a small triangular portion of Patrick County was added to Franklin County.
              Patrick County is twenty-five miles long with a mean width of twenty miles and is watered by the Dan River and its branches. The face of the country is broken and it has the Allegheny Mountains on the western boundary and the Bull Mountain and other ranges running across it from east to west. There is great diversity of soil. The bottom land on the water courses is generally of good quality and a large portion of the upland is strong though rocky. On the south side of Bull Mountain the staple is tobacco; iron ore abounds. (Doc.# 107)


PATRICK AND HENRY COUNTIES IN VIRGINIA
By JOHN REDD SMITH

              The people of the Blue Ridge and Appalachian Ranges laid deep the foundations of this republic and were the largest contributors to the prosperity of our institutions.
       Their contributions were threefold, they cleared the track through the wilderness and here they were wedged in between kingly oppression and savage brutality, the one on the east, the other on the west, but with heroic courage and sacrifice unsurpassed in the annals of mankind they brought there out a civilization that has elicited the applause of the world, and has caused downtrodden humanity in all lands to look up with inspiration and hope. Such was the patriotism manifested by the people in southern Piedmont Virginia in the first one hundred years of this republic.
              In the unsettled times antedating the American Revolution, many sturdy colonists with rare vision, seeing the coming storm and hearing the mutterings of distant thunder, wishing to place themselves in the most strategic position to successfully meet the inevitable conflict, moved their all to the mountains of Virginia and it was these people who formed Henry County in 1776, and named it in honor of Patrick Henry who lived here in his latter days on a farm six miles east of Martinsville.
              At this time the eastern boundary was well defined, but as was the custom in those days the western frontier extended to the heads of the water courses and it was not until 1854 that, by an Act of the Legislature, the western boundary was accurately fixed. The Act, however, provided that the same was not to be established by law until the voters of Penn’s Store and Blackberry precincts approved it.
              The first courthouse was on a hill just northeast of where the Stanley Furniture Factories now stand, a few miles northwest of Martinsville, and the clerk’s office was two miles across the river therefrom. At the meeting of the courts, presided over by five justices, the clerk brought the court papers across the river in a basket, and if the river was past fording there was, of course, no clerk and no court. While the justice then administered was delivered amid crude surroundings, yet it came from the rock of integrity, prompt, pure and undefiled.
              The contributions of these people, under the leadership of such men as Abram Penn, George Waller, Joseph Martin, John Redd and George Hairs. ton, riot only to the fortunes of the Revolution but also to the establishment of local peace and order, were large. Indeed, the prayers made by the Methodist circuit rider, rendered in laying the foundation of our civilization, what cannot he estimated, nor has such patriotism been confined to the activities of the Revolution hut in every fight for constitutional liberties since those days, Henry County men have participated and the bones of some of them are now resting in the war-worn fields of France.
              The original settlers were of English and Saxon blood. Abram Penn and George WaIler formed a company and took the lead in the formation of a settlement.
              Many descendants of these pioneers still live within the bounds of the county. Both were Revolutionary patriots and participated in the Battle of King’s Mountain, claimed by Thomas Jefferson, as “the joyful turning of the tide.” Bancroft, the historian, observes that “the Battle of King’s Mountain changed the aspect of the war.”
              The remains of George Waller lie at present in an unmarked grave in Fieldale, while two of his descendants, George and Stuart Pannill, volunteers from Henry County to the World War, “sleep the sleep that knows no ending” at Chateau Thierry, France.
       Major John Redd, Henry County pioneer and one of the strongest men of his time, was a witness to the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown.
              Among the earlier settlers of Henry County were the Penns, Wallers, Redds, Minters, Hords, Laniers, Joneses, Hairstons, Roysters, Martins, Gravelys, Bassetts, Stultzes, Burches, Spencers, Dillards, Bondurants, Richardsons, Dyers, and others, many of whose descendants still reside in the county of their forbears of colonial days.
              Henry County, Virginia, is considered of enough geologic importance to warrant an extensive survey, which is now being carried on by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the State of Virginia. The purpose of this survey is to determine the mineral and hydraulic resources of the area, and to aid in the development of enterprises of this nature.

Since families often migrated and settled an area together. We located the following for early families and founders of Henry County, Virginia in hopes of learning more about your Reynolds families. According to the Ancestral File, Abraham Penn was born on 27 Dec 1743 in Drysdale Parish, Caroline County, Virginia. He died on 26 Jun 1801 in Patrick County (Doc.#113d-e).

The Spencer Reynolds who is listed in the early Henry County records appears to have been named after the Spencer family who were among the early settlers of Henry County. The Harbour family, whom the Reynolds families resided next to and inter-married with, came from Hanover, Lunenberg and Halifax Counties of Virginia (Doc.#113f-g).

FARMING IN THE EARLY DAYS

              After the Revolutionary War agriculture made steady progress. From the first settlements in Virginia till the mountains were reached the tendency was to take up large boundaries of land, the plantations usually embraced hundreds or even thousands of acres. Under the slave system they were cultivated and made profitable.
              The surface of the farming land in Henry and Patrick Counties s-aries from steep hills to rich bottom land. Preparing the hillsides for planting crops was, of course, a difficult matter; oxen, horses and mules were used to draw the plow.
       We learn that at first two men were required to manage a one-horse plow, one to lead the horse and the other to hold the plow, and that furrows were run up and down hill instead of circling around.
              George King, an early settler in the Leatherwood neighborhood, learned to guide the horse with plow lines and bit upon the plan of running furrows around the hill instead of up and down.
              Leatherwood has the distinction of being one of the most progressive sections of henry County, one citizen of that community is credited with having built the first rock flue by means of which the beautiful, fragrant yellow tobacco was cured, the kind that made Henry County famous.
              Upon the large plantations the landlord had an overseer who superintended the slaves, and the landlady, with the help of the brightest and most capable of the female servants, looked after the household affairs and reared the sons and daughters of the family according to the traditions of her ancestors, many of whom were of royal blood.
       Alter the Revolution the population, both white and black, increased amazingly. Better homes were built and the big house ideally located, with the groups of smaller houses located about the premises, gave the place the appearance of a village. There were the kitchen, smokehouse, weaving house and other places in which the work of the household was carried on. In the smokehouse hundreds of pounds of bacon and tubs of snow-white lard were always on hand.
              A few hundred yards distant was the “cabin row” where the slaves lived. From amongst these the cooks, butlers, maids, coachmen, weavers, spinners and seamstresses were chosen and trained, their specialties being often handed down from one generation to another. In the wealthy families each young lady had her own particular maid, usually a gift from her parents, and each young gentleman his “body servant” (valet).
              The mistress of the mansion kept her basket of keys always at hand in her sitting room, and, with the cook, went into the smokehouse and store rooms and gave out supplies for a meal or for a day.
              The laundry was done in the summer under the shade of trees near the spring. A fire was made under a big iron pot, which rested on legs several inches from the ground, so that the linen was washed, boiled in the big pot, rinsed and dried in the sun on bushes. Before the corrugated washboards came into use, the garments, if much soiled, were laid upon a fiat, smooth rock and paddled to loosen the dirt. The paddles were made of very hard wood and were very smooth. In winter the water for laundry work was hauled to the house in barrels.
              The telegraph apparatus came into use at a later period, but was installed by only a small percentage of the people. This apparatus consisted of a wire cable, on which a bucket could be sent sliding down hill and plunged into the spring, then by some arrangement of wires the dripping bucket, full of water, could be drawn to the starting place.
       Ice was a luxury, practically unknown in the very early days, but after a time people dug ice houses after the fashion of a deep cellar with a roof over it and from a pond ice was cut and stored, well covered with straw and sawdust, for the summer. The spring house was a splendid substitute for water from the spring. Boxes were arranged so that jars of milk and crocks of butter could be kept in water at just the right temperature.
              Until the introduction of cooking stoves, cooking was done in heavy iron utensils before an open fireplace in which beds of red hot coals had been prepared by burning plenty of well-seasoned wood. A broad hearth in front of the fireplace furnished space for the skillets and ovens in which baking and frying were done. These utensils were on legs and had covers or heavy lids so that coals could be put on top as well as underneath. Pots in which meat and vegetables, hominy, etc., were boiled were hung on cranes or set securely on the logs. Pot hooks were an indispensable adjunct to the kitchen equipment, as the ovens, pots and skillets had places in which these could be hooked and the utensils lifted conveniently.
              Corn pone and ash cake were delicious when made by a real cook. Ash cake was made just as any other corn bread—meal with a little salt mixed with cold water. The flat stones that formed the bottom of the fireplace were raked clear of the red hot coals, embers being left upon sufficient space upon which to put tile cakes of dough, after being patted into shape by the brown hands of the cook, with a grace and skill which were inimitable. Then standing some distance from the scorching heat the round cake of dough was “flung” into the right spot, covered with hot embers and coals heaped on top. At just the right time the cake was taken out, washed in cold water while very hot and a nice, brown, thick-crusted cake was reads’ to be eaten with butter and a glass of cool milk—a meal fit for a king!
              In later years one of the Negro men made a trip to the Middle West with some traders, and while there married and brought back a wife—a tall mulatto woman said to have some Indian blood in her veins. On one occasion she was told by her husband to make an ash cake for supper. Alter puzzling over the matter she concluded that an ash cake must contain ashes as an ingredient, so she mixed part meal and part ashes and baked it, much to the amusement of the other colored folk and disgust of the husband.
              There was in the household usually a black mammy or chief nurse who took a leading part in caring for the white folks’ children and was loved by them next to their own parents.
              The weavers made, besides the jeans (woolen cloth for the men’s clothing), cotton checks and “hinsey woolsey” for the women’s dresses, plain cotton cloth as well as brilliant colored blankets woven in intricate patterns, some of which are in use at the present time, though the old ones are kept as souvenirs. There was some flax raised, especially in Patrick County, and the cloth woven from it is exceedingly strong and durable, pieces of it over a hundred years old still retain its strength.


              TRAVEL & TRANSPORTATION

              In another chapter we have an account of rolling tobacco to market many miles distant in hogsheads, prepared with shafts fastened to the ends of the hogsheads so that they would turn after the fashion of a wheel, the mule or horse hitched as if to a wagon. Wagons, carts and plows were drawn by oxen to a large extent about the farms. Until tile advent of rail. roads and motor vehicles, covered wagons were the principal means of hauling tobacco and other produce to market, bringing back goods of every description to supply the storekeepers or private families. The wagons were strongly built, roomy and the thick covers provided a good shelter and sleeping quarters when camp was made.
              Travel was necessarily slow as a two or four-horse wagon, loaded heavily, drawn by horses or mules, could make only thirty or forty miles a day over roads frequently washed out in deep ruts and heavy with mud. Horseback was the earliest and most popular mode of travel. A man with a good horse, equipped with saddle and saddle bags, was considered well - prepared for a journey of almost any length. He could stop when night overtook him at any farmhouse and food and lodging were freely given.
       Carriages and buggies were in use also, especially for the well-to-do families, but doctors went from place to place to visit patients, lawyers rode from one county seat to another to attend court, young men and women rode for the pleasure of it and often went visiting or to church on horseback.
              The side saddle was used by women and girls; to sit astride a horse in early times would have shocked the community almost to the point of hysterics, although the side saddle was a clumsy affair, much more dangerous than the well-balanced saddle used by men and much harder on the horse, as the weight had a tendency to pull to one side. To add to the inconvenience for women, long riding skirts were considered absolutely indispensable, for, by no chance must a lady’s ankle be exposed to view. The ordinary riding skirt was made of straight widths of denim or alpaca sewed to a belt, which was buttoned around the waist and the skirt closed with buttons down the side. The riding habit was a better looking affair, worn by those who could afford something better than the riding skirt. The habit consisted of a long skirt with a basque which fitted snugly; this worn with a becoming hat made a costume which was pretty and picturesque.


       SOCIAL LIFE

              Social life in Henry and Patrick Counties kept up a standard equal to any in this, or any other country, for let it be remembered that the early settlers were descended from noble or highly respectable English, Scotch, Welch or Irish families.
              On the large plantations the people were well prepared and enjoyed dispensing hospitality, so, naturally, the home was the social center and what could be gayer than the gatherings of young people for house parties. There were always fiddlers and banjo players available and dancing could be indulged in until the morning hours. During the day before the party dispersed, horseback riding was enjoyed and frequently all hands joined in following the bounds in a real fox hunt. Fox hounds in large numbers were almost always an adjunct to every gentleman’s premises.
              Visiting among the older people, as well as among the young, was a very different matter from that of the present time. People went for visits and usually spent the day. An unexpected guest was a source of pleasure as people with well-filled larders, trained servants and time to spare, enjoyed entertaining their friends. News traveled slowly in those days; writing and receiving letters were events of importance. Mail was carried on horseback in leather pouches, and people had to go or send to the post office for their mail, in many cases several miles distant. Usually, however, the post office was located in a country store, which carried groceries and general merchandise and going for the mail could be combined with a shopping expedition.
              The country church was also a real social center. There was time before and after services for ‘the young people to meet and enjoy each other’s society, but the climax was the “protracted meeting.” There were two services a day with an intermission of an hour or two for lunch and social intercourse. Families went with well-filled lunch baskets and a real picnic lunch was spread underneath the trees. After lunch all returned to the church for the afternoon service.


THE TOURNAMENT

              Although the Tournament—relic of the days of chivalry—has been relegated to the past, many of the Henry and Patrick people can recall the pleasure and excitement of these gala occasions, even as late as sometime in the “seventies.”
       A place was chosen for the track—a long stretch of level ground. Heavy poles were set firmly along the side, at intervals, with arms upon which rings two or three inches in diameter were placed. These arms extended over the track within reach of the rider’s lance, which was a long, well-finished rod, perhaps four or five feet in length. In those days horseback riding was a real accomplishment, men, women, boys and girls were usually skilled riders.
              For weeks and even months before the event, the Tournament was discussed by the young people and the girl who had an admirer who was to enter the lists, was envied by the less fortunate, and what better means could there be for a young man to win the admiration of a young lady than by making such a gallant appearance, win a crown or wreath and choose her for the “Queen of Love and Beauty.’’
              When the eventful day arrived the young people for miles around appeared in carriages, buggies, etc., and took the best positions they could find along the track. The knights mounted on the finest horses the country afforded, wearing picturesque riding clothes, with broad sashes of brilliant colors, passing over one shoulder and under the arm on the opposite side, to float upon the breeze as they passed in splendid array to the starting point.
              The field marshal, with much dignity and ceremony, took charge of the program and when all was ready called the knights by their titles which they or their lady loves had chosen. The knight whose name was announced dashed along the track at full gallop, catching the rings upon his lance. This was repeated until each knight had been given an opportunity to show his prowess. The one catching the greatest number of rings, while making the fastest time, was declared victor and, riding to the place where his chosen one sat, dropped the rings from his lance at her feet. The knight catching the next largest number, the third and fourth repeated the ceremony of seeking out the one upon whom they wished to bestow their favor.
              The grand ball followed in the evening and upon a sort of dais in the ballroom the ladies chosen by their knights appeared in their order. The first gallant placing a glittering crown upon the head of the one he had chosen Queen of Love and Beauty,” snaking an appropriate speech. The other knights followed in turn, placing wreaths less ornate upon floe heads of their chosen ones.
              Then the “Royal Quadrille” was led by the first knight and his queen, this being participated in only by the successful knights and their partners, after that the other guests joined in the dancing.


OUR GREAT STAPLE—TOBACCO

              The cultivation of tobacco has always been a long, tedious process, and only in recent years have labor-saving devices been invented and they are not perfected even yet.
              For the beginning of the crop plant beds are prepared in very early spring and the seed sown, tobacco seed so tiny that in order to handle them they must be mixed with dry earth or ashes.
              In early times there was no well-known protection for time little plants against the frosts or especially the flies that delight to devour them. These flies are amongst the most persistent of pests. Planters now use thin, white cotton cloth for covering the plant beds. This is a great protection against frosts and puts the tobacco fly entirely out of business. Traveling through the country these cloth-covered beds on the rich hillsides have the appearance of patches of snow. One planter in early times hit upon a plan most unique, by which lie saved his tobacco plants. He made two plant beds close together and when the tender plants began to show themselves an(l the flies were getting ready for a feast, the planter would take a lien with a newly hatched brood of chicks and put the hen in a coop between the plant beds. The baby chicks having the freedom of the premises, as is their wont, would swarm over the beds like animated puffballs keeping up such motion that the flies could not settle down and get in their deadly work. When this brood grew large enough to injure the plants another newly hatched brood was put on duty, and the plants saved until transplanting time. Transplanting was then done entirely by hand but a device is now in use, which makes the work of planting easier and more rapid. This device, a funnel-shaped implement, with a hole through which the plant passes, is inserted into the ground. Water contained in the implement is forced around the roots of the plant and with a twist the earth is pressed close. No mechanical device has vet been invented to rid the growing tobacco plants of the worms which invariably appear. Some planters have again resorted to the barnyard for aid. Turkeys when allowed the freedom of the tobacco patch will walk about under the plants, casting an appraising eye underneath the beautiful broad leaves and pick off amid devour the destructive worms. Worming for the most part, however, must be done by hand. Time worms are of a bright green color just the shade of the growing tobacco arid grow to the thickness of a lead pencil or larger, and two or three inches long. Unless the plants are kept free from them, they get in their “chewing” before the other fellow has a chance, leaving holes in the leaves which injure the tobacco materially.
              In order to develop the full richness of tobacco, the tops of time plants must be plucked out at a certain stage of the growth and leaves near the ground must be pulled off.
              It is essential to keep the fields well cultivated as weeds must be kept out.
       Late summer and early fall are also anxious times for the tobacco grower; lie must know just when the plants are ripe for cutting and curing. Frost is a deadly enemy of the plants, turning the leaves dark and injuring the sale of the tobacco.
       Until recently time entire stalk was cut, a portion of it split, so that it could be put astride the sticks and hung upon rafters in the barn several feet above the flues. The later method is to pluck the leaves from the stalk and tie them in bundles by a sort of weaving process with cord. Flues have been Improved and thermometers aid the curers in keeping time right temperature, a very important point in curing tobacco. The work is still unfinished. When first cured The tobacco is very dry and must be handled with great care. In early tunes the planters had to wait for a season of rain, so that the tobacco would absorb enough moisture to render handling it without injury possible. Now there are other means of bringing it “in order.”
              As much fertilizer must he used to produce fine tobacco and that is very expensive, the planter is decidedly out of luck if he does not receive a good price for his crop.

HENRY COUNTY TOBACCO

              Some The ago the inimitable and lovable Henry Grady was rambling through Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, when lie met an intelligent looking man on the highway and asked him this question. “What is The explanation of time fact that Lancaster County is the richest agricultural county in America?” Canine The swift and terse answer, “Tobacco.” Some time later, wi~en wandering through a desolate region of North Carolina where (with apologies to Gen. Sheridan) a crow would have to take his knapsack if it flew across it, he met a down-and-out looking man and fired thus question at him, “Brother, what is the matter with this God-forsaken country?’ “Tobacco.”
              Grady contended that both answers were correct. The difference was this: in Lancaster County they raised almost everything else that they needed, and the fine or high-priced cigar tobacco was the “apex” of the “pyramid.” In current English it was their money crop. In the North Carolina district they raised tobacco, sold it, bought bacon and ate it, bought grain and fed it, bought whiskey and drank it, and undertook to buy everything else with the little money left after the annual settlement with the merchant who furnished supplies or overhead expenses.
              For many years the Henry County farmers have conformed too closely to the methods of the North Carolina district farmers, as described above. The gospel of diversified crops has been preached to them in season and out, but has usually fallen upon deaf ears. Thus, the henry County tobacco grower has missed a great opportunity. Nobody that knows or has ever questioned the statement that the very finest chewing tobacco in the world grows in Henry County.
              When I (the writer) was an undergraduate medical student in New York City, something over a half century ago, I walked into a fashionable tobacco store on Broadway and requested the Proprietor to show rue a plug of the very finest chewing tobacco. Without time slightest hesitation he reached up to a shelf and took down a plug of B. F. Wravely’s “Superior,” and laid it on the counter with an air of finality, as if there could be no room for discussion. The sample that he showed me was raised and manufactured in my native district of Henry County.
       Some years later, in Jacksonville, Florida, I approached a retail dealer in tobacco, and in a business way showed him some samples of tobacco manufactured in Martinsville, wholly out of The genuine Henry County leaf. A tired expression came over his face and he said, “Oh, everything is Henry County, Henry County!” The plain implication was true, namely, that all over the country the name of this famous tobacco region is counterfeited on tobacco that was never even shipped through Henry County. “Imitation is the sincerest flattery.”
              Many years ago, when the great explorer, Henry M. Stanley, forced an expedition through six hundred miles of seemingly impenetrable forests to the rescue of Emin Bey, and when he and Emin met formally on time shore of the lake, it seemed the proper thing for them to exchange diplomatic presents. Emil Bey’s gift to Stanley included a pound of Peyton Gravely’s “Honey Dew” tobacco.

ORIGIN OF ONE OF THE GREATEST TOBACCO
MANUFACTURING ENTERPRISES IN
THE WORLD
By MAJOR A. D. REYNOLDS

              W hen my father was eighteen years of age, my grandfather had him roll his crop of tobacco in a water-tight hogshead over an Indian trail, through The mountainous country to Lynchburg, Virginia, to be gone about ten days. He returned very much discouraged by the prices received and induced his father to let him chisel a hole in a chestnut tree and put a beam through it something hike a cider press; this he did and manufactured his tobacco into twists which be carried off to South Carolina in peddling wagons.
              He did so much better than he did with his leaf that he put two of his Negro men on what we called the Rich hollow where they grew about six thousand pounds of tobacco, and he raised about twice that at the home place, then bought as much more from the Negroes, all of which he disposed of in South Carolina.
              Seeing the cotton presses down South made from wood on beams and threaded with wooden threads with roofs over them, he saw that this was a greater protection to The tobacco than the tree press, and quite an improvement on the latter. This press had two levers, each forty feet long, with a mule hitched to one end of the lever and the factory hands at the other.
              While this was a great improvement over the cider press, being of a progressive nature, he bought the iron screws with the iron lever which he said to me he did not mind investing in as he did not think they could make any further improvement over the iron press, but before his death we introduced hydraulic pressure which was a great improvement over the other processes.
              I ran his factory as a partner for five years and made sufficient money to move to Bristol, Tennessee, and start a factory on my own account, leaving father with greatly increased capital.
              I sold out to my brother, R. J. Reynolds, and he ran the business for three years, then sold out to my brother, H. II. Reynolds, who ran the business several years, and sold out to Waiter Reynolds and Robert Critz (my youngest brother and brother-in-law). A few years later, after my father’s death, they closed out and moved to Bristol, Tennessee, where they remained for a few years, then brother R. J. induced them to wind up the business in Bristol and take stock in The R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company in Winston, North Carolina.


DEVELOPMENT AND GROWTH OF THE REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY

              The R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company was established in 1875, with a capital of $7,500 and incorporated under the laws of New Jersey, in 1899, the capital stock had then reached the figures $2,100,000.
              Afterwards the American Tobacco Company obtained control through the acquisition of more than half of the outstanding capital stock. The company thus came, to some extent at least, under The control of The old tobacco trust until the dissolution, in 1911, of the old American Tobacco Company, under court order resulting from the suit of time government against that company under the antitrust laws.
       In compliance with the ruling of the court, time American Tobacco Company divested itself of its holdings of Reynolds Tobacco stock through distribution of such holdings pro rata among its common shareholders.
              Since its reestablishment in the field as an independent, the H. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company has experienced a truly remarkable growth. Each year it has succeeded in securing its full share, and more, of the constantly increasing demand which the industry as a whole has experienced.
              As the first company to sense the developments which have so completely revolutionized the tobacco industry during the past two decades, when cigarette production has increased enormously, whole consumption of other forms of tobacco has declined or remained stationary. The R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company introduced, in 1915, The Cannel brand cigarette, the first to have the inexpensive blended cigarette which has proved so popular, amid which is to-day by far the most important branch of the tobacco industry.
              At the present time the most powerful companies in this field are the ones which recognized this development, and who were aggressive in The marketing and advertising of this particular b)rand of cigarette. As The pioneer in the popular-priced, blended cigarette field, time 11. J. Reynolds Tobacco
       Company has been foremost in this branch of The industry and has maintained a leading position in The face of constantly increasing competition.
       While time company is best known for its commanding position in the cigarette field, it occupies a leading place as a producer of both chewing and smoking tobacco. Prince Albert smoking tobacco was the outcome of many years’ patient study and exhaustive experiments. When the manufacturing process was perfected, and the brand placed on the market, in 1908, it was an instantaneous success, which has been enormously augmented with The passing years.
              From a comparatively modest beginning, the H. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company has grown to such stupendous proportions that the name and fame have reached to the uttermost parts of the civilized world.


INDIAN CORN

              Indian corn has always been the crop next in importance to tobacco, the latter being time crop that brings The farmer cash if he has good luck. Sonic wheat, rye and oats have been produced but to a limited extent.
       Fruits, especially apples and peaches have been plentiful in Henry and Patrick Counties some cherries are produced and quantities of berries grow wild and can be had for the picking.
              In times past, in the fall of the year, gathering and shucking The corn, especially the latter, was a real festival. Fodder pulling preceded the gathering of time corn by some weeks, The blades were pulled off of The stalks by hand, tied into bundles, dried and stacked so that the top of the stack formed a cole and the rains would not soak in. Some time in October the corn was gathered, hauled to a place near the corn cribs and piled upon the ground. Each family hind an evening set apart for the shucking. Neighbors both black and white were called in and soon after supper tune the work and fun began, and was kept up until a great pile of gleaming corn was on one side and a mountain of shucks on the other, no matter how late time hour.
              Singing corn songs was an indispensable part of The program. The songs were given out, and led by a colored man who could cut more “monkey shines” than any one else. Lie stood on The crest of The big pile of corn, waving his arms and urged on the work by The words of his song, while the crowd as they joined in the singing tore the shucks from the ears, which they sent whizzing through the air to the growing mound, all to the accompaniment of the songs and the capers of the leader.
              The drinks were a great feature of the occasion and jugs and flasks were passed at intervals all through the evening.
              The closing ceremony consisted of catching the plantation owner, whether he resisted or not, swinging him to the shoulders of two of the huskiest of the men and marching around the house three times to the tune of the closing song. (Doc.#107)

Since Patrick was created from Henry County, we continued our research with searching the records of Henry County. Shortly after the formation of Henry County in 1776 during the struggle for independence, it was required for the inhabitants of the new county to renounce their allegiance to Great Britain and swear allegiance to the Commonwealth of Virginia:

       13 Sep 1777, Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. IX, p. 139; Richard Reynolds listed as having taken the oath of allegiance to the Commonwealth of Virginia (Doc.#174a)

This was the only listing for an individual named Reynolds who was listed in this list for Henry County renouncing their allegiance to Great Britain. This appears to have been the same individual as your ancestor, i.e. the father of Joseph Reynolds, Sr.

The 1778 - 1780 Henry County tax list for heads of households, i.e. male tithables over age twenty one and females with taxable property, reveals the following:

       1778 Henry County Tax List (Doc.#94a)

       Bartlett Reynolds
       Nathaniel Reynolds, Sr.
       William Reynolds
       Richard Reynolds
       John Reynolds

       Susannah Reynolds
       Richard Reynolds - Leatherwood
       Spencer Reynolds
       
       Richard Reynolds - Smith River

Notice that Joseph Reynolds is not listed, indicating that he was not yet age 21 years of age. However, there were three Richard Reynolds listed including your ancestor Richard Reynolds, Sr., on the Smiths River, another on the waters of the Leatherwood Creek area inhabited by George and Susanna Reynolds, and another residing next to Bartlett Reynolds, and a Nathaniel Reynolds, Sr., who does not appear on any other records in Henry, Patrick or Pittsylvania records. Hence, Nathaniel Reynolds, Sr., appears to have died or left Henry County after the year 1778.

In regards to Bartlett Reynolds, there is no detailed information listed for him in the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster, by Col. Steve F. Tillman other than erroneously listing him as the son of David Reynolds (Doc.#117w-117x). However, from the Henry and Patrick County records, we have compiled an accurate list of his siblings and children as listed in this report.

In regards to the Spencer Reynolds listed in the 1778 tax list, there are several listings for Spencer Reynolds in the Ancestral File data who were born between 1750 and 1764, of Henry County, Virginia. Spencer is listed as having married a woman named Sarah about 1783 in Henry County, Virginia. Spencer is also listed as the son of Richard Spencer Reynolds and his wife, Sarah. According to the Ancestral File, Spencer Reynolds died abt 1830 in Williamson County, Tennessee (Doc.#112g-112m). According to the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster by Col. Steve F. Tillman, we obtained the following information:

       Richard Spencer Reynolds was born 1749 in Caroline County, Virginia. He was the son of James Reynolds, born 1715 in Surry County, and Sukie Lindsay. Richard died in 1787 in Wilkes County, Georgia. He served in the Revolutionary War with Henderson’s Company in the Virginia State Line. He married a woman named Sarah and had issue: Rachel, who married in 1779 to Thomas Matthews; Thomas, born 1766; Garland, born 1768; Joseph, born 1770; George; Elijah, born 1774 who married in 1801 to Nancy Jones; Benjamin Franklin; Richard; Elizabeth; Spencer; John; Greensby, born 1786; Matthew; Dorothy; and Mary (Doc.#117p).

       Spencer Reynolds, born Henry County, Virginia. He was the son of Richard Spencer Reynolds and his wife, Sarah. Spencer died 1830 in Williamson County, Tennessee. His will is on file in Williamson County, Tennessee. Issue: Richard C.; Green; Nancy, who married Kennerly; George Washington; Sally; Catherine, who married Barber; Coleman, born 1785; Spencer, born 1800; Elizabeth, who married Barber; Reuben, born 1784; Matilda, who married Durham; Phebe, who married Thomas Smith; and William C. (Doc.#117q)

This information for Richard Reynolds and his son, Spencer Reynolds, corresponds with the above tax records for early Henry County, Virginia. Notice that Richard Spencer Reynolds served in Henderson’s Company during the Revolutionary War as confirmed below in the Revolutionary War records for Pittsylvania County, Virginia. However, in regards to Spencer Reynolds’ birth year and place, the fact that Spencer Reynolds appears in the 1778 tax list for Henry County as listed above reveals that he was born prior to 1757 in Virginia. Since Henry County was created in 1776 from Pittsylvania County, which was created in 1766 from Halifax County, Spencer was possibly born in Caroline County, the same place where his father was born. This indicates that his father was born prior to 1737.

In regards to Nathaniel Reynolds, Sr., who is listed above in the 1778 tax list for Henry County, there are five Nathaniel Reynolds which appear in the Ancstral File data base born between 1633 and 1762 in Virginia (Doc.#112a-f). However, only the two born in 1762, in Loudon and King William Counties, and one born 1724 in Isle of Wight County, were of the right age to have been the same Nathaniel Reynolds, Sr., of Henry County, Virginia who is listed above in the 1778 tax list (Doc.#112c,e-f). The Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster by Col. Steve F. Tillman lists the following for Nathaniel Reynolds:

       Nathaniel Reynolds was born 25 Nov 1762 in King William County, Virginia. He married Catherine Vernon and had children: Jesse or James, born 1784; Admiral, born 1788; Isaac, born 1789; William Robert, born 1790; Thomas C., born 12 Mar 1796; and John, born 1810. Nathaniel served in the Revolutionary War with the Virginia State Line and died in Stephensburg, Kentucky. He was the son of William Reynolds of Surry County, Virginia, and his wife, Elizabeth Mossum. William and Elizabeth settled in Albemarle County, Virginia (Doc.#117m-117o).

Name and residence patterns indicate that Nathaniel Reynolds was related to your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, Sr. Hence, the Albemarle County, Virginia records should be searched for additional information on your Richard Reynolds who was the right age to have been a brother of William Reynolds who married Elizabeth Mossum, i.e. the son of Richard Reynolds and Mary Anderson.

In regards to the Susannah Reynolds listed above, the Reynolds Homestead and the Patrick County Historical Society lists that she was a sister of Moses Reynolds and his siblings. Their information lists that Susannah Reynolds was born about 1750 in Surry County, Virginia, and that she married David Rhoades/Rodes in Albemarle County, Virginia (Doc.#118e). This information appears to have been obtained from the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster, by Col. Steve F. Tillman (Doc.#117p). However, this information appears inconsistent with the above information. As referenced above, it is more likely that Susannah Reynolds was the widowed mother of Moses and his siblings. Notice also from the Patrick County marriage records listed above, that Moses named one of his daughters Susannah after his mother.

       1779 Henry County Tax List (Doc.#94b)

       Richard Reynolds
       James Reynolds

       Richard Reynolds, Sr.
       Spencer Reynolds
       Richard Reynolds, Jr.
       George Reynolds
       John Reynolds

       Bartlett Reynolds
       John Reynolds
       Moses Reynolds
       Susanna Reynolds
       
These tax records indicate that Richard Reynolds, Sr., who appears to have been the same Richard Reynolds, Sr., of the Leatherwood Creek area listed above in the previous tax year, was the father of Richard Reynolds, Jr. Richard Reynolds, Sr., appears to have been the father or brother of Spencer, George and John Reynolds who resided next to him according to these tax lists. Notice that your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds, is not listed with Richard and James Reynolds, who appear to have been his father and older brother. As in the previous tax year, Bartlett, John and Moses Reynolds appear to have been the sons of Susanna Reynolds, who appears to have been a widow.

The ancestral File lists that there was a George Reynolds who married Frances Barber on 12 Dec 1759 in Richmond County who had a son named Bartemous Reynolds who was born about 1769 in Richmond County, Virginia who may have been related to the above Reynolds families (Doc.#108-108a). There was also a George Reynolds who married Susannah Lansford on 12 Jun 1779 in Henry County. This could be the same Susanna Reynolds who shows up on the tax lists as early as 1778, which is actually a tax for the following year. However, it appears more likely that she was the widowed mother of Bartlett Reynolds and his siblings according to the value of her personal property as listed in later tax record. The Ancestral File lists that the George Reynolds ,who married Susanna , died in 1813 in Williamson County, Tennessee. He and Susannah had several children (Doc.#110-110a).

              1780 Henry County Tax List (Doc.#94c)

       Bartlett Reynolds
       John Reynolds
       Moses Reynolds
       Richard Reynolds
       George Reynolds
       Richard Reynolds

By 1780, the number of tithable Reynolds families of Henry County decreased substantially, indicating that many of these families left Henry County or were omitted from the tax lists as some of these names such as Spencer Reynolds appear in later tax lists.
       
We next searched the Henry County land, probate , court and subsequent tax records, all of which correspond with the Patrick County records listed above:

       Henry County, Virginia Deeds, Surveys, Court Order Books & Tax Records

       21 Jul 1777, Court, Richard Reynolds appointed appraiser of estate for will of James Wilson, also listed as appraiser for estate of Samuel Jones along with Isaiah and Joel Harbour (Doc.#93b-c)

       15 Sep 1777, Court, George Reynolds, 2nd Lt. in Henry County Militia under Col. George Hairston (Doc.#93d-f)

       25 Mar 1779, Court, Deed, acknowledged that Joseph Reynolds bought land from Palatiah Shelton (Doc.#93g)

       Oct 1779, Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. IX, p. 266, Henry County, Virginia; George Reynolds of Leatherwood appointed 1st Lt. in the Company of John Wells (Doc.#174d-e)

       25 Nov 1779, George Reynolds listed as 1st Lt. in Leatherwood Company of militia (Doc.#93i)

These last two records appear to have been for the same George Reynolds who is listed above in the Henry County tax records. Notice that George appears to have resided in the area of Leatherwood Creek in Henry County. In Oct 1780/1, George Reynolds also received 36.5 pounds of Bacon from Capt. Hairston while on the march to the assistance of General Greene (Doc.#174g-h). In May 1782, George Reynolds was appointed Capt. of the company previously commanded by Peter Hairston (Doc.#176a).

       25 Nov 1779, Spencer Reynolds listed as appraiser of the estate of Thomas Garner (Doc.#93j)

       1779/1780, Henry County Survey, Richard Runnolds, 312 acres on Smith River (Doc.#64f)

       As other deeds and records of Patrick and Henry Counties illustrate, your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds and his father, Richard Reynolds, Sr., owned much land on the Smith [Smiths or Irvin] River. This residence pattern and deeds indicate that this Richard Runnolds is the same person as Richard Reynolds, Sr., the father of your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds.

       In addition to Richard Reynolds, Sr., there were also surveys made for the following individuals who appear related:

       1779/1780, Henry County Survey, George Runnolds for 200 and 469 acres on Leatherwood waters (Doc. #64e)

       1779/1780, Henry County Survey, Bartlett Runnolds for 367 acres on Stones Creek (Doc.# 64f)

       1779/1780, Henry County Survey, Jesse Runnolds for 256 acres on Stones Creek (Doc.#64f)

       1779/1780, Henry County Survey, Moses Runnolds for 157 acres on Mayo waters (Doc.#64f, 90e).

       Other deeds of Henry County list Archelaus Reynolds purchasing land on waters of Leatherwood Creek in 1793 (Doc.#65b-c), which indicates that he was related to George Reynolds and Susannah Lansford who originally settled on those waters as listed above.

       15 Mar 1779, Deed Bk. 1, pp.209-210, Joseph Reynolds, son of Richard Reynolds, of Henry County, Virginia, purchased from Palatiah and Mary Shelton, for 250 pounds, 165 acres on both sides of Irvin (Smiths) River adjoining line of Robert Walton and Company... crosses a branch (Doc.#64b, 90b)

       This deed confirms that your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds, Sr., was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., who later died in Jefferson County, Kentucky as listed later in this report.

       2 Dec 1779, Will Book 1, p. 43, Spencer Reynolds listed as an appraiser of the estate for Thomas Garner (Doc.#66b)

This Spencer Reynolds appears to have been related to the other Reynolds families of Henry and Patrick Counties. He appears to have been named after the Spencer surname which should assist us in learning where the Reynolds families resided prior to coming to Henry County, Virginia.

       10 Dec 1779, George Reynolds bought from Jeffrey Murrell and his wife, Martha, for 1000 pounds, 400 acres on the Muster Branch of Leatherwood Creek adjoining Lomax and Company line corner (Doc.#90c)

       25 May 1780, Court, Deed acknowledged between George Reynolds and Jeffrey Murrell, George Reynolds appointed 1st Lt. In Capt. Peter Hairston’s Compnay of Militia (Doc.#93l-m)

       5 Jul 1780, Patent Bk. A, #42, p. 563, Susanna Reynolds obtained 38 acres on the north side of the South Branch of the Mayo River (Doc.#106b, 114aag, 142w)

       6 Jul 1780, Patent Bk. A, # 49, p.655, George Runnolds obtained 200 acres on the waters of Muster Branch of Leatherwood Creek (Doc.#106b)

       This patent appears to be the for the same 200 acre tract listed above in the 1779/1780 survey for George Runnolds. Marriage records of Henry County reveal that George and Susanna Reynolds were husband and wife, i.e., the same couple who were married on 12 Jun 1779 according to Henry County, Virginia, marriage records which are listed below (Doc.# 89a).

       26 Apr 1781, Court, Richard Reynolds listed as owning land next to Samuel Patterson on Smiths River (Doc.#93n)

       26 Apr 1781, Court, George Reynolds produced a certificate from Peter Hairston, Capt. Of the militia, that he furnished him with 36.5 pounds of bacon for the use of the militia when on their march to the assistance of General Greene (Doc.#93o)

       1 Mar 1781, Patent Bk. D, #238, p. 598, Richard Runnolds obtained 312 acres on Smith’s River adjoining Matthew Small’s land (Doc.#106c)

       This is the same tract of land referred to above in the 1779/1780 survey for Richard Reynolds, Sr., in Henry County.

       Mar 1781, Bartlett Reynolds listed as a member of James Dillard’s Company which was included in a list of militia ordered from Henry County, Virginia to the assistance of General Greene (Doc.#177a)

       10 Apr 1781, Patent Bk. D, #295, p.928, William Perkins obtained 492 acres on Poplar Camp Creek, adjoining Charles Thomas (Doc.#106d)

       This appears to have been the same William Perkins, Sr., who was a close friend of Richard Reynolds and who was the father of Sarah Perkins, the wife of your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds. This close friendship between Richard Reynolds and William Perkins suggests they may have resided in the same area prior to obtaining land in Henry County.

       10 Apr 1781, Patent Bk. F, #398, p. 54, Moses Runnalds obtained 157 acres on Nobusiness Fork of Mayo River, adjoining Cogar’s land (Doc.# 106e)

       This is the same tract of land referred to above in the 1779/1780 survey for Moses Reynolds in Henry County.

       Mar 1782, Richard Reynolds compensated 2.17.0 pounds fro 285 pounds of beef to Comissary (Doc.#176b)

       2 Mar 1782, Court Order Book, Richard Reynolds was allowed 280 pounds of beef furnished by the Commissioner of Provisions, William Perkins was allowed 475 pounds of beef for property taken for public use (Doc.#63f, 93p)

       2 Mar 1782, Court Order Book, Richard Reynolds is allowed 182 pasturages, 38 diets, 4 bushels and a half corn furnished the Commissioner of Provisions for public use (Doc.# 93q)

These provisions confirm that Richard Reynolds contributed to the support of the local militia which he no doubt served in along with his son, Joseph Reynolds.

       27 Nov 1782, Deed Bk. 1, pp.314-5, Richard Reynolds of Henry County, Virginia, purchased from Jimmy and John James of the same county, for 60 pounds, 400 acres on Shooting Creek, beginning at the fork of Turkey Cock Creek on both sides, crosses Rakoon Branch (Doc.#64c)

       1783 Tax List, Henry County, Virginia (Doc.#116)




Tithables       tithes       white tithes 21       Slaves 16-       slaves -16       horses       cattle        Comments
Richard Reynolds       1       1                      6       70       





Bartlett Reynolds       1       1                     1       7       
George Reynolds       1       1              2       1       8       


       17 Jan 1783, Deeds, George Reynolds listed a witness in inquisition regarding land on Smiths River (Doc.#90d)

       1784 Tax List, Henry County, Virginia (Doc.#116a)




Tithables       tithes       white tithes 21       Slaves 16-       slaves -16       horses       cattle        Comments
Jesse Reynolds       1       1                      2              Constable





Susannah Reynolds                                   2       8       
Moses Reynolds       1       1                     2       4       
David Reynolds       1              1              1              
Archelaus Reynolds       1              1                     1       


       25 May 1784, Deed Bk. 1, pp. 486-7, Richard Reynolds of Henry County, Virginia, sold to William Edwards, for 100 pounds, 400 acres on Shooting Creek, beginning at the fork of Turkey Cock Creek on both sides, crosses Rakoon Branch (Doc.#64c)

       1785 Tax List, Henry County, Virginia (Doc.#116b-c)




Tithables       tithes       tithes +21       tithes -21       Slaves +16       slaves -16       horses       cattle        Comments
Richard Reynolds       2       1               1       3       2       1       





Spencer Reynolds       2       1              1              2              
Bartlett Reynolds       2       1       1                     1       7       
Jesse Reynolds       1       1                            1              
Moses Reynolds       1       1                            2       4       
David Reynolds       1       1                            1              
Archelaus Reynolds       1              1                     1              
Susannah Reynolds                                          2       8       
Richard Reynolds       2       1       1                     10       12       


       25 May 1785, Deed Bk. 2, p. 133, Richard Reynolds of the one party and his wife Mary Reynolds of the other part. The said Richard Reynolds hath allowed his wife Mary the following articles: a tract of land that joins the east side of the land he now lives on with the plantation and orchards thereon to have peaceful possession during her lifetime if she will live thereon, also five pounds in gold or silver to be paid yearly during her lifetime, also one hundred pounds to be valued to her in stock and house goods. Mary Reynolds agrees for her part to give the said Richard Reynolds all the best of the estate belonging to them to have it in peaceful possession and all other properties to him and his heirs, never to claim anything belonging to the said Richard Reynolds (Doc.#64i).

       1786 Tax List, Henry County, Virginia (Doc.#116d-e)




Tithables       tithes       tithes +21       tithes -21       Slaves +16       slaves -16       horses       cattle        Comments
Bartlett Reynolds       1       1                                    6       Dillard







Constable

Lackey

Moses Reynolds       1       1                            3       4       
Susannah Reynolds                                          2       8       
Archibald Reynolds       1       1                            1       2       
David Reynolds       1       1                            1       4       
Jesse Reynolds       1       1                            1              
Mary Reynolds                                          1       7       
Joseph Reynolds       1       1                            1       1       


Notice that Joseph was residing next to his mother, Mary Reynolds. However, his father Richard appears to have been residing in North Carolina or Kentucky in 1786. The name and residence patterns exhibited in this and earlier tax records for Henry County indicate that Susannah was the mother of Bartlett, Moses, Archelaus who is erroneously listed here as Archibald, David and Jesse Reynolds. Notice they were all taxed by the same commissioner named Dillard. Jesse Reynolds was also serving as constable similar to 1784. Lackey was the tax commissioner for your ancestors, Mary Reynolds and her son Joseph Reynolds.

       24 Oct 1786, Deeds, George Reynolds, and his wife, of Pittsylvania County, sold to Thomas Richardson of Henry County, for 75 pounds, a parcel of land containing 600 acres on the Muster Branch of Leatherwood Creek beginning at Lomax & Company (Doc.#91b)

       1787 Tax List, Henry County, Virginia (Doc.#116f-h)




Tithables       tithes +16       Slaves +16       slaves -16       horses       cattle        Comments
William Perkins, Sr.       1       3        4       7       22       


Mary Perkins              1       3       2       6       
Joseph Reynolds       1                     1       2       
Mary Reynolds                            1       8       
Moses Reynolds                            2       7       
Bartlett Reynolds                                   8       
Jesse Reynolds                            1       2       
David Reynolds                     1       1              


       14 Sep 1787, George Runnolds listed owning land on Muster Branch of Leatherwood Creek (Doc.#91c)

       10 Sep 1787, Susannah Reynolds, wife of George Reynolds, of Pittsylvania County, relinquised her right of dower to a transaction of 600 acres of land sold to Thomas Richardson in Henry County, Virginia (Doc.#91d)

This appears to have been the same George Reynolds who married Susannah Lansford, daughter of Catherine Lansford of Pittsylvania County, in Henry County in 1779 as listed above. According to this deed, they moved to Pittsylvania County where they were residing in 1787.

       1788 Tax List, Henry County, Virginia (Doc.#116g)




Tithables       tithes +16       Slaves +16       slaves 12-16       horses        Comments
William Perkins, Jr.       1       1               2       


William Perkins, Sr.       2       9              9       
Christian Perkins       1                     1       
Moses Reynolds       2                     6       
Jesse Reynolds                            1       
Joseph Reynolds       1                     1       
Mary Reynolds                            1       


According to the Ancestral File, Christian Perkins was born on 7 Aug 1757 in Goochland County, Virginia. He died in 1836 in Garrard County, Kentucky (Doc.#113). He also resided in Jefferson County, Kentucky near your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, Sr., as listed later in this report. Christian Perkin’s brother, William Perkins, Jr., died after 1832 in Kentucky (Doc.#113-113a).

       26 Jan 1788, Will Book 1, p. 161, Inventory and Appraisal of David Reynolds estate, returned 9 Jun 1788 by John Cammeron, William Sharp, James Taylor, total estate value of 61 pounds, 6 shillings (Doc.#66c)

Notice that David Reynolds estate was appraised by William Sharp among others. According to the Ancestral File, there is a Richard Reynolds who is listed as an ancestor of David Reynolds whose wife was named Elizabeth Sharpe (Doc.#111). However, that Richard Reynolds is listed as having been born in 1641 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, and died 27 Jun 1711 at Newport, Giles County, Virginia. Note that Giles County wasn’t created until 1806 from Montgomery County, Virginia. According to records of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, Richard Reynolds actually died testate in 1712 in Newport Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia. The Ancestral File further lists that Richard and Elizabeth Sharpe were the parents of Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Mary Anderson and resided in Surry County, Virginia. These same individuals are erroneously listed as the father of this David Reynolds according to various records (Doc.#109). More details and analysis of David Reynold’s estate are included below in our report. We have listed it here primarily for chronological purposes.

       19 May 1788, Deed Bk. 3, pp.415-6, 418, Joseph Reynolds of Henry County listed as witness to deeds for Joel and Esais Harbour for tracts of land on Irvin (Smiths River) and Widgon Creek containing 229 and 141 acres (Doc.#64j, 91e)

       19 Sep 1788, Deed Bk. 4, p. 140, Richard Reynolds of Madison County, Virginia appoints his beloved friend William Perkins, Jr., to receive money due him to pay all just debts. Witnessed by Esias and Joel Harbour, David and William Perkins, Jr, William Smith and Nicholas Kogar (Doc.#64m).

       Though Madison County was actually located in the state of Kentucky, Kentucky did not obtain statehood until 1792, about four years after the above deed was recorded. This deed reveals that this was the same Richard Reynolds, Sr., who was the father of your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds. Note that Richard refers to his son, Joseph Reynold’s father-in-law, William Perkins, Jr., as his beloved friend whom he appointed his power of attorney in Henry County, Virginia while he was residing in Madison County, Kentucky in 1788. Though we searched the Kentucky wills index, there is no listing for a Richard Reynolds who died in Madison County, Kentucky (Doc.#43).

        We also searched the master index for Virginia Surveys and Grants in Kentucky up to 1791. Though there are no listings for Richard Reynolds, there are listings for the following; George Reynolds who settled on the Dicks River in Lincoln County in 1781, Thomas Reynolds who settled on the Forks of the Elkhorn in Fayette County in 1788, and William Reynolds who received large military land grants on the south fork of the Little Barren River in 1791 (Doc.#24, 114aao-114aax).

       1789 Tax List, Henry County, Virginia (Doc.#116h)




Tithables       tithes +16       Slaves +16       slaves 12-16       horses        Comments
William Perkins, Jr.       1        1              2       


William Perkins, Sr.       1       9       1       10       
Thomas Perkins       1                     1       
Bartlett Reynolds       1                            
Moses Reynolds                            3       
Archalus Reynolds       1                            
Bartimus Reynolds       1                     1       
D. Reubin Reynolds       1                     1       
Joseph Reynolds       1                     2       


This was the first tax list in which Joseph Reynolds and most of the other Reynolds families are listed as having been taxed in Henry County. After this year, they were taxed in the newly formed Patrick County records as listed above. The fact that Joseph Reynold’s mother, Mary Reynolds, is listed in the 1788 tax list, but not in the 1789 tax list indicates that she died or moved in 1788/9. According to the will of her husband, Richard Reynolds, Sr., which is listed below, she appears to have moved to Jefferson County, Kentucky.

       31 Aug 1789, Deed Bk. 4, p.35, Bill of Sale, ...We are hereunto moving and more especially for the love and goodwill we have to our lawful sister Mary Reynolds and her lawful heirs for ever give right, title to a certain negro boy named Daniel who was the property of our brother David Reynolds, deceased. To her to possess upon her arrival of age 18 years or her marriage, whichever may happen first.

       Signed: Moses Reynolds
       Jesse Reynolds
       Archalus Reynolds
       Bartus Reynolds
       Reuben Reynolds
       Millenton Reynolds
       (Doc.#64k-l)

       Though the Ancestral File and other records erroneously list that Mary Reynolds’ brothers were the sons of David Reynolds and Mary Anderson, this Henry County, Virginia deed confirms that they were actually his brothers. According to Henry County, Virginia, probate records, David Reynolds died intestate in 1788:

       Henry County, Virginia, Wills and Probate
       Bk. 1, p. 161, Inventory and Appraisal of David Reynolds
       Dated 26 Jan 1788, Appraisal returned 9 Jun 1788 by John Cameron, William Sharp, James Taylor...1 negro, horse, gun, furniture appraised at 61 pounds, 6 shillings (Doc.#66c)

       Bk. 1, p.181-2, Accounts of Estate of David Reynolds
       Dated 30 Nov 1789, Paid John Marr, A. Hughes, George Hairston, John Clark, Henry Lyne, Andrew Wolverton, John Staples, Isaac McDaniel, Moses Reynolds, Sheriff David Reynolds.
       Receipts; David Reynolds his debt of Solomon Stevens, David Going (of Moses Hanks), Jacob Adams, Abraham Penn, John Gates.
       Moses Reynolds, Administrator (Doc.#66d)

       Notice that the estate of this David Reynolds lists no real estate indicating that he died young and was probably single. There are no early deed or patent records listed for a David Reynolds in Henry County which confirms that he did not own land. The assumption that David Reynolds was the father of his siblings was apparently made without the knowledge of the above bill of sale between David’s brothers to his younger sister. Notice that the Negro listed among the estate of David Reynolds was later listed in a bill of sale and recorded in the Henry County deeds about a year later by his brothers who gave the Negro slave, named Daniel, to their sister, Mary Reynolds, who was still a minor according to the Bill of Sale listed above. David’s brother, Moses Reynolds, was the administrator for the estate of David Reynolds. Among those debts David Reynolds owed at the time of his death were owed to Moses Reynolds and Sheriff “David Reynolds.” Sheriff David Reynolds appears to be the same individual who was the deceased, indicating money that was owed to his own estate at the time of his death.

       There was also a Henry County, Virginia estate listed for Archalus [Archelius] Reynolds:

       Henry County, Virginia, Wills and Probate
       Bk. 1, p. 199, Sales Estate of Arch, Reynolds
       Dated 4 Oct 1791, To: Jesse Reynolds, George Hairston, Moses Reynolds, Jacob Adams, Jr., Arch. Reynolds, William Sharp, Abraham Penn, Shadrack Barrett, Baretmus Reynolds, John Holt, Francis Holt, Samuel Mannen, William Mannen, Widow Smith. Total: 50 pounds, 7 shillings and 6 pence (Doc.#66e)

       David’s brother, Archalus/Archelius Reynolds, appears to have died just a few years after David according to this probate record. Notice that his estate was valued less than his brother, David Reynolds’ estate.

       From the name and residence patterns exhibited in Henry and Patrick Counties, David Reynolds, Archalus/Archelius Reynolds and their siblings appear most likely to have been sons and daughters of George Reynolds. As listed above, there was a George Reynolds who served as a first Lt. in the Leatherwood Company commanded by Peter Hairston of Henry County, Virginia during the end of the Revolutionary War.

       4 Dec 1790, Patent Bk. 22, #828, p. 648, William Perkins obtained a patent for 111 acres on waters of White Oak Creek of Smiths River, adjoining Perkins’ land (Doc.# 106f)

       18 Nov 1791, Patent Bk. 24, #844, p. 361, Moses Reynolds obtained a patent for 117 acres on a south branch of Gray’s Fork of North Mayo River, adjoining Francis’ line (Doc.# 106f)
       
       4 Jul 1792, Deed Bk. 4, pp. 353-5, Deed of Trust, Samuel Hughes of Henry County, Virginia, to Samuel Calland of Pittsylvania County in the amount of one hundred twenty six pounds, fifteen shillings, a penny and a half penny that the said Samuel Hughes is justly indebted to Samuel Callands. Therefore assigns the following: a tract of land on Turkey Cock Creek containing 200 acres, which the said Hughes purchased of Samuel Johnson, 10 head of cattle, 1 bay mare 10 years old, 1 sorrel mare 8 years old, 1 black mare 4 years old, sorrel colt one year old, 17 head of sheep, one pair mill stones, his stock of hogs, 2 feather beds and furniture, together with all household and kitchen furniture and all plantation tools. Date due 1 Mar 1794.

       Witnesses: Samuel Tompkins, Jr.
       Samuel Johnson
       Joseph Reynolds
       Bowker Smith
       (Doc.#64o-p)

       30 Apr 1793, Deed Bk., 5, pp 25-6, Archelaus Reynolds bought from William Brown, both of Henry County, for forty pounds, 80 acres on waters of Leatherwood Creek (Doc.#65b)

       2 Apr 1794, Deed Bk. 5, p. 205, Power of Attorney, Richard Reynolds listed as witness for Joseph Fuqua who appointed his friends David Lanier and George Hairston his attorneys to transact his business in Virginia (Doc.#65d)

       28 Aug 1797, Deed Bk. 5, pp359-60, George Reynolds listed as land owner on waters of Bold Branch and Meadow Branch of Leatherwood Creek (Doc.#65c)

       15 May 1797, Patent Bk. 37, #1018, p.274, George Runnalds obtained 462 acres on the head of Bold Branch of Leatherwood Creek at William Bernard’s corner (Doc.#106g)

       29 Aug 1803, Deed Bk. 6, pp. 454-5, George Reynolds of Pittsylvania County sold to Richard Reynolds of Henry County, for 50 pounds, 496 acres at the head of Bold Branch of Leatherwood Creek (Doc.#65e)

       26 Sep 1803, Deed Bk. 6, pp. 467-8, Richard Reynolds of Henry County sold to Samuel Higgs of the same county, for 21 pounds, 100 acres on the waters of Bold Branch of Leatherwood Creek (Doc.#65f)

       26 Sep 1803, Deed Bk. 6, pp. 468-9, Richard Reynolds of Henry County sold to James Clark of the same county, for 30 pounds, 200 acres on the waters of Bold Branch of Leatherwood Creek (Doc.#65f-g)

       These appear to be the last deeds by the early Reynolds families of Henry and Pittsylvania Counties of Virginia. The George Reynolds of Pittsylvania County appears to have been the same George Reynolds who married Susanna Lansford in Henry County on 12 Jun 1779 (Doc.#89a). This deed indicates that this George and Richard Reynolds, both of whom owned land on the tributaries of Leatherwood Creek, may have been directly related, possibly brothers or father and son. Note from tax records listed above, that there was a Richard Reynolds who originally settled on Leatherwood Creek. However, since there were three Richard Reynolds listed in the early Henry County tax records it is unclear whether this Richard Reynolds was the same Richard Reynolds, Sr., who was residing in Jefferson County, Kentucky as early as 1792, who was the father of your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds, Sr., of Patrick County. Since there was also a Richard Reynolds who resided on Bold Branch of Leatherwood Creek in 1803, these appear to have been two separate Richard Reynolds, possibly father and son.

       Not dated, Deed Bk. 6, p. 475, Power of Attorney, Henry Lyne appoints Warden Pope, Esq. of Jefferson County, Kentucky to convey to Richard Reynolds of Jefferson County, Kentucky, 2/3 of a tract on the waters of Harrods Creek and the other 1/3 unto Abraham Hite, Esq, of the same. The tract contains 500 acres and was patented in my name. Signed: Henry Lyne. Proved: 31 Oct 1803.... (Doc.# 65g, 121h)

From this information, which reveals that Richard Reynolds, Sr., was residing in Jefferson County, Kentucky in 1803, we searched the Jefferson County, Kentucky records which reveal that Richard Reynolds, Sr., resided there as early as 1785 (Doc.#121e):

       Jefferson County, Kentucky - Bond & Power of Attorney

       Bk. 1, p. 225, Henry Lyne of Henry County, Virginia, appoints Stephen Ormsby of Jefferson County, Kentucky, as his true and lawful attorney in fact, to convey to Richard Reynolds with special warranty, two thirds part of 500 acres granted to Lyne by patent dated May 27, 1785, in Jefferson County on the waters of the Ohio River adjoining William Fleming and George Lyne, agreeable to a division to be made of the said land between Henry Lyne and Isaac Hite of Jefferson County; and also to convey to said Isaac Hite, with special warranty, one-third of the said tract. May 25, 1793. J. Coleman and Joseph Kellar, witnesses. Recorded Jul 20, 1798 (Doc.#121r)

       Notice that this power of attorney corresponds with the last listing in Henry County, Virginia records, which is listed above, for Richard Reynolds, Sr., of Jefferson County, Kentucky. Richard Reynolds along with Henry Lyne, coroner of Henry County, Virginia, appear to have begun obtaining land in Kentucky as early as 1785. In 1793, Henry Lyne sold 2/3 of his 500 acre patent in Jefferson County to Richard Reynolds, Sr.. Hence, the above Power of Attorney which was proved and recorded in 1803, pertains to this deed dated 25 May 1793 in Jefferson County, Kentucky.

       Jefferson County, Kentucky Deeds

       18 Feb 1795, Jefferson County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. 1, p. 30, Bond, Richard Reynolds, to Jacob Kuykendall, for 100 pounds, conditioned that in consideration of the quantity of one peck of corn yearly rent, Reynolds has leased to Kuykendall 20 acres adjoining Reynolds Station, to have during the life of said Jacob Kuykendall and Mary Kuykendall his wife. Witnessed by Charles Reynolds and Christian Perkins. Recorded 5 Feb 1799. (Doc.#121x).

       This deed from Richard Reynolds, Sr., to Jacob Kuykendall indicates that Jacob was a son-in-law when compared with probate records listed below. Notice that the deed was witnessed by Charles Reynolds who according to probate records was the grandson of Richard Reynolds, Sr. Charles was the grandson of Richard Reynolds, Sr., i.e. the son of George Reynolds. The deed was also witnessed by Christian Perkins, a son of William Perkins, Sr., of Henry and Patrick Counties, Virginia as listed above. Christian Perkins was also a brother-in-law to Richard Reynolds, Sr.’s son, your ancestor Joseph Reynolds, who married Sarah/Sally Perkins.

       6 Aug 1799, Jefferson County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. 1, p. 164, Indenture, Richard Reynolds sold to his son Samuel Reynolds, for 12 shilllings, all his right and claim to 600 acres in Lincoln County on the waters of the South Fork of the Rolling Fork of Salt River, patented at Frankfort on 24 May 1799, and surveyed 20 Dec 1797, beginning at north west corner of Adam Carpenter’s land, thence north east. Recorded 5 Nov 1799 (Doc.#121y).

       This deed reveals that one of Richard Reynolds, Sr.’s sons was named Samuel Reynolds. According to this deed, Samuel resided in Lincoln County, Kentucky on land sold to him by his father. Hence, Kentucky land grants dated after 1791 should be searched for additional land grants and patents issued to Richard Reynolds, Sr., and other related Reynolds.

       25 Jul 1801, Jefferson County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. 1, p. 475, Indenture, Richard Reynolds sold to William Stewart for 100 pounds, 119 acres in Jefferson County, on Harrod’s Creek, bounded by Corwin’s land. Witnessed by Thomas Barbour, Jr., Margaret McDaniel and George Alhand. Recorded 3 Aug 1803 (Doc.#121z).
       
       25 Jul 1801, Jefferson County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. 2, p. 399, Indenture, Richard Reynolds, sold to Charles Reynolds, for $1000, 140 acres in Jefferson County, beginning corner to Tenant’s military survey, thence south west, on the waters of Harrod’s Creek, bounded by Simeon Smith. Witnessed by Thomas Barbour, Jr., George Alhand, and Margaret McDaniel. Recorded 23 Nov 1805 (Doc.#121ab).

       17 Aug 1801, Jefferson County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. 2, p. 397, Indenture, Richard Reynolds, farmer, sold to Charles Reynolds, farmer, for $200, 130 acres in Jefferson County, bounded by Stewart, Cowin and Harrod’s Creek. Witnesses by Thomas Barbour, Jr., George Alhand, and Margaret McDaniel. Recorded 28 Nov 1805 (Doc.#121ab).

       8 Feb 1805, Jefferson County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. 2, p. 176, Indenture, Richard Reynolds bought from Reubin Eastin, for 120 pounds, 500 acres in Hardin County, being the moiety of a tract of 1000 acres which Reubin Eastin purchased at Sheriff’s sale under an execution in the name of Henry Tait against David Barber, and which was conveyed to said Eastin by George Helm as late Sheriff of Harden County by deed dated July 25, 1799. The said 500 acres having been taken off the upper side of the said 1000 acre tract. Recorded 8 Feb 1805. (Doc.#121aa)

       13 Sep 1805, Jefferson County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. 2, p. 428, Indenture, Richard Reynolds bought from Reubin Eastin, for $650, 500 acres being the balance of a survey of 1000 acres of David Barbour sold by the Sheriff of Hardin County, and since which the said Reubin Eastin has sold to Richard Reynolds the said 500 acres. Witnessed by Charles Reynolds, Robert N. Lewis and one name in German script. Recorded 20 Dec 1805. (Doc.# 121ac)

These deeds reveal that Richard Reynolds, Sr., owned 1000 acres of land in Hardin County, Kentucky. Hence, Hardin County records could reveal additional information about Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his descendants, and these records should be searched along with Lincoln County records and subsequent Jefferson County deeds.

After 1791, the majority of land grants, patents and deeds for the above Reynolds families occurred in Patrick County which was formed from Henry County in 1790/1.


       According to Jefferson County, Kentucky will books, Richard Reynolds made out his will on 1 Oct 1808:

       Jefferson County, Kentucky Will Books

       Bk. 2, p.35, Abstract of Will of Richard Reynolds, desires that his wife, Mary Reynolds, and his son Richard Reynolds, shall be amply and sufficiently maintained out of the estate so long as they or either of them shall live. Executors shall sell the negroes, stock, and other moveable personal property on 20 months credit. The tract of land and plantation whereon he now lives shall be rented out by the executors and the rents or profits applied to the maintenance of wife and son. And at the death of both, the said tract of land be sold for cash for the best price that can be obtained, or on credit as executors may deem advisable, and the purchase money divided between all his children that shall then be alive, and those that shall be dead, their children shall have the part that would have fallen to their parent. Should the rents and profits of the plantation not be sufficient to maintain said wife and son Richard, the executors shall retain in their hands as much money out of the debts due testator and the sale of the negroes and personal estate as the interest thereon will afford when added to the rents and profits the maintenance aforesaid, and the balance of the money divided equally among all the children then alive except Richard. To granddaughter Anna Smith, the tract of land adjoining Richard Woolfolk, purchased of Henry Lynn [Lyne], it being a part of the 500 acres patented in the name of the said Lynn. All the other lands not mentioned herinbefore are to be sold by the executors and conveyed by special warranty , and the money equally divided among all the children then alive and the children of those deceased. Executors to complete all suits brought by testator or against him. Wife Mary and son Richard to live on the plantation, have a house to live in which is made comfortable, and a piece of ground sufficient to cultivate for a garden and enclose it. The negro woman Tamar shall not be sold, but given to wife and son Richard to serve them as long as they or either shall live. Appoints Andrew Steele and Warden Pope as executors. October 1, 1808. Witnessed by Levi Tyler, Archibal Allen, Stephen Mitchell, Worden Pope, Frederick W. S. Grayson and Isaac H. Tyler. Probated Mar 11, 1816 (Doc.#121u-v, 122).

       Apparently, by 1808, Richard Reynold’s wife, Mary, had moved to Kentucky where she resided with her husband and son, Richard Reynolds, Jr. Hence, contrary to the implications of the Henry County deeds, Richard Reynolds, Sr., did not abandon his wife when he left for Kentucky. He appears to have merely provided for her while he was fighting Indians and paving the way for settlement in Kentucky. He later sent for her after the majority of Indian Wars were resolved and it was safe for her to reside in Kentucky. According to his land jholding and probate records, Richard Reynolds, Sr.’s estate appears to have been very substantial. Though his will does not list all of his children, there was a suit filed by one of his daughters, Catherine Reynolds Smith, in the Jefferson County, Kentucky Chancery Court records which lists the following:

       Jefferson County, Kentucky - Old Chancery Court

       1828 - Catharine Smith, heir and daughter of Richard Reynolds, deceased, vs. Papers of the other heirs: Executor Andrew Steele, Jos. Reynolds, Samuel Reynolds, Charles Reynolds, Edward Reynolds, James Perkins, Jos. Perkins, Sally Reynolds, John Perkins, William Perkins, Susan Coombs and her husband, heirs of Lourina Perkins -deceased, John Reynolds, Abraham Reynolds, George Reynolds, William Reynolds, Jacob Reynolds, Allan Reynolds, Mary Ann Reynolds, Matilda Reynolds, Lourina Reynolds, Eleanor Reynolds, Polly Noor and her husband John Noor, Sally Goodman and her husband Joel Goodman, Betsey Peck and her husband, Margaret Reynolds and Abraham H. Kellar administrators, grandson Magruder Richard Barbour...

       To the Honorable the Judge of the Jefferson Circuit Court in Chancery Setting, Catherine Smith’s father, Richard Reynolds, departed this life in 1816 having first made and published his last will and testament which afterwards duly proved and admitted to record in the county court of Jefferson County in the circuit court, a court properly competent jurisdiction for that purpose, and execution of said will was by said court granted and committed in one form of law to Andrew Steele one of the executors therein named, Worden Pope, Esq., the other executor named in said will either refusing to gratify in ? his right to do so thereafter - the said Pope has however not yet taken of himself the execution of said will or qualified as executor thereof - that the said Andrew Steele .... together with Francis Taylor and Thomas Stewart...that the said Richard Reynolds had on hand at the time of his death money to a very considerable amount... [names heirs]:

              Joseph Reynolds; Samuel Reynolds; and Charley Reynolds the only son and heir at law to George Reynolds, deceased son of Richard Reynolds; Edward Reynolds; James Perkins; Joseph Perkins; Sally Reynolds who was Sally Perkins and Charles Reynolds her husband; John Perkins; William Perkins; Susan Coombs who was Susan Perkins and Mr. Coombs her husband; children heirs of Lourina Perkins, deceased who was Lourina Reynolds, daughter and heir of said Richard Reynolds, deceased; Thomas, John, Abraham, George, William, Jacob, Charles, Allan, Mary Ann, Matilda Lourina; Eleanor Reynolds ; Polly/Mary Noor, maiden name Reynolds, and John Noor her husband; Sally Goodman, maiden name Reynolds and [Jacob Goodman] her husband; Patsey Peck, maiden name Reynolds, and ? her husband, deceased; heirs of ? Reynolds, deceased son of said Richard Reynolds; and Margaret Reynolds and Abraham H. Kellar, administrators; grandson Magruder Richard Barbour, Margaret Reynolds... (Doc.#124)

       Though index to the above records indicates that Lourina Reynolds Perkins’ children were named Reynolds, this is an error in the index. The children of Lourina Reynolds Perkins should have been listed in the index as Perkins, i.e. the children of Lourina and her husband, Mr. Perkins. Since Richard Reynolds, Sr.’s son, Charles Reynolds, died testate in 1821, his heirs are listed in his place in the above suit, i.e. his daughters Sarah Reynolds, wife of Jacob Goodman, and Mary Reynolds, wife of John Noor. Refer to the Jefferson County, Kentucky will of Charles Reynolds who married Margaret Kuykendall (Doc.#122a). There was also a grandson named Charley Reynolds who appears to have married a woman named Sally Perkins. Charley was the only heir and son of George Reynolds who was a deceased son of Richard Reynolds, Sr. As Richard Reynolds, Jr., and Mary Reynolds, the wife of Richard Reynolds, Sr. are not listed in the above suit, it appears they both died prior to 1828 when this suit was filed.

       From the above Jefferson County, Kentucky Chancery Court records for the estate of Richard Reynolds, Sr., along with his will, he appears to have had the following children:

       Children of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Mary

       1) Joseph Reynolds, your ancestor, who married Sally/Sarah Perkins about 1784, probably in Henry County, Virginia
       2) Samuel Reynolds, who married Sally/Sarah Kuykendall on 1 Jun 1804 in Jefferson County, Kentucky (Doc.#123a)
       3) George Reynolds, who possibly married Morning Wade on 14 Sep 1791, by consent of her sister Elizabeth Hilton and her husband Numan Hilton, Surety Joseph Reynolds, performed by Min. Robert Jones (Doc.#51b, 88a). George was the father of Charley Reynolds who married Sally/Sarah Perkins. George died prior to 1816.
       4) Edward Reynolds
       5) Charles Reynolds who married Margaret Kuykendall on 1 Jun 1811 in Jefferson County, Kentucky and died testate in Jefferson County in 1821 (Doc.#123a, 122a)
       6) Lourina Reynolds who married ? Perkins and had several children as listed above in the Jefferson County, Kentucky Chancery Suit
       7) Eleanor Reynolds
       8) Polly/Mary Reynolds who married John Noor
       9) Sally Reynolds who married Joel Goodman
       10) Betsey Reynolds who married Mr. Peck
       11) Margaret Reynolds
       12) Richard Reynolds, Jr.
       13) Catharine Reynolds who married Mr. Smith and had a daughter named Anna Smith. Catherine is the person who filed the Chancery Suit in Jefferson County, Kentucky as listed above (Doc.#122a)

       For the most part, these children appear to be listed in the order of their births. Exceptions to the order of birth are Richard Reynolds, Jr., and the names of his daughters who appear listed after their brother’s names rather than in the order of their birth in the Jefferson County, Kentucky Chancery Court records. Further research of the Jefferson County and Kentucky records should provide us with marriage dates and places for most of the children of Richard Reynolds, Sr.

Continuing with Henry County, Kentucky records, aside from George Reynolds, there were only two other grooms named Reynolds listed in the early Henry County marriage records:

       Henry County, Virginia Marriages

       12 Jun 1779, George Reynolds married Susanna Lansford, daughter of Catherine Lansford of Pittsylvania County, Virginia (Doc.#89a)

As listed above, this George Reynolds and Susanna Lansford settled in the Leatherwood Creek area before migrating to Williamson County, Tennessee according to the Ancestral File. The Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster, by Col. Steve F. Tillman, which has been an authoritative compilation for the Reynolds families of Virginia and England since 1948, lists the following for this George Reynolds and his father, James Reynolds:

       George Reynolds, born 1750 in Caroline County, Virginia, son of James Reynolds, born 1715 in Surry County, Virginia, and Sukie Lindsay. George died 1813 in Williamson County, Tennessee. He was appointed Lieutenant and Chaplain of the Virginia State Line in Oct 1779. He married Susannah Lansford on 12 Jun 1779. DAR membership #122998. Issue: Elizabeth, born 1780; Pryor, born 30 Sep 1783; Susannah, born 1784; Jency, born 7 Mar 1789; Nancy, born 11 Dec 1781; Mary; Sallie; Bethenia, who married Walter C. Haley in August 1817; George; Thomas; and Richard born 1790 (Doc.#117s)

       James Reynolds, born 1715 in Surry County, Virginia, son of Richard Reynolds and Mary Anderson. James married Sukie Lindsay about 1748. James settled in Caroline County, Virginia and had issue: Richard Spencer, born 1749; George, born 1750; Jesse David, born 1754; David; Robert; William; and Bernard born 12 Nov 1763 (Doc.#117p, 117m)

       This information reveals once again that Reynolds families resided in Caroline County, Virginia, prior to coming to Pittsylvania and Henry Counties of Virginia. Hence, we searched Caroline County records for additional information on your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, Sr. Though Caroline County records list a Sarah Reynolds as executrix for Benjamin Reynolds’ estate in 1743, there is no listing of a Richard Reynolds and no will or estate records listed for Benjamin Reynolds (Doc.#129). There was also a Joseph Reynolds who is listed in the early records of Caroline County, Virginia (Doc.#129,130).

Henry County marriage records continue to list the following for the Reynolds surname:

       19 Jul 1806, John Raynolds married Sarah Phillpott, daughter of Charles Thomas Philpott (Doc.#89a)

       16 Apr 1821, William Reynolds married Lucy Burchett (Doc.#89a)

       Notice that the second to last land record of Henry County, Virginia, which is listed above, lists Joseph Reynolds, Sr., as a witness to property on Turkey Cock Creek which was sold to Samuel Calland of Pittsylvania County, Virginia. Henry County was created form this portion of Pittsylvania County in 1776. This is the same area listed above where Richard Reynolds, Sr., bought land on Turkey Cock Creek in 1782. According to a Pittsylvania County history, the Reynolds family is listed as residing on land called the Calland in Pittsylvania County, Virginia from a very early time period:

       Reynolds

              Whether it’s a blue-eyed Reynolds or a brown-eyed Reynolds, he has been in Pittsylvania County a very long time.

              This numerous family, whose name is synonymous with the Callands area where they have lived and held land for generations, traces its roots to County Kent, England, where Christopher Reynolds was born in 1530. His son George visited Virginia but decided not to stay. George’s son Christopher, however, born in Gravesend, took the plunge. He died in 1654 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia. A couple of generations later, David Reynolds and his wife, Mary Anderson Reynolds, settled in Henry County. They moved into Pittsylvania, then returned to Henry. It is their sons, William and Bartlett, that became Revolutionary soldiers... (Doc.#83c)

       This brief history of the Reynolds family of Henry and Pittsylvania County was published in 1976. Though the accuracy of the David Reynolds ancestry is erroneous (as referenced and explained in detail in the above probate and land records of Henry County, Virginia), Pittsylvania County records reveal that a Hugh Reynolds resided in Pittsylvania County from a very early time period.

       Notice that according to the Ancestral File data, a Bartlett Reynolds is listed as a son of George Reynolds, not David Reynolds and Mary Anderson as indicated in this article. Other Ancestral File records list David Reynolds’ mother as Mary Anderson, the wife of Richard Reynolds of Isle of Isle of Wight County, Virginia. However, the above Henry and Patrick County records reveal, contrary to the above article, that Bartlett Reynolds was the older brother of Moses, Jesse, David, Archelaus, Bartimous, Reuben, Foster Millington and Mary Reynolds. These individuals appear to have been children of the widow Susannah Reynolds. Susannah Reynolds appears in the early tax records for Henry County, Virginia, which was created from Pittsylvania County in 1776, the year the Revolutionary War began. Notice also, in contrast to the above article, that Bartlett did not have a brother named William. As listed below, the William Reynolds who served as an ensign in the Revolutionary War from Pittsylvania County died testate in 1791 and appears to have been a son of Hugh Reynolds.

       The above historyalso lists the following Revolutionary War service for Pittsylvania County:

       Pittsylvania County, Virginia Revolutionary War Service

       Bartlett Reynolds served in Dillard’s Company of the Virginia State line (Doc.#83a)

As listed above, Bartlett Reynolds was the oldest of the siblings which Henry County records indicate were the sons of the widow Susannah Reynolds. Captain Dillard, under which Bartlett served, was a resident of the area which became Patrick County, Virginia in 1791. According to Patrick County tax lists, Dillard was the commissioner in charge of collecting taxes for several years in Henry and Patrick Counties of Virginia, where Bartlett and his brothers resided.

       Richard Spencer Reynolds served in Henderson’s Company of Virginia State Line (Doc.#83a)

As listed above, according to the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster by Col. Steve F. Tillman, this Richard Spencer Reynolds was the father of Spencer Reynolds who is listed in the early tax records of Henry County, Virginia. There was also a Richard D. Reynolds who served in Pittsylvania County during the Revolution according to his pension which is referenced above. As listed below, Richard D. Reynolds married Nancy Grisham on 2 Mar 1785 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia before moving to Muhlenburg County, Kentucky where he died testate in 1836. His Revolutionary War pension file lists all of his children and their birth dates, etc.

        William Reynolds served as an Ensign in the Pittsylvania County Militia (Doc.#83a)

This appears to have been the same William Reynolds who died testate in Pittsylvania County in 1791 as listed below. He appears to have been a son of Hugh Reynolds, the original settler of Pittsylvania County according to his 1768 survey on the Bannister River in the Callands area.

       According to Pittsylvania County, Virginia, wills, we located the following wills for William Nealy and William Reynolds:

       Pittsylvania County Wills, Bk. 11, p. 162
       Will of William Nealy [Nely], dated 6 Dec 1787

       To daughter, Mary Reynolds, he leaves a mare.
       To grandson William Reynolds, he leaves all lands and tenements
       To grandson Joseph Reynolds, he leaves all rest of his estate
       Executors: William and Joseph Reynolds
       Witnesses: George Smith and Micajah Hughs
       Will Proved: 21 Jul 1788
       Security: Hugh Reynolds
       (Doc.#76b)

       Notice that William Nely lists only his daughter, Mary Reynolds, and two grandsons, William and Joseph Reynolds. This will indicates that Mary Reynolds may have been the wife of your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, Sr., whose wife was named Mary. However, William Nely’s will only lists two grandsons. Hence, in light of Richard Reynold, Sr.’s Jefferson County, Kentucky will, this Mary Reynolds does not appear to have been the same Mary Reynolds who was the wife of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and who resided in Patrick and Henry Counties of Virginia prior to moving to Jefferson County, Kentucky where she died. Richard and Mary Reynolds had several sons as recorded in Richard Reynolds, Sr.’s probate records listed above.

Notice that there was a Robert Neally who owned land next to Hugh Reynolds according to the 1768 survey in Pittsylvania County for Hugh Reynolds. Name and residence patterns indicate that William Neally’s daughter, named Mary Reynolds in his will, was the wife of Hugh Reynolds. Hence, William and Joseph Reynolds appear to have been the sons of Hugh Reynolds. Ensign William Reynolds’ died testate in 1791 according to his will listed below. Joseph Reynolds married first to Margaret Devin in 1780, and secondly to Nancy Ford in 1803 as listed below.

       In addition to the will of William Nely, we also located a will for William Reynolds which lists the following:

       Pittsylvania County Wills, Bk. 9, pp. 37-9
       Will of William Reynolds, dated 16 Jan 1791

       Lists wife Martha whom he leaves his land and plantation where he lived, together with one moiety of his whole tract being 104 acres located on the same side of the road with his plantation, during her natural life.
       After her decease the plantation and 54 acres to his son, Joseph Reynolds.
       To Son, Richard Cole Reynolds - other 50 acres of tract with the plantation on Gease Creek where he now lives.
       Wife to have feather beds, furniture, pewter and two chests and spinning wheel. After her decease to be sold and equally divided among his children: Salley, Tiffey, Betty, Thomas, Johan, Jessey, William, James, Alice, Lucy, Joseph, Richard Cole [Reynolds], Anna Davis [Reynolds] and heirs.
       Executors: Wife, Martha Reynolds and Robert Walters, Jr.
       Witnesses: Thomas Cissell, Samuel Constable
       Security: John Wilson and William Lynch
       (Doc.#76c-d)

       4 Oct 1791, Probate, Inventory of William Reynolds’ estate abstract, etc., recorded 20 Feb 1792 (Doc.#98c)

Name and residence patterns indicate that this William Reynolds, Sr., was the son of Hugh Reynolds. On 15 Oct 1792, William Reynold’s sons, Joseph and Richard Cole Reynolds sold the land that their father willed to them in Pittsylvania County, to their brother Jesse Reynolds. At this time, Richard Cole Reynolds and his wife, Betsy, were residing in Halifax County while Joseph Reynolds and his wife, Nancy [Ford], were still residing in Pittsylvania County (Doc.#77f-g). This also confirms that these individuals were not the same individuals as your ancestors who resided in Henry and Patrick Counties. However, they appear to have been cousins as listed above. In addition to Joseph, Richard and Jessy Reynolds, other sons of William Reynolds are also listed in Pittsylvania County deeds (Doc.#77).

       Early Pittsylvania County, Virginia Records

       6 Apr 1768, Survey for Hugh Reynolds, Pittsylvania County, 298 acres bounding Robert Nealy and William Roberts (Doc.#78c)

       3 Aug 1771, Virginia Patent Bk. 40, p. 551, Pittsylvania County, Hugh Reynolds received patent for 298 acres on the waters of Banister River adjoining land of Nealy and Roberts (Doc.#114o)

       Notice that this Virginia survey and subsequent patent for Hugh Reynolds borders land of Robert Nealy who is no doubt related to the William Nealy whose Pittsylvania County will, which is listed above, lists Hugh Reynolds as his security. Name and residence patterns indicate that William Reynolds was the same individual who served as an ensign in the Revolutionary War from Pittsylvania County. This particular tract of land is located in the Callands area, a portion of which became Henry County in 1776. There was also a 425 acre tract surveyed for a Hugh Reynolds on 30 Dec 1807 on the waters of Banister River and Tomahawk Creek adjoining land owned by Balland Devin, William and Joseph Reynolds (sons of William Reynolds, Sr.) near the original survey for Robert Neally’s 452 acres on Tomahawk Creek and Bannister River (Doc.#79b, 97, 114p).

       30 Dec 1807, Survey, Pittsylvania County, Survey for Hugh Reynolds for 425 acre tract on waters of Banister River and Tomahawk Creek adjoining land owned by [Balland] Devin, William and Joseph Reynolds (sons of Hugh Reynolds) near the original survey for Robert Neally’s 452 acres on Tomahawk Creek and Bannister River (Doc.#79b, 97, 114p)

Name and Residence patterns indicate that this Joseph Reynolds, who was the son of Hugh Reynolds according to the will of William Neally, is the same individual who married Margaret Devin on 21 Aug 1780 in Pittsylvania County as listed below (Doc.#81a). This is the individual from whom Desmond Kendrick, the Henry County, Virginia Archivist descends. Desmond Kendrick has provided us with the following genealogy which he has compiled for his Reynolds ancestry in Pittsylvania County, Virginia:


       FIRST GENERATION

       1. Joseph Reynolds was born about 1760. He died about 1840 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. He was married to Margaret "Peggy" Devin (daughter of William Devin and Sarah Smith) on August 21, 1780 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. Margaret "Peggy" Devin was born about 1760. She died about 1798 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. Joseph Reynolds and Margaret "Peggy" Devin had the following children:

                +2        i.        Hugh Reynolds, (born about 1781).
              +3       ii.       John Devin Reynolds (born on February 22, 1783).
              +4       iii.       Sarah "Sally"Sarah Reynolds (born about 1785).
              +5       iv.       William Reynolds (born about 1787).
              +6       v.       Mary "Polly" Reynolds (born about 1789).
              +7       vi.       Elizabeth Reynolds (born about 1791).
              +8       vii.       Joseph , Reynolds Jr. (born about 1793).
              +9       viii.       Robert Devin Reynolds (born about 1795).
              10       ix.       Margaret Reynolds was born about 1797.

       Joseph Reynolds was married to Nancy Ford on July 26, 1803. Joseph Reynolds and Nancy Ford had the following children:

              +11       i.              Matilda Reynolds (born about 1804).
              +12       ii.       Berryman Reynolds (born about 1806).
              +13       iii.       Featherstone Foard "Ford" Reynolds (born about 1808).
              +14       iv.       Demaris Reynolds (born about 1810).
              +15       v.              Abraham Reynolds (born about 1812).
              +16       vi.       Perry Green "Bay" Reynolds (born in 1814).
              +17       vii.       Williamson Reynolds (born about 1817).
              +18       viii.       Nancy Booker Reynolds (born about 1820).


       SECOND GENERATION

       2. Hugh Reynolds was born about 1781. He was married to Elizabeth Mitchell (daughter of James A. Mitchell and Sarah Warren Philpott) on September 21, 1801.
       3. John Devin Reynolds was born on February 22, 1783. He died on March 18, 1831 in Worlds, near Callands, Pittsylvania County, Virginia. He was married to Sarah Ann Philpott (daughter of Charles Thomas Philpott) on July 19, 1806. Sarah Ann Philpott was born on October 1, 1784 in Maryland. She died about 1863 in Worlds, near Callands, Pittsylvania County, Virginia.

       4. Sarah "Sally" Reynolds was born about 1785.
       
       5. William Reynolds was born about 1787. He died on January 27, 1816.       He was married to Nancy Blair (daughter of James Blair and Polly Dickerson ) on March 29, 1814.
       6. Mary "Polly" Reynolds was born about 1789. She died about 1833. She was married to Samuel Blair (son of William Blair and Sarah Sutter) on July 26, 1810.

       7. Elizabeth Reynolds was born about 1791. She was married to John Hawkins Kendrick on October 23, 1817 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. John Hawkins Kendrick died about 1850.

       8. Joseph Reynolds, Jr. was born about 1793. He was married to Manerva Collins (daughter of Keziah Collins) on February 2, 1815.

       9. Robert Devin Reynolds, was born about 1795. He died before February 19, 1844. He was married to Susanna Carter (daughter of Nathan Carter and Elizabeth Adkins) on February 11, 1820. Susanna Carter was born on July 26, 1804. She died on April 24, 1847.

       11. Matilda Reynolds, was born about 1804. She died about 1821.
       She was married to Hiram Collins on February 21, 1820.

       12. Berryman Reynolds was born about 1806. He died before 1850. He was married to Nancy Adkins (daughter of Henry Adkins and Elizabeth Rossett) on November 16, 1829.

       13. Featherstone Foard "Ford" Reynolds was born about 1808. He was married to Susan F. Napier on February 11, 1818.

       14. Demaris Reynolds, was born about 1810. She was married to William A. Napier on November 21, 1827.

       15. Abraham Reynolds, was born about 1812. He was married to Martha Epperson on December 18, 1833.

       16. Reynolds, Perry Green "Bay," was born in 1814. He died in 1896. He was buried in P.G. Reynolds Family cemetery on Tomahawk Creek, near Museville, Pittsylvania County, Virginia. He was married to Cassandra Ann Reynolds (daughter of Hugh Reynolds and Elizabeth Mitchell) on December 5, 1837. Cassandra Ann Reynolds was born in 1815. She was buried in P.G. Reynolds Family cemetery on Tomahawk Creek, near Museville, Pittsylvania County, Virginia.

       17. Reynolds, Williamson, was born about 1817. He was married to Catherine Oakes (daughter of William Burl Oakes, William Burl and Ruth Smith) on February 17, 1834.Oakes, Catherine

       18. Reynolds, Nancy Booker, was born about 1820. She was married to Anderson Adkins (son of Henry Adkins and Elizabeth Rossett) on February 19, 1836.

       Prepared by: DESMOND KENDRICK
       ARCHIVIST, HENRY COUNTY, VIRGINIA
       (Doc.#120-120a)

       As listed above, Desmond Kendrick has agreed to assist us with locating early Henry and Pittsylvania County church records as well as the sources of information for the Reynolds genealogy which was compiled by the Reynolds Homestead and the Patrick County Historical Society.

       13 Oct 1809, Virginia Commonwealth Grants Bk. 60, p. 180, Pittsylvania County, Hugh Reynolds obtains grant for 425 acres on the branches of the Tomahawk and Banister River adjoining Balland Devin (Doc.#114p)

       These land records in 1807 and 1809 appear to have been for a grandson of the Hugh Reynolds who obtained the 1768 survey listed above almost forty years earlier in the same area of the Callands on the Bannister River. Unfortunately, there are no early will or land records recorded in Pittsylvania County for Hugh Reynolds’ estate. Hence, chancery court records of Pittsylvania County will need to be examined. Name and residence patterns indicate that Hugh Reynolds was the father of William Reynolds who died testate in Pittsylvania County in 1791 as listed above. Pittsylvania County marriage records reveal that a Hugh Reynolds, a son of Joseph Reynolds and Margaret Devin according to Desmond Kendrick’s records, is the same individual who obtained the 1807 survey and married Elizabeth Mitchell on 21 Sep 1801 as listed below (Doc.#81a).

       30 Jun 1777, Pittsylvania County Deeds, William Reynalds listed as witness of a Pittsylvania County deed between Josias Reynolds of Brunswick County and Edward Atkins of Charlotte County (Doc.#95b)

       This deed reveals that early settlers of Pittsylvania County, including a Josias Reynolds of Brunswick County, came from Brunswick and Charlotte Counties of Virginia. The date if this deed is just a year after the creation of Henry County, which was created from Pittsylvania County in 1776. Further research should be conducted in the records of Brunswick County for additional information on the Reynolds families of that area.

       The Pedigree Resource file lists that a Josiah Reynolds was born 1 Jan 1758 in Nansemond County, Virginia. He died in 1833 in Smith County, Tennessee. He is listed as the son of John David Reynolds and Mary Martha Gay. John David Reynolds was born 1 Jan 1727/8 in Guilford County, North Carolina, the son of William Reynolds and Mary Brown. William Reynolds was born 5 Jul 1701 at Nottingham, Pennsylvania. Hence, name and residence patterns indicate that this Reynolds family of Pennsylvania, North Carolina and Virginia, is probably not directly related to the Reynolds families of Patrick, Henry, Pittsylvania and Brunswick Counties of Virginia.

       7 Oct 1777, Pittsylvania County Probate, Richard Reynolds, Joel Harbour and John Kindrick appraised the estate of Samuel Crowley (Doc.#98b)

       This probate record occurred a year after the creation of Henry County from Pittsylvania County in 1776. Name and residence patterns, i.e. the fact that Joel Harbour is listed as an appraiser along with your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, Sr., indicates that they were neighbors which corresponds with Henry and Patrick County records. As listed in this report, your Reynolds and the Harbour families of Henry and Patrick County resided next to each other, sold land to each other, and intermarried. The other apprasier, John Kindrick/Kendrick, is no doubt related to the ancestors of Desmond Kendrick, the Henry County Virginia Archivist listed above who is a descendant of Joseph Reynolds and Margaret Devin of Pittsylvania County.

       22 Oct 1782, Pittsylvania County, James Keele’s 24 Oct 1769 original survey for 31 acres on Mayo river transferred to Moses Reynolds (Doc.#78b)

       This is the same Moses Reynolds who resided on the waters of Nobusiness Creek, a fork on the North Mayo River in that portion of Pittsylvania County which became Henry County in 1776, and Patrick County in 1791. Refer to the records of Henry and Patrick counties which are listed above.

       26 Dec 1789, Pittsylvania County Deeds, p. 176, Richard Reynolds of Pittsylvania County, bought from John Young of same county, for 85 pounds, 130 acres in Pittsylvania on the South Fork of Sandy River bounded by Robard [Robert] Williams and Isaiah Morton. Recorded 26 Apr 1792 (Doc.#77b)

       4 Oct 1791, Pittylvania County Probate, Inventory of William Reynolds’ estate abstract, etc., recorded 20 Feb 1792 (Doc.#98c)

       This appears to have been the same Richard Cole Reynolds who was a son of William Reynolds, Sr., who died testate in 1791 in Pittsylvania County as listed above.

       15 Oct 1792, Pittsylvania County Deeds, p. 510, Joseph Reynolds and his wife, Betsey, of Halifax County, and Richard Reynolds and his wife Nancy, of Pittsylvania County, sold to Jesse Reynolds of Pittsylvania County, for 30 pounds, a tract of land containing 104 acres by survey on the branches of Burches Creek bounded by Joseph Earp. The land was left by William Reynolds, deceased, and jointly conveyed by them to Jesse Reynolds (Doc.#77b).

       This deed corresponds with the Pittsylvania County will of William Reynolds, Sr., listed above in which he left this 104 acre tract to his sons, Joseph and Richard, who then sold it to their brother, Jesse Reynolds. Notice that in 1792, Joseph Reynolds and his wife, Betsey were residing in Halifax County in 1792. Hence, Halifax County records were searched for more information about the Reynolds family which could aid further research. Halifax County marriage records reveal that a Joseph Reynolds married Elizabeth Turner on 26 Nov 1787, and a William Reynolds married Lucy Holt on 19 Dec 1801 (Doc.#128). Personal property tax lists also list a John and Joseph Rannolds residing there in 1788 (Doc.#127), but no Richard Reynolds listed in earlier records.

       Unlike Joseph and Betsey Reynolds who moved to Halifax County, Richard and Jesse Reynolds remained in Pittsylvania County.

       22 Dec 1792, Pittsylvania County Deeds, p. 356, Jesse Reynolds and Sarah his wife, of Pittsylvania County, sold to Richard Reynolds of same county, for 20 pounds, a certain tract of land in Pittsylvania County containing about 50 acres bounded by William Twadel on a branch of Falls Creek (Doc.#77c)

       15 Apr 1793, Pittsylvania County Deeds, p. 374, Richard Reynolds and his wife, Nancy, of Pittsylvania County, sold to George Dyer of same county, for 85 pounds, 130 acres in Pittsylvania on Young’s Creek and bounded by Robert Williams and Isaiah Morton. Recorded 15 Apr 1793 (Doc.#77d)

       This tract is the same tract of land which Richard Reynolds purchased from John Young in 1789. These deeds reveal the names of the wives for three of the sons of William Reynolds of Pittsylvania County; Jesse, Richard and Joseph Reynolds. Richard Reynolds is the same individual who married Nancy Grisham on 2 Mar 1785 in Pittsylvania County according to his Revolutionary War pension file.

       10 May 1794, Pittsylvania County Probate, Thomas and Spencer Reynolds listed in the estate records of Joseph Fortune Doc.#98d)

       8 Apr 1794, George Reynolds of Pittsylvania County bought from John Briscose and his wife, Charity, of same county, for 50 pounds, a tract of land containing 50 acres, located on west side of Mountain Creek and on a branch of the said Creek called Dividing Run (Doc.#77i)

       1 Feb 1796, Pittsylvania County Probate, George Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of George Davis (Doc.#98e-f)

       Note that this George Reynolds is not listed as a son of William Reynolds according to William’s will which is listed above. Hence, this George Reynolds appears to have been a son of a different Reynolds family of Pittsylvania County.

       Pittsylvania County marriage records list the following Reynolds marriages:

       Pittsylvania County, Virginia, Marriages

       21 Aug 1780, Joseph Reynolds married Margaret Devin, surety Edward Hodges (Doc.#81a)

       2 Mar 1785, Richard Reynolds married Nancy Grisham, by Rev, David Barr (Doc.#81a)

       This Richard Reynolds is the same individual listed as Richard D. Reynolds, who according to his Revolutionary War pension, was born on 27 Mar 1755 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. As listed earlier in this report, the Ancestral File erroneously lists this Richard D. Reynolds as the son of David Reynolds and Mary Anderson (Doc.#80b). As listed above, Richard D. Reynolds served in the Revolutionary War from Pittsylvania County and married Nancy Grisham on 2 Mar 1785 in Pittsylvania County after the war. He died testate on 21 Aug 1836 in Muhlenburg County, Kentucky. He received a Revolutionary War pension which lists the names and birth dates for each of his children. Name and residence patterns of Pittsylvania county deeds and other records indicate that Richard D. Reynolds was the son of Hugh Reynolds, Sr. As listed above, Hugh Reynolds, Sr., was the original settler of the Callands area. He obtained a 1768 survey for 298 acres on Tomahawk Creek and Bannister River in Pittsylvania County.

       21 Sep 1801, Hugh Reynolds married Elizabeth Mitchell, daughter of Sarah Mitchell who consents, surety Robert Devin (Doc.#81a)

       This appears to have been the marriage for Hugh Reynolds, the grandson of Hugh Reynolds, Sr., the original Pittylvania County settler. According to Desmond Kendrick’s records, he was the son of Joseph Reynolds and Margaret Devin who were married a year earlier in 1780.

       26 Jul 1803, Joseph Reynolds married Nancy Ford, surety James Devin, by Rev. Richard Elliott (Doc.#81a)

       Desmond Kendrick’s records list that this was a second marriage for his ancestor, Joseph Reynolds, who married first to Margaret Devin.

       Name and residence patterns indicate that all of the Reynolds who appear in Pittsylvania County marriages were relatives and descendants of the original Hugh Reynolds who obtained the 1768 survey in Pittsylvania County. There were also several more Reynolds marriages, particularly for individuals named Joseph Reynolds, listed in the Pittsylvania County marriages which we have not listed above (Doc.#82). They appear to have been descendants of Joseph Reynolds and his wives, Margaret Devin and Nancy Ford.
       
       In addition to the land records located in Pittsylvania, Henry and Patrick Counties, we also located records for your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, in the records of Montgomery County, Virginia where he acted as a an assignee of William Perkins and speculated in land in south western Virginia on the New River, Holston River and Clinch River drainage near the North Carolina and Kentucky borders:

       Montgomery County Entry Book B, p. 53
       12 Feb 1784, Richard Reynold, assignee of William Perkins, treasury warrant, 375 acres at the mouth of Mud River and up said river and down the Gyandott in the fork (Doc.#102b)

       Montgomery County Entry Book B
       Richard Reynolds, 187 acres Little River; additions 1782, 400 acres Pine Creek, branch of little River by right of settlement; 300 acres on Old Field Creek; Botetourt County Grant, 1784, 400 acres joining his own land; 1783, 375 acres mouth of Mud Creek. (Doc.#102c)

       10 Nov 1785, Virginia Commonwealth Grants, Book R, p. 705, Montgomery County, Richard Reynolds obtained grant for 375 acres on the mouth of Mud River (Doc.#84t, 142r)

       2 Dec 1785, Virginia Commonwealth Grants, Book V, p. 702, Montgomery County, Richard Reynolds obtained grant for 920 acres on Gyandott Creek at a place known by the name of Big Horse Shoe (Doc.#84s, 142s)

       These land records reveal that your Joseph Reynolds was very active in land speculation in Virginia. As listed above, he also owned land in Buncombe County, North Carolina and in Madison County, Kentucky. Similar to Henry and Patrick Counties, some of the same settlers, such as Col. George Hairston, also obtained land on the waters of the Little River (Doc.#103e).

       There was also a William Reynolds who received very large land grants containing thousands of acres on Beaver Creek and other waterways near the Sandy River in Montgomery County in 1793 which were connected with the estate of William Madison (Doc.#114aaz-114aaac).

       Montgomery County was created from Botetourt County in 1776. Botetourt County was created in 1769 from Augusta County, which was created in 1738 from Orange County. Orange County was created in 1734 from Spotsylvania County. Botetourt and Augusta Counties list the following Virginia Commonwealth land grants for Richard Reynolds:

       26 Jul 1765, Virginia Patents, Book 36, 1764-67, p. 814, Augusta County, Richard Reynolds obtained patent for 300 acres on the east side of the North Branch of James River (Doc.#84x, 142o)

       This patent reveals that as early as 1765, a Richard Reynolds was obtaining land in Augusta County from which Botetourt County was created in 1769, and Montgomery County in 1776, at the beginning of the Revolutionary War.

       The following two land grants were for your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, who along with his good friend, William Perkins, Jr., obtained much land along the Gyandott and Little River in Montgomery and Botetourt Counties of Virginia.

       24 Feb 1784, Virginia Commonwealth Grants, Book I, 1783-4, p. 381, Botetourt County, Richard Reynolds obtained grant for 300 acres on the waters of Old Field Creek, a branch of Little River (Doc.#84w, 142p)

       27 Feb 1784, Virginia Commonwealth Grants, Book I, 1783-4, p. 429, Botetourt County, Richard Reynolds obtained grant for 400 acres on the waters of Pine Creek, a branch of Little River adjoining his own land (Doc.#84v, 142q)

       Notice that these last two land grants in Botetourt County correspond with the Montgomery land records listed above. This confirms that Richard obtained these grants in the area of the Little River which runs through Montgomery County, Virginia.

       23 Aug, 1787, The Library of Virginia, Land Office Grants No.12, 1787, p. 517; Botetourt County, Richard Reynolds listed as owning land which bounded a 100 acre patent located on Old Field Creek, a branch of Little River (Doc.#142m)

       21 Oct 1796, The Library of Virginia, Land Office Grants No.37, 1796-1798, p. 53; Botetourt County, Richard Reynolds listed as owning land which bounded a 242 acre patent located on Old Field Creek, a branch of Little River (Doc.#142n)

       Though we also located other land grants and patents among the Virginia land records for Richard Reynolds, most of these were very early patents in the 1600's for Richard and Christopher Reynolds of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, etc., which are listed later in this report.

       However, we did locate a patent for a John Reynolds in Goochland County, Virginia where Richard Reynolds’ good Friend, William Perkins, Sr., was born according to the Ancestral File data listed above. Since families often migrated west together, name and residence patterns indicate that this John Reynolds may have been related to your Richard Reynolds, Sr.:

       20 Sep 1745, Virginia Patents, Bk. 24, 1745-46, p. 36, Goochland County, John Reynolds obtained 400 acres on both sides of Byrd Creek adjoining Thomas Ken (Doc.#114ad)

       The Goochland County land, probate and court records should be searched in order to determine if this John Reynolds is directly related to your Richard Reynolds, Sr., and the other Reynolds families of Pittsylvania, Henry and Patrick Counties.

       There were also a few early land patents listed for a William Reynolds of Albemarle and Brunswick Counties of Colonial Virginia about the right time period to have been directly related to your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, Sr.:

       28 Sep 1728, Virginia Patent Bk. 14, 1728-32, p. 34, Brunswick County, William Reynolds obtained patent for 297 acres on the Long Branch (Doc.#114aak)

       28 Sep 1728, Virginia Patent Bk. 14, 1728-32, p. 35, Brunswick County, William Reynolds obtained patent for 764 acres on the south side of the Nottoway River (Doc.#114aal)

       30 Jun 1743, Virginia Patent Bk. 21, 1742-1743, p. 476, Brunswick County; Henry Reynolds obtained a 300 acre patent lying on the north side of the Staunton River (Doc.#156c)

       Brunswick County was created in 1720 from Isle of Wight, Surry and Prince George Counties indicating that this William and Henry Reynolds descends from Richard Reynolds, I, and Christopher Reynolds, Jr., of Isle of Wight and New Kent Counties of Colonial Virginia. Notice that there was a Josias Reynolds of Brunswick County who bought land in Pittsylvania County in 1777 as listed above. Hence, the Reynolds families of Brunswick County were researched in order to obtain additional information on your Reynolds ancestry and ascertain if they are related to the Reynolds families of Pittsylvania, Henry and Patrick Counties. However, we found no record of Reynolds families in the Brunswick County wills.

       16 Aug 1756, Virginia Patent Bk. 33, 1756-61, p. 230, Albemarle County, William Reynolds obtained patent for 398 acres on both sides of Millers Branch of the south side of the Rivanna (Doc.#114aaj)

       Albemarle County was created in 1744 from Goochland and Louisa Counties. Hence, this William Reynolds appears to have been related to the John Reynolds who obtained a patent in Goochland County in 1745 as listed above. Hence, we searched the Goochland and Albemarle County records for Reynolds families but located nothing for your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, Sr.

       Unfortunately, Surry County records list no further information about Richard Reynolds or any of the above Reynolds who resided in Henry and Patrick Counties where your ancestors resided. However, we did locate much information on several Richard Reynolds families of Isle of Wight County, Virginia. Since the other Virginia county records we searched listed nothing for individuals named Richard Reynolds, name and residence patterns strongly indicate that your ancestor descends from the long line of Richard Reynolds families of Isle of Wight County. Hence, we extracted all listings for the Richard Reynolds families listed in the Isle of Wight County records. Since these Richard Reynolds families descend from Christopher Reynolds, we also extracted all listings for Christopher Reynolds and compiled the following chronology:


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