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Chronology - Reynolds Family of Virginia
Posted by: Rod Stucker, Professional Genealogist Date: August 28, 2001 at 10:33:33
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       Chronology of The Reynolds Families of Virginia

(With emphasis on Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant of Isle of Wight County and his descendants, particularly those named Richard and Christopher. Includes some records from surrounding counties and other Colonial Virginia and English records such as the Virginia Company of London.)

       According to the Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, there were several individuals named Reynolds/Reynold, etc., who were among the first to explore Virginia in connection with the Virginia Company of London, England:

       1609, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; Henry Reynold/Reynolds, Esquire, probably known as Henry Reynolds the Adventurer of the Virginia Company of London (Doc.#191b)

       1609, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; John Reynold/Reynolds, probably known as John Reynold the Adventurer of the Virginia Company of London (Doc.#191b)

       1609, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; Richard Reynold, Adventurer of the Virginia Company of London (Doc.#191b)

       1612, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; John Reynold, probably known as John Reynolds the Adventurer of the Virginia Company of London (Doc.#191b)

       1620, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; Mr. Reynold listed as an adventurer of the Virginia Company of London (Doc.#191b)

       These records of the Reynolds/Reynold adventurers of the Virginia Company from London reveal that individuals named Reynolds were among the earliest members of the Virginia Company to explore the English Colony of Virginia. They may have resided in London where the Virginia Company was located and some of them were possibly related to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who emigrated to Virginia in 1622 as follows:

       1622, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 87, Christopher Reynolds immigrated to Virginia aboard the John & Francis (Doc.#131w, 162a)

       The above reference to Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s arrival in Virginia aboard the John & Francis was obtained from the 1625 military muster roll of the inhabitants at Wariscoyack, Virginia, taken 7 Feb 1625 for the servants of Mr. Edward Bennett which is listed below and which includes the following for Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant:

              ...Christopher Reynold’s, Luke Chappman, Edward Maybank, in the John & Francis 1622... (Doc.#162a)

       Though The Robert Reynolds Family web-site lists that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., immigrated with a brother named Thomas Reynolds from Dorsetshire, England (Doc.#140), we have found no documentation to support this information. Other records such as those compiled by Sybil R.”Lee” Taylor in 1992 for the Reynolds Family Association, list that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was possibly born in Gravesend, County Kent, England (Doc.#144e-g). As listed below, Gravesend was the town of residence in England for the Minister who examined the passengers aboard the Speedwell for “their conformitie to the orders & discipline of the Church of England & have taken the oath of Allegeance.” As was typical, passengers were often examined by the local parish ministers. Though this is valuable information which should aid further research in England, without locating christening records or other supporting documents, this is not conclusive proof that these passengers resided in Gravesend prior to their journey to Colonial Virginia. Susan Clement of the Reynolds Family Association lists the following in regards to the English ancestry of Christopher Reynolds, Sr. the immigrant:

       Robert Reynolds of East Berghold,
by Susan Clement
(for RFA, 1992)

Many statements have been published setting forth the ancestor of Christopher
of England as being Robert Reynolds of East Berghold, Suffolk, England. Based
on documents found by this writer as well as by RFA member Earle K. Smith of
Horringer, Suffolk, Eng., this claim can be laid to rest. Much appreciation
goes to Earle who offered his research assistance to RFA.

Robert Reignold of Estberhold, son of Robert Reignold, was assessed 5s. in
the Subsidy Return of 1524. Robert, the elder, was also of Estberholt in 1524
and was assessed L15. Robert the father is almost certainly the Robert
Reynolds who was buried in the chancel of Bergholt church in 1524, who, by
his will, desired his son George, also assessed in the Subsidy, to glaze "all
the wyndows in the nethir storye of the north side of the cherche at East
Bergholt att my coste and charge."

Robert Reignold, the younger, purchased the manor of Illarius als. New Hall
in East Bergholt in 1542. He also owned the manors of Stratford, Great
Wenham, Capel, Butley, Holton and Brantham. He died in 1548 when his will was
proved: "Robert Reignolde, Esquier. Of East Bergholt." He directed that his
wife Mary have the manor of Hyllaryes otherwise called New Hall. His son
Robert was to have his manor of Spencers. The will was pronounced null and
void in 1550, and another will was proved, perhaps because son Robert had
died.

Robert married four times. His first wife was the daughter of Sir Thomas
Brewse of Little Wenham, sister of Sir John Brewse. They had one son, George,
who probably died young, since there is no further mention of him.

The second wife was the daughter of Edward Mackwilliam of Stambourn Hall,
co. Essex. They had two sons, Robert and Edward. Robert probably married
Joan, daughter of John Nun of Tostock. He died before 1558, perhaps before
1548, and his widow married second John Beriffe of Colchester, Essex. Edward,
who was called "sonne & heyre" in the Visitation of 1561, may have married
Rose Rosse in 1573. His children were Henry, Robert, Christopher, Francis and
Anne, and at least four daughters.
Robert married third --- Spilman, probably of Norborough, co. Norfolk. Their
children were Henry of East Bergholt and Belstead, Philip and Katherine.
Henry died in 1587 and his will (dated 9 Aug 1585, with a codicil dated 22
Sep 1587, proved 13 Oct 1587) names many of his family members. Henry married
three times: first wife unknown; second in 1563 Anne (Rous) Goldingham, widow
of christopher Goldingham and daughter of Sir William Rous, who died 1573/4;
third marriage to Elizabeth Withypoll, daughter of Edmund Withypoll of
Ipswich, Suffolk. Henry had only one son by his third wife, Henry who was
under age 21 when his father wrote his will in 1585. Philip was living in
1585 when his brother made his will. Katherine married first ---Warner of
Dedham, co. Essex, and second Martin Browne. Katherine had died before her
brother wrote his will in 1585.

Robert's fourth wife was Mary (Anne) Waller, daughter of William Waller of
Ipswich and Ramsholt, Suffolk. Their children were William, Humphrey, John
and Mary. William married Barbara Wentworth, daughter of Roger Wentworth. They lived in Shotley, Suffolk, and had one son, William. Mary married John
Welman. John was probably living in Belstead in 1568, according to the
Subsidy returns.

The will of Henry Reignoldes of Little Belsteade, Suffolk, Esq. names his
wife Elizabeth; his late wife Ann and her former husband Christopher
Goldingham; his father Robert buried in the church of East Bergholt; his
first wife buried in the church of Much Ocle (Oakley); son Henry (under 21);
cousin Francis in Norfolk; Francis's son Thomas; William Goldingham; Henry,
son of his brother Edward; and Robert, Christopher and Francis his brothers;
Henry Goldingham; Jonas Goldingham; niece Anne Reignoldes and her brothers
and sisters of the whole blood; Children of his late sister Browne dcd.;
Niece Anne Reignoldes as one of the daughters of brother Edward; Rose and
Mary Browne, and William Warner their brother, and Thomas Warner their
brother, and Francis Browne; his cousin Sherman of Colchester; brother
Philip; brothers William, Henry and Jonas Goldingham and their sister
Hansarde Aldeham; children of cousin Francis Reignolde; cousin Richard Kempe;
brother Edward Withipoll, Peter Withipoll and Benjamin Withipoll; brother
Wolverstone; nephew Veasie of Burstall; sister Frances Withipoll; John Warner
of Ipswich; William Goldingham to be Executor. Codicil bequest to niece Rose
Browne and her sister Mary the wife of Heriche of Chelmsford.

The above documents clearly show that Robert Reignold of East Bergholt did
not have any son named Christopher, and the Christopher born 1530 could also
not have been his brother as the father, Robert, was buried in 1524. The only
Christopher in this family is Robert's grandson, son of his son Edward, who
was born no earlier than 1561, and after 1573 if this was his parents true marriage date, though was born by 1585 when his uncle Henry wrote his will.
These dates make him too old to be the Christopher in VA in 1622. Neither of
the Christophers proposed by Col. Tillman can be considered of this family.

Obviously the given names in this family are similar to many of those of the
American colonist families. This coincidence bears further checking,
particularly as Boxford, Suffolk is one of the proposed birthplaces of Robert
Reynolds who was in Boston about 1632. There have also been numerous
statements of the near kinship of the Reynoldses with the Sherman family of
Dedham, Essex. Henry's will seems to indicate some familial relationship with
the Shermans, but no further information has been found to date.

[Ref: John Corder, The Visitation of Suffolk 1561, London 1981; Henry F.
Waters, Genealogical Gleanings in England, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing
Co., 1969, Reprint Ed.; Walter C. Metcalf, The Visitations of Essex, London,
1878.]

       Though we have not yet examined the sources listed in this research report by Susan Clement, her research appears to be well documented. Hence, as listed in our report, further research on the ancestry of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, should be conducted in connection with Edward Bennett and the other original settlers of Mr. Bennett’s Warrosquyoake Bay settlement. The George and Christopher Reynolds of Bristol, England, who are listed below [Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. XVIII, Virginia Gleanings in England, p. 308; 16 Mar 1634/5 - Christopher Reynolds, son of George Reynolds deceased and brother of Anne Reynolds listed as kinsmen in will of Henry Hobson of City of Bristol, Inn Holder (Doc.#173a-c)], should also be researched for a possible relationship to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. According to the notes accompanying the publication of Henry Hobson’s will, he was a Mayor of Bristol, England. His grandson, Miles Cary, was the emigrant to Virginia. Though there is no direct connection to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., of Isle of Wight County, listed in this will, the name pattern of a Christopher Reynolds listed as the son of George Reynolds is intriguing when compared with the information on the Reynolds families of Gravesend in County Kent and London. Hence, additional research should be conducted in the records of Bristol in order to ascertain if there is a connection between Christopher Reynolds, Sr., of Isle of Wight and the Reynolds families of Bristol.

       In regards to the ancestry of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, there are other theories which have been proposed. These theories have been compiled by Sybil R. “Lee” Taylor of the Reynolds Family Association:

       We have no conclusive proof of the parents of Christopher, and at least two other writers disagreed with Col. Tillman. J.R.B. Hathaway, in 1901, stated in The North Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol II, No 4, Oct 1901 [Reprinted - Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1979, pp135-136] "Parker Family," that Christopher was the brother of Cecily, and the son of Thomas Reynolds: "The grandfather of Cicely Reynolds was Thomas Jordan, of Dorsetshire, England, grand daughter (sic), the mother of Cicely married a Reynolds. Her mother's maiden name was Cicely Fitzpen or Phippen, and she was the daughter of Robert Phippen and his wife Cicely or Cicellie Jordan. Robert Phippen was the son of one Joseph Phippen, whose mother was Alice Pierce, and thus Ciceley Reynolds was related to Capt. William Pierce and his wife Joane... Twelve years later, her brother, Christopher Reynolds, arrived on the 'John and Francis'...."

       In 1978, William Glasgow Reynolds privately published The Reynolds History Annotated (1475-1977), in which he sided with Judge Ray. Reynolds identified the father of Christopher as Thomas Reynolds b. ca 1594 who married Cecily Phippen b. 1575 in Dorsetshire, England. "Christopher Reynolds was the son of Thomas Reynolds [Ray Index, p.135] born 1604 in Dorsetshire, England, and died 1654 (Isle of Wight) Virginia; married 1639 Mrs. Elizabeth (Matthews) Rivers relict of George Rivers and daughter of Anthony Matthews. Worth S. Ray, in Index to Hathaway's NC Historical & Genealogical Register p. 135, states "Christopher Reynolds was born in Dorsetshire, England, although Tillman takes a contrary position that it was County Kent, England. Boddie in Historical Southern Families, Vol II, 'Reynolds of Isle of Wight,' p. 201, seems to agree with Judge Ray."

       Unfortunately, none of these writers provided sources for their information. It doesn't seem likely that Thomas and Cecily could be the father of Christopher and Cecily. Please refer in this book to the article about "Cecily ?Reynolds? of Virginia" for a discussion of this parentage. To date, no record has been found that clearly relates Christopher of Isle of Wight to Christopher of County Kent, nor to Thomas and Cecily.

       In addition to the above, an article on Cicely Jordan also appeared in the Virginia Historical Magazine of History and Biography as represented here by Sybill “Lee” Taylor of the Reynolds Family Association:

              LINKS IN A CHAIN
              by James P.C. Southall in
              The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography
              Vol. LI, No. 4, October 1943
              Pages 383-386

       James P.C. Southall, in "Links In A Chain," wrote of Samuel Jordan and Cicely his wife, and substantiates the information in the foregoing except for Cecily's ancestry. He agrees that Temperance Baley and Mary and Margaret Jordan were Cicely's daughters.

              "...it is to be inferred that Mrs. Cicely Jordan was born in 1601 and was therefore a year younger than Samuel Jordan's eldest son. In other words, widower Samuel Jordan who married widow Cicely about 1 December 1620 was old enough to be her father. Whereas the Muster reports that Cicely came to Virginia in the 'Swan' in 1610, we are led to infer from Samuel Jordan's patent that the year was 1611. The latter is evidently correct, for the 'Swan,' the 'Tryall' and the 'Noah' were the three ships of Sir Thomas Gates's fleet which reached Jamestown towards the end of August 1611. Others who came in the 'Swan' with ten-year old Cicely were: Richard Biggs, 41 years old, Thomas Boulding, John Fludd, Gent., Thomas Garnett, servant of Captain William Powell, Lieut. Albiano Lupo, Gent., 40 years old, Thomas Stepney, 35 years old, John Taylor, 37 years old, and Amyle Wayne, 30 years old. Incidentally, Elizabeth Dunthorne, 38 years old, wife of Thomas Dunthorne, Robert Greenleafe, and John Sleight came in the 'Noah,' and Henry Coltman in the 'Tryal,' all at the same time. Lady Gates and her two daughters had accompanied Sir Thomas Gates on this voyage, but Lady Gates died in the West Indies without ever reaching Virginia. Whether any of the individuals above mentioned was related to our Cicely, who were her parents or guardians, and what was her own name, are questions that cannot be answered. Just as the burden of the famous song in the Two Gentlemen of Verona was, Who is Sylvia? so here we ask, but ask in vain, Who was Cicely?"

       Southall's references: 19 Nugent, introductory pages et seq , pp. 5, 6, 21, 25, 34 [all relative to the names of persons on the three ships; and 50 V 77.

       [1] Peter Wilson Coldham, The Complete Book of Emigrants 1607-1660, A Comprehensive Listing Compiled from English Public Records, p. 35-46: 16 Feb 1624. List of the names of the living in Virginia and of those who have died since April 1623 from PRO:CO1/3/5 (Public Record Office, Kew, Richmond, Surry TW9 4DU, England): At Jordan's Journey. Living: Sislye Jordan; Temperance Bailey; Mary Jordan; Margery Jordan; William Farrar...

       Though this information appears to have been properly documented, further research is required in order to verify the connection between Cicely Jordan and Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. Notice that Cicely’s maiden name is not listed in the above records. Hence, the original records should be searched in order to verify that her maiden name was Reynolds. Notice also that there was a Richard Biggs who arrived with this group of immigrants including the ten year old Cecily aboard the Swan at Jamestown in August 1611. This corresponds with the fact that there was also an eleven year old girl named Elizabeth Biggs and a six month old child named Phillip Biggs who were among the nine servants transported to Virginia aboard the Speedwell in 1635 by “Chri: Reinhold” (Doc.#161a). This “Chri: Reinhold” appears to have been the same person as Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant as listed below. The Biggs family also appears fairly frequently in the Isle of Wight County records as listed below in this report.

       In his book entitled The Reynolds Family Annotated, attorney William Glasgow Reynolds lists that Cecily Jordan was the older sister of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. The author further claims that Cecily came to Jamestown, Virginia aboard the ship Swan which arrived in August 1610. She married first to Thomas Bailey and had a daughter named Temperance Bailey who was born in 1616. After Thomas Bailey died from malaria, Cecily married secondly to Samuel Jordan, a cousin of her mother. After Samuel Jordan died, she married William Farrar who died in 1635. Cecily married twice after the death of William Farrar; Peter Montague who died in 1659 by whom she had seven children during their twenty three years of marriage; Thomas Parker by whom their were no heirs (Doc.#194a-d). As listed above, a copy of The Reynolds Family Annotated, by attorney William Glasgow Reynolds was provided to us by Sybil “Lee” Taylor who retyped the entire text and then emailed us this book chapter by chapter including endnotes. Though this book was well written, it does not appear to properly document the actual source materials, i.e. the endnotes are not connected with the text. There are no superscripts in the text which refer to the endnotes. Though we do not have access to the original publication, it was filed with the Library of Congress card number: 78-61854. According to Lee Taylor, William Glasgow Reynolds was an original founder of the Reynolds Family Association.

       Sybil “Lee” Taylor of the Reynolds Family Association also provides the following in regards to the Warrosquyoake/Waresquoack massacre which occurred about the same time period in which Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant arrived in Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622:

       22 Mar 1621, At [Edward] Bennett's Plantation only 86 of the scheduled settlers had arrived at the time of the Waresquoack massacre (the Good Friday massacre, 22 March 1621-22); 33 survivors managed to drive off the attackers [Boddie 17th Century Isle of Wight County Virginia, pp. 35-6]. Robert Bennett and his new secretary, Christopher Reynolds, were among them [W.G. Reynolds]. By RFA [Reynolds Family Association] member Robert A. Reynolds, Roselle, New Jersey (obtained from Sybil “Lee” Taylor of the Reynolds Family Association)

       This is interesting information which appears to correspond with the above records. However the statement that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, was the “new secretary” for Robert Bennett is not documented other than the reference to “W.G. Reynolds” which stands for William Glasgow Reynolds’s book entitled “The Reynolds Family Annotated,” which was copyrighted in 1978. A copy of this book was provided to us by Sybil “Lee” Taylor who retyped the entire text and then emailed us this book chapter by chapter including endnotes. Though this book was well written, it does not appear to properly document the actual source materials, i.e. the endnotes are connected with the text. There are no superscripts in the text which refer to the endnotes. Though we do not have access to the original publication, according to Sybil “Lee” Taylor, it was filed with the Library of Congress card number: 78-61854. According to some historians of Isle of Wight County, Robert Bennett was a brother or nephew of Edward Bennett who was in charge of Edward Bennett’s Isle of Wight plantation in Colonial Virginia. Robert A. Reynolds of the Reynolds Family Association lists the following in regards to the Warrosquyoake massacre:

       19 Apr 1622, Gov. Francis Wyatt ordered Capt. Ralph Hamor to bring the survivors to Jamestown Island for their safety [Records of the Virginia Company of London, III, part ii, p. 50a]. On 7 Oct 1622, Edward Bennett of the plantation of Warascoake requested that his people might be returned thereto [Records of the Virginia Company Vol. II, pp. 104-5.]

       Christopher Reynolds' name appears on a post-massacre muster of living inhabitants at Waresquoack taken 16 Feb 1623. [List of names of persons living in Virginia, 16 Feb 1623, set forth in Hotten Lists of Emigrants to America 16--1700, p. 169 et seq. Christopher Reynolds name appears on page 181 as a survivor at Warwick Squrake [Records of the Virginia Company of London, III, par ii, p. 50a]. Waresquoack Plantation was located in the vicinity of present day Smithfield, Virginia].

       The above information, which appears to be properly documented, corresponds with the following which was published in the history entitled Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, an abstract of which reads as follows:

       16 Feb 1623, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 37, Chr. Reinholds [Christopher Reynolds] was among 33 inhabitants listed in a census for Warrascoyack [Warrosquyoake County], Virginia (Doc.#131v):

       John Batt, Henry Pinffe, Wassell Weblin, Anthony Read, Frances Woodson, Henry Phillips, Peter Collins, Chr. Reinold’s, Edward Mabin, John Maldman, Thomas Collins, George Rushmore, Thomas Spencer, George Clarke, Rich. Bartlett, Frances Anthony, Franse, Margrett, negroes; John Bennett, Nicholas Skinner, John Atkins, John Pollentin, Margrett Pollentin, Mary, a maid, Henry Woodward, Thomas Sawyer, Thomas, a boye. Total 33, including 4 negroes (Doc.#131v,169a)
       
       Notice that there is a boy named Thomas listed in this 1623 census for Warrosquyoake County, Virginia. However, Christopher Reynolds, Sr.,who is listed as “Chr. Reinold ” in this census, is not listed as a boy even though he would have been only thirteen years old if he was born in 1610 as indicated by his age in the passenger ship list for the Speedwell which arrived in Virginia in 1635 as listed below. However, the term “boye” as it used above appears to refer to a “Negro boy” named Thomas. Notice that no surname was listed for this Negro boy. This corresponds with the listing of the other three Negroes named Franse, Margrett and Mary the maid, none of whom are listed with surnames. The fact that this census lists all inhabitants indicates that it was not concerned with either the age or the color of the inhabitants, i.e. all inhabitants were listed regardless of age or race.

       7 Feb 1624, The Original Lists of Person of Quality by John Camden Hotten, p. 241; Christopher Reynolds' is listed in a muster of Edward Bennett’s servants in Wariscoyacke. There were twelve servants, two of whom were Negroes. Similar to the 1623 census, this muster lists that Christopher Reynolds immigrated to Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622 (Doc.#189a)

       Notice that this information is not listed in the history entitled Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie.       In comparison with the twelve servants listed in 1624, notice that in the previous year in 1623, that there were thirty three inhabitants residing in the Warrosquyoake settlement. In just one year the number of Edward Bennett’s servants decreased by twenty one, apparently due to the Indian attacks on the new settlement.

       Robert A. Reynolds, a member of the Reynolds Family Association lists the following: “Shortly after the 1624 muster, the Virginia Council dispatched Edward Bennett to London to seek a Colonial monopoly for Virginia in the tobacco trade with England. Christopher accompanied him and remained as his secretary during the time it took Mr. Bennett to secure the monopoly [W.G. Reynolds: Boddie, 17th Century Isle of Wight County Virginia, p. 38].” Though the information about dispatching Edward Bennett to England corresponds with the reference to Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, pp. 36-38, nowhere in that history does it list Christopher Reynolds as the secretary of Edward Bennett.
       
       25 Feb 1625, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 37, Christopher Reynolds listed in a muster of the inhabitants of Wariscoyack [Warrosquyoake County], Virginia, who were servants of Mr. Edward Bennett (Doc.#131v)

       Mr. Boddie obtained his information from the original list which was printed in the William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, VII (1899), 217-218 which also lists the following as reprinted in New World Immigrants by Michael Tepper, Vol. I, p.1:

       1625 - Total inhabitants of Virginia - 1,095
       Muster of the Inhabitants at Wariscoyack, Virginia, Taken 7 Feb 1625
       
       The Muster of Mr. Edward Bennett’s Servants.
              Henry Pinke came in the London Marchannt 1619, John Bate in the Addam 1621, Peter Collins in the Addam 1621, Wassell Webbling, Antonio, a negro, in the James 1621, Christopher Reynold’s, Luke Chappman, Edward Maybank, in the John & Francis 1622, John Attkins, William Denum, Francis Banks, in the Guifte 1623, Mary, a negro woman, in the Margrett & John 1622 (Doc.#162a)

       This muster reveals that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., began residing in Warrosquyoake County within a year after arriving in the Colony of Virginia. Since he was a servant or “employee” of Mr. Edward Bennett, who owned a large amount of land in Warrosquyoake County, it appears he originally settled in the Warrosquyoake settlement which was located on the Pagan River. Christopher Reynolds, Sr., or his family may have known Edward Bennett and resided in the same general area of England prior to emigrating to Virginia as one of Mr. Bennett’s servants. Further research into the origins of Edward Bennett and his servants may allow us to confirm Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s place of origin in England.

       The fact that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was listed in the 1625 military muster reveals that he survived the Indian attacks on the Colonial Virginia settlements and was an active member of the Colonial Virginia militia in Warrosquyoake. Though no documentation is provided, Robert A. Reynolds of the Reynolds Family Association lists that on 18 Mar 1625, Christopher Reynolds appeared in General Court at Jamestown and swore that he, as secretary to Robert Bennett, had seen and read Peter Collins' indenture and that it said that Collins was bound to serve Mr. Bennett for four years from 1621. Though there is no reference to Christopher Reynolds as having been the secretary of Robert Bennett, Sybil “Lee” Taylor provides the following:

       13 Mar 1625/6, Minutes of the Council and General Court of Virginia, 2nd Edition, published in 1979, Richmond, Edited by H.R. McIlwaine; Before the General Court at Jamestown, Virginia: "Christopher Reighnalls, sworne and examined sayeth that he did see and read Peter Collins indenture and that he was bound to serve Mr. Bennett four years."

       Notice the spelling of Christopher’s name in this deposition: "Christopher Reighnalls, sworne and examined sayeth that he did see and read Peter Collins indenture and that he was bound to serve Mr. Bennett four years." Notice that it is an unusual spelling for the Reynolds surname which no doubt many previous researchers had not discovered.

       The above deposition indicates that at least some, possibly all of the servants of Edward Bennett’s tobacco plantation at Warrosquyoake were indentured to him for a period of about four years in order to pay for their passage to Virginia and provide employment once they arrived. No doubt Christopher Reynolds was also an indentured servant. According to the 1625 muster listed above which lists: “Peter Collins in the Addam 1621," Peter Collins immigrated to Virginia as an indentured servant of Edward Bennett in 1621. Hence, Peter Collins would have fulfilled his indenture agreement in 1625, the same year that Christopher Reynolds provided his deposition. This indicates that Christopher Reynolds’s deposition was in favor of Peter Collins who appears to have recently completed his indentured service to Mr. Edward Bennett.

       Though some Reynolds family genealogists have interpreted the fact that Christopher Reynolds “...did see and read Peter Collins indentures...” to indicate that he was the secretary to Mr. Bennett, Christopher Reynolds merely provided his testimony in this deposition. As indicated above, this testimony appears to have been against Mr. Edward Bennett and in favor of Peter Collins who appears to have recently completed his indentured service to Mr. Edward Bennett. There is no reference to Christopher as having been the secretary to Mr. Bennett. There is also no reference to Christopher Reynolds traveling to England with Mr. Bennett as his secretary to secure a monopoly in the tobacco trade as suggested by some Reynolds family genealogists.

       However, it is interesting to note that according to this deposition, Christopher Reynolds appears to have been able to read. This indicates that he received some education. If this was the same Christopher Reynolds who was born in 1611, i.e. age twenty four when he transported nine servants to Virginia aboard the Speedwell in 1635, then he would have been age fourteen or fifteen when he provided this deposition. Provided that Christopher Reynolds was also bound to Edward Bennett for four years of indentured service, from the date of his original arrival in Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant would have fulfilled his indentured service sometime in 1626/7. However, it is possible that he was obligated for a period longer than four years.

       16 Mar 1634/5, Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. XVIII, Virginia Gleanings in England, p. 308; Christopher Reynolds, son of George Reynolds deceased and brother of Anne Reynolds listed as kinsmen in will of Henry Hobson of City of Bristol, Inn Holder (Doc.#173a-c)

       According to the notes accompanying the publication of this will, Henry Hobson was a Mayor of Bristol, England. His grandson, Miles Cary, was the emigrant to Virginia. Though there is no direct connection to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant of Isle of Wight County, listed in this will, the name pattern of a Christopher Reynolds listed as the son of George Reynolds is intriguing when compared with the information on the Reynolds families of Gravesend in County Kent and London. Hence, additional research could be conducted in the records of Bristol in order to ascertain if there is a connection between Christopher Reynolds, Sr., of Isle of Wight and the Reynolds families of Bristol.

       21 Dec 1634, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 531, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. A, p.103; Christopher Reynolds of Warwickqueak [Warrosquyoake County] obtained 100 acre patent from Robert Sabine of Warrisquick [Warrosquyoake County] Bay, Witnesses: Robert Cramporne and Thomas Coarkman (as shown in the deed of Wassell Webling and George Fawdon from Justinian Cooper and wife) (Doc.#131ac, 135b)

       This is the first record of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., obtaining land in Virginia. From the year of Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s arrival in Virginia in 1622, it was twelve years later in 1634 before he purchased land. This information and the information above appears to confirm that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, was an indentured servant of Mr. Edward Bennett. This also appears to support the theory that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., originally immigrated to Colonial Virginia as an eleven year old child, who was possibly an orphan, in 1622. As listed below, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant appears to have sold this land five years later: 1 May 1639, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. A, p.103; Christopher Reynolds sold 100 acre patent in Warrisquack [Warwicke Squeake or Warrosquyoake] Bay to Peter Hull [Hill], Witnesses: John Spackman and John Oliver (Doc.#131ac, 135b). In a patent issued to John Mungoe (Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 7, p. 417), dated 21 Oct 1684 which is listed below, it lists that this 100 hundred acres which Robert Sabine originally sold to Christopher Reynolds on 21 Dec 1634, was located on the south side of Hutchinson’s Creek: 21 Oct 1684, Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 4, p. 417; Christopher Reynolds of Isle of Wight County, Virginia listed as having bought land from Robert Sabine on 21 Dec 1634, 100 acres located on the south side of Hutchison’s Creek, which Christopher Reynolds then sold to Peter Hill/Hull on 1 May 1639.
       
       According to John Camden Hotten’s list of immigrants aboard the Speedwell, which arrived in 1635, there is a listing for “Chris. Reinhold, 24," which could have been the same individual as Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who arrived in 1622 aboard the John & Francis as listed above. Richard Reynolds, a Reynolds family genealogist, has proposed that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., returned to England and then brought nine servants back to Virginia. The following is a transcription of the original ship manifest and passenger ship list for the Speedwell:

       28 May 1635
              Theis under-written names are to be transported to Virginia imbarqued in the Speedwell of London JO: Chappell Mr: being examined by the Minister of Gravesend of their conformitie to the orders & discipline of the Church of England & have taken the oath of Allegeance.

       [Chri: Reinolds group]
       Kathryn Richard’s...19
       Marie Sedgwick.....20
       Elizabeth Biggs......10
       Dorothie Wyncott..40
       Ann Wyncott..........16
       Phillipp Biggs.........6 mo.
       Elizabeth Pew.........20
       Francis Langworth..25
       Chri: Reinholds.......24
       Abram Poore..........20
       Elizabeth Tuttell.....25
       (Doc.#161a)

       It is interesting to note that the majority of these passengers were woman, most of them in their early twenties. The only two males are listed as Christopher Reinholds/Reynolds and a six month old child named Phillipp Biggs. Phillip may have been the younger brother of Elizabeth Biggs, age ten, both of whom appear to have been orphans. As indicated throughout this report, the Biggs families resided in the same area as the Reynolds families in Isle of Wight County. The majority of these passengers aboard the Speedwell appear to have been brought to Virginia in order to provide wives to the men of the Warrosquyoake settlement. Notice that three of these females were named Elizabeth, i.e. the same given name listed as the wife of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., in his will dated 1654 which is listed below. Hence, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., may have married one of these female passengers named Elizabeth.

       In contrast to the information from the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster by Col. Steve F. Tillman and others, who have calculated that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, as having been born in 1611 in Gravesend, County Kent, England, Sybil “Lee” Taylor lists the following: “Col. Tillman stated that Christopher was born in 1611, but this does not seem probable since he appeared as a witness in court in 1625, when he would have been only 14 years of age. Before the General Court held at Jamestown 13 Mar 1625, "Christopher Reighnalls, sworne and examined sayeth that he did see and read Peter Collins indenture and that he was bound to serve Mr. Bennett four years." It is shown in Edward Bennett's muster of 1625 that Peter Collins came over on the "Adams" in 1621.”

       The theory that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, was born in 1611, is apparently based on the listing of Chris: Reinhold as having been age twenty four in 1635as listed on the passenger list for the Speedwell. If Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was the same individual as the Chris. Reinhold, age 24, who arrived aboard the Speedwell in 1635, he would have been only eleven years old when he arrived in Colonial Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622. Though this seems unlikely since Christopher Reynolds, Sr., is listed the following year in the 1623 census as one of the thirty three original residents of Warrosquyoake County, notice that the 1623 census, which is listed above, lists children as well as adults. Though censuses usually refer to tithables, i.e. white persons above age twenty one years of age, that was not the case in these colonial Isle of Wight census and muster rolls. Hence, it is possible that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who arrived in Colonial Virginia in 1622 aboard the John & Francis, is the same person as “Chris: Reinhold, age 24,” who arrived in America in 1635 aboard the Speedwell with the nine other persons. Notice that the time period in which “Chri: Reinhold” and his group of nine servants/persons arrived in Virginia in 1635 aboard the Speedwell corresponds with the 450 acre patent that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., received the following year in Warrosquyoake County “for transporting nine servants” as listed below.

       In 1636, Christopher Reynolds obtained a 450 acre patent on the waters of Pagan Shore for transporting nine servants to the Virginia Colony:

       15 Sep 1636, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 659; The Library of Virginia, Virginia Land Office Patents No. 1, 1623-1643, p.382; Christopher Reynolds obtained a 450 acre patent “bounded with a back creek running eastward behind Pagan Shore some three miles upward, the land lying on the south side of the creek in Warrasquinoke [Warrosquyoake ] County for transporting 9 servants. (Doc.# 131w,131ay, 142h)

       Warrasquinoke, also listed as Warrasquoyacke or Warrosquyoake, was a Colonial Virginia County which was originally formed in 1634. In 1637, the name was changed to Isle of Wight County. The article entitled Christopher Reynolds of Isle of Wight, Virginia, published by The Reynolds Family Association lists that Christopher Reynolds was born in 1611 at Gravesend, Kent County, England. The source of this birth year and place appears to have been the passenger list for the Speedwell which arrived in 1635 as listed above. Though the article further lists that they settled in “Warwick County, Virginia” (Doc.#144e-h), the records listed above reveal that Christopher Reynolds, Sr. was among the thirty three original inhabitants listed in a census for Warrascoyack [Warrosquyoake County], Virginia on 16 Feb 1623(Doc.#131v). Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s first purchase of land there occurred almost nine years later for 100 acres in Warrisquick [Warrosquyoake] Bay in 1634 in the newly formed Warrosquyoake County. On 15 Sep 1636, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., obtained a 450 acre patent on the waters of Pagan Shore or Pagan Creek in Warrosquyoake County which subsequently became Isle of Wight County in 1637. This information confirms that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., originally settled in Mr. Edward Bennet’s Warrosquyoake Bay settlement in Warrosquyoake County, not in Warrick [River] County.

       The fact that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was responsible for transporting nine servants to Virginia indicates that he was a successful tobacco planter of Colonial Virginia. As were most individuals who resided in Colonial Virginia, Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s will and the deeds listed below confirm that he was a prosperous tobacco planter. As was the custom in Colonial Virginia, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., received the above patent for 450 acres as compensation for bringing nine servants to the rapidly growing tobacco economy in the Colony of Virginia.

       23 Dec 1636, Virginia Land Office, Patent Bk. 1, 1623-1643, p. 408; Nicholas Reynolds obtained a patent for 1000 acres lying at Lawnes Creek S.S. Et. up Lawnes Creeke (Doc.#156)

       As revealed below, this Nicholas Reynolds inhabited James City County which in Colonial time periods bounded the northern border of Isle of Wight County. James City County was an original shire/county of Virginia which was formed in 1634. In 1652, James City County changed it’s name to Surry County. According to several genealogical data bases (including the Ancestral File) and Reynolds family histories, there was a Richard Reynolds and his wife, Mary Anderson, who resided in Surry County during the colonial time period. However, no sources of information are listed for these data bases regarding the Richard Reynolds and Mary Anderson of Surry County. There are however, references to the will and children of Robert Reynolds whose will was proved 2 Mar 1702 as listed below. James Reynolds’s will lists that he had a son named Robert and a grandson named Nicholas. Hence, name and residence patterns indicate that James Reynolds was the son of Nicholas Reynolds who first settled in James City County. Though the county location for the 1636 patent for Nicholas Reynolds was not provided in the original description of the patent, the description does list Lawnes Creek which corresponds with the northern boundary for the Upper Parish in Isle of Wight County as follows: “In March, 1643, by an Act of the General Assembly, Isle of Wight County was divided into two parishes: “The upper parish to extend from Lawnes Creek to the eastern side of the Bay, the creeke devideing the plantation of Sam. Davis and Joseph Cobbs to be the extant and division of the said upper parish: The lower parish to extend from the Pagan-Poynt upon the river side to the plantation of Rich. Hayes, from the Pagan-Poynt upon the bay including all the southerly side to the plantation of the said Cobbs, and that all the inhabitants alreadie resideing or that hereafter shall reside on that side to belong to the said lower parish.” (Doc.#154c-d)

       As indicated above, this parish history confirms that Nicholas Reynolds settled in the same general area as Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who resided in the adjoining Lower Parish. However, these were large parishes during this time period, nearly sixty miles in length. Aside from this patent, Nicholas Reynolds also obtained two other patents in the years 1637 and 1638 as listed below. According to Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, there was also a Nicholas Reynolds who was transported to Virginia in 1642 by Hugh Gwyn, Gentleman (Doc.#21a). Though no county is listed in connection with this latter record for Nicholas Reynolds, he immigrated five years after the Nicholas Reynolds of James City County first obtained land there.

       1637, Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, p. 276; Richard Reynolds was transported to New Norfolk County by James Knott (Doc.#21a)

       According to the publication entitled Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, who was clerk of the Virginia State Land Office, there were several individuals named Reynolds/Reynolls who were transported to Colonial Virginia as servants in the mid 1600's. The author of this publication appears to have extracted the names of these indentured servants from the land patents and transportation records which were used to issue the original land patents and headrights to the individuals who were responsible for transporting these servants to Virginia. This publication lists these immigrants and indentured servants with the individual who was responsible for their transportation as well as the county to where they were transported. Several were transported to Charles River and Charles City Counties. There were also three Richard Reynolds who were transported to: New Norfolk County in 1637 as listed above; to Charles City County in 1638; and to Virginia, no county listed, in 1652. William Reynolds was the only immigrant/indentured servant listed who was transported to Isle of Wight County. He was transported in 1648 by John Seward (Doc.#21a). Interestingly, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant is not listed among them and only William Reynolds was transported to Isle of Wight County.

       10 Feb 1637, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 664; The Library of Virginia, Virginia Land Office Patents No. 1, 1623-1643, p.517; Christopher Reynolds listed as a land owner bounding a patent for 350 acres lying behind the Pagan Shore issued to Charles Barcroft (Doc.#131az, 142b)

       As indicated above, the Pagan Shore referred to in this land patent appears to refer to that portion of the Pagan River where it is joined by the Cypress Creek tributary in the area of modern day Smithfield Town (Map-Doc.#160). According to the following deeds, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his descendants occupied this property for several generations.

       26 Aug 1637, Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 1, p. 473; Nicholas Reynolds obtained a patent for 1000 acres lying on Lawnes Creek (Doc.#156a)

       20 Feb 1638, Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 1, p. 676, James City County; Nicholas Reynolds listed as owning a patent which adjoins the 500 acre patent of Thomas Stamp bounding southerly from the head of Lawnes Creek (Doc.#156b)

       Though no county is listed in the second land patent for Nicholas Reynolds dated 1637, as listed above, Lawnes Creek is located on the border of the Upper Parish in Isle Of Wight County. The Upper Parish was adjacent to the Lower Parish where Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his descendants resided for several generations. Notice that according to the 1638 patent, Nicholas Reynolds’ land was located next to a 500 acre land patent issued to Thomas Stamp at the head of Lawnes Creek in James City County. This indicates that Nicholas Reynolds’ land patents were actually located at the head waters of Lawnes Creek which today is in Surry County and borders Isle of Wight County to the south (Doc.153b). Subject to documentation, the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster by Col. Steve F. Tillman lists that a Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Mary Anderson, resided in Surry County.

       1638, Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, p. 276; Richard Reynolds was transported to Charles City County by John George (Doc.#21a)

       According to the publication entitled Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, who was clerk of the Virginia State Land Office, there were several individuals named Reynolds/Reynolls who were transported to Colonial Virginia as servants in the mid 1600's. The author of this publication appears to have extracted the names of these indentured servants from the land patents and transportation records which were used to issue the original land patents and headrights to the individuals who were responsible for transporting these servants to Virginia. This publication lists these immigrants and indentured servants with the individual who was responsible for their transportation as well as the county to where they were transported. Several were transported to Charles River and Charles City Counties. There were also three Richard Reynolds who were transported to: New Norfolk County in 1637 as listed above; to Charles City County in 1638 as listed here; and to Virginia, no county listed, in 1652. William Reynolds was the only immigrant/indentured servant listed who was transported to Isle of Wight County. He was transported in 1648 by John Seward (Doc.#21a). Interestingly, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant is not listed among them and only William Reynolds was transported to Isle of Wight County.

       1 May 1639, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. A, p.103; Christopher Reynolds sold 100 acre patent in Warrisquack [Warwicke Squeake or Warrosquyoake] Bay to Peter Hull [Hill], Witnesses: John Spackman and John Oliver (Doc.#131ac, 135b)

       This appears to have been the same 100 acre tract which Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, purchased from Robert Sabine five years earlier as listed above: 21 Dec 1634, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 531, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. A, p.103; Christopher Reynolds of Warwickqueak [Warrosquyoake County] obtained 100 acre patent from Robert Sabine of Warrisquick [Warrosquyoake County] Bay, Witnesses: Robert Cramporne and Thomas Coarkman (as shown in the deed of Wassell Webling and George Fawdon from Justinian Cooper and wife) (Doc.#131ac, 135b). The land purchasde from Robert Sabine is the first record of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., obtaining land in Virginia. From the year of Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s arrival in Virginia in 1622, it was twelve years later in 1634 before he first purchased land. This indicates that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was probably an indentured servant of Edward Bennett. This also appears to support the theory that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., originally immigrated to Colonial Virginia as an eleven year old child, who was possibly an orphan, in 1622.

       1642, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; Mr. Reynold listed as undersheriff and mentioned in a deposition in Northampton County (Doc.#191b)

       This is the first records listing an individual named Reynolds/Reynold in Northampton County.

       1643, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; Nicholas Rennells listed as a witness in Surry County (Doc.#191d)

       This appears to have been the same Nicholas Reynolds who obtained a land patent in 1637 and 1638 in James City County as listed above: 26 Aug 1637, Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 1, p. 473; Nicholas Reynolds obtained a patent for 1000 acres lying on Lawnes Creek (Doc.#156a); 20 Feb 1638, Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 1, p. 676, James City County; Nicholas Reynolds listed as owning a patent which adjoins the 500 acre patent of Thomas Stamp bounding southerly from the head of Lawnes Creek (Doc.#156b). Though no county is listed in the first land patent for Nicholas Reynolds dated 1637, as listed above, Lawnes Creek is located on the border of the Upper Parish in Isle Of Wight County. The Upper Parish was adjacent to the Lower Parish where Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his descendants resided for several generations. Notice that according to the 1638 patent, Nicholas Reynolds’ land was located next to a 500 acre land patent issued to Thomas Stamp at the head of Lawnes Creek in James City County. This indicates that Nicholas Reynolds’ land patents were actually located at the head waters of Lawnes Creek which today is in Surry County and borders Isle of Wight County to the south (Doc.153b). Subject to documentation, the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster by Col. Steve F. Tillman lists that a Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Mary Anderson, resided in Surry County. The following information, which is listed below, appears to pertain to the descendants of Nicholas Reynolds in Surry County: 30 Jan 1702, Surry County, Virginia Wills & Administrations, Bk. 5, p. 267; Robert Reynolds will lists him about age sixty. Wife named Elizabeth; To grandson Nicholas, the plantation that his son lives on when 21 years of age; To daughter Susannah...; To daughter Elizabeth; To grandson Robert Griffin. Witnesses: John Griffen, Agness Griffin and Henry Baker. Proved 2 Mar 1702 (Doc.#186a-b). Aside from Nicholas Reynolds, this is the earliest record which we have located so far for a Reynolds listed in Surry County records. These name and residence patterns indicate that James was a descendant of Nicholas Reynolds: 23 Dec 1636, Virginia Land Office, Patent Bk. 1, 1623-1643, p. 408; Nicholas Reynolds obtained a patent for 1000 acres lying at Lawnes Creek S.S. Et. up Lawnes Creeke (Doc.#156). As revealed above, this Nicholas Reynolds inhabited James City County [which became Surry County in 1652] which in Colonial time periods bounded the northern border of Isle of Wight County. James City County was an original shire/county of Virginia which was formed in 1634. In 1652, James City County changed it’s name to Surry County. According to several genealogical data bases (including the Ancestral File) and Reynolds family histories, there was a Richard Reynolds and his wife, Mary Anderson, who resided in Surry County during the colonial time period. However, no sources of information are listed for these data bases regarding the Richard Reynolds and Mary Anderson of Surry County. Though the county location for the 1636 patent for Nicholas Reynolds was not provided in the original description of the patent, the description does list Lawnes Creek which corresponds with the northern boundary for the Upper Parish in Isle of Wight County as described above. There was another estate record for Robert Reynolds on 5 Jul 1709 which was signed by Grace Reynolds (Doc.#186b).

       21 Mar 1643, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 541, Christopher Reynolds assigned 350 acres, on main branch of Bay Creek Called Cypress Swamp, to Arthur Smith (Doc.#131ad-131ae)

       Notice that there is no previous record of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., obtaining this 350 acres on Cypress Swamp (which is also known as Cypress Creek on modern maps), a main branch of Bay Creek (which appears to be the same waterway as the Pagan River) prior to his assigning it to Col. Arthur Smith, I. On modern day maps Cypress Creek is situated just outside the Smithfield Town limits. Cypress Creek appears on Isle of Wight County maps as a tributary for the Pagan River which empties into the James River.

       The history entitled Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John Bennett Boddie, lists the following on p.541, “Gov. William Berkeley confirms to Arthur Smith 350 acres on the main branch of Bay Creek [Pagan River?]called Cypress Swamp [part of Cypress Creek], first granted to James Roe by Patent 10 Dec 1640 and by him assigned to Arthur Smith provided said Smith does not plant or seat [seed] for a term of three years, dated 21 Mar 1643." This area of Cypress Swamp was later considered part of Newport Parish where Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his descendants resided for many generations.

       Early church records of Isle of Wight County reveal that Newport Parish, where Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and many of his descendants resided for several generations, was originally known as the Lower Parish according to deed and court records. These early parish church records were patterned after the Episcopal Church of England since Virginia was an English Colony prior to the Revolutionary War in 1776. Aside from land ownership regarding deeds and patents, the church and the court were the bodies around which much public life in Colonial Virginia revolved. Isle of Wight and Nansemond Counties played a significant part in the development of the Virginia Colony.

       According to the Parish Lines of Southern Virginia, by C. F. Cocke, the Upper and Lower Parishes of Isle of Wight County were created from Warrosquyoake Parish in 1643. In 1734, the Upper Parish was divided with the lower half becoming part of the Lower Parish, also called Newport Parish, and the upper half going to Nottoway Parish which later became part of Southampton County (created from that portion of Isle of Wight County lying west of the Blackwater River) when it was created from Isle of Wight County in 1749. The Upper Parish was dissolved by this division and the Lower Parish, which existed from 1643-1743, was now officially called Newport Parish (Doc.#154a-b). Unfortunately, the records for the Upper Parish, now known as Nottoway Parish in Southampton County, are not complete with current records not beginning until 1748.

              “Parish vestries usually met twice a year to conduct the business of the Church. A new vestryman was selected to fill a vacancy when there was a designation or a death and two of the Vestryman were designated as Church Wardens each year. Every four years all of the land in each parish was “processioned” and boundaries were either confirmed or established between land owners unless there was a lack of agreement between the two land owners. These processioners’ reports always included the names of the men conducting the “processions” and often include the names of the individual land owners involved and any other persons who were in attendance at this important business undertaking. Another integral part of the business conducted at the vestry meetings was the selection of a minister, the purchase and constant repair of the Glebe and the financial aid give to individual members of the parish.” (Doc.#151a)

       A brief history of the Isle of Wight parishes reveals the following:

       Warrosquyoake, later Isle of Wight, Parish
        and the Parishes in the Dicoese of Southern Virginia Descended therefrom

       Warrosquyoake Parish, circa 1629.

              The first parish organization in what later became Isle of Wight County is recorded in 1629 as already existing at Warrosquyoake. Copies of the General Court Proceedings show that in 1629 the Commissioners at Warrosquyoake delivered complete records of the monthly court proceedings, together with the register of christenings, marriages, and burials under the hand of the minister and the church wardens, and likewise a copy of their lives and disbursements at Warrosquyoake. When Warrosquyoake was established as a county in 1634 a parish was already in existence.

              Until March, 1634, Isle of Wight County had but one parish.

              In March, 1643, by an Act of the General Assembly, Isle of Wight County was divided into two parishes:

              “The upper parish to extend from Lawnes Creek to the eastern side of the Bay, the creeke devideing the plantation of Sam. Davis and Joseph Cobbs to be the extant and division of the said upper parish: The lower parish to extend from the Pagan-Poynt upon the river side to the plantation of Rich. Hayes, from the Pagan-Poynt uppon the bay including all the southerly side to the plantation of the said Cobbs, and that all the inhabitants alreadie resideing or that hereafter shall reside on that side to belong to the said lower parish.”

              Officially, the Upper Parish became known as Warrosquyoake Parish, and the Lower Parish as Newport Parish. The Act of 1734 herinafter referred to gives the official name to Newport for the first time. (Doc.#154c-d)

       According to a book entitled Historical Notes of Isle of Wight County, we also located the following parish history available on the Internet:

       “As early as 1629 a parish existed in Warrasquyoake. By 1643 it was necessary to divide the county lengthwise, making the Upper and Lower parishes using the Pagan River as the dividing line. Later the names were changed to Warrasquyoake for the Upper and Newport for the Lower Parish. In 1734 these parishes were again divided, this time at the Blackwater River. The upper parts were combined and called Nottoway Parish; the lower parts were named Newport. All of Nottoway Parish formed the new county of Southampton in 1749, leaving all of Newport in Isle of Wight County.”

       Notice that this second description of the parish histories is better defined than the original description listed above. The fact that the Upper and Lower Parishes used the Pagan River as the dividing line is important information for identifying the Reynolds families who resided on the shores of the Pagan River and Cypress Creek where Christopher Reynolds, Sr., obtained his first land patent in 1636 as listed above. In 1734, the Upper and Lower Parishes were divided again at the Blackwater River with the portions of the Upper Parish combined with the Nottoway Parish which became Southampton County in 1749, leaving all of the Lower Parish, now called Newport Parish, in Isle of Wight County.

       Another enlightening description from the book entitled Isle of Wight County, 1608 - 1907, by Col. E. M. Morrison, provides the following interpretation of the original description of the Upper and Lower Parishes of Isle of Wight County:

       In 1642 the county, heretofore one parish, was divided into two. Lawnes Creek was the northern and Pagan Creek was the southern boundary of the Upper Parish; Pagan Creek the northern and the Nansemond county line the southern boundary of the Lower Parish. They both extended [East] to the North Carolina line, about ninety miles [prior to the formation of Nottoway Parish in 1734, and Southampton County in 1749 as listed above].

       Though the Newport Parish records contain some birth records for the years 1705-1757, which were transcribed from an early parish register, they were lost. However, a transcription of these colonial birth records from the lost parish register appear on pages 223-228 of a later parish register for Newport Parish which is contained on microfilm via Miscellaneous reel 649; Isle of Wight County reel 50, at the Library of Virginia. These birth records are also listed in the Newport Parish records which are transcribed and published by William Lindsay Hopkins. Though there are several listings for Christopher and Richard Reynolds in the Newport Parish records which are extant from 1724-1784, as listed below in this chronology, there are no birth, marriage, death or burial records listed for any individuals named Reynolds in either the Lower or Newport Parish records.

       1 Oct 1645, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 330, Christopher Reynolds listed as a land owner bounding land owned by Arthur Smith called the “Freshett” and “John Roe’s Neck” in the will of [Col.] Arthur Smith [Sr.] of Warrisqueake, recorded 9 Feb 1693 (Doc.#132j, 182d)

       1646, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; William Rennalds listed in various records of York County, Virginia (Doc.#191d)

       This is the first record of a Reynolds/Rennalds family listed in York County records. Due to the lack of name and residence patterns and the location of York County, William Rennalds does not appear to have been directly related to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant or his descendants of Isle of Wight County. York County was created from Charles City County in 1634.

       1648, Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, p. 276; William Reynolds was transported to Isle of Wight County by John Seward (Doc.#21a)

       According to the publication entitled Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, who was clerk of the Virginia State Land Office, there were several individuals named Reynolds/Reynolls who were transported to Colonial Virginia as servants in the mid 1600's. The author of this publication appears to have extracted the names of these indentured servants from the land patents and transportation records which were used to issue the original land patents and headrights to the individuals who were responsible for transporting these servants to Virginia. This publication lists these immigrants and indentured servants with the individual who was responsible for their transportation as well as the county where they were transported. Several were transported to Charles River and Charles City Counties. There were also three Richard Reynolds who were transported to: New Norfolk County in 1637; to Charles City County in 1638; and to Virginia, no county listed, in 1652. William Reynolds was the only immigrant/indentured servant listed who was transported to Isle of Wight County. He was transported in 1648 by John Seward (Doc.#21a). Interestingly, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant is not listed among them and only William Reynolds was transported to Isle of Wight County.

       1648, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; Thomas Reynalls listed in a bill which he assigned to another in York County, Virginia (Doc.#191e)

       1649, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; William Rennols listed residing in Northumberland County (Doc.#191c)

       This is the first record of a Reynolds/Rennols family in Northumberland County. Due to the lack of name and residence patterns and the location of Northumberland County, William Rennols does not appear to have been directly related to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant or his descendants of Isle of Wight County. According to the Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660, William Reynalds died in 1655 in Northumberland County where records, dated 1658, list he had a wife Ann and children named William Reynalds, Jr.; James Reynalds; and Ann Reynalds (Doc.#191e).

       9 Apr 1649, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 531, Christopher Reynolds listed residing next to 300 acres of land sold by Ambrose Bennett to Ambrose Meader (Doc.#131ac)

       The 1645 and 1649 land records reveal that Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s land was located adjacent to the land of his neighbors, Col. Arthur Smith, I and Ambrose Bennett. In addition, Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s land was bounded by the tracts of land called the “Freshett” and “John Roe’s Neck.” Ambrose Bennett was possibly related to Mr. Edward Bennett of whom Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant appears to have been an indentured servant.

       1652, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; Thomas Rennolds of Lower Norfolk County listed as the subject of a headright in Lower Norfolk County (Doc.#191c)

       Colonial Virginia headrights were usually issued in the form of land patents which were granted to an individual by the Colonial Virginia government in return for providing transportation of individuals to Virginia. This Thomas Rennolds appears to have been the same individual listed below in our report: 1669-1671, Lower Norfolk County Deeds, Bk. E, pp. 47, 113, 116; Thomas Reynolds of Lower Norfolk County is listed buying and selling land in Lower Norfolk County; 1 Sep 1671, Brief Abstracts of Lower Norfolk County Wills, 1637-1710, by C. F. McIntosh, p.37-8; Thomas Reynolds listed as husband of Elizabeth Ashall, daughter of George Ashall according to the will of George Ashall of ye little Creek in Linhaven Parish, proved 17 Feb 1672 (Doc.#193a). These records appear to be the source for some family genealogists including Col. Steve F. Tillman, for listing that Thomas Reynolds was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. However, other than the fact that Thomas resided in Lower Norfolk County which is near Isle of Wight County, there is no documentation to support this theory. The theory that Thomas Reynolds was the unborn child listed in the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant regarding his wife, Elizabeth Reynolds, does not correspond with the dates of the above headright or the above deeds and will records . Lower Norfolk County, Virginia land records reveal that Thomas Reynolds first obtained land there in 1652 as listed above, and again from 1669-1671 as listed above (Deed Book E, pp. 47, 113, 116). If Thomas Reynolds was born in 1654/5 as indicated by “the unborn child which my wife goeth with” listed in Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant’s will, then Thomas would only have been age eight years old in 1652 when he first obtained his headright in Lower Norfolk County. Usually, individuals were over age twenty one before they were allowed to buy and sell land in Colonial Virginia. Hence, this could not have been the unborn child of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. Though this Thomas Reynolds was old enough to have been a brother of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant as suggested by some Reynolds researchers, there is nothing other than name and residence patterns to document this information. Lower Norfolk County was originally created in 1637 from New Norfolk County. It was located south of Isle of Wight County. Lower Norfolk County no longer exists and related records are currently housed in Chesapeake City, Virginia.

       1652, Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, p. 276; Richard Reynolls was transported to Virginia by Henry Soane (Doc.#21a)

       According to the publication entitled Early Virginia Immigrants by George Cabell Greer, who was clerk of the Virginia State Land Office, there were several individuals named Reynolds/Reynolls who were transported to Colonial Virginia as servants in the mid 1600's. The author of this publication appears to have extracted the names of these indentured servants from the land patents and transportation records which were used to issue the original land patents and headrights to the individuals who were responsible for transporting these servants to Virginia. This publication lists these immigrants and indentured servants with the individual who was responsible for their transportation as well as the county to where they were transported. Several were transported to Charles River and Charles City Counties. There were also three Richard Reynolds who were transported to: New Norfolk County in 1637 as listed above; to Charles City County in 1638 as listed above; and to Virginia, no county listed, in 1652, as listed here. William Reynolds was the only immigrant/indentured servant listed who was transported to Isle of Wight County. He was transported in 1648 by John Seward (Doc.#21a). Interestingly, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant is not listed among them and only William Reynolds was transported to Isle of Wight County.

       30 Apr 1652, Christopher Reynolds, along with his neighbor Richard Bennett, was elected to the House of Burgesses on 30 Apr 1652 from Isle of Wight Co; Bennett was chosen to be Governor of Virginia. [Statutes at Large by William Waller Henning, Vol. I, pp. 371-373 (Doc.#188); Register of Ancestors, National Society of Colonial Dames of America in Virginia, p. 77, 1979]

       This record and the accompanying references are extracted from research conducted by Sybil “Lee” Taylor of the Reynolds Family Association. Notice that this information appears to be documented. We were able to locate a copy of Statutes at Large by William Waller Henning, Vol. I, pp. 371-373 (Doc.#188) which verifies some of the above information. The listing of Charles Reynolds as a burgess in 1652 is also reprinted from Henning’s Statutes in Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, 1619-1658/9 (Doc.#192a) with Henning’s Statutes listed as the source. However, the actual text in Henning’s Statutes refers to Charles Reynolds as follows:

       25 Nov 1652, Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. VI, p. 253; Statues at Large, by William W. Henning, Vol. I, p. 373; “The names of the Burgesses for the several plantations, Nov 25, 1652...Isle of Wight County - Mr. Charles Reynolds” (Doc.#170b)

       This listing for Charles Reynolds as a Burgess in Isle of Wight County is interesting since there are no other references to a Charles Burgess in the Colonial Isle of Wight County records. The Virginia Magazine of History & Biography reference to Charles Reynolds as Burgess appears in connection with the wills of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his descendants. However, the original reference for this information is found printed in Statues at Large, by William W. Henning, Vol. I, p. 373 as listed above. The original source material listed for this reference by Henning is the Thomas Jefferson Manuscript Collection, apparently part of the Rand Manuscript collection according to the source reference. Thomas Jefferson is listed as having purchased this particular Colonial Virginia manuscript collection from the estate of William Bland. Thomas Jefferson’s Manuscript Collection is currently held at the Library of Congress. In order to verify the existence of this Charles Reynolds, we conducted an extensive search of Colonial Isle of Wight County records. However, there are no references to Charles Reynolds listed in any of the early patents, deeds, probate or court records for Isle of Wight County. The Virginia Land Office Patents & Grants data base lists only two listings for a Charles Reynolds. However, these land records occurred in the years 1789 and 1793 in Amherst County and are not related to the early Reynolds families of Isle of Wight County. Since the given name of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., is often abbreviated as “Chr:” which could easily have been misinterpreted as an abbreviation for Charles in the original manuscript, this reference to Charles Reynolds appears to actually have been a reference to Christopher Reynolds, Burgess of Isle of Wight County, Virginia in 1652. In Colonial Virginia, a Burgess was a representative in the popular branch of the legislature. The Thomas Jefferson Manuscript Collection at the Library of Congress should be examined in order to verify this information.

       1654, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 117, Elizabeth Reynolds, daughter of Christopher Reynolds, married Richard Jordan, son of Thomas Jordan, Sr., of Chuckatuck Parish in Nansemond County (Doc.#131w,131x)

       This record indicates that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant’s daughter, Elizabeth Reynolds, was married to Richard Jordan of Nansemond County prior to 1654. The year of this record indicates that she was born prior to 1638 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia in order for her to have been old enough to have been married by 1654. Nansemond County was originally created in 1637 from Upper Norfolk County which bordered Isle of Wight County on the north side and North Carolina on the south side. On 1 Jan 1974, Nansemond County was merged with Suffolk City where the Nansemond County records are housed today.

       1 May 1654, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 521, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 46; Will of Christopher Reynolds [Christopher Reynolds, Sr.], planter: to son Christopher [Christopher Reynolds, Jr.] land that Richard Jordan liveth on. To son John [John Reynolds] land near swamp when he is 21. To son Richard [Richard Reynolds, Sr.], land I live on when 21. My daughter Abbasha, I have given her a portion already. To daughter Elizabeth, cattle. Daughter Jane. To George Rivers unborn child, 1 heifer. To child wife goeth with. Wife Elizabeth to be executrix and bring up John and Richard, my sons until they are age 16. Teste, Sylvester Bullen, Anthony Matthews. (Doc.#131ab, 132b, 138c)

       Though the above will abstract for Christopher Reynolds, Sr., is useful, it is not complete. Portions of it are inaccurate when compared with the original will as noted below. The original will, as recorded in Isle of Wight County Will Bk. 1, p. 46, reads as follows:

       In the name of God, Amen. The first day of May 1654. I Christopher Reynolds [Sr.]of the Isle of Wight County in Virginia, planter, being healthful in body and sound in mind & memory make this my last Will and Testament in manner and form as followeth. First, I give and bequeath my soul unto the hands of God my Creator and Maker and my body to be buried in sure and certain hope of Resurrection and Eternal Life through the only merit and satisfaction of Jesus Christ my only Savior and Redeemer. Impremis: I give and bequeath unto my son Christopher Reynolds [Jr.] all my land on the southerly side of the Freshest swamp that Richard Jordan [son-in-law who married daughter Elizabeth Reynolds] now liveth upon. And I give unto my son John, all my lands on the northerly side of the Freshest Swamp, and one cow, and he to enjoy the said land at Twenty one years of age. And unto my son Richard, I give all my land I now liveth upon and one cow and he to enjoy the said land at Twenty one years of age. And my daughter Abbasha, I have give her a portion already which was two cows and two calves. And I give unto my daughter Elizabeth one heifer of two years old besides the stock I gave her formerly. And unto my daughter Jane I give one cow and one yearling heifer. And I give to [step son] George Rivers one yearling heifer. And I give unto the child my wife now goeth with if it lives two cows to enjoy them at three years old. And if any of my children dye my will is that the other should succeed what estate they leave. And unto Elizabeth my loving wife, I give all the rest of my estate both goods and chattels moveable and unmoveable and debts that are due to me from any person or persons whatsoever and my two servants she paying all my debts truly and justly. And I do constitute and ordain Elizabeth my loving wife my whole and sole Executrix. And my will is that my wife Elizabeth shall have the ordering and bringing up John and Richard my sons until they be sixteen years of age, and Elizabeth and Jane until they be fifteen years of age. In witness whereof I Christopher Reynolds do hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written.

       Signed: Christ. Reynolds

       Witnesseses: Sylvester Bullen, Anthony Matthews
       Isle of Wight County, Virginia Wills, Bk. 1, pp.46-8, (Doc.#148, 170a-b)

       As indicated above, the will declaration that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was a planter confirms that he was a successful tobacco planter in Colonial Virginia. His 450 acre plantation, which he received for transporting nine servants to Colonial Virginia, remained in the family for many generations as witnessed by the deed descriptions listed below in Isle of Wight County records.

       The portion of Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s will which lists “And I give unto the child my wife now goeth with if it lives two cows to enjoy them at three years old” is interpreted by many to indicate that Christopher’s wife was pregnant at the time he made out his will. Unfortunately, there are no subsequent probate records which reveal the date that this will was proved ,or that provide an inventory and appraisal, in order to confirm if his wife Elizabeth had another child. The fact that only Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and Abbatha Reynolds appear to have been over age sixteen and that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., had two sons under age sixteen and two daughters under age fifteen, indicates that Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s wife, Elizabeth, was young enough to have been pregnant.

       Based on the ages of his children who were under age sixteen, Christopher Reynolds, Sr. would have married about 1637, which is fifteen years after he immigrated to Colonial Virginia and two years after he transported nine servants to the colony. According to Chris: Reinholds’ age, i.e. twenty four in 1635, it is possible that his wife Elizabeth, was one of the three young woman named Elizabeth whom he transported to Virginia aboard the Speedwell. Christopher Reynolds, Sr. would have been age twenty six in 1637. This information suggests that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., may have been previously married with Christopher Reynolds, Jr., born about 1632, and Abbatha Reynolds, born about 1634, having been the children of a previous wife who died prior to 1637.

       Notice that the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., lists an heir named George Rivers, who appears to have been a step son. In the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s son John Reynolds, which is listed below, John refers to George Rivers as his brother: 11 Mar 1668, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 62: Will of John Reynolds, Legacy: my [step] brother George Rivers; brother Richard; sister Jane; [step] sister Elizabeth Rivers; to Robert Driver; to Elizabeth River’s daughter Mary; to my sister Elizabeth Jordan a bill of Robert Clothier’s, at her decease to her son Richard Jordan. Recorded 3 May 1669. Witnesses: Anselm Baylic, William Bradshaw (Doc.#132c). The fact that John Reynolds refers to George Rivers as his brother, indicates that George was a step brother, i.e. the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s wife, Elizabeth, who was previously married to a Mr. Rivers.

       Unless we compare the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., with the will of his son John Reynolds, it is unclear from Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s will how George Rivers was related. Contrary to the will abstract listed above, the actual will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr. does not refer to “George River’s unborn child” as listed erroneously in the above will abstract. The individual who abstracted this will information appears to have confused the following information in the original will: “And I give to George Rivers one yearling heifer. And I give unto the child my wife now goeth with if it lives two cows to enjoy them at three years old.” The reference to George Rivers is a separate item in the will and it appears to be unrelated to the item in regards to the wife of Christopher Reynolds, Sr. Though The Robert Reynolds Family web-site lists Christopher’s wife as “Elizabeth Matthews Rivers,” (Doc.#140) other than the listing of Anthony Matthews as a witness to the will of Christopher Reynolds, there is no documentation in the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., to support the maiden name of Matthews for his wife, Elizabeth, who was previously married to Mr. Rivers.

       According to Isle of Wight probate records, George Rivers died testate. His will was dated 16 Mar 1706 and recorded 9 Apr 1707. His will lists his wife, Mary, and daughters named Mary and Sarah Rivers. His brother-in-law Richard Jordan was witness to his will along with Charles Jordan and Arthur Jones (Doc.#163a-b). Though John Reynolds’ will indicates that George Rivers may have been the husband of the Elizabeth Rivers who is also listed in John Reynolds’ will, note that George and Elizabeth Rivers are listed separately in John Reynolds’ will. This suggests that they were more likely brother and sister, not husband and wife. This is confirmed from the will of George Rivers which lists his wife was named Mary as listed below (Doc.#163a-b).

       Notice that there is no child named Elizabeth Rivers listed in the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr. Hence, it is possible that Elizabeth Rivers was the child with whom his wife Elizabeth was pregnant at the time he recorded his will in 1654. However, this seems unlikely since her maiden name was Rivers. She also appears to have been married prior to 1669. Note that John Reynolds’ will refers “to Elizabeth River’s daughter Mary,” which indicates that Elizabeth Rivers was already married at the time that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., made out his will in 1654. However, in 1669, she was still listed as Elizabeth Rivers in John Reynolds’ will with a daughter named Mary. If Elizabeth Rivers had married prior to 1654, this could be the reason why she was not listed in Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s will. However, it doesn’t explain why she was still listed under the Rivers surname? This information about Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s step children, George and Elizabeth Rivers, appears to confirm that Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s wife, Elizabeth, was previously married to a man named Rivers. This corresponds with the listing of his wife as Elizabeth Rivers by several genealogists. However, so far we have found no documentation proving that her maiden name was Matthews or that she was the daughter of Anthony Matthews from Ireland. The Reynolds Family Association lists the following:

       William Glasgow Reynolds stated that Christopher married as her 2nd husband Elizabeth Matthews, whose first husband had been George Rivers, by whom she had a son, George. By Christopher Elizabeth had daughters Abbasha, Jane, and Elizabeth who later married Richard Jordan. She also had four additional sons: Christopher, John, Richard, and a posthumous child whom Christopher referred to in his Will as "the child my beloved wife now goeth with." This son was named Thomas.

       The name Matthews had significant ties to Christopher Reynolds [Samuel Matthews' Secretary on his Crown mission to VA was Peter Montague, who later became the fourth husband of Cecily Reynolds, Christopher (III)'s older sister. See American Historical Magazine, Vol 1, No 1, Jan 1896, pp 8, 19]. Christopher's will had been witnessed five years before by Anthony Matthews, a relative of Samuels' in what is now Isle of Wight County VA. Anthony Matthews also was Christopher's father-in-law. Christopher was the second husband of Elizabeth Matthews. Her first husband was George Rivers, by whom she had a son George. By Christopher she had daughters Abbasha, Jane, and Elizabeth [Isle of Wight County VA Wills, Vol. A]. The last of these, Elizabeth, later married her first cousin, Richard Jordan, Aunt Cecily (Reynolds) Jordan's posthumous child by Samuel Jordan. She also had four additional sons - Christopher, John, Richard and a posthumous child whom her husband had referred to in his will as "the child my beloved wife goeth with." She eventually named this late arrival Thomas (III) [Tillman also identified the child as Thomas]; [Ray, Index & Digest, p. 135 says of Cecily's last Jordan offspring "...the child was born. His name was Richard Jordan and he married his first cousin (as they so often did in those days) Elizabeth, daughter of Christopher Reynolds." [W.G. Reynolds, Reynolds History Annotated (1475-1977)].

       Jester, in Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1625 (1956), makes an interesting statement in writing of Christopher's will: "...to George Rivers (apparently a step-son).... He apparently married (1) ? and (2) Elizabeth (?) Rivers." There is nothing in the article to give a clue as to what brought her to this conclusion. No additional information was provided in later editions of Adventurers.

       Though our analysis agrees with much of the above information, as indicated below, there is nothing to support the naming of Elizabeth’s unborn child as Thomas. In addition to George Rivers, Elizabeth also appears to have had a daughter named Elizabeth Rivers who is listed below in the will of John Reynolds as his sister. While the information on the Matthews theory is interesting, further research needs to be conducted in order to verify that Elizabeth’s maiden name was Matthews. If the above information is true, it could aid further research in England.

       According to the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., both John and Richard Reynolds were under age sixteen, i.e. they were born between 1638 and about 1645. His daughters, Elizabeth and Jane, are listed as having been under age fifteen, i.e. they were born between 1639 and 1645. Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who received land from his father, was apparently already age 21 indicating that he was born between 1630 and 1633. Notice that this is a few years earlier than the date of birth, 1637, which is calculated for Christopher Reynolds, Jr., according to The Robert Reynolds Family web-site (Doc.#140a). Abbatha Reynolds, also appears to have been older than the other children. She was probably born a few years after Christopher Reynolds, Jr.

       The Reynolds Family Association lists that Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s children were born as follows: Richard Reynolds, born 1641; Christopher Reynolds, Jr., born 1642; John Reynolds, born 1644 and died 11 Mar 1668; Abbasha Reynolds, born 1646; Elizabeth Reynolds, born 1648, [married Richard Jordan, son of Thomas Jordan, Sr., of Nansemond County]; Jane Reynolds, born 1650; and Thomas Reynolds, born 1655 (Doc.#144e). Notice that the Reynolds Family Association lists a son named Thomas Reynolds who is not listed in Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s will. Since no documentation is provided for this information, the Reynolds Family Association appears to have estimated the years of birth for the children of Christopher Reynolds based on the date of his will. However, the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., begins with listing Christopher Reynolds, Jr. He appears to have been the only son who was over age sixteen at the time Christopher Reynolds, Sr., made out his will. Notice also from above, that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., had a daughter named Elizabeth who married Richard Jordan about 1654. This would indicate that Elizabeth was at least fifteen or sixteen years old in 1654, i.e. she would have been born in 1638/9 in order to have married Richard Jordan in 1654. However, Elizabeth is also listed as having been under age fifteen according to Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s will. Hence, it appears that Elizabeth Reynolds married Richard Jordan within a few months after her father’s death in the latter part of 1654!

       Occasionally, a will lists children in the order of their birth. According to the order in which Christopher Reynolds, Sr., lists his children in his will, they were actually born as follows: 1) Christopher Reynolds, Jr., born about 1632; 2) Abbasha Reynolds, born about 1634; 3) Elizabeth Reynolds, born about 1638, married Richard Jordan, Sr., in 1654; 4) John Reynolds, born about 1640, will dated 11 Mar 1668 and proved on 3 May 1669 in Isle of Wight County; 5) Richard Reynolds, Sr., born about 1642; 6) Jane Reynolds, born about 1644. Since Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s will lists sons first, then daughters, from the order of the listing of his daughters, the apparent gap in years between Christopher Reynolds, Jr. and his brothers, the approximate age of Elizabeth and Jane who were under age fifteen and the date of marriage for his daughter Elizabeth who married Richard Jordan in 1654, we have calculated and inserted the daughter’s birth years as listed above.

       According to the 1623 census Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was one of thirty three inhabitants for Warrosquyoake Bay (Pagan River Bay), Warrosquyoake County, Virginia. Hence, all of his children would have been born in Warrosquyoake County which became Isle of Wight County in 1637. After 1636 (when Christopher obtained his 450 acre patent for transporting nine servants to Virginia), his children would have been born on that 450 acre patent which was located on the waters of Cypress Creek, a tributary of the Pagan River in Isle of Wight County. Hence, based on the dates of birth calculated for his children, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, the widow Elizabeth Rivers, were married about 1637 in Warrosquyoake Bay (also known as Pagan River Bay), Warrosquyoake County, Virginia. Though the Reynolds Family Association lists that there was also a son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., named Thomas Reynolds (Doc.#144f), we have found no documentation which supports this information. Additional information on a Thomas Reynolds of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia is listed below. However, we was too old to have been the unborn child listed in the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant.

       Based on the above information, we list the following for the life and family of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant:

              Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant was born in England. In 1622 he emigrated to Virginia as an indentured servant of Mr. Edward Bennett arriving aboard the John & Francis and settled in Warrosquyoake Bay, Warrosquyoake County, Virginia (Doc.#131w). On 16 Feb 1623 Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was among thirty three inhabitants listed in a census for Warrascoyack [Warrosquyoake County], Virginia (Doc.#131v).

              16 Feb 1623, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 37, Chr. Reinholds [Christopher Reynolds] was among 33 inhabitants listed in a census for Warrascoyack [Warrosquyoake County], Virginia (Doc.#131v):

              John Batt, Henry Pinffe, Wassell Weblin, Anthony Read, Frances Woodson, Henry Phillips, Peter Collins, Chr. Reinold’s, Edward Mabin, John Maldman, Thomas Collins, George Rushmore, Thomas Spencer, George Clarke, Rich. Bartlett, Frances Anthony, Franse, Margrett, negroes; John Bennett, Nicholas Skinner, John Atkins, John Pollentin, Margrett Pollentin, Mary, a maid, Henry Woodward, Thomas Sawyer, Thomas, a boye. Total 33, including 4 negroes (Doc.#131v,169a)
       
              Notice that there is a boy named Thomas listed in this 1623 census. However, Christopher Reynolds, Sr.,who is listed as “Chr. Reinold ” (similar to the 1635 listing on the Speedwell) in this census, is not listed as a boy even though he would have been only thirteen years old. This is based on the information that he was born in 1610 as indicated by his age in the passenger ship list for the Speedwell which arrived in Virginia in 1635. However, the term “boye” as it used above appears to refer to a Negro boy named Thomas. Notice that no surname was listed for Thomas. This corresponds with the listing of the other three Negroes named Franse, Margrett and Mary the maid, none of whom are listed with surnames. Since Christopher Reynolds was not a Negro, he was not listed as a “boy” even though he was only twelve years old according to the Speedwell. The fact that this census lists all inhabitants indicates that it was not concerned with either the age or the color of the inhabitants, i.e. all inhabitants were listed regardless of age or race.

              A few years later on 25 Feb 1625, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was listed in a muster of the inhabitants of Wariscoyack [Warrosquyoake County], Virginia, who were servants of Mr. Edward Bennett (Doc.#131v):

                     1625 - Total inhabitants of Virginia - 1,095
              Muster of the Inhabitants at Wariscoyack, Virginia, Taken 7 Feb 1625
       
              The Muster of Mr. Edward Bennett’s Servants.
                     Henry Pinke came in the London Marchannt 1619, John Bate in the Addam 1621, Peter Collins in the Addam 1621, Wassell Webbling, Antonio, a negro, in the James 1621, Christopher Reynold’s, Luke Chappman, Edward Maybank, in the John & Francis 1622, John Attkins, William Denum, Francis Banks, in the Guifte 1623, Mary, a negro woman, in the Margrett & John 1622 (Doc.#162a)

              This muster reveals that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., began residing in Warrosquyoake County within a year after arriving in the Colony of Virginia. Since he was a servant or “employee” of Mr. Edward Bennett, who owned a considerably large amount of land in Warrosquyoake County, it appears he originally settled in the Warrosquyoake Bay settlement which was located on the Pagan River. Christopher Reynolds, Sr., or his family may have known Edward Bennett and resided in the same general area of England prior to emigrating to Virginia as one of Mr. Bennett’s servants. These records reveal that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., began residing in Warrosquyoake County in 1622 after arriving in the Colony of Virginia. Further research into the origins of Edward Bennett and his servants may allow us to confirm Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s place of origin in England.

              The fact that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was listed in the 1625 military muster for Warrosquyoake reveals that he survived the prior Indian attacks on the Colonial Virginia settlements and was an active member of the Colonial Virginia militia in Warrosquyoake.

              13 Mar 1625/6, Minutes of the Council and General Court of Virginia, 2nd Edition, published in 1979, Richmond, Edited by H.R. McIlwaine; Before the General Court at Jamestown, Virginia: "Christopher Reighnalls, sworne and examined sayeth that he did see and read Peter Collins indenture and that he was bound to serve Mr. Bennett four years."

              Notice the spelling of Christopher’s name in this deposition: "Christopher Reighnalls, sworne and examined sayeth that he did see and read Peter Collins indenture and that he was bound to serve Mr. Bennett four years." Notice that it is an unusual spelling for the Reynolds surname which no doubt many previous researchers had not discovered.

              The above deposition indicates that at least some, possibly all of the servants of Edward Bennett’s tobacco plantation at Warrosquyoake were indentured to him for a period of about four years in order to pay for their passage to Virginia and provide employment once they arrived. No doubt Christopher Reynolds was also an indentured servant. According to the 1625 muster listed above which lists: “Peter Collins in the Addam 1621," Peter Collins immigrated to Virginia as an indentured servant of Edward Bennett in 1621. Hence, Peter Collins would have fulfilled his indenture agreement in 1625, the same year that Christopher Reynolds provided his deposition. This indicates that Christopher Reynolds’s deposition was in favor of Peter Collins who appears to have recently completed his indentured service to Mr. Edward Bennett.

              Though some Reynolds family genealogists have interpreted the fact that Christopher Reynolds “...did see and read Peter Collins indentures...” to indicate that he was the secretary to Mr. Bennett, Christopher Reynolds merely provided his testimony in this deposition. As indicated above, this testimony appears to have been against Mr. Edward Bennett and in favor of Peter Collins who appears to have recently completed his indentured service to Mr. Edward Bennett. There is no reference to Christopher as having been the secretary to Mr. Bennett. There is also no reference to Christopher Reynolds traveling to England with Mr. Bennett as his secretary to secure a monopoly in the tobacco trade as suggested by some Reynolds family genealogists.

              It is interesting to note that according to the above deposition, Christopher Reynolds appears to have been able to read. This indicates that he received some education. If this was the same Christopher Reynolds who was born in 1611, i.e. age twenty four when he transported nine servants to Virginia aboard the Speedwell in 1635, then he would have been age fourteen or fifteen when he provided this deposition. Provided that Christopher Reynolds was also bound to Edward Bennett for four years of indentured service, from the date of his original arrival in Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant would have fulfilled his indentured service sometime in 1626/7. However, it is possible that he was obligated for a period longer than four years.

       On 21 Dec 1634, Christopher Reynolds of Warwickqueak [Warrosquyoake County] obtained a 100 acre patent from Robert Sabine of Warrisquick Bay, [Warrosquyoake County] (Doc.#131ac,135b). This is the first record of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant obtaining land in Virginia. From the year of Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s arrival in Virginia in 1622, it was twelve years later in 1634 before he purchased land. This information and the information above appears to confirm that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, was an indentured servant of Mr. Edward Bennett. This also appears to support the theory that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., originally immigrated to Colonial Virginia as an eleven year old child, who was possibly an orphan, in 1622 aboard the John & Francis. Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant appears to have sold this land five years later: 1 May 1639, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. A, p.103; Christopher Reynolds sold 100 acre patent in Warrisquack [Warwicke Squeake or Warrosquyoake] Bay to Peter Hull [Hill], Witnesses: John Spackman and John Oliver (Doc.#131ac, 135b). In a patent issued to John Mungoe (Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 7, p. 417), dated 21 Oct 1684, it lists that this 100 hundred acres which Robert Sabine originally sold to Christopher Reynolds on 21 Dec 1634, was located on the south side of Hutchinson’s Creek: 21 Oct 1684, Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 4, p. 417; Christopher Reynolds of Isle of Wight County, Virginia listed as having bought land from Robert Sabine on 21 Dec 1634, 100 acres located on the south side of Hutchison’s Creek, which Christopher Reynolds then sold to Peter Hill/Hull on 1 May 1639.

              On 28 May 1635, Christopher Reynolds, Sr. appears to have been listed as a passenger aboard the ship Speedwell as follows:

              “Theis under-written names are to be transported to Virginia imbarqued in the Speedwell of London JO: Chappell Mr: being examined by the Minister of Gravesend of their conformitie to the orders & discipline of the Church of England & have taken the oath of Allegeance.

              [Chri: Reinolds group]
              Kathryn Richard’s...19
              Marie Sedgwick.....20
              Elizabeth Biggs......10
              Dorothie Wyncott..40
              Ann Wyncott..........16
              Phillipp Biggs.........6 mo.
              Elizabeth Pew.........20
              Francis Langworth..25
              Chri: Reinholds.......24
              Abram Poore..........20
              Elizabeth Tuttell.....25
              (Doc.#161a)

              It is interesting to note that the majority of these passengers were woman, most of them in their early twenties. The only two males are listed as Christopher Reinholds [Reynolds] and a six month old child named Phillipp Biggs. Phillip may have been the younger brother of Elizabeth Biggs, age ten, both of whom appear to have been orphans. As indicated throughout this report, the Biggs families resided in the same area as the Reynolds families in Isle of Wight County. The majority of these passengers aboard the Speedwell appear to have been brought to Virginia in order to provide wives for the men of the Warrosquyoake Bay settlement. Notice that three of these females were named Elizabeth, i.e. the same name listed as the wife of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., in his will dated 1654. Hence, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., may have married one of these female passengers named Elizabeth.

              From the passenger list of the Speedwell which arrived in Virginia in 1635, The Reynolds Family Association and others have calculated Christopher Reynolds, Sr., as having been born in 1611 in Gravesend, County Kent, England. This is based on the listing of “Chri: Reinhold - 24" indicating that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was age twenty four in 1635. If Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was the same individual as the Chris. Reinhold, age 24, who arrived aboard the Speedwell in 1635, he would have been only eleven years old when he arrived in Colonial Virginia aboard the John & Francis in 1622. Though this seems unlikely since Christopher Reynolds, Sr., is listed the following year in the 1623 census as one of the thirty three original residents of Warrosquyoake County, notice that the 1623 census, which is listed above, lists children as well as adults. Though censuses usually refer to tithables, i.e. white persons above age twenty one years of age, that was not the case in these early colonial Isle of Wight censuses and muster rolls. Hence, it is possible that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who arrived in Colonial Virginia in 1622 aboard the John & Francis, is the same person as “Chri: Reinhold,” age 24, who arrived in Virginia in 1635 aboard the Speedwell with nine other persons. Notice that the time period in which “Chri: Reinhold” and his group of nine persons arrived in Virginia in 1635 aboard the Speedwell corresponds with the 450 acre patent that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., received the following year in Warrosquyoake County “for transporting nine servants” as listed below.

              On 15 Sep 1636, less than a year after the arrival of “Chris: Reinhold, age twenty four and his group of nine servants aboard the Speedwell,” Christopher Reynolds, Sr., obtained a 450 acre patent on the waters of Pagan Shore “for transporting nine servants” to the Virginia Colony: 15 Sep 1636, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 659; The Library of Virginia, Virginia Land Office Patents No. 1, 1623-1643, p.382; Christopher Reynolds obtained a 450 acre patent “bounded with a back creek running eastward behind Pagan Shore some three miles upward, the land lying on the south side of the creek in Warrasquinoke [Warrosquyoake ] County for transporting 9 servants (Doc.# 131w,131ay, 142h).

              Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, appears to have been a Burgess for Isle of Wight County in 1652 according to the following: On 25 Nov 1652, Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. VI, p. 253; Statues at Large, by William W. Henning, Vol. I, p. 373; “The names of the Burgesses for the several plantations, Nov 25, 1652...Isle of Wight County - Mr. Charles Reynolds” (Doc.#170b). This listing for Charles Reynolds as a Burgess in Isle of Wight County is interesting since there are no other references to a Charles Burgess in the Colonial Isle of Wight County records. The Virginia Magazine of History & Biography reference to Charles Reynolds as Burgess appears in connection with the wills of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his descendants. However, the original source for this information is found printed in Statues at Large, by William W. Henning, Vol. I, p. 373. This reference by Henning was obtained from the Thomas Jefferson Manuscript Collection, apparently part of the Rand Manuscript collection according to the source information. Thomas Jefferson is listed as having purchased his collection from the estate of William Bland. Thomas Jefferson’s Manuscript Collection is currently held at the Library of Congress. Our research reveals that there are no references to Charles Reynolds listed in the Library of Virginia’s online index to Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County and only two references in the Virginia Land Office Patents & Grants data base for the years 1789 and 1793 in Amherst County which appear unrelated. Since the given name of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., is often abbreviated as “Chr:,” which could have been misinterpreted as an abbreviation for Charles, this reference to Charles Reynolds was probably for Christopher Reynolds, Sr., Burgess of Isle of Wight County, Virginia in 1652. In Colonial Virginia, a Burgess was a representative in the popular branch of the legislature. The Thomas Jefferson Manuscript Collection at the Library of Congress should be examined in order to verify this information.

              Christopher Reynolds, Sr., wrote his will on 1 May 1654 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, a copy of which is transcribed above from Isle of Wight County, Virginia Wills, Bk. 1, pp. 46-8, (Doc.#148, 170a-b).

              Christopher Reynolds, Sr., married Elizabeth Rivers, the widow of Mr. Rivers and the mother of George and Elizabeth Rivers. Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s step son, whom he lusts as an heir in his will, lists that George Rivers married a woman named Mary. George and Mary had two daughters, Mary & Sarah Rivers. George Rivers made out his will on 16 Mar 1706/7 and it was recorded on 9 Apr 1707 in Isle of Wight County (Doc.#163a-b).

              According to Isle of Wight County records and the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., he had the following children:

              1) Christopher Reynolds, Jr., born about 1632, Warrosquyoake Bay, Warrosquyoake, Virginia

              2) Abbasha Reynolds, born about 1634, Warrosquyoake Bay, Warrosquyoake, Virginia

              3) Elizabeth Reynolds, born about 1638, Cypress Creek & Pagan River, Warrosquyoake, Virginia, married Richard Jordan about 1653/1654

              4) John Reynolds, born about 1640, Cypress Creek & Pagan River, Warrosquyoake, Virginia, will dated 11 Mar 1668 and proved on 3 May 1669 in Isle of Wight County
              
              5) Richard Reynolds, Sr., born about 1642, Cypress Creek & Pagan River, Warrosquyoake, Virginia, married Elizabeth Sharpe, daughter of Richard Sharpe, Sr. Richard Reynolds, Sr., died testate in 1712 in Newport Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia

              6) Jane Reynolds, born about 1644, Cypress Creek & Pagan River, Warrosquyoake, Virginia

       Our Chronology of the Reynolds families of Virginia continues as follows:

       1655, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; William Reynalds listed as deceased husband of Ann Reynalds in Northumberland County (Doc.#191e)

       1656, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; Mary Renols and Eleanor Rennolds listed as indentured servants from Bristol, Worcestershire, England (Doc.#191c-d)

       Though no county of residence in Virginia is listed, these listings for Mary Renols and Eleanor Rennolds could have been a mis-spelling of Reynolds. It is interesting to note that she came to Virginia from Bristol, England. Hence, Mary or Eleanor may have been related to the George and Christopher Reynolds of Bristol, England, who are listed below: Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. XVIII, Virginia Gleanings in England, p. 308; 16 Mar 1634/5 - Christopher Reynolds, son of George Reynolds deceased and brother of Anne Reynolds listed as kinsmen in will of Henry Hobson of City of Bristol, Inn Holder (Doc.#173a-c), should also be researched for a possible relationship to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. According to the notes accompanying the publication of Henry Hobson’s will, he was a Mayor of Bristol, England. His grandson, Miles Cary, was the emigrant to Virginia. Though there is no direct connection to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., of Isle of Wight County, listed in this will, the name pattern of a Christopher Reynolds listed as the son of George Reynolds is intriguing when compared with the information on the Reynolds families of Gravesend in County Kent and London. Hence, additional research should be conducted in the records of Bristol in order to ascertain if there is a connection between Christopher Reynolds, Sr., of Isle of Wight and the Reynolds families of Bristol.

       1657/1658, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; William Reynalds listed in various records of York County, Virginia (Doc.#191f)

       The following information in this chronology pertains primarily to the children and descendants of Christopher Reynolds, Sr.

       12 Mar 1657, Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk.4, 1655-1664, p. 252, Ilse of Wight County; Christopher Reynolds and John Reynolds listed as owning land which bounds a 100 acre patent in Isle of Wight County issued to Giles Driver (Doc.#156g)

       These are obviously the two oldest sons of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., as listed in his will which is transcribed above.

       25 Mar 1657, The Library of Virginia, Virginia Land Office Patents No. 4, 1655-1664, p.252; Christopher Reynolds and John Reynolds listed as owning land bounding a 100 acre tract near the [Cypress Creek] swamp and at the miles end of the said John Reynolds land, patent issued to Giles Driver. The previous patent of 100 acres listed in the name of Driver and this patent for 100 acres were both joined together and granted to said Giles Driver on 13 Jan 1661 (Doc.#142d).

       By 25 Mar 1657, both Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his younger brother John Reynolds appear to have been residing on lands they inherited from their father, Christopher Reynolds, Sr. Though the two patents above are listed with different dates, they are for the same land patent volume and page number.

       25 Nov 1657, The Library of Virginia, Virginia Land Office Grants No. 4, 1786, p.243; Christopher Reynolds obtained patent for 350 acres bounding Freshett by the miles end of 450 acres of land patented by Christopher Reynolds, deceased. This patent was renewed in Richard Jordans’ name on 18 Mar 1662 (Doc.#142)

       Christopher Reynolds, Jr., obtained this patent three years after the death of his father, Christopher Reynolds, Sr. However, Christopher Reynolds, Jr., appears to have assigned the 350 acre patent to his brother-in-law, Richard Jordan, who renewed it five years later on 18 Mar 1662.

       1658, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; Dr. Thomas Reynolds of Surry County bought land in Surry County (Doc.#191c)

       This record for Thomas Rennolds in Surry County is the earliest listing located for Thomas Rennolds/Reynolds. This record and those listed below for a Thomas Rennolds of Lower Norfolk County, appear to be the sources for listing that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant had a son and brother named Thomas. However, other than residence patterns, there is nothing which documents that Thomas Rennolds was a brother of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. They are not listed together in any of the Isle of Wight, Surry or Lower Norfolk County records.

       1658/1660, Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1660; Thomas Reynold listed in the records of Charles City County (Doc.#191b)

       This record for Thomas Reynold appears to be a different person than the Dr. Thomas Reynolds of Surry County who is listed above in the same year in Surry County.
       
       12 Jan 1661, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 8, p.242, Richard Staples granted 750 acres in Newport Parish (Doc.#136k)

       Isle of Wight County deeds listed below indicate that Richard Staples was the father of Joyce Staples who married a Richard Reynolds. Name and residence patterns indicate that this is the same Richard Reynolds, Sr., referred to as “Richard Reynolds the Younger,” below in a 1679 patent, who was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr. This corresponds with other records which list Richard Staples as the father-in-law of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger. Though the Ancestral File also lists that a Richard Reynolds, Sr. married Elizabeth Sharpe, name and residence patterns indicate that this was a different Richard Reynolds, Sr. He was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. He married Elizabeth Sharpe and resided in Newport Parish where he died testate in 1710 as listed below.

       From the date of Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s will in 1654, to the date of his son John Reynolds’ will in 1668, there are no further probate, court or deed listings for individuals named Christopher or Richard Reynolds during this fourteen year period. The first listing after their father’s will is for their brother, John Reynolds, who died unmarried leaving his estate to his siblings. According to the year of his will, 1668, and the calculated year of his birth, John Reynolds died young at the age of twenty eight.

       11 Mar 1668, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 62: Will of John Reynolds, Legacy: my brother [in law]George Rivers; brother Richard; sister Jane; sister Elizabeth Rivers; to Robert Driver; to Elizabeth River’s daughter Mary; to my sister Elizabeth Jordan a bill of Robert Clothier’s, at her decease to her son Richard Jordan [Jr.]. Recorded 3 May 1669. Witnesses: Anselm Baylic, William Bradshaw (Doc.#132c)

       This will when compared with the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and the land records of Isle of Wight County confirm that this John Reynolds was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr. Notice that John Reynolds had a sister who married Richard Jordan which corresponds with Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s will as listed above. In addition, George Rivers is also listed in both wills. In addition, the mention of John’s sister as Elizabeth, wife of Richard Jordan confirms that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, was the father of this John Reynolds. According to John Reynolds’ will, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., had children named: step son George Rivers; son Richard Reynolds; daughter Jane Reynolds; step daughter Elizabeth Rivers; and Elizabeth Reynolds, wife of Richard Jordan who had a son named Richard Jordan, Jr. Hence, John Reynolds’s will corresponds with the will of his father, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, which lists the following as it is extracted from above: “In the name of God, Amen. The first day of May 1654. I Christopher Reynolds [Sr.]of the Isle of Wight County in Virginia, planter, being healthful in body and sound in mind & memory make this my last Will and Testament in manner and form as followeth. First, I give and bequeath my soul unto the hands of God my Creator and Maker and my body to be buried in sure and certain hope of Resurrection and Eternal Life through the only merit and satisfaction of Jesus Christ my only Savior and Redeemer. Impremis: I give and bequeath unto my son Christopher Reynolds [Jr.] all my land on the southerly side of the Freshest swamp that Richard Jordan [son-in-law who married daughter Elizabeth Reynolds] now liveth upon. And I give unto my son John Reynolds lands on the northerly side of the said Freshest Swamp and one cow, and he to enjoy the said land at Twenty one years of age. And unto my son Richard Reynolds I give all my land I now liveth upon and one cow and he to possess the said land until he is twenty one years of age. And my daughter Abbasha, I have given her a portion already which are two cows and two calves. And I give unto my daughter Elizabeth one heifer of two years old besides the stock I gave her formerly. And unto my daughter Jane I give one cow and one yearling heifer. And I give to George Rivers one yearling heifer. And I give unto the child my wife now goeth with if it lives two cows to enjoy them at three years old. And if any of my children dye my will is that the other should succeed what estate they leave. And unto Elizabeth my loving wife, I give all the rest of my estate both goods and chattels moveable and unmoveable and debts that are due to me from any person or persons whatsoever and my two servants she paying all my debts truly and justly. And I do constitute and ordain Elizabeth my loving wife my whole and sole Executrix. And my will is that my wife Elizabeth shall have the ordering and bringing up John and Richard my sons until they be sixteen years of age, and Elizabeth and Jane until they be fifteen years of age. In witness whereof I Christopher Reynolds do hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. Signed: Christ. Reynolds, Witnesseses: Sylvester Bullen, Anthony Matthews: Isle of Wight County, Virginia Wills, Bk. 1, pp.46-8, (Doc.#148).

       Though The Robert Reynolds Family web-site lists that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant’s son, Richard Reynolds, Sr., married Joyce Staples (Doc.#140a), as will be explained below, name and residence patterns indicate that he actually married Elizabeth Sharpe, the daughter of Richard Sharpe. Name and residence patterns indicate that the Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Joyce Staples who was the daughter of Richard Staples, is the same individual as Richard Reynolds, Sr., who is listed as “Richard Reynolds the Younger,” below in a 1679 patent. He was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and hence, he was referred to as Richard Reynolds ‘the younger” in order to distinguish him from his uncle, Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant.

       3 May 1669, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 19; Richard Reynolds appointed executor of the will for his brother, John Reynolds, according to the will of John Reynolds. Proved 23 Sep 1669. Securities were Ambrose Bennett and Benjamin Beale (Doc.#132v)

       By 1669, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, appears to have reached age twenty one as he was appointed the executor of his brother, John Reynolds’ will. This corresponds with the estimated birth year, 1642, which we have calculated for Richard Reynolds, Sr. This indicates that Richard Reynolds, Sr., would have been age twenty seven.

       1669-1671, Lower Norfolk County Deeds, Bk. E, pp. 47, 113, 116; Thomas Reynolds of Lower Norfolk County is listed buying and selling land in Lower Norfolk County

       1 Sep 1671, Brief Abstracts of Lower Norfolk County Wills, 1637-1710, by C. F. McIntosh, p.37-8; Thomas Reynolds listed as husband of Elizabeth Ashall, daughter of George Ashall according to the will of George Ashall of ye little Creek in Linhaven Parish, proved 17 Feb 1672 (Doc.#193a)

       These records appear to have been for the same Thomas Reynolds who was the subject of a headright (Colonial Virginia headrights were usually issued in the form of land patents which were granted to an individual by the Colonial Virginia government in return for providing transportation of individuals to Virginia) in Lower Norfolk County in 1652 according to the Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia, 1607-1670. These records appear to be the source for some family genealogists including Col. Steve F. Tillman, for listing that Thomas Reynolds was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. However, other than the fact that Thomas resided in Lower Norfolk County which is near Isle of Wight County, there is no documentation to support this theory. The theory that Thomas Reynolds was the unborn child listed in the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant regarding his wife, Elizabeth Reynolds, does not correspond with the dates of the above headright or the above deeds and will records . Lower Norfolk County, Virginia land records reveal that Thomas Reynolds first obtained land there in 1652 as listed above, and again from 1669-1671 as listed above (Deed Book E, pp. 47, 113, 116). If Thomas Reynolds was born in 1654/5 as indicated by “the unborn child which my wife goeth with” listed in Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant’s will, then Thomas would only have been age eight years old in 1652 when he first obtained his headright in Lower Norfolk County. Usually, individuals were over age twenty one before they were allowed to buy and sell land in Colonial Virginia. Hence, this could not have been the unborn child of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. Though this Thomas Reynolds was old enough to have been a brother of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant as suggested by some Reynolds researchers, there is nothing other than name and residence patterns to document this information. Lower Norfolk County was originally created in 1637 from New Norfolk County. It was located south of Isle of Wight County. Lower Norfolk County no longer exists and related records are currently housed in Chesapeake City, Virginia.

       In 1672, Richard Reynolds, Sr., was residing near his brother-in-law, Richard Jordan, Sr., on land which he inherited from his father at the head of Lower Bay Creek and the mouth of Cypress Creek in the Lower Parish area of Isle of Wight County:

       13 Nov 1672, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 583, Richard Reynolds listed as a resident near Richard Jordan, Sr., at head of Lower Bay Creek and mouth of Cypress Creek (Doc.#131ai)

       This land record in 1672 indicates that this was Richard Reynolds, Sr. who was a brother-in-law to Richard Jordan who married his sister, Elizabeth Reynolds. This corresponds with the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, who died in 1654 as listed above. According to this deed, Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Richard Jordan, Sr., were residing at the mouth of Cypress Creek which is a tributary for the Pagan River which corresponds with previous land and probate records listed above. Notice that this is the same description for the location of property which is provided in John Reynolds’s will, as listed above, in which his brother, Richard Reynolds, Sr. was the executor.

       8 Sep 1673, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 567, Richard Reynolds listed as a witness to a guardianship record of John Nelson to Robert Coleman (Doc.#131af)

       This record appears to have been for Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Anne Coleman. As revealed below, Anne Coleman was the daughter of Robert and Mary Coleman. Hence, according to name and residence patterns, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger was the grandson of Robert and Mary Coleman.

       10 Jan 1675, Isle of Wight County Wills & Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 137; Henry Reynolds listed with daughter Mary Reynolds in the will of William Clay (Doc.#182)

       7 Oct 1675, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 146, Richard Rennalds and Will Jenkins listed as witnesses to will of John Hardy, recorded 9 Jun 1677 (Doc.#132d)

       20 Nov 1675, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.45; Richard Reynolds listed as a witness to a 50 acre deed between Hodges Council of Lower Parish and Joseph Vicke along with Bridgeman Joyner and William Kerle, recorded 9 Aug 1692 (Doc.#135h)

       6 Jun 1676, Virginia Patent Bk. 6, p.609; Richard Reynolds, Jane Williams and others listed in a patent for 400 acres in Lower Norfolk County near the head of the Western Branch [of the Pagan River]near the Elizabeth River (Doc.#152a)

       In 1676, Lower Norfolk County bordered Nansemond County on the north. Hence, Nansemond County, which was called Upper Norfolk County prior to 1643, was situated between Isle of Wight and Lower Norfolk Counties. From the description of the above patent, it is unclear whether this Richard Reynolds actually resided in Lower Norfolk County. Name and residence patterns indicate that he may have been the same person as Richard Reynolds, Sr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, or he may have been the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe, i.e. Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Williams.

       12 Dec 1676, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk.2, p. 147; Richard Reynolds and Will Bradshaw listed as witnesses to the will of Giles Driver (Doc.#182a)

       9 Jun 1677, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk.2, p. 41; Richard Reynolds and Robert Burnett listed as security for the will of Giles Driver who appointed his wife, Olive, Executrix; proved 11 Aug 1677 (Doc.#132w, 182f)

       5 Sep 1677, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 577, Richard Reynolds listed as a witness to a 100 acre deed between Robert Dryver [Driver] to Jno. Bromfield (Doc.#131ag)

       9 Apr 1678, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 579, Richard Reynolds listed as a witness to 170 acre deed between Ambrose Bennett and James Tullaugh (Doc.#131ah)

       30 Mar 1679, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 203, Richard Reynolds and Phillip Thomas, listed as a witnesses to will of John Daniel, recorded 17 Jul 1679 (Doc.#132e)

       According to the dates of the above listings, the majority of these listings for Richard Reynolds appears to have been for Richard Reynolds, Sr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. The names of the individuals, Ambrose Bennett and James Tullaugh, listed in the above records confirm that they were neighbors and close friends of the Reynolds families.

       6 Apr 1679, Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. VI, p. 253; Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, pp. 52, 218-9; Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations, Card Catalog; Henry Reynolds’ will appoints his wife, Joyce Reynolds, as his Executrix, Proved 9 Jun 1681, Inventory and appraisal recorded 10 Oct 1681 (Doc.#170b,182g, 187)

       10 May 1679, Virginia Land Office, Patents Bk. 6, p.684; Cavaliers and Pioneers, Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, Vol. 11: 1666-1695, p. 198; Richard Reynolds, the younger, of Isle of Wight County, 566 acres in the Lower Parish of said County, on northwest side of the head of the Lower Bay Creek; P. 684. Beginning at an Island near head of said Creek to Christopher Bly’s line; along Henry King; to Col. [Arthur] Smith & Mr. Driver; to head of West Freshett or swamp &c [calculated] 241 acres. Part of 450 acres granted Mr. Christopher Reynolds [Sr.], late of said County, 15 Sep 1636 and by will given to his eldest son Christopher [Jr.]and his heirs forever who bequeathed to said Richard, his only son and heir; 100 acres part of 350 acres granted to Mr. Richard Jordan, Sr., 18 Mar 1662, who conveyed it to said Christopher Reynolds [Jr.] on 17 May 1658, who bequeathed to said Richard [Reynolds the Younger]: 225 acres being waste together with said 341 acres, due for transporting of 12 persons. Witnesses: Daniel Hennon/Herron, John Champion, Lewis Davis, Edward Goodson (Note: Conveyance from Jordan to Reynolds antedates this patent) (Doc.#149,150a,140a)

       Though it is not listed under Richard Reynolds in the card catalog for the Library of Virginia’s collection of Land Office Patents & Grants, this patent and other deed records reveal that Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger was the only son and heir of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. As listed above, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., obtained the original 450 acre patent on 15 Sep 1636. In 1657, Christopher Reynolds, Jr., obtained a 350 acre patent for land which bounded the 450 acre patent obtained by his father, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, as described in the following deed abstract which is listed above: 25 Nov 1657, The Library of Virginia, Virginia Land Office Grants No. 4, 1786, p.243; Christopher Reynolds [Jr.] obtained patent for 350 acres bounding Freshett by the miles end of 450 acres of land patented by Christopher Reynolds, deceased. This patent was renewed in Richard Jordans’ name on 18 Mar 1662 (Doc.#142). Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s will was made out on 1 May 1654, as listed above, and corresponds with this land patent.

       According to The Robert Reynolds Family web-site, they interpret the above land patent as confirming that Richard Reynolds the Younger was the only son and heir of Christopher Reynolds, Jr. and his wife, Elizabeth, whose maiden name is listed as Sharpe. The Robert Reynolds Family web-site also lists that Richard Reynolds, the Younger, is the same person as Richard Reynolds who married Joyce Staples (Doc.#140a). Though The Robert Reynolds Family web-site provides no documentation to support the theory that Richard Reynolds the Younger is the same person who married Joyce Staples, name and residence patterns suggest that it is accurate. Hence, in conclusion of our analysis of the above land patent, both Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his brother Richard Reynolds, Sr., had sons named Richard Reynolds. In regards to the accuracy of the land patent abstract which is listed above for Richard Reynolds, Sr., the Younger, we obtained a copy of the original patent which appears to correspond with the transcription by Cavaliers and Pioneers. Hence, according to this 10 May 1679 land patent, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, is listed as the only son and heir of Christopher Reynolds, Jr.

       9 Dec 1680, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 51; Richard Reynolds and John Nevill listed as security for the will of Neale Macone who appointed his wife, Anne, his executrix, recorded 14 Jan 1681 (Doc.#132x)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this Richard Reynolds was Richard Reynolds, Jr., who was a brother-in-law to John Nevill. Both are listed as security for the will of Neale Macone. As confirmed below, John Nevill married Elizabeth Reynolds, the sister of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and daughter of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe who resided in the Lower Parish.

       9 Dec 1680, William & Mary College Quarterly, Series 1, Vol. VII, p. 242; Richard Reynolds and Col. Arthur Smith listed as overseers to the will of Ambrose Bennett (Doc.#181, 182b)

       1681, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 225, Richard Reynolds listed as an appraiser for the estate of John Bromfield along with Robert Coleman, Thomas Giles and Ambrose Bennett (Doc.#132f)

       This last record appears to have been for Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Anne Coleman. Anne was the daughter of Robert and Mary Coleman. According to name and residence patterns, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger was the grandson of Robert and Mary Coleman.

       23 Apr 1681, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.254; The Library of Virginia, Land Office Patents No. 7, 1679-1689, p.71; Richard Reynolds, Sr., obtained a patent for 380 acres bounded by Col. Arthur Smith and the Lower Bay Creek (Doc.#135p, 142v)

       The description of this 380 acre deed and the listing of Col. Arthur Smith as a neighbor in this deed indicates that this was Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe. He was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant as listed above.

       9 Jun 1681, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, pp. 52, 218-9; Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations, Card Catalog; Henry Reynolds’ will appoints his wife, Joyce Reynolds, as his Executrix, Proved 9 Jun 1681, Inventory and appraisal recorded 10 Oct 1681 (Doc.#182g, 187)

       The Virginia Magazine of History & Biography lists that Henry Reynolds’ will was originally dated 6 Apr 1679, but does not list a volume and page number. The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations online Card Catalog, lists only the date, 9 Jun 1681, in which Henry Reynolds’ will was proved.

       20 Apr 1682, The Library of Virginia, Land Office Patents No. 7, p. 174; Richard Reynolds obtained a patent for 450 acres Escheat land which Ambrose Bennett died seized of (Doc.#142k)

       This 1682 patent for Richard Reynolds, appears to have been for Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger who was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr. Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger would have been about age forty at the time that this patent was obtained. The 450 acres of escheat land was obtained when it reverted back to the crown after the death of Ambrose Bennett. Ambrose Bennett was an early neighbor of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who first appears in the above records as follows: 9 Apr 1649, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 531, Christopher Reynolds listed residing next to 300 acres of land sold by Ambrose Bennett to Ambrose Meader (Doc.#131ac).

       Though Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant also received a 450 acre patent on 15 Sep 1636 for transporting nine persons to Virginia, this was a different tract of land than the 450 acre patent listed for Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger. In addition, Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s will lists that his 450 acre patent, which was located on the waters of Cypress Creek and the Pagan Shore [Pagan River], was divided between his sons, Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and Richard Reynolds, Sr., in 1654 as listed above.

       21 Oct 1684, Virginia Land Office Patents, Bk. 4, p. 417; Christopher Reynolds of Isle of Wight County, Virginia listed as having bought land from Robert Sabine on 21 Dec 1634, 100 acres located on the south side of Hutchison’s Creek, which Christopher Reynolds then sold to Peter Hill/Hull on 1 May 1639, regarding a patent issued to John Mungoe

       As referred to by the dates listed in this patent to John Mungoe, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, first obtained this 100 acre tract on the south side of Hutchison Creek from Robert Sabine on 21 Dec 1634. As listed above, this is the first record of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant having obtained land. It is this patent to John Mungoe which reveals that this 100 acre tract was located on the south side of Hutchison Creek in Isle of Wight County.

       9 Sep 1684, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 57; Richard Reynolds, Sr., listed as security along with Robert Coleman for estate of John Lockhart, administration requested by James Tullaugh (Doc.#132y)

        According to name and residence patterns, this record was for Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Anne Coleman. As confirmed below, Anne Coleman was the daughter of Robert Coleman who is listed as a security along with his son-in-law, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, in this probate record. Hence, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger was the grandson of Robert and Mary Coleman as confirmed below.

       1685, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p.243; Isle of Wight County Deeds Bk. 1, p.90; Richard Reynolds listed as having married Elizabeth Williams, daughter of George Williams (Doc.#138f)

       This Richard Reynolds who married Elizabeth Williams prior to 1685 was known as Richard Reynolds, Jr. in later deeds and probate records which indicates that he was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe. According to a deed dated 1693, which is listed below, we learn the following: 7 Feb 1693, Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Elizabeth, daughter of George Williams, listed in deed between them and Pharoah Cobb and his wife Elizabeth, recorded 9 Feb 1693 (Doc.#135i). Notice that this deed lists this Richard Reynolds who married Elizabeth Williams as Richard Reynolds, Jr. Another deed and probate record dated in 1700 lists: 6 Apr 1700, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 81; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.306; Richard Reynolds and his wife Elizabeth bought from George Williams 100 acres in the Lower Parish (part of deed dated 10 Apr 1671 of Pharoah Cobb to George Williams, Taylor [Williams], father of the said George Williams), recorded 9 Apr 1700, Witnessed by Arthur Smith, Thomas Smith and Mathew Lowry (Doc.#135r).

       9 Feb 1685, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.216; Richard Reynolds and his wife, Elizabeth, sold to William Murfrey, 100 acres in Lower Parish (Doc.#135n)

       20 Oct 1685, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 247, Richard Reynolds, Ann Tullaugh and Isabell Williams listed as witnesses to the will of John Burnell recorded 9 Dec 1685 (Doc.#132g)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that these two records refer to Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife Elizabeth Williams. Note that in the probate record dated 20 Oct 1685 that Richard Reynolds, Jr., appears as a witness with Ann Tullaugh and Isabell Williams. Name and residence patterns suggest that Isabell Williams may have been a sister to Richard Reynolds, Jr.’s wife, Elizabeth Williams. In reference to Ann Tullaugh, in 1684, Richard Reynolds, Jr.’s father, Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Robert Coleman were listed as securities for James Tullaugh (probably the father or husband of Ann Tullaugh) who was the administrator for the estate of John Lockhart: 9 Sep 1684, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 57; Richard Reynolds, Sr., listed as security along with Robert Coleman for the estate of John Lockhart, administration requested by James Tullaugh (Doc.#132y). In 1698, Richard Reynolds was listed as a witness to the will of James Tullaugh who was originally from Ireland: 26 Mar 1698, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 390; Richard Reynolds, John Street and Ann Street listed as witnesses to will of James Tullaugh, father of Ann Tullaugh, no wife listed; trustee was John Giles, recorded 2 May 1698 (Doc.#132l).

       23 Nov 1687, Middlesex County Military Census, Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. VIII, p.190; Richard Reynolds found capable to serve as a foot soldier (Doc.#172b)

       This appears to have been the same Richard Reynolds who was listed in the 1704, Middlesex County, Virginia Quit Rent Rolls which was published in the Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. 33, p.47; Richard Reynolds, - 50 acres, which is listed below (Doc.#166b). Middlesex County is located a few hundred miles north of Isle of Wight County. Hence, this listing for Richard Reynolds does not appear to be directly related to the Reynolds families of Isle of Wight County.

       1689, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.25; Elizabeth Reynolds, sister of Richard Reynolds, listed as wife of John Nevill (Doc.#138d)

       This deed reveals that Elizabeth Reynolds, sister of a Richard Reynolds, married John Nevill, prior to 1689, probably about 1688 just prior to the following land dispute. Within the next few years Richard Reynolds and John Nevill appear is subsequent records as follows: 3 Apr 1690, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.25; Richard Reynolds and John Neuill [Neville] involved in a division of a tract of land, Witnesses: Joseph Woory and Samuel Swann, recorded 9 Apr 1690, signed in the presence of James Benn, William West, Will Godwin, James Tullaugh... (Doc.#135g). 9 Apr 1690, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 603, Richard Reynolds and John Neville involved in a dispute settled by a Jury (Doc.#131aj). The listing of James Tullaugh as a witness in 1690 to the division of land between Richard Reynolds and his brother-in-law John Nevill suggests that this is the same Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Williams. He also appears to have been the same individual who appeared as a witness of James Tullaugh’s will in 1698.

       1690, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.25; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 8, p. 242; Richard Reynolds listed as having married a woman with maiden name Staples, the daughter of Richard Staples (Doc.#138f)

       This is the first listing of a Richard Reynolds having married a woman named Staples. Since the other wives of the men named Richard Reynolds were named Elizabeth Sharpe and Elizabeth Williams as listed above, this listing for a wife of Richard Reynolds appears to be for Joyce Staples, the daughter of Richard Staples according to this deed. There are several references to a woman named Joyce who is listed as the wife of a Richard Reynolds according to the following deed and probate records listed in this chronology. Name and residence patterns indicate that Joyce Staples was the wife of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger who was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr.

       3 Apr 1690, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.25; Richard Reynolds and John Neuill [Nevill] involved in a division of a tract of land, Witnesses: Joseph Woory and Samuel Swann, recorded 9 Apr 1690, signed in the presence of James Benn, William West, Will Godwin, James Tullaugh... (Doc.#135g)

       9 Apr 1690, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 603, Richard Reynolds and John Neville [Nevill] involved in a dispute settled by a Jury (Doc.#131aj)

       These listings for Richard Reynolds and John Nevill appear to be for Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Williams, and his brother-in-law, John Nevill, who married Elizabeth Reynolds.

       2 Dec 1691, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.47; Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Richard Reynolds, Jr., listed as witnesses along with Giles Driver to a deed between Robert Driver and his wife, Elizabeth, and Charles Driver (Doc.#135h)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this deed refers to Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe, and his son, Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Williams. Richard Reynolds, Jr., is listed in the 1712 will of Richard Reynolds, Sr., of Newport Parish. Though the patent dated 1679 lists Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger as the only son and heir of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., this is the first listing in Isle of Wight County records for an individual actually referred to as “Richard Reynolds, Jr.”

       13 Dec 1691, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 314; Richard Reynolds and his wife Elizabeth appointed guardians of Richard Lewis’ daughter named Elizabeth. Overseers were Thomas Joyner, Jr., and Richard Reynolds, Jr. Richard Lewis’ will was recorded 26 Mar 1692. Richard Lewis resided in the Lower Parish (Doc.#132h)

       The will of Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe, lists Elizabeth Lewis, the daughter of Richard Lewis as follows: 27 Jul 1711, Richard Reynolds, of Newport Parish: Legatees - Wife Elizabeth; son Richard; son Sharpe; son Christopher the land on which Richard Jackson lives; grandson ----Reynolds; what is due Elizabeth Lewis one of the daughters of Richard Lewis to be paid. Executors my wife and sons. Recorded 26 May 1712. Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Giles Driver and Jane Benn (Doc.#132r). Hence, this confirms that the above record refers to Richard Reynolds, Sr., (son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant) and his wife Elizabeth Sharpe with their son, Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Williams, listed as an overseer with Thomas Joyner, Jr.

       13 Dec 1691, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p.314; Richard Reynolds and Wife Elizabeth listed as guardians and Richard Reynolds Jr. listed as overseer in the will of Richard Lewis of Lower Parish, an abstract of which reads as follows: "Legatee wife, Sarah; son Richard plantation on which William Duck lives, said Duck to take in tuition my son Richard; son Thomas land rented to James Cullie, Thomas Giles to take his son, if Mr. Giles die, then he may be free; Ann placed in care of Mr. Bressie; daughter Elizabeth in care of Richard Reynolds and wife Elizabeth; unborn child. Overseers Thomas Joyner Jr. and Richard Reynolds Jr. Witness Joshua Turner, Alexander Mathews, Hugh Bressie and Luke Kent (2:314), recorded 26 Mary 1692 (Doc.#182c)

       This will for Richard Lewis of the Lower Parish which lists Richard Reynolds, Sr., his wife, Elizabeth, and son Richard Reynolds, Jr. as the overseer, corresponds with the guardianship records listed above in which Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife Elizabeth were appointed guardians of Elizabeth Lewis, the daughter of Richard Lewis. This information also corresponds with the will of Richard Reynolds, Sr., an abstract of which is listed above. The listing of Richard Reynolds, Jr., as an overseer in the will and guardianship records for Richard Lewis indicates that Richard Reynolds, Jr., was over age twenty one in 1691. Based on the year, 1691, that the will for Richard Lewis was written, this reveals that Richard Reynolds, Jr., was born prior to 1670. This corresponds with the 1668 birth year calculated for Richard Reynolds, Jr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe.

       19 Aug 1692, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 326, Richard Reynolds listed as a land owner in Upper Parish in will of John Frizell, recorded 10 Apr 1693 (Doc.#132i)

       John Frizell appears to have had a son named John Frizell, Jr. who bought land from Richard Reynolds, Sr.’s brother, Christopher Reynolds, Jr., several years later as listed below: 9 Feb 1708, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.137; Christopher Reynolds, John Browne and Thomas Calecott witnessed a deed between Thomas Sawyer of Chuckatuck Parish in Nansemond County to John Frizell, cooper of Newport Parish in Isle of Wight County, 80 acres in Newport Parish bounded by John Duke, James Bragg and Capt. Henry Applewhaite, recorded 9 Feb 1708 (Doc.#135ah). Several members of the Applewhaite family are also listed frequently in these records along with John Frizell, Christopher Reynolds and Richard Reynolds, Sr.’s families of Newport Parish in Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

       2 Dec 1692, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 607, Richard Reynolds, Giles Driver and Theopilus Hearne, listed as a witnesses to deed between Robert Driver and Charles Driver (Doc.#131ak)

       6 Jan 1693, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 613; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.88; Richard Reynolds and Joyce Reynolds along with Dorothy Butler listed as witnesses to deed between Robert & Elizabeth Mercer to John Luther (Doc.#131am, 135i)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this land record was witnessed by Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger who married Joyce Staples, the daughter of Richard Staples as listed above: 1690, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.25; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 8, p. 242; Richard Reynolds listed as having married a woman with maiden name Staples, the daughter of Richard Staples (Doc.#138f). This is the first listing of a Richard Reynolds having married a woman named Staples. Since the other wives of the men named Richard Reynolds were named Elizabeth Sharpe and Elizabeth Williams as listed above, this listing for a wife of Richard Reynolds appears to be for Joyce Staples, the daughter of Richard Staples according to this deed. There are several references to a woman named Joyce who is listed as the wife of a Richard Reynolds according to the following deed and probate records listed in this chronology. Name and residence patterns indicate that Joyce Staples was the wife of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger who was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr.

       7 Feb 1693, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.90; Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Elizabeth, listed as daughter of George Williams in deed with Pharoah Cobb and his wife Ann, and mother Elizabeth Cobb, recorded 9 Feb 1693 (Doc.#135i)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this was Richard Reynolds, Jr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe as listed above.

       1 Oct 1693, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 611, Richard Reynolds, Joyce Reynolds and John Butler listed as witnesses to deed between John & Mary Luther to Robert Mercer (Doc.#131al)

       9 Oct 1693, Isle of Wight County Court Orders, p.1; Richard Reynolds, Sr., is listed in court records with Col. Arthur Smith, Capt. Henry Applewhaite, Thomas Giles, Lt. Col. Samuel Bridger, Capt. John Goodrich and Henry Baker (Doc.#135u-v)

       16 Oct 1693, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 347; Richard Reynolds and Will Arrington listed as a witnesses in will of James Peddon of the Lower Parish, recorded 9 Aug 1694 (Doc.#132k)

       1 Dec, 1693, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.80; Richard Reynolds and his wife, Joyce Reynolds, and John Butler witnessed a deed between John Luther and to Robert Mercer, recorded 9 Dec 1693 (Doc.#135i)

       11 Feb 1694, Isle of Wight County Court Orders, p.37; Richard Reynolds, Sr., versus William Jolley (Doc.#135x, 135aa)

       20 Apr 1694, The Library of Virginia, Land Office Patents No. 8, 1689-1695, p. 347; Richard Reynolds, of Isle of Wight County, obtained a 720 acre patent on a branch called Cabin Branch in Nansemond County (Doc.#142t)

       This is the first record of land in Nansemond County obtained by a Richard Reynolds. Nansemond County records should be searched to learn more about this Richard Reynolds who obtained this patent. According to a deed listed below, this patent was issued to Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger who was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr. and Ann Coleman: 9 Jun 1697, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 640; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.309; Richard Reynolds of Isle of Wight County sold to William Butler of Nansemond County 220 acres, part of a patent of 720 acres on Cabin Branch. Joyce Reynolds signs dower..., witnessed by John Council, William Brown and Robert Driver (Doc.#131aw).

       1 May 1694, Isle of Wight County Court Orders, Orphans Court, p.33; Richard Reynolds appointed as Subsheriff with Henry Baker as Sheriff (Doc.#135w)

       Since Richard Reynolds, Sr., appears listed often as Richard Reynolds in contrast to Richard Reynolds, Jr. or Richard Reynolds the younger, this record indicates that Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe, was appointed as Subsheriff, similar to a deputy, in 1694.

       9 Aug 1694, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 173; Isle of Wight County Court Orders, p.49; Mr. Richard Reynolds agreed to shingle the Isle of Wight County Courthouse for 5,500 lbs. of tobacco...(Doc.#131y, 135y)

       10 Oct 1694, Isle of Wight County Court Orders, p.58; Richard Reynolds present in court (Doc.#135z)

       Similarly, these last two records appear to refer to Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe.

       10 Dec 1694, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.144; Richard Reynolds, Jr., listed in jury case between Robert Coleman and Malurk Hawley, signed by William Bradshaw, William Green, Ben Beale, Jr., Thomas Norsworthy, George Wright, Thomas Wright, John Neville [Nevill] and Richard Wilkison...(Doc.#135j)

       This record appears to have been for Richard Reynolds, Jr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and the grandson of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Anne Coleman, who was the daughter of Robert and Mary Coleman. According to name and residence patterns, Richard Reynolds, Jr., was the great grandson of Robert and Mary Coleman. Notice that Richard Reynold, Sr. and Elizabeth Sharpe’s son-in-law, i.e. the husband of their daughter Elizabeth, John Nevill, appears listed as a juryman in this record.

       1695, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 625; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.190; Richard Reynolds listed as a witness with Thomas Joyner to 40 acre deed between Henry Martin and Henry Applewhaite (Doc.#135l)

       5 Feb 1695, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 619, William Jolly was removed from Richard Reynolds’ plantation (Doc.#131an)

       9 Feb 1695, Isle of Wight County Court Orders, p.76; Richard Reynolds, Jr., Pharoh Cobb, Charles Durham, George Green, Bridgeman Joyner, Thomas Joyner...listed as a juryman in Thomas Godwin versus Jacob Durden (Doc.#135aa)

       According to Isle of Wight County deeds and probate records, this is the same Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Williams and who was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe: 7 Feb 1693, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.90; Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Elizabeth, listed as daughter of George Williams in deed with Pharoah Cobb and his wife Ann, and mother Elizabeth Cobb, recorded 9 Feb 1693 (Doc.#135i); 6 Apr 1700, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 81; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.306; Richard Reynolds and his wife Elizabeth bought from George Williams 100 acres in the Lower Parish (part of deed dated 10 Apr 1671 of Pharoah Cobb to George Williams, Taylor [Williams], father of the said George Williams), recorded 9 Apr 1700, Witnessed by Arthur Smith, Thomas Smith and Mathew Lowry (Doc.#135r). This deed was for the Richard Williams who married Elizabeth Williams, the daughter of George Williams. Elizabeth Williams was the granddaughter of Taylor Williams who resided in the Lower Parish of Isle of Wight County according to this deed.

       3 Jun 1695, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 621, Richard Reynolds, Sr., listed in law suit against John Davis who was represented by John Giles (Doc.#131ao)

       10 Jun 1695, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.160; Richard Reynolds, Sr., in law suit against John Davis (Doc.#135k)

       6 Aug 1695, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.172; Richard Reynold’s old plantation bounded by Ambrose Bennett and Giles Driver which was then occupied by Robert Driver, Witnesses: William Bradshaw, Elizabeth Bradshaw and Theophilus Joyner (Doc.#131ap, 135k)

       This appears to have been the same Richard Reynolds, Jr., who appears in previous deeds listed above: 10 Dec 1694, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.144; Richard Reynolds, Jr., listed in jury case between Robert Coleman and Malurk Hawley, signed by William Bradshaw, William Green, Ben Beale, Jr., Thomas Norsworthy, George Wright, Thomas Wright, John Neville [Nevill] and Richard Wilkison...(Doc.#135j). This record appears to have been for the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, i.e. the grandson of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Anne Coleman, who was the daughter of Robert and Mary Coleman. According to name and residence patterns, Richard Reynolds, Jr., was the great grandson of Robert and Mary Coleman. Notice that Richard Reynold, Sr. and Elizabeth Sharpe’s son-in-law, i.e. the husband of their daughter Elizabeth, John Nevill, appears listed as a juryman in this record.

       9 Feb 1696, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 631, Richard Reynolds, James Tallaugh and Rich Wilkinson listed as witnesses to deed between Jane Regan and Nicholas Casey (Doc.#131as)

       6 Apr 1696, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.203; Richard Reynolds provided valuation of goods (Doc.#135m)

       7 Oct 1696, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.220; Richard Reynolds listed as former owner of land bounded by the Meadow Swamp in deed from William Murfrey to Daniel Nobeboy, Jr., Witnesses: Michael Murfrey and John Watters, recorded 9 Oct 1696 (Doc.#135n)

       According to a previous deed listed above, this Richard Reynolds appears to have been Richard Reynolds, Jr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe:

He married Elizabeth Williams, daughter of George Williams and previously bought land from William Murfrey: 9 Feb 1685, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.216; Richard Reynolds and his wife, Elizabeth, sold to William Murfrey, 100 acres in Lower Parish (Doc.#135n); 7 Oct 1696, Richard Reynolds listed as having owned 100 acres of land adjoining the meadow swamp which William Murfrey and his wife Frances purchased from him and then sold on this date to Daniel Nobeboy, Jr. (Doc.#135n).

       24 Sep 1696, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.210; Richard Reynolds listed in land record with William Bradshaw, William Green, Thomas Joyner, Benjamin Beale, Jr., Thomas Wright, Richard Wilkinson, Jr....(Doc.#135m)

       According to name and residence patterns of Isle of Wight County deeds and probate records listed above, this is the same Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Williams and who was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe: 7 Feb 1693, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.90; Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Elizabeth, listed as daughter of George Williams in deed with Pharoah Cobb and his wife Ann, and mother Elizabeth Cobb, recorded 9 Feb 1693 (Doc.#135i); 6 Apr 1700, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 81; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.306; Richard Reynolds and his wife Elizabeth bought from George Williams 100 acres in the Lower Parish (part of deed dated 10 Apr 1671 of Pharoah Cobb to George Williams, Taylor [Williams], father of the said George Williams), recorded 9 Apr 1700, Witnessed by Arthur Smith, Thomas Smith and Mathew Lowry (Doc.#135r). This deed was for the Richard Williams who married Elizabeth Williams, the daughter of George Williams. Elizabeth Williams was the granddaughter of Taylor Williams who resided in the Lower Parish of Isle of Wight County according to this deed.

       7 Oct 1696, Richard Reynolds listed as having owned 100 acres of land adjoining the meadow swamp which William Murfrey and his wife Frances purchased from him and then sold on this date to Daniel Nobeboy, Jr. (Doc.#135n)

       9 Oct 1696, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 628, Richard Reynolds and George Smith listed as witnesses to deed between George Bellinge and George Norsworthy (Doc.#131ar)

       9 Nov 1696, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.211; Richard Reynolds listed as a witness with John Giles and George Smith for deed between Evi Bellonge to George Norsworthy of Nansemond County, recorded 9 Nov 1696 (Doc.#135n)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this record was for Richard Reynolds, Jr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, i.e. the grandson of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Ann Coleman. As listed above, Ann Coleman was the daughter of Robert and Mary Coleman. According to name and residence patterns, Richard Reynolds, Jr., was the great grandson of Robert and Mary Coleman. This appears to have been the same Richard Reynolds, Jr., who is listed in the following deeds: 10 Dec 1694, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.144; Richard Reynolds, Jr., listed in jury case between Robert Coleman and Malurk Hawley, signed by William Bradshaw, William Green, Ben Beale, Jr., Thomas Norsworthy, George Wright, Thomas Wright, John Neville [Nevill] and Richard Wilkison...(Doc.#135j). Notice that Richard Reynold, Sr. and Elizabeth Sharpe’s son-in-law, i.e. the husband of their daughter Elizabeth, John Nevill, appears listed as a juryman in the above record.
       
       9 Feb 1697, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.234; Richard & Joyce Reynolds listed as a witnesses to deed between Thomas Mann and William Butler (Doc.#135o)

       9 Jun 1697, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 640; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.309; Richard Reynolds of Isle of Wight County sold to William Butler of Nansemond County 220 acres, part of a patent of 720 acres on Cabin Branch. Joyce Reynolds signs dower..., witnessed by John Council, William Brown and Robert Driver (Doc.#131aw)

       These deeds reveal that it was Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and his wife, Joyce Staples who obtained the original 720 acre patent on Cabin Branch in Nansemond County as listed above: 20 Apr 1694, The Library of Virginia, Land Office Patents No. 8, 1689-1695, p. 347; Richard Reynolds, of Isle of Wight County, obtained a 720 acre patent on a branch called Cabin Branch in Nansemond County (Doc.#142t).

       26 Mar 1698, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 390; Richard Reynolds, John Street and Ann Street listed as witnesses to will of James Tullaugh, trustee John Giles, recorded 2 May 1698 (Doc.#132l)

       9 Apr 1698, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.252; Richard Reynolds’ deposition states that about 25 years ago he was summoned by the Sheriff to be on a Jury of Escheat to meet at the house of Col. Joseph Bridger, lately deceased, to determine if a parcel of land belonged to Capt. John Upton, lately deceased, (being 850 acres) should Escheat to his majesty or not. Mention of John Goodwin in deed record (Doc.#135p)

       According to his deposition twenty five years ago, in 1698, this Richard Reynolds would have been about age forty five. This is based on the fact that he would have been age twenty one or older at the time that he was a juryman twenty five years earlier. Hence, this Richard Reynolds would have been born prior to 1653 which corresponds with the approximate birth year for Richard Reynolds, Sr., (husband of Elizabeth Sharpe). According to the will of his father, Christopher Reynolds, Sr. the immigrant, Richard Reynolds, Sr., was born about 1642.

       2 May 1698, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.236; Richard Reynolds and Thomas Evan listed as witnesses to deed of John Smith of Isle of Wight County to George Norsworthy of Nansemond County...100 acres bounded by Mathew Tomlin and Mr. Kysewell...(Doc.#135o)

       8 Jun 1698, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 634; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.254; Richard Reynolds, Sr., of Lower Parish, sold to Richard Reynolds, Jr., for 13,000 lbs. of tobacco, part of a 380 acre patent issued on 23 Apr 1681, in occupation of Edward Goodson, William West, John Tyler and Richard Reynolds, Sr., Witnesses: Francis Floyd, John Butler and Richard Wooton, recorded 9 Aug 1698 (Doc.#131at, 135p)

       9 Jun 1698, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 635; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.256; Richard Reynolds, Jr., of the Lower Parish sold 100 acres to Richard Reynolds, Sr., of the same place , being part of the 380 acres granted to Richard Reynolds, Sr., bounded by Col. Arthur Smith, Charles Driver, and the Lower Bay Creek, Witnesses: Francis Floyd, John Butler and Richard Wooten, recorded 9 Aug 1698 (Doc.#131at, 135p)

       This is an interesting sell and purchase of lands between Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his son Richard Reynolds, Jr., for property which was part of the 380 acre patent located on the Lower Bay Creek which was originally issued to Richard Reynolds, Sr., on 23 Apr 1681. Name and residence patterns reveal that this Richard Reynolds, Sr., is the same individual as the son of the immigrant, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe. The 1681 patent for Richard Reynolds, Sr., which is listed above, is the first record for land obtained by Richard Reynolds, Sr., after the death of his father, Christopher Reynolds, Sr. in 1654. The 1681 patent lists the following: 23 Apr 1681, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.254; The Library of Virginia, Land Office Patents No. 7, 1679-1689, p.71; Richard Reynolds, Sr., obtained a patent for 380 acres bounded by Col. Arthur Smith and the Lower Bay Creek (Doc.#135p, 142v). The description of this 380 acre deed and the listing of Col. Arthur Smith as a neighbor in this deed indicates that this was Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe. He was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant as listed above.

       7 Sep 1698, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 400; Richard Reynolds, William West and Charles Durham listed as appraisers of the estate of Walter Rutter (Doc.#132l-m)

       9 Sep 1698, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 635, Richard Reynolds and Henry Applewhaite, Jr., listed as witnesses to deed between Arthur Smith and Robert Brock (Doc.#131at, 135p)

       According to name and residence patterns listed in the following probate and deed records, this listing appears to have been for Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe. Note that the witness named Henry Applewhaite appears in Richard Sharpe’s will as listed below. Henry Applewhaite also appears as a witness to a deed listed below as follows; 9 Feb 1708, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.137; Christopher Reynolds, John Browne and Thomas Calecott witnessed a deed between Thomas Sawyer of Chuckatuck Parish in Nansemond County to John Frizell, cooper of Newport Parish in Isle of Wight County, 80 acres in Newport Parish bounded by John Duke, James Bragg and Capt. Henry Applewhaite, recorded 9 Feb 1708 (Doc.#135ah). This Newport Parish deed, which occurred in 1708 between Christopher Reynolds and others to John Frizell, confirms that Capt. Henry Applewhaite was a neighbor and friend of the Sharpe and Reynolds families of Newport Parish. This confirms that Richard Sharpe and Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married his cousin Elizabeth Sharpe, resided in Newport Parish. According to deeds, probate and vestry records, several members of the Applewhaite family are listed frequently in these records along with Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his brother, Richard Reynolds, Sr., and their families of Newport Parish in Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

       30 Oct 1698, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 637, Richard Reynolds, John Luther, Robert Thomas and George Norsworthy listed as witnesses to deed between Edward Griffin and Daniel Sanborn (Doc.#131au)

       According to name and residence patterns listed in previous deeds, this record was for Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger who married Joyce Staples, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr.: 1 Oct 1693, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 611, Richard Reynolds, Joyce Reynolds and John Butler listed as witnesses to deed between John & Mary Luther to Robert Mercer (Doc.#131al); 1 Dec, 1693, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.80; Richard Reynolds and his wife, Joyce Reynolds, and John Butler witnessed a deed between John Luther and to Robert Mercer, recorded 9 Dec 1693 (Doc.#135i).

       1699, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 422; Richard Reynolds married a woman with the maiden name of Sharpe, daughter of Richard Sharpe (Doc.#138f)

       This is the first reference for the marriage of Richard Reynolds to a woman named Sharpe. Many family genealogists have interpreted this reference to refer to the Elizabeth who married Richard Reynolds, Sr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., of Newport Parish. According to the will of this Richard Reynolds, who resided in Newport Parish, he had a wife named Elizabeth and sons named Christopher, Richard and Sharpe, etc. 27 Jul 1711, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 536; Will of Richard Reynolds, of Newport Parish, lists: Legatees - Wife Elizabeth; son Richard; son Sharpe; son Christopher the land on which Richard Jackson lives; grandson ------Reynolds; what is due Elizabeth Lewis one of the daughters of Richard Lewis to be paid. Executors my wife and sons. Recorded 26 May 1712. Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Giles Driver and Jane Benn (Doc.#132q-132r). 26 May 1712, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, 1661-1719, p. 536-8; Will Proved for Richard Reynolds, of Newport Parish (Doc.#143c). Name and residence patterns reveal that these two probate records, which list the dates that the will of Richard Reynolds, Sr., was recorded and proved, were for Richard Reynolds, Sr., (the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant) who married Elizabeth Sharpe. Name and residence patterns contained in this will confirm that the Richard Reynolds, Sr., who died testate in 1712 in Newport Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, who named a son Sharpe in his will, is the same Richard Reynolds, Sr., who was a first cousin of Richard Sharpe and who married Elizabeth Sharpe! According to the will of Richard Reynolds, Sr., who resided in Newport Parish, he had a wife named Elizabeth and sons named Christopher, Richard and Sharpe, etc. Hence, name and residence patterns appear to confirm that the Richard Reynolds, Sr., who resided in Newport Parish was married to Elizabeth Sharpe. Hence, according to the above reference, Richard Reynolds, Sr., married Elizabeth Sharpe prior to 1699, probably about 1667 according to the estimated dates of their births and their children which are listed below.

       15 Jan 1699, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 422; Richard Sharpe’s will lists: Legatees - Anne Harris in case she recovers from this present sickness; cousin Richard the son of my cousin Richard Reynolds the full term of my lease from Col. Arthur Smith; Christopher and Sharpe Reynolds, the sons of my cousin Richard Reynolds. Executor, Richard Reynolds. Recorded 9 Apr 1700. Witnesses were Henry Applewhaite, John Hood and John Watson (Doc.#132n, 182e)

       This will of Richard Sharpe appears to list second cousins named Richard Reynolds, Jr., Christopher and Sharpe Reynolds, the sons of his first cousin, Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe. This relationship between Richard Sharpe and Richard Reynolds, Sr., along with the previous reference above which lists that Richard Reynolds, Sr., married a woman named Sharpe, supports the above documentation for listing Elizabeth Sharpe as the wife of this Richard Reynolds, Sr. This Richard Reynolds, Sr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, died testate in 1711 and his will, which is listed below in this chronology, lists the following: 27 Jul 1711, Richard Reynolds, of Newport Parish: Legatees - Wife Elizabeth; son Richard; son Sharpe; son Christopher the land on which Richard Jackson lives; grandson ----Reynolds; what is due Elizabeth Lewis one of the daughters of Richard Lewis to be paid. Executors my wife and sons. Recorded 26 May 1712. Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Giles Driver and Jane Benn (Doc.#132r). Hence, the name and residence patterns listed in the will of Richard Reynolds, Sr., of Newport Parish supports the information that he was married to Elizabeth Sharpe. Note that Richard and Elizabeth named a son Sharpe, after Elizabeth’s maiden name. This was a popular naming pattern, i.e. naming a son after the wife’s maiden name.

       Notice that Richard Sharpe’s will lists: Legatees... cousin [son of first cousin] Richard the son of my cousin Richard Reynolds [Sr.] the full term of my lease from Col. Arthur Smith; Christopher and Sharpe Reynolds, the sons of my cousin Richard Reynolds [Sr.]. Executor, Richard Reynolds. Recorded 9 Apr 1700. Witnesses were Henry Applewhaite, John Hood and John Watson. From this information, it is clear that Richard Sharpe was a first cousin of Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe. However, Richard Sharpe appears to have actually been a cousin of Elizabeth Sharpe who married Richard Reynolds, Sr. Hence, the reference to Richard Reynolds, Sr., as his first cousin appears to be by marriage only, i.e. as the result of Richard Reynold’s marriage to Richard Sharpe’s cousin, Elizabeth Sharpe. As confirmed below, Richard Sharpe appointed Richard Reynolds, Jr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe, as his executor: 9 Apr 1700, Richard Reynolds, Jr., appointed executor of the estate for Richard Sharpe, deceased, according to the will of Richard Sharpe. Probate entry recorded 18 Dec 1700 (Doc.#132z).

       As emphasized throughout this report, name and residence patterns are important criteria for establishing relationships in genealogical records. It is important to note that the witness named Henry Applewaite in Richard Sharpe’s will also appears as a witness to a deed as follows; 9 Feb 1708, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.137; Christopher Reynolds, John Browne and Thomas Calecott witnessed a deed between Thomas Sawyer of Chuckatuck Parish in Nansemond County to John Frizell, cooper of Newport Parish in Isle of Wight County, 80 acres in Newport Parish bounded by John Duke, James Bragg and Capt. Henry Applewhaite, recorded 9 Feb 1708 (Doc.#135ah). This Newport Parish deed, which occurred in 1708 between Christopher Reynolds and others to John Frizell, confirms that Capt. Henry Applewhaite was a neighbor and friend of the Sharpe and Reynolds families of Newport Parish. This confirms that Richard Sharpe and Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married his cousin Elizabeth Sharpe, resided in Newport Parish. According to deeds, probate and vestry records, several members of the Applewhaite family are listed frequently in these records along with Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his brother, Richard Reynolds, Sr., (sons of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant) and their families of Newport Parish in Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

       Though the above records clearly indicate that Richard Reynolds, Sr., married Elizabeth Sharpe, it is interesting to note that The Robert Reynolds Family web-site lists an Elizabeth Sharpe as the wife of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., the son of the immigrant (Doc.#140a). Christopher Reynolds, Jr., is also listed as the brother of the Richard Reynolds who married Joyce Staples according to The Robert Reynolds Family web-site (Doc.#140). However, according to the name and residence patterns listed above, this information appears to be inaccurate. The Robert Reynolds Family web-site also lists the following: “Most of the credit for the information on this page goes to Tom M. Spight, who graciously shared his information and gave me permission to use it to help point others toward finding their Reynolds kin. Like most genealogy pages, this is a work in progress and information is based on the best available data, but may (and probably does) contain errors....If you are as confused about the number of Christophers, Richards and unknown Elizabeths, join the crowd. Tom freely acknowledges "a confusing morass" but tries to use a variety of sources and some common sense to put the whole thing together. He concludes, "At the end of this chain, I've convinced myself that the lineage of interest to us is Christopher 1611 to Robert 1641 m. Elizabeth Sharpe to Robert 1669 m. Elizabeth Williams (and secondly, Mary Anderson) to Christopher 1690 m. Ann Coleman to Christopher 1728 m. Mary Lightfoot to Mary Lightfoot Reynolds 1758 m. Simon Spight. I'd be pleased to have arguments otherwise or confirming data.’” Surprisingly, we have come to the same conclusion as The Robert Reynolds Family web-site in regards to Robert Reynolds, Jr., who married 1) Elizabeth Sharpe, and 2) Mary Anderson. However, other than the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster, by Col. Steve F. Tillman, which lists that a Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Mary Anderson, resided in Surry County, we have been unable to locate documentation for either the marriage or family of Richard Reynolds and Mary Anderson.

       17 Jul 1699, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.292; Richard Reynolds listed as a witness to a bond along with Charles Chapman (Doc.#135q)

       9 Oct 1699, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 639, Richard Reynolds, William Mayo, and Henry Woodley listed as witnesses to deed between Edward Cobb and Andrew Woodley, Dorothy Cobb signs dower (Doc.#131av)

       It is interesting to note that there is a Mayo River in the area of Henry County where your Reynolds and other related Reynolds families resided during the Revolutionary War time period. The Mayo River may have been named after the Mayo family which is listed in this Isle of Wight County deed.

       8 Feb 1700, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.323; Richard Reynolds was appointed attorney for John Luther, Witnesses: Christopher Reynolds and John Butler (Doc.#135s)

       According to name and residence patterns revealed from deeds and other records listed above, this listing was for Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Joyce Staples, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr.: 1 Oct 1693, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 611, Richard Reynolds, Joyce Reynolds and John Butler listed as witnesses to deed between John & Mary Luther to Robert Mercer (Doc.#131al); 1 Dec, 1693, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.80; Richard Reynolds and his wife, Joyce Reynolds, and John Butler witnessed a deed between John Luther to Robert Mercer, recorded 9 Dec 1693 (Doc.#135i). 30 Oct 1698, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 637, Richard Reynolds, John Luther, Robert Thomas and George Norsworthy listed as witnesses to deed between Edward Griffin and Daniel Sanborn (Doc.#131au).

       6 Apr 1700, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 81; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.306; Richard Reynolds and his wife Elizabeth bought from George Williams 100 acres in the Lower Parish (part of deed dated 10 Apr 1671 of Pharoah Cobb to George Williams, (Taylor [Williams], father of the said George Williams), recorded 9 Apr 1700, Witnessed by Arthur Smith, Thomas Smith and Mathew Lowry (Doc.#135r)

       This deed was for Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Williams, the daughter of George Williams. Hence, Elizabeth Williams was the granddaughter of Taylor Williams who resided in the Lower Parish of Isle of Wight County according to this deed.

       9 Apr 1700, Richard Reynolds, Jr., appointed executor of estate for Richard Sharpe, deceased, according to the will of Richard Sharpe, recorded 18 Dec 1700 (Doc.#132z)

       As analyzed above, name and residence patterns listed above appear to confirm that this Richard Reynolds, Jr., was the same individual who married Elizabeth Williams. He was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Elizabeth Sharpe of Newport Parish.

       18 Dec 1700, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 642; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.320; Richard Reynolds, George Moore, and Richard Wilkinson, Jr., listed as witnesses to deed from Thomas Price of Chuckatuck Parish in Nansemond County to Thomas Jordan of the same place, Gentleman, 107 acres, recorded 18 Dec 1700 (Doc.#131ax, 135r)

       1700, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 642, Christopher Reynolds, Joseph Bridger, Elizabeth Harris, Ed Myles and John Butler listed as a witnesses in deed for John Luther to Tristram Norsworthy...given my wife Mary, daughter of Benjamin Beale by last will of Ambrose Bennett, 80 acres (Doc.#131ax)

       According to name and residence patterns revealed from deeds and other records listed above, this appears to have been for Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Joyce Staples, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr.: 1 Oct 1693, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 611, Richard Reynolds, Joyce Reynolds and John Butler listed as witnesses to deed between John & Mary Luther to Robert Mercer (Doc.#131al); 1 Dec, 1693, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.80; Richard Reynolds and his wife, Joyce Reynolds, and John Butler witnessed a deed between John Luther and to Robert Mercer, recorded 9 Dec 1693 (Doc.#135i). 30 Oct 1698, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 637, Richard Reynolds, John Luther, Robert Thomas and George Norsworthy listed as witnesses to deed between Edward Griffin and Daniel Sanborn (Doc.#131au).

       12 Dec 1701, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.357; Richard & Christopher Reynolds listed as witnesses along with Arthur Whitehead for deed between William Fowler to Benjamin Beal for 100 acres in the Lower parish on the west side of the Currawock Swamp, bounded by Thomas Mann, Hodges Councill, Thomas Parnell and Col. Bridges (Doc.#135t)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this record refers to Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his older brother, Christopher Reynolds, the sons of Richard Reynolds, Sr. and Elizabeth Sharpe.

       30 Jan 1702, Surry County, Virginia Wills & Administrations, Bk. 5, p. 267; Robert Reynolds will lists him about age sixty. Wife named Elizabeth; To grandson Nicholas, the plantation that his son lives on when 21 years of age; To daughter Susannah...; To daughter Elizabeth; To grandson Robert Griffin. Witnesses: John Griffen, Agness Griffin and Henry Baker. Proved 2 Mar 1702 (Doc.#186a-b)

       Aside from Nicholas Reynolds above, this is the earliest record for a Reynolds listed in Surry County records. This name and residence pattern indicates that James was a descendant of Nicholas Reynolds: 23 Dec 1636, Virginia Land Office, Patent Bk. 1, 1623-1643, p. 408; Nicholas Reynolds obtained a patent for 1000 acres lying at Lawnes Creek S.S. Et. up Lawnes Creeke (Doc.#156). As revealed above, this Nicholas Reynolds inhabited James City County [which became Surry County in 1652] which in Colonial time periods bounded the northern border of Isle of Wight County. James City County was an original shire/county of Virginia which was formed in 1634. In 1652, James City County changed it’s name to Surry County. According to several genealogical data bases (including the Ancestral File) and Reynolds family histories, there was a Richard Reynolds and his wife, Mary Anderson, who resided in Surry County during the colonial time period. However, no sources of information are listed for these data bases regarding the Richard Reynolds and Mary Anderson of Surry County. Though the county location for the 1636 patent for Nicholas Reynolds was not provided in the original description of the patent, the description does list Lawnes Creek which corresponds with the northern boundary for the Upper Parish in Isle of Wight County as described above. There was another estate record for Robert Reynolds on 5 Jul 1709 which was signed by Grace Reynolds (Doc.#186b).

       9 Apr 1702, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.349; Richard Reynolds and Thomas Giles listed as witnesses for deed between Arthur Smith, Jr., and Jeremiah Fly, recorded 9 Apr 1702 (Doc.#135t)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this record refers to Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, who married Joyce Staples, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Anne Coleman (the daughter of Robert and Mary Coleman). According to name and residence patterns, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger was the grandson of Robert and Mary Coleman. The first reference to Thomas Giles, who was a witness to this deed lists the following: 1681, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 225, Richard Reynolds listed as an appraiser for the estate of John Bromfield along with Robert Coleman, Thomas Giles and Ambrose Bennett (Doc.#132f). The reference to Robert Coleman indicates that this Richard Reynolds was his grandson, i.e. the same individual as Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger who is listed in the 1679 patent above.

       7 Apr 1703, Richard Reynolds listed as a witness to will of John Portis, recorded 9 Oct 1707 (Doc.#132o)

       1704, Isle of Wight County, Virginia Quit Rent Rolls, The Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. 29, p.341; Richard Reynolds, Sr., - 853 acres; and Richard Reynolds, -746 acres, listed residing near John Nevill, Robert Coleman, Arthur Smith and others (Doc.#165c)

       The individual named John Nevill is the same individual who married Elizabeth Reynolds, the daughter of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe. Hence, name and residence patterns indicate that these listings are for Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe and their son, Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Williams. Name and residence patterns indicate that Richard Reynolds, Jr., married secondly to Mary Anderson from whom your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, III, (who was born about 1727 in Virginia and whose will is dated 11 Mar 1816 in Jefferson County, Kentucky), possibly descends. However, as listed above, other than the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster by Col. Steve F. Tillman, which lists that a Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Mary Anderson, resided in Surry County, we have been unable to locate documentation for either the marriage or family of Richard Reynolds and Mary Anderson.
According to Isle of Wight County records, Richard Reynolds, Jr., appears to have left Isle of Wight County shortly after 1704. The above Quit Rent, dated 1704, is the last record which we have located for him in Isle of Wight County records.

       1704, Middlesex County, Virginia Quit Rent Rolls, The Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. 33, p.47; Richard Reynolds, - 50 acres (Doc.#166b)

       Middlesex County is located a few hundred miles north of Isle of Wight County. Hence, this listing for Richard Reynolds does not appear to be directly related to the Reynolds families of Isle of Wight County. Further research should be conducted in the records of Middlesex County in order to learn more about this Richard Reynolds.

       9 Aug 1704, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p1; Richard Reynolds [Sr., the younger] & Christopher Reynolds [Sr., his son] deed to Benjamin Beal for 267.5 acres (being part of a patent granted Richard Staples) adjoining Daniel Holloway and the Western Branch, Witnesses: Richard Reynolds, Jr., William Browne and Andrew Woodley, recorded (Doc.#135ab)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this deed refers to Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger who married Joyce Staples. He and Christopher Reynolds were probably father and son. As listed in other records, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., was the son-in-law to Richard Staples of the Lower Parish in Isle of Wight County. The original land patent, which was issued to Richard Staples, is listed above and reveals the following: 12 Jan 1661, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 8, p.242, Richard Staples granted 750 acres in Newport Parish (Doc.#136k). There was also a 1679 patent issued to Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger which reveals the following: 10 May 1679, Virginia Land Office, Patents Bk. 6, p.684; Cavaliers and Pioneers, Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, Vol. 11: 1666-1695, p. 198; Richard Reynolds, the younger, of Isle of Wight County, 566 acres in the Lower Parish of said County, on northwest side of the head of the Lower Bay Creek; P. 684. Beginning at an Island near head of said Creek to Christopher Bly’s line; along Henry King; to Col. [Arthur] Smith & Mr. Driver; to head of West Freshett or swamp &c [calculated] 241 acres. Part of 450 acres granted Mr. Christopher Reynolds [Sr.], late of said County, 15 Sep 1636 and by will given to his eldest son Christopher [Jr.]and his heirs forever who bequeathed to said Richard [Reynolds, Sr., the younger], his only son and heir; 100 acres part of 350 acres granted to Mr. Richard Jordan, Sr. [who married Elizabeth Reynolds], 18 Mar 1662, who conveyed it to said Christopher Reynolds [Jr.] on 17 May 1658, who bequeathed to said Richard [Reynolds the Younger]: 225 acres being waste together with said 341 acres, due for transporting of 12 persons. Witnesses: Daniel Hennon/Herron, John Champion, Lewis Davis, Edward Goodson (Note: Conveyance from Jordan to Reynolds antedates this patent) (Doc.#149,150a,140a). Though it is not listed under Richard Reynolds’name in the card catalog for the Library of Virginia’s collection of Land Office Patents & Grants, this patent and other deed records list that Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger was the only son and heir of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. As listed above, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., obtained the original 450 acre patent on 15 Sep 1636. In 1657, Christopher Reynolds, Jr., obtained a 350 acre patent for land which bounded the 450 acre patent obtained by his father, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, as described in the following deed abstract which is listed above: 25 Nov 1657, The Library of Virginia, Virginia Land Office Grants No. 4, 1786, p.243; Christopher Reynolds [Jr.] obtained patent for 350 acres bounding Freshett by the miles end of 450 acres of land patented by Christopher Reynolds, deceased. This patent was renewed in Richard Jordans’ name on 18 Mar 1662 (Doc.#142). Christopher Reynolds, Sr.’s will was made out on 1 May 1654, as listed above, and corresponds with this land patent. According to The Robert Reynolds Family web-site, they interpret the above land patent as confirming that Richard Reynolds the Younger was the only son and heir of Christopher Reynolds, Jr. and his wife, Elizabeth, whose maiden name is listed as Sharpe. The Robert Reynolds Family web-site also lists that Richard Reynolds, the Younger, is the same person as Richard Reynolds who married Joyce Staples (Doc.#140a). Though The Robert Reynolds Family web-site provides no documentation to support the theory that Richard Reynolds the Younger is the same person who married Joyce Staples, name and residence patterns suggest that it is accurate. Hence, in conclusion of our analysis of the above land patent, both Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his brother Richard Reynolds, Sr., had sons named Richard Reynolds. In regards to the accuracy of the land patent abstract which is listed above for Richard Reynolds, Sr., the Younger, we obtained a copy of the original patent which appears to correspond with the transcription by Cavaliers and Pioneers. Hence, according to this 10 May 1679 land patent, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, is listed as the only son and heir of Christopher Reynolds, Jr.

       9 Nov 1704, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.6; Richard Reynolds, William West, Jr., and Thomas Weston listed as a witnesses to a deed between John Jordan, Jr., of Newport Parish to Nicholas Casey of the same place, 100 acres near Cypress Swamp handed down to him through his father, John Jordan, Sr., and grandfather, Richard Jordan, Sr. (Doc.#135ab)

       The name and residence patterns indicate that this deed refers to Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe. He was the brother-in-law to Richard Jordan, Sr., who married his sister, Elizabeth.

       9 Aug 1705, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.33; Richard Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and John Butler witnessed deed between William Butler of Nansemond County to Thomas Wooten, 150 acres bounded by Blackwater Swamp on Chewan River, recorded 10 Sep 1705 (Doc.#135ac)

       According to name and residence patterns revealed from deeds and other records listed above, this deed refers to Richard Reynolds, Sr. the younger, who married Joyce Staples. He appears to be listed in this deed with his father, Christopher Reynolds, Jr. They were neighbors and close friends with John Butler as listed above: 1 Oct 1693, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 611, Richard Reynolds, Joyce Reynolds and John Butler listed as witnesses to deed between John & Mary Luther to Robert Mercer (Doc.#131al); 1 Dec, 1693, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.80; Richard Reynolds and his wife, Joyce Reynolds, and John Butler witnessed a deed between John Luther and to Robert Mercer, recorded 9 Dec 1693 (Doc.#135i).

       9 Apr 1706, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.35; Richard Reynolds, [Sr.], and Richard Reynolds, [Jr.], witnessed a deed from Thomas Joyner to William Thomas... 200 acres adjoining James Barnes and the Seacok Swamp, recorded 9 Apr 1706 (Doc.#135ac)

       Name and residence patterns from previous records listed above indicate that this deed refers to Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger who married Joyce Staples, and his son, Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Rebecca: 9 Feb 1695, Isle of Wight County Court Orders, p.76; Richard Reynolds, Jr., Pharoh Cobb, Charles Durham, George Green, Bridgeman Joyner, Thomas Joyner...listed as a juryman in Thomas Godwin versus Jacob Durden (Doc.#135aa). Notice that Thomas Joyner was also listed as a witness to the following deeds of gift between Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and his wife, Joyce Staples, to their children:

       9 Sep 1706, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.46; Richard and Joyce Reynolds conveyed a deed of gift to their daughter, Jane Casey and her husband, Richard Casey, a tract of land adjoining Denstram Norsworthy (being part of a tract said Reynolds lives on and Thomas William lives on part of the land), Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Richard Reynolds, Jr. and Thomas Joyner (Doc.#135ad, 138b)

       23 Sep 1706, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.163; Richard Reynolds listed as a witness with Nathaniel Ridley for bond between Dennis Obrian and Joseph Gladston, both of Nantiroke in Maryland to Dr. Edward Loftis of Warwick County in Virginia (Doc.#135ai)

       9 Oct 1706, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.52; Richard and Joyce Reynolds conveyed a deed of gift to their daughter Elizabeth Reynolds, for love and affection, 100 acres adjoining Widow Harris, William Hawley and Mr. James Tullaugh, Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Richard Casey and Sarah Williams, recorded 11 Nov 1706 (Doc.#135ad)

       The above deeds reveal that Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and Joyce Staples were the parents of Richard Reynolds, Jr. who married Rebecca; Jane Reynolds who married Richard Casey; and Elizabeth Reynolds who had not yet married. Notice that this appears to be the same Richard Reynolds, Sr. and/or Richard Reynolds, Jr., who appear listed in county records with their neighbors whose names were Norsworthy and who appear to have been descendants of Denstram Norsworthy.

       24 Jun 1707, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, 1661-1719, p. 494; Richard Reynolds’ estate appraised by Giles Driver, Thomas Allen, John Wright and John Parmento (Doc.#132p, 143b)

       This probate listing and the one below listed for the Richard Reynolds, Sr., who died in 1711 confirms that there were three different Richard Reynolds: 1) Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger (whom name and residence patterns confirm was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr.) who married , Joyce Staples, the daughter of Richard Staples according to Isle of Wight County records listed above. He resided in the Lower Parish of Isle of Wight County where his estate was appraised on 24 Jun 1707 by Giles Driver; 2) Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Williams and who appears to have been the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr. who married Elizabeth Sharpe; and 3) Richard Reynolds, Sr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe and who made out his will on 27 Jul 1711 in Newport Parish, Isle of Wight County. He died between 27 Jul 1711 and 26 May 1712 when his will was proved.

       28 Jul 1707, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.74; Christopher Reynolds of the Lower Parish sold to Timothy Tynes of the same place, 100 acres in the said parish (being land formerly bought by my father, Richard Reynolds, from Richard Reynolds, Jr., on 9 Jun 1698, and my father lately dyeing descended to me) bounded by Arthur Smith and Giles Dryue [Driver], Witnesses: Arthur Smith, John Frissell and Thomas Sumersoll, recorded 9 Aug 1707, signed by Christopher, Joyce and Elizabeth Reynolds (Doc.#135af)

       As listed above, Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife Anne Coleman appear to have left Isle of Wight County and settled in Jones County, North Carolina, where Anne Coleman’s father, Robert Coleman died . Hence, this deed appears to refer to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who was a son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and his wife, Joyce Staples, of the Lower Parish. Notice that Joyce Reynolds and Elizabeth Reynolds, signed the deed. From the signature of Elizabeth Reynolds, she appears to have been the wife or sister of this Christopher Reynolds, Sr. (The Robert Reynolds Family web-site lists her maiden name as Brock - Doc.#140a), the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and Joyce Staples. His son, Christopher Reynolds, Jr., was married to a woman named Mary according to the records listed below.

       Notice that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., lists that his father Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger who was the husband of Joyce Staples, had originally purchased this land from Richard Reynolds, Jr. (who married Elizabeth Williams) on 9 Jun 1698, about nine years earlier. This corresponds with the following deeds which are listed above: 9 Jun 1698, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 635; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.256; Richard Reynolds, Jr., (husband of Elizabeth Williams and son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe) of the Lower Parish sold 100 acres to Richard Reynolds, Sr., (husband of Elizabeth Sharpe and son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant) of the same place , being part of the 380 acres granted to Richard Reynolds, Sr., bounded by Col. Arthur Smith, Charles Driver, and the Lower Bay Creek, Witnesses: Francis Floyd, John Butler and Richard Wooten, recorded 9 Aug 1698 (Doc.#131at, 135p). There was also a deed recorded between Richard Reynolds Sr. (who married Elizabeth Sharpe), and Richard Reynolds, Jr. (who married Elizabeth Williams), recorded the previous day as listed above: 8 Jun 1698, Richard Reynolds, Sr., of Lower Parish, sold to Richard Reynolds, Jr., for 13,000 lbs. of tobacco, part of a 380 acre patent issued on 23 Apr 1681, in occupation of Edward Goodson, William West, John Tyler and Richard Reynolds, Sr. (Doc.#131at, 135p).

       According to The Robert Reynolds Family web-site as listed above, Richard Reynolds, Jr. is the same person as Richard Reynolds the Younger, the only son and heir of Christopher Reynolds, Jr. However, there are several instances listed in this chronology which prove that Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and his wife, Joyce, had a son named Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Rebecca. The Robert Reynolds Family web-site does not account for this Richard Reynolds, Jr. who married Rebecca as listed in the deeds below!

       Notice that on 28 Jul 1707, the date of the deed listed above, that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., lists that his father, Richard Reynolds, the husband of Joyce Staples, had recently died. Hence, the only probate or will record for a Richard Reynolds who died within the previous ten years which corresponds with the death of Christopher’s father was the subsequent listing for Richard Reynolds whose estate was appraised by Giles Driver and others on 24 Jun 1707. Hence, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., sold his land which he inherited from his father’s estate a little over a month after his father died.

       1708, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p.244; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p. 102; Susannah Reynolds, relict of Richard Reynolds, married Hercules Toule (Doc.#138g)

       According to this information, there was a Richard Reynolds who was married to a woman named Susannah prior to his death. By 1708, Richard Reynold’s widow, Susannah Reynolds, had married Hercules Toule according to the deeds of Isle of Wight County. This is the only listing in the Isle of Wight County records for a wife of a Richard Reynolds who was named Susannah. According to probate records for Isle of Wight County, the only probate records listed for a Richard Reynolds who died during this time period was the following which is listed above: 24 Jun 1707, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, 1661-1719, p. 494; Richard Reynolds’ estate appraised by Giles Driver, Thomas Allen, John Wright and John Parmento (Doc.#132p, 143b). Unfortunately, there is no wife or widow’s name listed in this probate record. However, according to name and residence patterns listed above, this probate record appears to have been for the estate of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, who married Joyce Staples.

       9 Feb 1708, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.137; Christopher Reynolds, John Browne and Thomas Calecott witnessed a deed between Thomas Sawyer of Chuckatuck Parish in Nansemond County to John Frizell, cooper of Newport Parish in Isle of Wight County, 80 acres in Newport Parish bounded by John Duke, James Bragg and Capt. Henry Applewhaite, recorded 9 Feb 1708 (Doc.#135ah)

       Name and residence patterns listed above indicate that this Christopher Reynolds appears to have been the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Elizabeth Sharpe, who resided in Newport Parish. The first record of John Frizell and the Reynolds families in Isle of Wight County records occurred in 1692 as listed above: 19 Aug 1692, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 326, Richard Reynolds listed as a land owner in Upper Parish in will of John Frizell, recorded 10 Apr 1693 (Doc.#132i). The John Frizell listed in 1708 appears to have been a son of the John Frizell, Sr. who died testate in 1692. According to the Isle of Wight County records, John Frizell’s name is listed in conjunction with members of the Richard Reynolds, Sr. and Elizabeth Sharpe family and the Applewhaite families of Newport Parish in Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

       7 Oct 1708, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.107, Richard Reynolds receives power of attorney for Anne Butler, wife of John Butler of the Lower parish, Witnesses: Thomas Moscrop, Francis Floyd and Richard Casey (Doc.#135ag)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this was Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Rebecca (the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger who married Joyce Staples), and died testate on 24 Jun 1707 as listed above. Richard Reynolds, Jr’s brother-in-law, Richard Casey, who married his sister Jane Reynolds, is listed as a witness to this power of attorney for Anne Butler, the wife of John Butler. Richard Casey is listed in various records as follows: 21 Nov 1743, Newport Parish Vestry Book, p. 105; Sharp Reynolds and William Wiggs listed as processioners; lines processioned between John Reynolds and Richard Casey (Doc.#151h). In regards to the line processioned between John Reynolds and Richard Casey, the above land records reveal the following for Richard Casey: 9 Sep 1706, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.46; Richard and Joyce Reynolds conveyed a deed of gift to their daughter, Jane Casey and her husband, Richard Casey, a tract of land adjoining Denstram Norsworthy (being part of a tract said Reynolds lives on and Thomas William lives on part of the land), Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Richard Reynolds, Jr. and Thomas Joyner (Doc.#135ad, 138b). Hence, Richard Casey married Jane Reynolds, the daughter of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Joyce Staples.

       There is also a name and residence pattern derived from the listing of John Butler in the above power of attorney according to previous Isle of Wight County records which confirm that the above Richard Reynolds appears to have been Richard Reynolds, Jr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger who married Joyce Staples: 9 Aug 1705, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.33; Richard Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and John Butler witnessed deed between William Butler of Nansemond County to Thomas Wooten, 150 acres bounded by Blackwater Swamp on Chewan River, recorded 10 Sep 1705 (Doc.#135ac). According to name and residence patterns revealed from deeds and other records listed above, this was Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Joyce Staples. He and Christopher Reynolds were probably father and son. They were neighbors and close friends with John Butler: 1 Oct 1693, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 611, Richard Reynolds, Joyce Reynolds and John Butler listed as witnesses to deed between John & Mary Luther to Robert Mercer (Doc.#131al); 1 Dec, 1693, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.80; Richard Reynolds and his wife, Joyce Reynolds, and John Butler witnessed a deed between John Luther and to Robert Mercer, recorded 9 Dec 1693 (Doc.#135i).

       26 Feb 1710, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.174; Richard Reynolds, Samuel Browne and Arthur Williams witnessed a deed between Bridgeman Joyner, Sr., to Thomas Williams for 150 acres (being part of 300 acres bought from George Pearse by Hodges Councell [Councill]with 150 acres being sold by Councell to Richard Booth who sold it to said Bridgeman Joyner, Sr.), recorded 26 Feb 1710 (Doc.#135aj)

       23 Apr 1711, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.186; Christopher Reynolds and his wife, Elizabeth, of Newport Parish, sold to John Butler of the same place, 200 acres in the Lower parish (being formerly the land of Ambrose Bennett who gave it to said Christopher Reynolds) bounded by Giles Driver, Mr. Coleman and Jolly, Witnesses: Arthur Purcell, Henry Pitt and Henry Lightfoot, recorded 23 Apr 1711 (Doc.#aj)

       18 Jun 1711, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 547; Richard Reynolds, Jr., John Hillyard, Thomas Calcote, James Bragg and Ezekiel Fuller, listed as a witnesses to will of Henry Wiggs (Doc.#132s)

       27 Jul 1711, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 536; Will of Richard Reynolds, of Newport Parish, lists: Legatees - Wife Elizabeth; son Richard; son Sharpe; son Christopher the land on which Richard Jackson lives; grandson ------Reynolds; what is due Elizabeth Lewis one of the daughters of Richard Lewis to be paid. Executors my wife and sons. Recorded 26 May 1712. Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Giles Driver and Jane Benn (Doc.#132q-132r)

       26 May 1712, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, 1661-1719, p. 536-8; Will Proved for Richard Reynolds, of Newport Parish (Doc.#143c)

       Name and residence patterns reveal that these last two probate records, which list the dates that the will of Richard Reynolds’ was recorded and proved, were for Richard Reynolds, Sr., (the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant) who married Elizabeth Sharpe. Name and residence patterns contained in this will confirm that the Richard Reynolds, Sr., who died testate in 1712 in Newport Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, who named a son Sharpe in his will, is the same Richard Reynolds, Sr., who was a first cousin of Richard Sharpe and who married Elizabeth Sharpe! The following records support the marriage between Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe: 1699, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 422; Richard Reynolds married a woman with the maiden name of Sharpe, daughter of Richard Sharpe (Doc.#138f). This is the first reference for the marriage of Richard Reynolds to a woman named Sharpe. Many family genealogists have interpreted this reference to refer to the Elizabeth who married Richard Reynolds, Sr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., of Newport Parish. According to the will of this Richard Reynolds, who resided in Newport Parish, he had a wife named Elizabeth and sons named Christopher, Richard and Sharpe, etc. Hence, name and residence patterns appear to confirm that the Richard Reynolds, Sr., who resided in Newport Parish was married to Elizabeth Sharpe. Hence, according to the above reference, Richard Reynolds, Sr., married Elizabeth Sharpe prior to 1699, probably about 1667 according to the estimated dates of their births and their children. According to the will of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and the information listed above, we have calculated the births for his family as follows:

       Richard Reynolds, Sr., born about 1642, Cypress Creek, Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant

       Married: about 1667, Cypress Creek, Lower Parish, Isle Of Wight County, Virginia

       Elizabeth Sharpe, born about 1647, Lower parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, daughter of Richard Sharpe, Sr.

              Children:
              1) Richard Reynolds, Jr., born about 1668, Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, appears to have married 1) Elizabeth Williams about 1695, daughter of George Williams. Richard Reynolds, Jr. appears to have left Isle of Wight County after the 1704 Quit Rent, which is the last record we have located for him in Isle of Wight County. Name and residence patterns indicate that he married secondly to 2) Mary Anderson from whom your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, III descends. Though not documented, The Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster, by Col. Steve F. Tillman, lists a group of children for Richard Reynolds and Mary Anderson as listed above in our report.

              2) Elizabeth Reynolds, born about 1670, Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, married married John Nevill about 1688

              3) Sharpe Reynolds, born about 1672, Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia

              4) Christopher Reynolds, born about 1674, Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia

              5) John Reynolds, born about 1676, Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia

       Notice that Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Elizabeth Sharpe, named one of their sons Sharpe Reynolds after Elizabeth’s maiden name. This was a popular naming pattern for this time period. Notice also that this is the same Richard Reynolds, Sr., who was appointed the guardian for Elizabeth Lewis, the daughter of Richard Lewis as listed above: 13 Dec 1691, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 314; Richard Reynolds and his wife Elizabeth appointed guardians of Richard Lewis’ daughter named Elizabeth. Overseers were Thomas Joyner, Jr., and Richard Reynolds, Jr. Richard Lewis’ will was recorded 26 Mar 1692. Richard Lewis resided in the Lower Parish (Doc.#132h).

       Previous records which are listed above, particularly the will of Richard Sharpe, corresponds as follows: 15 Jan 1699, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 422; Richard Sharpe’s will lists: Legatees - Anne Harris in case she recovers from this present sickness; cousin Richard the son of my cousin Richard Reynolds the full term of my lease from Col. Arthur Smith; Christopher and Sharpe Reynolds, the sons of my cousin Richard Reynolds. Executor, Richard Reynolds. Recorded 9 Apr 1700. Witnesses were Henry Applewhaite, John Hood and John Watson (Doc.#132n). This will of Richard Sharpe appears to list second cousins named Richard Reynolds, Jr., Christopher and Sharpe Reynolds, the sons of his first cousin, Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe. This relationship between Richard Sharpe and Richard Reynolds, Sr., along with the previous reference above which lists that Richard Reynolds, Sr., married a woman named Sharpe, supports the above documentation for listing Elizabeth Sharpe as the wife of this Richard Reynolds, Sr. This Richard Reynolds, Sr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., died testate in 1711 and his will, which is listed below in this chronology, lists the following: 27 Jul 1711, Richard Reynolds, of Newport Parish: Legatees - Wife Elizabeth; son Richard; son Sharpe; son Christopher the land on which Richard Jackson lives; grandson ----Reynolds; what is due Elizabeth Lewis one of the daughters of Richard Lewis to be paid. Executors my wife and sons. Recorded 26 May 1712. Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Giles Driver and Jane Benn (Doc.#132r). Hence, the name and residence patterns listed in the will of Richard Reynolds, Sr., of Newport Parish supports the information that he was married to Elizabeth Sharpe. Note that Richard and Elizabeth named a son Sharpe, after Elizabeth’s maiden name. This is a popular naming pattern, i.e. naming a son after the wife’s maiden name. Notice that Richard Sharpe’s will lists: Legatees... cousin [son of first cousin] Richard the son of my cousin Richard Reynolds [Sr.] the full term of my lease from Col. Arthur Smith; Christopher and Sharpe Reynolds, the sons of my cousin Richard Reynolds [Sr.]. Executor, Richard Reynolds. Recorded 9 Apr 1700. Witnesses were Henry Applewhaite, John Hood and John Watson. From this information, it is clear that Richard Sharpe was a first cousin of Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth Sharpe. However, Richard Sharpe appears to have actually been a cousin of Elizabeth Sharpe who married Richard Reynolds, Sr. Hence, the reference to Richard Reynolds, Sr., as his first cousin appears to be by marriage, i.e. as the result of Richard Reynold’s marriage to Richard Sharpe’s cousin, Elizabeth Sharpe. As confirmed below, Richard Sharpe appointed Richard Reynolds, Jr., as his executor: 9 Apr 1700, Richard Reynolds, Jr., appointed executor of the estate for Richard Sharpe, deceased, according to the will of Richard Sharpe. Probate entry recorded 18 Dec 1700 (Doc.#132z).       As emphasized throughout this report, name and residence patterns are important criteria for establishing relationships in genealogical records. It is important to note that the witness named Henry Applewaite in Richard Sharpe’s will also appears as a witness to a deed as follows; 9 Feb 1708, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.137; Christopher Reynolds, John Browne and Thomas Calecott witnessed a deed between Thomas Sawyer of Chuckatuck Parish in Nansemond County to John Frizell, cooper of Newport Parish in Isle of Wight County, 80 acres in Newport Parish bounded by John Duke, James Bragg and Capt. Henry Applewhaite, recorded 9 Feb 1708 (Doc.#135ah). This Newport Parish deed, which occurred in 1708 between Christopher Reynolds and others to John Frizell, confirms that Capt. Henry Applewhaite was a neighbor and friend of the Sharpe and Reynolds families of Newport Parish. This confirms that Richard Sharpe and Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married his cousin Elizabeth Sharpe, resided in Newport Parish. According to deeds, probate and vestry records, several members of the Applewhaite family are listed frequently in these records along with Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his brother, Richard Reynolds, Sr., and their families of Newport Parish in Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

       27 Oct 1712, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.231; Christopher Reynolds, John Giles and Richard Giles witnessed a deed between Elizabeth Thomas of Newport Parish to Robert Sanders of the Upper Parish of Nansemond County (Doc.#135ak)

       13 Nov 1713, The Library of Virginia, Land Office Patents No. 10, 1710-1719, p. 98; Richard Reynolds, Jr., obtained patent for 200 acres on the south side of the main Blackwater Swamp beginning at the mouth of Tarrapin Swamp (Doc.#142u)
       
       8 Mar 1715, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 607; Christopher Reynolds and his wife Ann listed as heirs in the will of Robert Coleman. Executors were Christopher and Ann Reynolds, Witnesses: John Butler, Roger Murrey (Doc.#132t, 183)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this record refers to Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who married Anne Coleman, daughter of Robert & Mary Coleman. Christopher Reynolds, Jr., was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. This corresponds with The Robert Reynolds Family web-site (Doc.#140b). This will which was recorded in Isle of Wight County, was proved in Bath County, North Carolina in 1722 as follows: 9 Jul 1721, Bath County, North Carolina, Wills, Bk. 4, p. 106; Christifer Runnills [Christopher Reynolds, Jr.] listed as a son-in-law and executor in will of Robert Coleman of Bath County, North Carolina. Will lists his wife, Mary, whom he leaves his whole estate. Son-in-law Christifer Runnills - Negro man Frank on condition he give my grandson David Dupuise a 6 year old negro when said David is 21 years old. Wife’s son Dennis Odien - land called Hikkery Neck during his life and then to my grandson David Dupuies. Daughter Elizabeth Isler - cow and calf; granddaughter Mary Isler - 4 cows and calves; daughter Mary White - cow and calf; grandson David Dupuise - all my lands. Executors: wife Mary Coleman, son in law Christifer Runnills, Witnesses: Richard Casey, John (X) Butler, Peter Green - Attested in Isle of Wight County, Virginia before William Bridger 25 Sep 1721 (Early North Carolina Records by Steve Bradley). Notice that this will was attested and witnessed by residents of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, i.e. Richard Casey, John Butler, Peter Green and William Bridger. These are residents and neighbors of this Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who married Ann Coleman, who appear frequently with the Reynolds families in the records of Isle of Wight County, Virginia. In fact, the witness named Richard Casey, married Jane Reynolds, the daughter of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and granddaughter of Christopher Reynolds, Jr.,and Mary Coleman as listed above: 9 Sep 1706, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.46; Richard and Joyce Reynolds conveyed a deed of gift to their daughter, Jane Casey and her husband, Richard Casey, a tract of land adjoining Denstram Norsworthy (being part of a tract said Reynolds lives on and Thomas William lives on part of the land), Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Richard Reynolds, Jr. and Thomas Joyner (Doc.#135ad, 138b). The portion of the will of Robert Coleman which lists “Wife’s son Dennis Odien” indicates that Robert Coleman married a widow of a man named Odien. This corresponds with information from a Coleman family researcher, named Martha Marble, who lists that Robert Coleman’s wife, Mary, was previously married to Dennis O'Dyer/Odier. In regards to Robert Coleman , we have obtained the following which is listed above: 8 Sep 1673, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 567, Richard Reynolds listed as a witness to a guardianship record of John Nelson to Robert Coleman (Doc.#131af). This record appears to have been for Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Anne Coleman. Anne Coleman was the daughter of Robert and Mary Coleman. According to name and residence patterns, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, was the grandson of Robert and Mary Coleman; 1681, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 225, Richard Reynolds listed as an appraiser for the estate of John Bromfield along with Robert Coleman, Thomas Giles and Ambrose Bennett (Doc.#132f). This record appears to have been for Richard Reynolds the younger, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Anne Coleman. Anne Coleman was the daughter of Robert and Mary Coleman. According to name and residence patterns, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger was the grandson of Robert and Mary Coleman; 9 Sep 1684, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 57; Richard Reynolds, Sr., listed as security along with Robert Coleman for estate of John Lockhart, administration requested by James Tullaugh (Doc.#132y). This record appears to have been for Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Anne Coleman, who was the daughter of Robert and Mary Coleman. According to name and residence patterns, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger was the grandson of Robert and Mary Coleman; 10 Dec 1694, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.144; Richard Reynolds, Jr., listed in jury case between Robert Coleman and Malurk Hawley, signed by William Bradshaw, William Green, Ben Beale, Jr., Thomas Norsworthy, George Wright, Thomas Wright, John Neville [Nevill] and Richard Wilkison...(Doc.#135j). This record appears to have been for the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, i.e. the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Anne Coleman, who was the daughter of Robert and Mary Coleman. According to name and residence patterns, Richard Reynolds, Jr., was the grandson of Robert and Mary Coleman. Notice that Richard Reynolds, Sr. and Elizabeth Sharpe’s son-in-law, i.e. the husband of their daughter Elizabeth, John Nevill, appears listed as a juryman in this record; 5 Jul 1753, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p. 156; Christopher Reynolds, his wife Mary Reynolds and Ann Hunt sold to John Marshall, Jr., 250 acres (being part of the land willed by Robert Coleman) adjoining the main swamp, Stricklins Bridge and the Beaver dam Swamp, signed by Ann Hunt, Christopher Reynolds and Mary Reynolds, Witnesses: Thomas Gale and Christopher Reynolds, recorded 5 Jul 1753 (Doc.#137g). This deed in which a Christopher Reynolds appears as a party to a deed as well as a witness to the same deed indicates that there were two Christopher Reynolds. The previous deed for Christopher and Mary Reynolds indicates that this Christopher Reynolds was the son of Richard Reynolds, Jr., (son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe) and his wife Elizabeth Williams who resided in Newport Parish of Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

       25 Jun 1715, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.332; Richard Reynolds, Jr., and wife Rebeccah Reynolds, to Richard Jackson...100 acres bounded by Tarrapin Swamp, Witnesses: Joseph Chapman and William Ragdale, recorded 27 Jun 1715 (Doc.#135al).

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this Richard Reynolds, Jr., was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and his wife, Joyce Staples. Notice that Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Rebecca, resided next to the Tarrapin Swamp. In reference to the Tarrapin Swamp and deeds listed for the estate of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Rebecca, we refer to the following records which are listed in this chronology: 7 Apr 1741, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.326; Richard Reynolds notes receiving slaves and goods from his mother, Rebecca Reynolds, as part of the estate of his father, Richard Reynolds, deceased, signed by Richard Reynolds, Witnesses: George Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and Tabitha Reynolds, recorded 6 Mar 1755 (Doc.#137j). This George Reynolds who is listed as a witness, was a son of Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Rebecca. This George Reynolds may have been the same individual who obtained large military land patents in 1784 on the Dicks River in Lincoln County, Kentucky according to Virginia Land Office patents (Doc.#156d-f). However, William King, the president of the Reynolds Family Association, has indicated that the George Reynolds who obtained the large Kentucky military land grants on the Dicks River was a land speculator who resided in Jefferson County, Virginia, which became West Virginia after the Civil War. There were also George Reynolds listed in the Pittsylvania and Henry County records including one who served as a Captain of the Henry County Militia during the Revolutionary War. As listed above, Capt. George Reynolds appears in deeds with your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds, Sr., who was a son of Richard Reynolds.

       After conducting a survey of the Richard Reynolds and George Reynolds listed in printed sources, including those listed in the many genealogical data bases which are accessed both on and off line, subject to further research, name and residence patterns suggest that Capt. George Reynolds and Richard Reynolds, Sr., of Henry County, Kentucky, were related to the sons of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife Rebecca, of Isle of Wight County, Virginia. In addition to Richard Reynolds, Jr., George, Tabitha and Christopher Reynolds received their portion of their father’s estate from their mother, Rebecca Reynolds, as follows; 7 Apr 1741, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.327; George Reynolds states that he received slaves and goods from Rebecca Reynolds as part of the estate of his father, Richard Reynolds, signed by George Reynolds, Witnesses: Richard Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and Tabitha Reynolds, recorded 6 Mar 1755 (Doc.#137j); 7 Apr 1741, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.327; Tabitha Reynolds states that she has received her part of her father’s estate, signed by Tabitha Reynolds, Witnesses: Richard Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and George Reynolds, recorded 6 Mar 1755 (Doc.#137j); 7 Apr 1741, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.327; Christopher Reynolds states that he received his part of his father’s estate, signed by Christopher Reynolds, Witnesses: Richard Reynolds, George Reynolds and Tabitha Reynolds, recorded 6 Mar 1755 (Doc.#137j). These deeds reveal that Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Rebecca, were the parents of Richard Reynolds, III; Christopher Reynolds; George Reynolds; and Tabitha Reynolds. Richard Reynolds, III, was possibly your ancestor who resided in Henry County, Virginia and whose will was proved on 11 Mar 1816 in Jefferson County, Kentucky as listed above. The earliest record we have for Richard Reynolds, Jr., listed with his wife, Rebecca is the following deed which is listed above: 25 Jun 1715, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.332; Richard Reynolds, Jr., and wife Rebeccah Reynolds, to Richard Jackson...100 acres bounded by Tarrapin Swamp, Witnesses: Joseph Chapman and William Ragdale, recorded 27 Jun 1715 (Doc.#135al). This reveals that the Richard Reynolds, who married Rebecca, was the son of yet a third Richard Reynolds who resided in Isle of Wight County. Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife Rebecca, resided near the Tarrapin Swamp. The first deed mentioning the Tarrapin Swamp lists the following for Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Rebecca: 13 Nov 1713, The Library of Virginia, Land Office Patents No. 10, 1710-1719, p. 98; Richard Reynolds, Jr., obtained patent for 200 acres on the south side of the main Blackwater Swamp beginning at the mouth of Tarrapin Swamp (Doc.#142u). Notice that Tarrapin Swamp is located next to Blackwater Swamp. The first mention of Blackwater Swamp in conjunction with Richard or Christopher Reynolds is listed in the following deed: 9 Aug 1705, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.33; Richard Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and John Butler witnessed deed between William Butler of Nansemond County to Thomas Wooten, 150 acres bounded by Blackwater Swamp on Chewan River, recorded 10 Sep 1705 (Doc.#135ac). The name and residence patterns listed in these deeds reveals that Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Christopher Reynolds, who originally owned land bounding the Blackwater Swamp, were the sons of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the Colonial Virginia immigrant. Hence, Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Joyce Staples, appears to have been the father of 1) Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Rebecca; and 2) Christopher Reynolds who married Elizabeth, maiden name unknown. Though The Robert Reynolds Family web-site lists that there was a Christopher Reynolds who married Elizabeth Brock, we have found no documentation for the maiden name of Elizabeth.

       Though it appears to be a different river, Blackwater is also the name of a River which was originally in Henry County and which is listed in the description of the boundaries during the formation of Henry County: Henry County was formed by an Act of October, 1776 (first year of the commonwealth), which enacted “That from and after the last day of December next ensuing the said county of Pittsylvania be divided into two counties, by a line beginning at the mouth of Blackwater on Staunton River and running parallel with the line of Halifax County till it strikes the county line, and that all that part of the said county which lies to the westward of the said line shall be one distinct county and be called and known by the name of henry, and all the other part thereof which lies to the eastward of the said line shall be one other distinct county and retain the name of Pittsylvania.” According to the above boundary description, the Blackwater River was a tributary of the Staunton River. Though the U.S. Geological Survey site on the Internet lists no waterway named Blackwater in Henry County today, there is a Blackwater River in Franklin County, a Blackwater Creek in Halifax County, and a Blackwater River in Suffolk City which was created from Nansemond County.

       13 Nov 1717, Isle of Wight County Deeds & Wills, Great Bk. Vol. 2, p.121; Christopher Reynolds, William Wilkinson and William Godwin listed as witnesses to deed from Roger Tarlton to Henry Reynolds, weaver, both of the Lower Parish, 100 acres on the south side of the main Blackwater and bounded by Black Creek, recorded 25 Nov 1717 (Doc.#135am)

       This is the first listing for an individual named Henry Reynolds, a weaver of the Lower Parish, in Isle of Wight County records. The fact that Christopher Reynolds was a witness, indicates that Henry was related to Christopher Reynolds. Name and residence patterns indicate that this Christopher Reynolds was a son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe. In regards to William Godwin, we located the following: 30 Sep 1747, Newport Parish Vestry Book, p. 127; Christopher Reynolds and William Rand listed as processioners (in the room of Sharp Reynolds and William Wiggs) (Doc.#151j); Richard Reynolds and Joseph Norsworthy listed as processioners (Doc.#151k); line processioned between Christopher Reynolds and William Godwin (Doc.#151l). According to Isle of Wight County wills and deeds, Christopher, Sharpe and Richard Reynolds, who are listed in these processioners records, were the sons of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe: 27 Jul 1711, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 536; Will of Richard Reynolds, of Newport Parish, lists: Legatees - Wife Elizabeth; son Richard; son Sharpe; son Christopher the land on which Richard Jackson lives; grandson ------Reynolds; what is due Elizabeth Lewis one of the daughters of Richard Lewis to be paid. Executors my wife and sons. Recorded 26 May 1712. Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Giles Driver and Jane Benn (Doc.#132q-132r).

       20 Sep 1718, Isle of Wight County Deeds & Wills, Great Bk. Vol. 2, p.389; Christopher Reynolds listed as property owner bounding land sold by John Gardner, Jr., of Chowan Precinct, North Carolina to James Pernell/Parnell of the Lower Parish in Isle of Wight County... 100 acres in the Lower Parish (being land on which Richard Beal lately lived) and also bounded by Walter Waters and the Blackwater Road, Witnesses: Jacob Darden and Joseph Chapman, recorded 26 Sep 1720 (Doc.#136b)

       22 Nov 1718, Isle of Wight County Deeds & Wills, Great Bk. Vol. 2, p.202; Richard Reynolds, William Wilkinson and John Boddie witnessed a deed between Robert Scott of Isle of Wight County to William Scott of Nansemond County, 100 acres located in the Lower Parish on the west side of Indian Creek Swamp, recorded 24 Nov 1718, (Doc.#135an)

       22 Aug 1719, Isle of Wight County Deeds & Wills, Great Bk. Vol. 2, p.275; Christopher Reynolds, Joseph Godwin and Thomas Williams witnessed deed between John and Stephen Williams of Albemarle County in North Carolina to Richard Williams of Isle of Wight County...170 acres adjoining said Richard Williams on the south side of the main Blackwater (being part of a patent for 600 acres granted to William Williams on 28 Oct 1702, recorded 24 Aug 1719 (Doc.#135ao)

       24 Aug 1719, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 79; Christopher Reynolds and John Butler listed as witnesses to will of Charles Driver, recorded 24 Apr 1721 (Doc.#133b)

       20 Mar 1720, Isle of Wight County Deeds & Wills, Great Bk. Vol. 2, p.405; Christopher Reynolds and William Bridger witnessed a deed between Barnaby Mackinnie/Mackquinny, Gentleman, to Robert Tyler, 100 acres bounded by Cypress Swamp, Martin Dawson and William Bonner, recorded 27 Mar 1721 (Doc.#136b)

       26 Feb 1721, Isle of Wight County Deeds & Wills, Great Bk. Vol. 2, p.463; Christopher Reynolds, John Johnston and Thomas Summerell witnessed a deed between William West of the Lower parish to Dannell Herring of the same place..., 130 acres adjoining Major Bridger, Peter Blake and Anthony Herring (being part of a patent for 2050 acres granted to William Oldiss and Robert Ruffin on 21 Sep 1674, recorded 26 Mar 1722 (Doc.#136c)

       12 May 1721, Christopher Reynolds, John Butler and Richard Casey appraised estate of Charles Driver, recorded 22 May 1721 (Doc.#133b)

       9 Jul 1721, Bath County, North Carolina, Wills, Bk. 4, p. 106; Christifer Runnills [Christopher Reynolds] listed as a son-in-law and executor in will of Robert Coleman of Bath County, North Carolina. Will lists his wife, Mary, whom he leaves his whole estate. Son-in-law Christifer Runnills - Negro man Frank on condition he give my grandson David Dupuise a 6 year old negro when said David is 21 years old. Wife’s son Dennis Odien - land called Hikkery Neck during his life and then to my grandson David Dupuies. Daughter Elizabeth Isler - cow and calf; granddaughter Mary Isler - 4 cows and calves; daughter Mary White - cow and calf; grandson David Dupuise - all my lands. Executors: wife Mary Coleman, son in law Christifer Runnills, Witnesses: Richard Casey, John (X) Butler, Peter Green - Attested in Isle of Wight County, Virginia before William Bridger 25 Sep 1721 (Early North Carolina Records by Steve Bradley)

       Notice that this will was attested and witnessed by residents of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, i.e. Richard Casey, John Butler, Peter Green and William Bridger. These are relatives and neighbors of this Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who married Ann Coleman, who appear frequently listed with the Reynolds families in the records of Isle of Wight County, Virginia. In fact, the witness named Richard Casey, married Jane Reynolds, the daughter of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger as listed above: 9 Sep 1706, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.46; Richard and Joyce Reynolds conveyed a deed of gift to their daughter, Jane Casey and her husband, Richard Casey, a tract of land adjoining Denstram Norsworthy (being part of a tract said Reynolds lives on and Thomas William lives on part of the land), Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Richard Reynolds, Jr. and Thomas Joyner (Doc.#135ad, 138b). Name and residence patterns indicate that Richard Casey was a grandson of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Ann Coleman.

       The portion of the will of Robert Coleman which lists “Wife’s son Dennis Odien” indicates that Robert Coleman married a widow of a Mr. Odien. This corresponds with information from a Coleman family researcher, named Martha Marble, who lists that Robert Coleman’s wife, Mary, was previously married to Dennis O'Dyer/Odier.

       23 Sep 1723, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 137; Christopher Reynolds, Thomas Pinner and Benjamin Beale appraised estate of Thomas Price (Doc.#133c)

       9 Jan 1724, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 199; Christopher Reynolds, Jr., Robert Richards, John Lawrence, Giles Driver, Jr. and Thomas Driver listed in will of Giles Driver (Doc.#133e)

       Since Christopher Reynolds, Jr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, had only one son and heir named Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, this Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who is listed in this probate record, appears to have been the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe. According to the will of Richard Reynolds, Sr., his son, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was born about 1674. Hence, his son, Christopher Reynolds, Jr., would have been born about 1700 in the Lower Parish of Isle of Wight County.

       23 Nov 1725, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p.176; Christopher Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Edward Brown along with John Butler and William Noyall (Doc.#133d)

       27 Dec 1725, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p. 728, Christopher Reynolds and his wife Elizabeth Reynolds of the Lower Parish sold to Joshua Whillney [Whitney] of the same place, 150 acres in the Lower Parish (whereon Charles Driver now lives and being land formerly belonging to Elizabeth Reynolds), Witnesses: John and Mary Whitfield, recorded 27 Dec 1725, signed by Christopher Reynolds and Elizabeth Reynolds

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this record refers to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who married Elizabeth, maiden name unknown though she is listed as Elizabeth Brock by The Robert Reynolds Family web-site. He was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and his wife, Joyce Staples. The fact that the land in the above deed formerly belonged to Elizabeth Reynolds suggests that it may have been part of her inheritance.

       28 Feb 1726, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 51; Christopher Reynolds listed as a witness and neighbor along with John Butler to the will of James Jolleffe of the Lower Parish, recorded 26 Nov 1727 (Doc.#133f)

       26 Feb 1727, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 141 Christopher Reynolds, Timohty Tynes and Arthur Benn listed as appraisers of estate for John Butler, recorded 1 Jan 1728 (Doc.#133j)

       26 Feb 1717, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 315; Christopher Reynolds, William Noyall and John Wright appraised the estate for Michael Fulgham (Doc.#133m)

       3 Dec 1727, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 68; Christopher Reynolds, Oliver Woodward and John Gurley listed as witnesses to will of John Gent, recorded 25 Mar 1728 (Doc.#133g)

       26 Aug 1728, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 125; Christopher Reynolds, William Noyall and John Wright listed as appraisers of estate for John Long, recorded 23 Sep 1728 (Doc.#133h)

       25 Nov 1728, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 134; Christopher Reynolds, Robert Richards and Joshua Whitney listed as appraisers for the estate for Ann Riggan, recorded 25 Nov 1728 (Doc.#133i)

       23 Mar 1729, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 197; Christopher Reynolds, William Noyall, Robert Driver and William West listed as appraisers for the estate for James Jolley (Doc.#133k)

       23 Jun 1729, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 166; Henry Runnells [Reynolds] estate appraised by Hodges Council, Epenetus Griffin and Joseph Bracher

       22 Mar 1730, Isle of Wight County Deeds Bk. 4, p.98; Christopher Reynolds, Barnaby Kearney and John Pitt witnessed the deed between Hardy Council, Gentleman to Richard Wooten, 500 acres on Beaver Dam Swamp, recorded 22 Mar 1730 (Doc.#136e)

       1 Sep 1730, Isle of Wight County Deeds Bk.4, p.38; Christopher Reynolds, Thomas Brewer and Thomas Morse witnessed the deed between John Bowen to James Haisty for 116 acres on the south side of Blackwater Swamp (being a patent granted on 5 Sep 1720), recorded 23 Sep 1730 (Doc.#136d)

       24 May 1731, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 270; Christopher Reynolds examined estate of Epaphroditus Williams along with John Chapman and William Noyall (Doc.#133l)

       25 Aug 1731, The Library of Virginia, Virginia Land Office Patents No. 14, 1728-1732, p.297; Christopher Reynolds obtained patent for 105 acres on the north side of the Nottoway River in Nansemond County bounded by William Fowlers (Doc.#142e)

       This land patent suggests that this Christopher Reynolds was either Christopher Reynolds, Sr., or his son, Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who descend from Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger who obtained a 750 acre land patent on Cabin Creek in Nansemond County as listed above: 20 Apr 1694, The Library of Virginia, Land Office Patents No. 8, 1689-1695, p. 347; Richard Reynolds, of Isle of Wight County, obtained a 720 acre patent on a branch called Cabin Branch in Nansemond County (Doc.#142t). This is the first record of land in Nansemond County obtained by a Richard Reynolds. Nansemond County records should be searched to learn more about this Richard Reynolds who obtained this patent. According to a deed listed below, this patent was issued to Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger who was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr. and Ann Coleman: 9 Jun 1697, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 640; Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 1, p.309; Richard Reynolds of Isle of Wight County sold to William Butler of Nansemond County 220 acres, part of a patent of 720 acres on Cabin Branch. Joyce Reynolds signs dower..., witnessed by John Council, William Brown and Robert Driver (Doc.#131aw). This record indicates that after 1731, the date of this land patent, Christopher Reynolds, Jr., the son of the immigrant, was residing in neighboring Nansemond County, Virginia. The will of Christopher Reynolds, Jr.’s father, Robert Coleman, which is listed above, also indicates that Christopher Reynolds, Jr., owned land and possibly resided in North Carolina. His granddaughter, Jane Reynolds, married Richard Casey who is listed as a witness to the will of Robert Coleman in Bath County, North Carolina in 1721/2 as listed above.

       17 Sep 1731, The Library of Virginia, Virginia Land Office Patents No. 14, 1728-1732, p.351; Christopher Reynolds, Thomas Woodley, Richard Williams and Francis Woodley obtained patent for 272 acres on the north side of the Nottoway River bounded by William Fowlers (Doc.#142e)

       21 Mar 1732, Isle of Wight County Deeds Bk. 4, p.228; Christopher & Elizabeth Reynolds listed as the parents of John Reynolds who sold land to Joshua Whitney which he obtained from his parents in 1725, Witnesses: John Wright, Moses Green and Henry Lightfoot, recorded 27 Mar 1733 (Doc.#136f)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this deed refers to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Elizabeth, whose maiden name was Brock according to The Robert Reynolds Family web-site (Doc.#140a).

       6 Nov 1733, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 338, Sharp Reynolds and Timothy Tynes appraised the estate of Samuel Special, recorded 28 Jan 1733 (Doc.#133n)

       22 Oct 1733, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 3, 1726-1734, pp. 372-373; Christopher Reynolds’ estate, inventory and appraisal (Doc.#143k)

       Notice that this 1733 probate record for Christopher Reynolds, which appears in the Library of Virginia Card Catalog, was not listed in the published records for Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations. Hence, the original probate records for this Christopher Reynolds should be searched in order to learn the names of his wife and children.

       22 Mar 1735, Newport Parish Vestry Book, pp. 75-7; Ann Reynolds listed along with Sharp Reynolds and Richard Reynolds regarding processions including neighbors Thomas Calcote, Thomas Peirce, George Wigge, William Wiggs, Col. Arthur Smith. Between Sharp Reynolds and Timothy Tyne with William Frizzel and Thomas Smith present. Between Sharp Reynolds and Col. Arthur Smith with William Frizzel and Thomas Smith present. Processioners were Richard Reynolds and Timothy Tyne (Doc.#151c)

       These processioners records which are listed in the Newport Parish Vestry Book are the first records listed for individuals named Reynolds in the Lower/Newport Parish records which begin in 1724 as listed above regarding the history of Newport Parish. In comparison with will and probate records listed above, Sharpe Reynolds and Richard Reynolds appear to have been brothers, i.e. sons of Richard Reynolds, Sr., (husband of Elizabeth Sharpe) who died testate in Newport Parish in 1712. Sharpe and Richard Reynolds’ neighbors names, which are listed in these processioners records, appear frequently with the Reynolds families in the land and court records of Isle of Wight County. Though the Anne Reynolds listed above is the same name as the wife of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant, she was too young to have been the same person. Ann Coleman, the wife of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., was born about 1634.

       1737, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 5, p.157, Bk 8, p.268; Michael Reynolds of North Carolina married Alice Darden, daughter of Joseph Darden (Doc.#138f)

       20 Sep 1737, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 5, p. 157; Christopher Reynolds listed as having owned land which bounded a tract sold by John Gardner of Chowan Precinct, North Carolina, planter, to James Parnal, James Garner, Joseph Garner, John Garner and William Garner of Newport Parish, planters of Newport Parish, signed by John Garner, Witnesses: John Dunkley and Jacob Darden, recorded 26 Sep 1737 (Doc.#139b)

       4 Oct 1738, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 5, p. 331; Christopher Reynolds and his son, John Reynolds, of Isle of Wight County, sold to William Noyall of the same place, for 15 pounds, 10 shillings, a 20 year lease for one certain plantation or tract of land, containing about 100 acres in the Lower Parish of Isle of Wight, being the land where said Noyall now lives bounded by the Creek side Carsey’s line, the old field side, said Noyall’s cart path, the main road, the schoolhouse, James Tullaugh, Permento, Whitney. Signed by Christopher Reynolds, John Reynolds and William Noyall, Witnesses: Mathew Sellers, Robert Sanders, Edward Driver and John Westwray, recorded 28 May 1739 (Doc.#139c)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this deed refers to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his son John Reynolds, who were descendants of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and his wife, Joyce Staples. Previous deeds listed above reveal that the Butler, Driver and Noyall families were neighbors and associates of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and his descendants.

       25 Jun 1739, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 5, p. 52; Richard Reynolds listed as having received a 200 acre grant in Newport Parish on 13 Nov 1713 which he sold to Robert Edwards by deed dated 10 Jan 1717, who conveyed a deed of gift to his son, Henry Edwards on 15 Jan 1731 who sold this land to Josiah John Halleman of Nottoway Parish in Isle of Wight County. Signed by Henry Edwards, and his wife, Patience Edwards,Witnesses: Mathew Jordan, Thomas Atkinson and Thomas Williamson, recorded 23 Jul 1739 (Doc.#52)

       2 Nov 1739, Newport Parish Vestry Book, p. 87, 93, 95; Sharp Reynolds and Capt. Timothy Tynes listed as processioners (Doc.#151e); lines processioned between Richard Reynolds and Thomas Pierce, Richard Reynolds and Col. Arthur Smith, Sharp Reynolds and Col. Arthur Smith (Doc.#151f)

       These processioners records reveal that Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his brother, Sharpe Reynolds resided next to each other on land inherited by them from their parents, Richard Reynolds, Sr. and Elizabeth Sharpe. Richard Reynolds, Jr., owned land next to Thomas Pierce and Col. Arthur Smith. Sharpe Reynolds also owned land next to Col. Arthur Smith [IV] who was one of the Vestrymen.

       22 Feb 1741, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 3, p. 396; Christopher Reynolds, Account of Estate, which was divided between the widow and orphans. Examined by Hardy Council, Thomas Gale and John Dunkley, recorded 22 Feb 1741 (Doc.#133o)

       Though this is possibly the same estate which is listed above for the Christopher Reynolds whose estate was inventoried and appraised in 1733, it is unusual to conduct an inventory and appraisal almost eight years later. Hence, this appears to be for a different Christopher Reynolds. As listed above, there were at least four Christopher Reynolds who resided in the Lower Parish of Isle of Wight County. There were 1) Christopher Reynolds, Sr. (born about 1684 in the Lower Parish of Isle of Wight County) who married Elizabeth, maiden name possibly Brock, who had a son named 2) Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who married a woman named Mary, maiden possibly Lightfoot, who are the son and grandson of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and his wife Joyce Staples; and there were 3) Christopher Reynolds, Sr., (born about 1674 in the Lower Parish of Isle of Wight County) a son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Elizabeth Sharpe, who also had a son named 4) Christopher Reynolds, Jr. In light of this information, name and residence patterns indicate that this Christopher Reynolds was a distant cousin of the Christopher Reynolds who married Elizabeth Saunders, i.e. Christopher Reynolds, Sr., (who married Elizabeth) the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and Joyce Staples.
       22 Mar 1741, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 403; Richard Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Samuel Goodwin/Godwin along with John Applewhaite and Joseph Wright, recorded 24 May 1742 (Doc.#133p)

       7 Apr 1741, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.326; Richard Reynolds notes receiving slaves and goods from his mother, Rebecca Reynolds, as part of the estate of his father, Richard Reynolds, deceased, signed by Richard Reynolds, Witnesses: George Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and Tabitha Reynolds, recorded 6 Mar 1755 (Doc.#137j)

       This deed reveals that Richard Reynolds, Jr., the father of George Reynolds and his siblings listed below, died in 1741. His wife, Rebecca Reynolds, deeded portions of their father’s estate to her children on 7 Apr 1741.

       This George Reynolds who is listed as a witness in this deed was a son of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and Rebecca as listed below. This George Reynolds may have been the same individual who obtained large military land patents in 1784 on the Dicks River in Lincoln County, Kentucky according to Virginia Land Office patents (Doc.#156d-f). There were also George Reynolds listed in the Pittsylvania and Henry County records as listed above. Name and residence patterns suggest that they were related to this George Reynolds of Isle of Wight County, Virginia. George, Tabitha and Christopher Reynolds also received their portion of their father’s estate from their mother, Rebecca Reynolds.

       7 Apr 1741, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.327; George Reynolds states that he received slaves and goods from Rebecca Reynolds as part of the estate of his father, Richard Reynolds, signed by George Reynolds, Witnesses: Richard Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and Tabitha Reynolds, recorded 6 Mar 1755 (Doc.#137j)

       7 Apr 1741, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.327; Tabitha Reynolds states that she has received her part of her father’s estate, signed by Tabitha Reynolds, Witnesses: Richard Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and George Reynolds, recorded 6 Mar 1755 (Doc.#137j)

       7 Apr 1741, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.327; Christopher Reynolds states that he received his part of his father’s estate, signed by Christopher Reynolds, Witnesses: Richard Reynolds, George Reynolds and Tabitha Reynolds, recorded 6 Mar 1755 (Doc.#137j)

       These last four deed records reveal that Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Rebecca, were the parents of Richard Reynolds, III, Christopher Reynolds, George Reynolds and Tabitha Reynolds. The earliest record we have for Richard Reynolds, Jr., listed with his wife, Rebecca is the following deed which is listed above: 25 Jun 1715, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.332; Richard Reynolds, Jr., and wife Rebeccah Reynolds, to Richard Jackson...100 acres bounded by Tarrapin Swamp, Witnesses: Joseph Chapman and William Ragdale, recorded 27 Jun 1715 (Doc.#135al) This reveals that the Richard Reynolds, who married Rebecca, was the son of yet a third Richard Reynolds who resided near the Tarrapin Swamp. The first deed mentioning the Tarrapin Swamp lists the following for Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Rebecca: 13 Nov 1713, The Library of Virginia, Land Office Patents No. 10, 1710-1719, p. 98; Richard Reynolds, Jr., obtained patent for 200 acres on the south side of the main Blackwater Swamp beginning at the mouth of Tarrapin Swamp (Doc.#142u).

       Rebecca Reynolds also left a will, as listed below in this Chronology, which lists the following: 4 May 1745, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 156; Rebecca Reynolds’ will lists: Legatees - daughter Tabitha; son Richard; son George; son Christopher; grandson Richard, the son of Richard Reynolds. Executors, son Richard and daughter Tabitha Reynolds. Recorded 6 Mar 1755, witnessed by Robert Tynes, Peter Green and Anne Green. (Doc.#133an). This will of Rebecca Reynolds, who was the wife of Richard Reynolds, Jr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and Joyce Staples, reveals that she had a son, Richard Reynolds, III, who had a son, Richard Reynolds, IV.

       Notice that Tarrapin Swamp is located next to Blackwater Swamp. The first mention of Blackwater Swamp in conjunction with Richard or Christopher Reynolds is listed in the following deed: 9 Aug 1705, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.33; Richard Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and John Butler witnessed deed between William Butler of Nansemond County to Thomas Wooten, 150 acres bounded by Blackwater Swamp on Chewan River, recorded 10 Sep 1705 (Doc.#135ac). The name and residence patterns listed in these deeds reveal that Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who originally owned land bounding the Blackwater Swamp, were the sons of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the Colonial Virginia immigrant. Hence, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, who married Joyce Staples, appears to have been the father of Richard Reynolds, Jr., (who married Rebecca), and Christopher Reynolds who married Elizabeth, maiden name unknown. Though The Robert Reynolds Family web-site lists that there was a Christopher Reynolds who married Elizabeth Brock, we have found no documentation for the maiden name of Elizabeth.

       Though it appears to be a different river than the one in Isle of Wight County, Blackwater is also the name of a River in Henry County which is listed in the description of the boundaries during the formation of Henry County: Henry County was formed by an Act of October, 1776 (first year of the commonwealth), which enacted “That from and after the last day of December next ensuing the said county of Pittsylvania be divided into two counties, by a line beginning at the mouth of Blackwater on Staunton River and running parallel with the line of Halifax County till it strikes the county line, and that all that part of the said county which lies to the westward of the said line shall be one distinct county and be called and known by the name of henry, and all the other part thereof which lies to the eastward of the said line shall be one other distinct county and retain the name of Pittsylvania.”

       25 Oct 1742, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 435; Richard Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Richard Wilkinson along with Hugh Giles, Joseph Wright and Joseph Weston, recorded 25 Oct 1742 (Doc.#133q)

       26 Sep 1743, Isle of Wight Guardian Accounts 1740-1767, p. 8; Account Estate of Christopher Reynolds, orphan of Christopher Reynolds, by Sharpe Reynolds as guardian (Doc.#135c)

       This Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the father of the orphan, appears to have been a brother of Sharpe Reynolds who was appointed guardian for Christopher’s orphaned son, Christopher Reynbolds, Jr. This Christopher Reynolds, Sr., appears to have been the same individual whose estate was inventoried and appraised in 1741 as listed above: 22 Oct 1733, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 3, 1726-1734, pp. 372-373; Christopher Reynolds’ estate, inventory and appraisal (Doc.#143k); 22 Feb 1741, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 3, p. 396; Christopher Reynolds, Account of Estate, which was divided between the widow and orphans. Examined by Hardy Council, Thomas Gale and John Dunkley, recorded 22 Feb 1741 (Doc.#133o).        As listed above in the will records of Isle of Wight County, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and Sharpe Reynolds were the sons of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe of Newport Parish who died in 1711. As listed above, Richard Reynolds’ will abstract reads as follows: 27 Jul 1711, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 536; Will of Richard Reynolds, of Newport Parish, lists: Legatees - Wife Elizabeth; son Richard; son Sharpe; son Christopher the land on which Richard Jackson lives; grandson ------Reynolds; what is due Elizabeth Lewis one of the daughters of Richard Lewis to be paid. Executors my wife and sons. Recorded 26 May 1712. Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Giles Driver and Jane Benn (Doc.#132q-132r)

       21 Nov 1743, Newport Parish Vestry Book, p. 105; Sharp Reynolds and William Wiggs listed as processioners; lines processioned between John Reynolds and Richard Casey (Doc.#151h)

       According to the will of Richard Reynolds, Sr., who died in 1712, John Reynolds was a brother of Sharpe Reynolds, Richard Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds, all of whom are listed in the Newport Parish vestry records. In regards to the line processioned between John Reynolds and Richard Casey, the above land records reveal the following for Richard Casey: 9 Sep 1706, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.46; Richard and Joyce Reynolds conveyed a deed of gift to their daughter, Jane Casey and her husband, Richard Casey, a tract of land adjoining Denstram Norsworthy (being part of a tract said Reynolds lives on and Thomas William lives on part of the land), Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Richard Reynolds, Jr. and Thomas Joyner (Doc.#135ad, 138b). Hence, Richard Casey married Jane Reynolds, the daughter of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Joyce Staples.

       5 Feb 1744, Spotsylvania County, Virginia Deeds Bk. D, p. ?; Joseph Reynolds listed as a witness to 100 acres in St. George Parish from Edward and Lucretia Coleman of St. George Parish to Samuel Waggoner of Southfarnum Parish in Essex County, Recorded 15 Nov 1744 (Doc.#186)

       This appears to be the first reference to an individual named Reynolds in Spotsylvania County, Virginia.

       4 May 1745, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 156; Rebecca Reynolds’ will lists: Legatees - daughter Tabitha; son Richard; son George; son Christopher; grandson Richard, the son of Richard Reynolds. Executors, son Richard and daughter Tabitha Reynolds. Recorded 6 Mar 1755, witnessed by Robert Tynes, Peter Green and Anne Green. (Doc.#133an)

       This will of Rebecca Reynolds, who was the wife of Richard Reynolds, Jr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and Joyce Staples, reveals that she had a son, Richard Reynolds, III, who had a son, Richard Reynolds, IV. This information corresponds with the deed and probate records listed above for Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Rebecca. It also corresponds with probate records listed below: 1755, Estate of Rebecca Reynolds appraised by Bartholomew Lightfoot, William McConnell and Robert Tynes (Doc.#133an). Notice that Rebecca Reynolds estate was appraised almost ten years after her will was recorded on 4 May 1745 as listed above: 4 May 1745, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 156; Rebecca Reynolds’ will lists: Legatees - daughter Tabitha; son Richard; son George; son Christopher; grandson Richard, the son of Richard Reynolds. Executors, son Richard and daughter Tabitha Reynolds. Recorded 6 Mar 1755, witnessed by Robert Tynes, Peter Green and Anne Green. (Doc.#133an).

       Name and residence patterns indicate that your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Captain George Reynolds of Henry County, Virginia, may descend from the family of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Rebecca. Note that they had sons named Richard and George Reynolds, the same names as your ancestors who settled in Henry County, Virginia. So far, little is known about Richard and George after their mother, Rebecca Reynolds dies in 1745. In 1754 when they are listed as cousins in the will of Sharpe Reynolds which is listed below: 8 Jul 1754, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 115; Sharpe Reynolds’ will lists: legatees - cousin Richard Reynolds; cousin George Reynolds; Sarah Wooten; cousin Christopher, the son of Christopher Reynolds, deceased. Executor, cousin Christopher Reynolds (Doc.#133am). According to the will of Sharpe Reynolds, he appears to have died between 8 Jul 1754 when his will was recorded, and 5 Sep 1754 when his will was proved as listed below. According to his will, Sharpe Reynolds does not appear to have married. His will leaves his estate to his cousins Richard Reynolds, George Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds, Jr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr. Name and residence patterns indicate that his cousins Richard Reynolds and George Reynolds appear to have been sons of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Rebecca. This is the only George Reynolds listed in the above records. In regards to Sharpe Reynolds’ cousin Christopher Reynolds, Jr., he appears to have been the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth, maiden name possibly Saunders or Brock who are listed above. It is interesting to note that these actually appear to have been second cousins of Sharpe Reynolds rather than first cousins.. About twenty years later, Richard Reynolds, Sr., Capt. George Reynolds and Hugh Reynolds obtain land in Pittsylvania and Henry Counties just prior to the Revolution. Further research should be conducted in Isle of Wight County records in order to learn more about Richard and George Reynolds, the sons of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Rebecca of Isle of Wight County.

       25 Nov 1745, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 24; Richard Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Joseph Wright along with Joseph Weston and Joseph Norsworthy, recorded 12 Jun 1746 (Doc.#133r)

       21 Apr 1746, Isle of Wight County Deeds Bk. Vol. 7, p.309; Christopher Reynolds and John Reynolds listed as previous owners of land sold by Jeremiah Whitney, executor for Joshua Whitney, of Goochland County to John Wills, Gentleman of Isle of Wight County, Witnesses: Bartholomew Lightfoot, Thomas Wills and John Jolley, Giles Driver had held a lease on this land, recorded 28 Apr 1746 (Doc.#136g)

       Name and residence patterns above indicate that this Christopher and John Reynolds were brothers, i.e. sons of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his wife Elizabeth, maiden name Brock according to The Robert Reynolds Family web-site. Though Isle of Wight County records confirm that Christopher Reynolds, Sr., married a woman named Elizabeth, there is no record of her maiden name. Name and residence patterns listed above indicate that this Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and Joyce Staples.

       Though there is a record listed below which lists that a Christopher Reynolds, Jr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was married to an Elizabeth Saunders prior to 1747: 1747, Isle of Wight County Order Bk. 1746-52, p.29; Christopher Reynolds listed as having married Elizabeth Saunders, sister of John Saunders (Doc.#138e), name and residence patterns indicate that this refers to the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe as listed below.

       12 Jun 1746, Isle of Wight County Deeds Bk. 7, p.324; Richard Reynolds listed owning land next to deed from Robert Campbell of Nansemond County to James Baker, Gentleman, of Isle of Wight County, 419 acres on the east side of Blackwater Swamp (being part of patent granted Hugh Campbell on 21 Apr 1695 who willed the 411 acres to John Campbell, deceased, father of the said Robert Campbell by will in Nansemond County) land also bounded by Owin Burns and the Blackwater River, recorded 12 Jun 1746 (Doc.#136h)

       9 Oct 1746, Isle Of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 7, p. 430, Christopher Reynolds listed as a Juryman (Doc.#136i)

       1747, Isle of Wight County Order Bk. 1746-52, p.29; Christopher Reynolds listed as having married Elizabeth Saunders, sister of John Saunders (Doc.#138e)

       This court record reveals that a Christopher Reynolds was married to an Elizabeth Saunders prior to 1747. Name and residence patterns listed below in the 1763 will of Christopher Reynolds indicates that he was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe. The 1763 will of Christopher Reynolds who married Elizabeth Saunders reads as follows: 22 Mar 1763, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 7, 1760-1769, p. 242; Christopher Reynolds’ will leaves his son Sharp Reynolds the plantation which he purchased from his cousin Christopher Reynolds, also a Negro boy named Coffee; Son Saunders Reynolds to receive the plantation that I now live on and a Negro boy named Toby; Daughter Sweeting Reynolds a Negro boy named Prince; all other Negroes to be hired out by my executor until son Saunders Reynolds becomes age 21 years of age at which time all money from Negroes to be equally divided among all my children. John Joyner appointed as sole Executor. Witnesses: Robert Tynes, Bartholomew Lightfoot and Charles Driver, proved 5 May 1763 (Doc.#158). This will abstract for Christopher Reynolds reveals that he had children named Sharpe Reynolds, Saunders Reynolds and Sweeting Reynolds. Name and residence patterns indicate that this was the same Christopher Reynolds who married Elizabeth Saunders as listed above: 1747, Isle of Wight County Order Bk. 1746-52, p.29; Christopher Reynolds listed as having married Elizabeth Saunders, sister of John Saunders (Doc.#138e). Christopher Reynolds appears to have named one of his sons after his wife’s maiden name, a popular naming pattern for this time period. Christopher also named one of his sons Sharpe Reynolds, apparently after his brother who was named Sharpe Reynolds. Sharpe also appears to have been the maiden name for Christopher Reynolds’ mother, Elizabeth Sharpe. Hence, name and residence patterns appear to confirm that this Christopher Reynolds, who married Elizabeth Saunders, was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr. (who married Elizabeth Sharpe), the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant.

       8 Jan 1747, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 8, p.52, Christopher Reynolds of Nottoway Parish to Robert Carr of the same place...100 acres on the north side of the main Blackwater Swamp (being part of a patent for 1311 acres granted to Hugh Campbell, deceased, to Richard Reynolds) adjoining Robert Carr’s other land bought from Gilstrap Williams and land of William Fowler, Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Daniel Doyle, Thomas Bradshaw and Joseph Bradshaw, recorded 14 Jan 1747 (Doc.#136j)

       Interestingly, there is no record of the deed from Hugh Campbell to Richard Reynolds. However, name and residence patterns indicate that this was Richard Reynolds, Jr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and his wife, Joyce Staples. Name and residence patterns regarding the Blackwater Swamp indicate that this deed refers to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who resided in Nottoway Parish at this time. He was a son of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife Rebecca, who owned land and resided near the Blackwater Swamp as listed above: 25 Jun 1715, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.332; Richard Reynolds, Jr., and wife Rebeccah Reynolds, to Richard Jackson...100 acres bounded by Tarrapin Swamp, Witnesses: Joseph Chapman and William Ragdale, recorded 27 Jun 1715 (Doc.#135al) This reveals that the Richard Reynolds, who married Rebecca, was the son of yet a third Richard Reynolds who resided near the Tarrapin Swamp. The first deed mentioning the Tarrapin Swamp lists the following for Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Rebecca: 13 Nov 1713, The Library of Virginia, Land Office Patents No. 10, 1710-1719, p. 98; Richard Reynolds, Jr., obtained patent for 200 acres on the south side of the main Blackwater Swamp beginning at the mouth of Tarrapin Swamp (Doc.#142u). Notice that Tarrapin Swamp is located next to Blackwater Swamp. The first mention of Blackwater Swamp in conjunction with Richard or Christopher Reynolds is listed in the following deed: 9 Aug 1705, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.33; Richard Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and John Butler witnessed deed between William Butler of Nansemond County to Thomas Wooten, 150 acres bounded by Blackwater Swamp on Chewan River, recorded 10 Sep 1705 (Doc.#135ac). The name and residence patterns listed in these deeds reveals that Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Christopher Reynolds, who originally owned land bounding the Blackwater Swamp, were the sons of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the Colonial Virginia immigrant. Hence, Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Joyce Staples, appears to have been the father of Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Rebecca, and Christopher Reynolds who married Elizabeth, maiden name unknown. Though The Robert Reynolds Family web-site lists that there was a Christopher Reynolds who married Elizabeth Brock, we have found no documentation for the maiden name of Elizabeth. Records listed above, also reveal that a Christopher Reynolds married an Elizabeth Saunders. Blackwater is also the name of a River in Henry County which is listed in the description of the boundaries during the formation of Henry County: Henry County was formed by an Act of October, 1776 (first year of the commonwealth), which enacted “That from and after the last day of December next ensuing the said county of Pittsylvania be divided into two counties, by a line beginning at the mouth of Blackwater on Staunton River and running parallel with the line of Halifax County till it strikes the county line, and that all that part of the said county which lies to the westward of the said line shall be one distinct county and be called and known by the name of henry, and all the other part thereof which lies to the eastward of the said line shall be one other distinct county and retain the name of Pittsylvania.”

       10 Mar 1747, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 100; Christopher Reynolds listed as an appraiser for estate of Christopher Butler along with James Godwin and John Smelley, signed by John Butler, recorded 14 Apr 1748 (Doc.#133s)

       10 Mar 1747, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 107; Richard Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Robert Richards along with Joseph Norsworthy, John Scammell, signed by Mary Richards, recorded 12 May 1748 (Doc.#133t)

       30 Sep 1747, Newport Parish Vestry Book, p. 127; Christopher Reynolds and William Rand listed as processioners (in the room of Sharp Reynolds and William Wiggs) (Doc.#151j); Richard Reynolds and Joseph Norsworthy listed as processioners (Doc.#151k); line processioned between Christopher Reynolds and William Godwin (Doc.#151l)

       Christopher, Sharpe and Richard Reynolds, who are listed in these processioners records, appear to have been sons of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe as listed in Richard Reynolds, Sr.’s will above: 27 Jul 1711, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 1, p. 536; Will of Richard Reynolds, of Newport Parish, lists: Legatees - Wife Elizabeth; son Richard; son Sharpe; son Christopher the land on which Richard Jackson lives; grandson ------Reynolds; what is due Elizabeth Lewis one of the daughters of Richard Lewis to be paid. Executors my wife and sons. Recorded 26 May 1712. Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Giles Driver and Jane Benn (Doc.#132q-132r).

       29 Jan 1749, Isle Of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 8, p. 292, Christopher Reynolds and his wife, Elizabeth, of Newport Parish, sold to Robert Tynes of the same place, 25 acres on the old road to Broadwater adjoining Arthur Applewhaite and said Tynes, recorded 29 Feb 1749 (Doc.#135l)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this deed refers to Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Elizabeth Saunders. Notice that Robert Tynes is listed as a witness to the will of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., as listed above: 1747, Isle of Wight County Order Bk. 1746-52, p.29; Christopher Reynolds listed as having married Elizabeth Saunders, sister of John Saunders (Doc.#138e). This court record reveals that a Christopher Reynolds was married to an Elizabeth Saunders prior to 1747. Name and residence patterns listed below in the 1763 will of Christopher Reynolds indicates that he was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth Sharpe. The 1763 will of Christopher Reynolds who married Elizabeth Saunders reads as follows: 22 Mar 1763, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 7, 1760-1769, p. 242; Christopher Reynolds’ will leaves his son Sharp Reynolds the plantation which he purchased from his cousin Christopher Reynolds, also a Negro boy named Coffee; Son Saunders Reynolds to receive the plantation that I now live on and a Negro boy named Toby; Daughter Sweeting Reynolds a Negro boy named Prince; all other Negroes to be hired out by my executor until son Saunders Reynolds becomes age 21 years of age at which time all money from Negroes to be equally divided among all my children. John Joyner appointed as sole Executor. Witnesses: Robert Tynes, Bartholomew Lightfoot and Charles Driver, proved 5 May 1763 (Doc.#158). This will abstract for Christopher Reynolds reveals that he had children named Sharpe Reynolds, Saunders Reynolds and Sweeting Reynolds. This Christopher Reynolds appears to have named one of his sons after his wife’s maiden name, a popular naming pattern for this time period. Christopher also named one of his sons Sharpe Reynolds, apparently after his brother who was also named Sharpe. It also appears to have been the maiden name for Christopher Reynolds’ mother, Elizabeth Sharpe. Hence, name and residence patterns indicate that this Christopher Reynolds, who married Elizabeth Saunders, was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr. (who married Elizabeth Sharpe), the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. The cousin of this Christopher Reynolds, from whom he purchased land from which he gave to his son Sharpe, may have been Christopher Reynolds, III, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and Ann Coleman.

       30 Jan 1749, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, Marriage records, Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. IV, p.199; Barbara Reynolds married John Jones (Doc.#175c)

       This is the first reference to an individual named Reynolds in Spotsylvania County. Notice that Barbara is the name of one of the daughters of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Mary Anderson according to the Rennolds-Reynolds Family Roster, by Col. Steve F. Tillman.

       1 Feb 1749, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 8, p. 359; Christopher Reynolds, [Jr.], son of Christopher Reynolds, [Sr.], late of Isle of Wight, and wife, Mary Reynolds...? acres in Newport Parish late in the tenure of George Whitley adjoining Capt. Arthur Smith and Robert Tynes, Witnesses: Batholomew Lightfoot, James Garner and John Smelly, signed by Christopher and Mary Reynolds (Doc.#137b)

       Name and residence patterns revealed in this deed and the previous deed listed above indicate that the Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Elizabeth Saunders, of Newport Parish, were the parents of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., whose wife was named Mary. Notice that Robert Tynes, who is listed in both deeds, was also a witness to Rebecca Reynolds’ (wife of Richard Reynolds, Jr., who was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and Joyce Staples) will as follows: 4 May 1745, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 156; Rebecca Reynolds’ will lists: Legatees - daughter Tabitha; son Richard; son George; son Christopher; grandson Richard, the son of Richard Reynolds. Executors, son Richard and daughter Tabitha Reynolds. Recorded 6 Mar 1755, witnessed by Robert Tynes, Peter Green and Anne Green (Doc.#133an).

       22 Feb 1749, Augusta County, Virginia, Deeds Bk. 2, p. 470; John Reynolds listed as a witness to the selling of lots 8 and 9 as well as two 50 acre wooded lots 6 &7 in Staunton between Beverly and Alexander Wright (Doc.#185)

       This appears to be the first listing of an individual named Reynolds in Augusta County, Virginia. Augusta County was created from Orange County in 1738. Orange County was formed from Spotsylvania County in 1734.

       10 May 1749, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 8, p. 242; Christopher Reynolds sold to John Chesnutt, Jr.,...400 aces of 750 acres in Newport Parish (being land granted Richard Staples on 12 Jan 1661...the remaining 350 acres being vested with the said Christopher Reynolds, grandson of the said Richard Staples). Witnesses: Godfrey Powell, Benjamin Parnall and John Hole, recorded 11 May 1749 (Doc.#136k)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this deed refers to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and his wife, Joyce Staples. This is one of the sources for the documentation of the maiden name of Joyce who was the wife of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger. In regards to the property of Richard Staples, the following is listed above: 9 Aug 1704, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p1; Richard Reynolds [Sr., the younger] & Christopher Reynolds [Sr., his son] deed to Benjamin Beal for 267.5 acres (being part of a patent granted Richard Staples) adjoining Daniel Holloway and the Western Branch, Witnesses: Richard Reynolds, Jr., William Browne and Andrew Woodley, recorded 9 Aug 1704 (Doc.#135ab). This deed indicates that this was Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Joyce Staples. Name and residence patterns indicate that Christopher Reynolds was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and Joyce Staples. As listed in other records, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., was the son-in-law to Richard Staples of the Lower Parish in Isle of Wight County. The original land patent, which was issued to Richard Staples, is listed above and reveals the following: 12 Jan 1661, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 8, p.242, Richard Staples granted 750 acres in Newport Parish (Doc.#136k). Richard Reynolds, Sr.’ wife is merely listed as Joyce in the early deeds of Isle of Wight County. According to The Robert Reynolds Family web-site, Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and Joyce Staples were the parents of Christopher Reynolds, Jane Reynolds and Elizabeth Reynolds. Christopher Reynolds was born about 1692 and married Elizabeth Brock according to The Robert Reynolds Family web-site. However, except for a listing of his wife as Elizabeth, we have found no documentation for the listing of Elizabeth’s maiden name as Brock. Christopher and Elizabeth Reynolds had one known son named John (Doc.#140a) which is confirmed by the above deed dated 21 Mar 1732. However, they also had a son named Christopher Reynolds, Jr., as listed above.

       20 May 1749, The Library of Virginia, Virginia Land Office Patents No. 27, 1748-1749, p.187; Christopher Reynolds listed as owning land which bounded a 53 acre patent located on the North side of Nottoway River and bounding Thomas Edwards land, issued to Daniel Batten in Nansemond County (Doc.#142c)

       Name and residence patterns listed above indicate that this deed refers to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who owned land and resided in Nottoway Parish at this time. He was a son of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife Rebecca, who owned land and resided near the Blackwater Swamp as listed above: 8 Jan 1747, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 8, p.52, Christopher Reynolds of Nottoway Parish to Robert Carr of the same place...100 acres on the north side of the main Blackwater Swamp (being part of a patent for 1311 acres granted to Hugh Campbell, deceased, to Richard Reynolds) adjoining Robert Carr’s other land bought from Gilstrap Williams and land of William Fowler, Witnesses: Arthur Smith, Daniel Doyle, Thomas Bradshaw and Joseph Bradshaw, recorded 14 Jan 1747 (Doc.#136j). Interestingly, there is no record of the deed from Hugh Campbell to Richard Reynolds, Jr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and his wife, Joyce Staples. Name and residence patterns regarding the Blackwater Swamp indicate that this deed refers to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., who resided in Nottoway Parish at this time. He was a son of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife Rebecca, who owned land and resided near the Blackwater Swamp as listed above: 25 Jun 1715, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.332; Richard Reynolds, Jr., and wife Rebeccah Reynolds, to Richard Jackson...100 acres bounded by Tarrapin Swamp, Witnesses: Joseph Chapman and William Ragdale, recorded 27 Jun 1715 (Doc.#135al) This reveals that the Richard Reynolds, who married Rebecca, was the son of yet a third Richard Reynolds who resided near the Tarrapin Swamp. The first deed mentioning the Tarrapin Swamp lists the following for Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Rebecca: 13 Nov 1713, The Library of Virginia, Land Office Patents No. 10, 1710-1719, p. 98; Richard Reynolds, Jr., obtained patent for 200 acres on the south side of the main Blackwater Swamp beginning at the mouth of Tarrapin Swamp (Doc.#142u). Notice that Tarrapin Swamp is located next to Blackwater Swamp. The first mention of Blackwater Swamp in conjunction with Richard or Christopher Reynolds is listed in the following deed: 9 Aug 1705, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.33; Richard Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and John Butler witnessed deed between William Butler of Nansemond County to Thomas Wooten, 150 acres bounded by Blackwater Swamp on Chewan River, recorded 10 Sep 1705 (Doc.#135ac). The name and residence patterns listed in these deeds reveal that Richard Reynolds, Sr., and Christopher Reynolds, Jr.,who originally owned land bounding the Blackwater Swamp, were the sons of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the Colonial Virginia immigrant. Hence, Richard Reynolds, Sr., who married Joyce Staples, appears to have been the father of Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Rebecca, and Christopher Reynolds who married Elizabeth, maiden name unknown. Though The Robert Reynolds Family web-site lists that there was a Christopher Reynolds who married Elizabeth Brock as listed above, we have found no documentation for the maiden name of Elizabeth. Records listed above, also reveal that a Christopher Reynolds married an Elizabeth Saunders. Blackwater is also the name of a River in Henry County which is listed in the description of the boundaries during the formation of Henry County: Henry County was formed by an Act of October, 1776 (first year of the commonwealth), which enacted “That from and after the last day of December next ensuing the said county of Pittsylvania be divided into two counties, by a line beginning at the mouth of Blackwater on Staunton River and running parallel with the line of Halifax County till it strikes the county line, and that all that part of the said county which lies to the westward of the said line shall be one distinct county and be called and known by the name of henry, and all the other part thereof which lies to the eastward of the said line shall be one other distinct county and retain the name of Pittsylvania.”

       3 Aug 1749, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 218; Richard Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Hugh Giles, Sr., along with Joseph Norsworthy and Lemuel Godwin, signed by Mary Pedin, recorded 7 Dec 1749 (Doc.#133u)

       This probate record reveals that Richard Reynolds was associated with Capt. Hugh Giles, Sr., of whom Richard Reynolds may have named a son, i.e. Hugh Reynolds. Capt. Hugh Giles Sr.’s estate was appraised on 4 Apr 1751 (Doc.#133ac). Notice that there was a Hugh Reynolds who obtained land in Pittsylvania County about the same time that your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, obtains land there in Henry County. Henry County was created from Pittsylvania County where Hugh Reynolds first obtained land there in 1769. This supports the name and residence patterns in Pittsylvania and Henry Counties which indicates that Richard Reynolds and Hugh Reynolds were related, possibly brothers.

       5 Oct 1749, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 252; Richard Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of William Wainright along with Joseph Norsworthy and Thomas Wills, recorded 5 Jul 1750 (Doc.#133w)

       7 Dec 1749, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 221; Richard Reynolds and Richard Jordan examine estate of Robert Driver, recorded 7 Dec 1749 (Doc.#133u-v)

       7 Feb 1750, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 302; Richard Reynolds examined account estate of Charles Chapman along with Joseph Norsworthy, signed by Joseph Chapman (Doc.#133z)

       7 Jun 1750, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 262; Christopher Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of John Jolly along with John Smelley and Thomas Norsworthy, signed by Ann Jolly, recorded 6 Sep 1750 (Doc.#133x)

       5 Jul 1750, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 264; Christopher Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Jacob Darden along with John Baldwin and John Butler, signed by Elizabeth Darden, recorded 6 Sep 1750 (Doc.#133x)

       5 Jul 1750, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 268; Christopher Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of John Chestnut along with John Powell and Bartholomew Lightfoot, signed by Martha Chestnut, recorded 6 Sep 1750 (Doc.#133x)

       23 Aug, 1750, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 279; Richard Reynolds listed as witness for estate of Sarah Godwin/Goodwin along with John Godwin and Wilkinson Parker, recorded 1 Nov 1750 (Doc.#133y)

       4 Apr 1751, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 381; Capt. Hugh Giles estate appraised by Jonathan Godwin, John Godwin and Samson West, recorded 7 Nov 1751, (Doc.#133ac)

       2 May 1751, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 339; Richard Reynolds examined estate of Robert Richards along with John Applewhaite (Doc.#133aa)

       1 Aug 1751, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 354; Christopher Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Thomas Uzzell along with Bartholomew Lightfoot and John Joyner, signed by James and Thomas Uzzell, recorded 1 Aug 1751 (Doc.#133ab)

       1 Aug 1751, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 374; Richard Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Caleb Mackoy along with Samson West and John Clark, recorded 4 Oct 1751 (Doc.#133ac)

       5 Sep 1751, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 369; Richard Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Richard West along with John Clark and Augustine King, recorded 3 Oct 1751 (Doc.#133ac)

       7 Sep 1751, Newport Parish Vestry Book, p. 145; Richard Reynolds and Joseph Norsworthy listed as processioners (Doc.#151m-o); Christopher Reynolds and Robert Tynes listed as processioners (Doc.#151m)
       
       6 Feb 1752, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 409; Richard Reynolds examined estate of Thomas Whitley along with Joseph Norsworthy (Doc.#133ad)

       6 Feb 1752, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 428; Richard Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Robert West along with Augustine King and George Whitley, recorded 4 Jun 1752 (Doc.#133ae)

       12 Feb 1752, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p.28; Richard Reynolds listed as a witness to will of Elizabeth Shaw of Newport Parish, recorded 4 Jan 1753 (Doc.#133ai)

       4 Jun 1752, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 430; Richard Reynolds examined estate of Edward Driver along with Joseph Norsworthy (Doc.#133ae)

       4 Jun 1752, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 449; Richard Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Joseph Bridger, Jr., along with Joseph Norsworthy, recorded 6 Aug 1752 (Doc.#133af)

       16 Jul 1752, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 8, p. 516; Richard Reynolds listed as witness to 15 year lease of James West to Giles West...200 acres (being the land Patience Casey lives on and was given to me by my father), signed by James West and Giles West, recorded 14 Sep 1752 (Doc.#137c)

       1 Oct 1752, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p. 38; Richard Reynolds and Charles Driver listed as witnesses to 15 year lease of Henry Pitt to Giles Driver...”all my land” on the south east side of Jones Creek (except 50 acres known as “Hains”). Giles West is mentioned, signed by Henry Pitt, recorded 2 Nov (Doc.#137d)

       5 Oct 1752, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p.7; Richard Reynolds examined estate of Richard West along with Thomas Gale and Charles Fulgam (Doc.#133ag)

       3 Nov 1752, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p. 98; Christopher Reynolds sold to James Calcote...150 acres adjoining the Deep Branch and Bartholomew Lightfoot, Witnesses: John Chapman, Joseph Chapman and Robert Reynolds. Signed by Christopher Reynolds, recorded 3 Nov 1752 (Doc.#137d)

       Name and residence patterns listed below indicate that Robert Reynolds was a son of this Christopher Reynolds, Sr. and his wife, Elizabeth. Christopher Reynolds, Sr., was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and Joyce Staples. Christopher Reynolds, Sr., owned land next to Bartholomew Lightfoot who appears to have been a son of Henry Lightfoot. As listed below, the sons of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his wife Elizabeth, intermarried with the daughters of Henry Lightfoot: 1753, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p.122; Isle of Wight County Deed Bk. 9, p. 154; Christopher Reynolds listed as having married Mary Lightfoot, daughter of Henry Lightfoot (Doc.#138e). Name and residence patterns indicate that this Christopher Reynolds, who married Mary Lightfoot, the daughter of Henry Lightfoot, is the same Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who is listed above and whose wife was named Mary in several Isle of Wight County deeds: 1 Feb 1749, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 8, p. 359; Christopher Reynolds, [Jr.], son of Christopher Reynolds, [Sr.], late of Isle of Wight, and wife, Mary Reynolds...? acres in Newport Parish late in the tenure of George Whitley adjoining Capt. Arthur Smith and Robert Tynes, Witnesses: Batholomew Lightfoot, James Garner and John Smelly, signed by Christopher and Mary Reynolds (Doc.#137b). Notice that Bartholomew Lightfoot is listed as a witness indicating that he was related to Mary Lightfoot, possibly her brother; 4 Jun 1753, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p. 154; Christopher Reynolds and his wife, Mary Reynolds, sold to William Woodward...460 acres in Newport Parish adjoining Western Branch Run, signed by Christopher Reynolds, Mary Reynolds and Ann Hunt, Witnesses: Thomas Gale and Christopher Reynolds, recorded 5 Jul 1753 (Doc.#137g).

       7 Dec 1752, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p.17; Richard Reynolds examined estate of Robert West along with Augustine King and John Goodrich (Doc.#133ah)

       1753, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p.122; Isle of Wight County Deed Bk. 9, p. 154; Christopher Reynolds [Jr.] listed as having married Mary Lightfoot, daughter of Henry Lightfoot (Doc.#138e)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this Christopher Reynolds, who married Mary Lightfoot, the daughter of Henry Lightfoot, is the same Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who is listed above with his wife named Mary in several Isle of Wight County deeds: 1 Feb 1749, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 8, p. 359; Christopher Reynolds, [Jr.], son of Christopher Reynolds, [Sr.], late of Isle of Wight, and wife, Mary Reynolds...? acres in Newport Parish late in the tenure of George Whitley adjoining Capt. Arthur Smith and Robert Tynes, Witnesses: Batholomew Lightfoot, James Garner and John Smelly, signed by Christopher and Mary Reynolds (Doc.#137b). Notice that Bartholomew Lightfoot is listed as a witness indicating that he was related to Mary Lightfoot, possibly her brother; 4 Jun 1753, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p. 154; Christopher Reynolds and his wife, Mary Reynolds, sold to William Woodward...460 acres in Newport Parish adjoining Western Branch Run, signed by Christopher Reynolds, Mary Reynolds and Ann Hunt, Witnesses: Thomas Gale and Christopher Reynolds, recorded 5 Jul 1753 (Doc.#137g).

       5 Feb 1753, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p. 98; Richard Reynolds, Charles Driver and William Chapman listed as witnesses to deed between Henry Pitt to Giles Driver....50 acres (being part of a patent for 750 acres ‘formerly granted to my deceased father, Thomas Pitt) on the south side of Jones Creek, recorded 1 Mar 1753 (Doc.#137e)

       5 Apr 1753, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.104; Richard Reynolds and Owin Burns listed as owning land adjoining 419 acres sold by James Baker to Edmund Fowler on the east side of Blackwater River (being part of a patent for 1311 acres granted to Hugh Campbell on 21 Apr 1695...), recorded 5 Apr 1753 (Doc.#137f)

       3 May 1753, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 59; Richard Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Mary Pedin along with Joseph Norsworthy and Samson West (Doc.#133aj)

       4 Jun 1753, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p. 154; Christopher Reynolds and his wife, Mary Reynolds, sold to William Woodward...460 acres in Newport Parish adjoining Western Branch Run, signed by Christopher Reynolds, Mary Reynolds and Ann Hunt, Witnesses: Thomas Gale and Christopher Reynolds, recorded 5 Jul 1753 (Doc.#137g)

       5 Jul 1753, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p. 156; Christopher Reynolds, his wife Mary Reynolds and Ann Hunt sold to John Marshall, Jr., 250 acres (being part of the land willed by Robert Coleman) adjoining the main swamp, Stricklins Bridge and the Beaverdam Swamp, signed by Ann Hunt, Christopher Reynolds and Mary Reynolds, Witnesses: Thomas Gale and Christopher Reynolds, recorded 5 Jul 1753 (Doc.#137g)

       This deed in which a Christopher Reynolds appears as a party to a deed as well as a witness to the same deed confirms that there were two separate Christopher Reynolds who were father and son. The previous deed for Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and Mary Lightfoot indicates that this Christopher Reynolds is the same person. He was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Elizabeth, who resided in Newport Parish of Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

       1754, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p. 286; Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 122; Robert Reynolds married Patience Lightfoot, daughter of Henry Lightfoot (Doc.#138f)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this Robert Reynolds was a son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Elizabeth. It was fairly common for families to inter-marry such as brothers marrying sisters.

       4 Jan 1754, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 78; Richard Reynolds examined estate of Jacob Dickinson along with John Applewhite [Applewhaite] (Doc.#133ak)

       6 Jun 1754, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 78; Christopher Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Arthur Smith along with James Calcote and Benjamin Brock, recorded 1 Aug 1754 (Doc.#133al)

       7 Jun 1754, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p. 289; Robert Reynolds and his wife, Patience Reynolds, sold to Henry Pitt...200 acres called “the Pocoson Plantation” adjoining Jordans Mill Swamp, Robert Driver and Turner ?, signed by Robert Reynolds, Patience Reynolds and Ann Hunt, Witnesses: Giles Driver, recorded 7 Nov 1754 (Doc.#137i)

       Notice that Ann Hunt also signed with Christopher and Mary Reynolds in the deeds dated 4 Jun 1753 and 5 Jul 1753 which are also listed above in this chronology. This indicates that Robert may have been a son of Christopher Reynolds and Mary Reynolds. Ann Hunt also appears to have been related, possibly the widowed mother of Mary Reynolds.

       5 Dec 1754, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p. 290; Christopher Reynolds, William Woodward and George Hall witnessed a deed from James Bridger, Gentleman, and wife Mary, to Nathan Cooke...250 acres adjoining Burks Swamp, Round Hill Branch and Daniel Herring, signed by James and Sarah Bridger, Witnesses: Christopher Reynolds, William Woodward and George Hall, recorded 5 Dec 1754 (Doc.#137i)
       
       8 Jul 1754, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 115; Sharpe Reynolds’ will lists: legatees - cousin Richard Reynolds; cousin George Reynolds; Sarah Wooten; cousin Christopher, the son of Christopher Reynolds, deceased. Executor, cousin Christopher Reynolds (Doc.#133am)

       According to the will of Sharpe Reynolds, he appears to have died between 8 Jul 1754 when his will was recorded, and 5 Sep 1754 when his will was proved as listed below. According to his will, Sharpe Reynolds does not appear to have married. His will leaves his estate to his cousins Richard Reynolds, George Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds, Jr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr. Name and residence patterns indicate that his cousins Richard Reynolds and George Reynolds appear to have been sons of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Rebecca. This is the only George Reynolds listed in the above records. In regards to Sharpe Reynolds’ cousin Christopher Reynolds, Jr., he appears to have been the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth. It is interesting to note that these actually appear to have been second cousins of Sharpe Reynolds rather than first cousins.

       5 Sep 1754, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, 1752-1760, pp. 115-116; Sharpe Reynold’s will Proved (Doc.#143e)

       3 Oct 1754, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, 1752-1760, pp. 121-122, Sharpe Reynold’s inventory and appraisel of his estate by Thomas Norsworthy, James Calcote and Robert Tynes (Doc.#133am, 143e)

       1755, Estate of Rebecca Reynolds appraised by Bartholomew Lightfoot, William McConnell and Robert Tynes (Doc.#133an)

       Notice that Rebecca Reynolds estate was appraised almost ten years after her will was recorded on 4 May 1745 as listed above: 4 May 1745, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 156; Rebecca Reynolds’ will lists: Legatees - daughter Tabitha; son Richard; son George; son Christopher; grandson Richard, the son of Richard Reynolds. Executors, son Richard and daughter Tabitha Reynolds. Recorded 6 Mar 1755, witnessed by Robert Tynes, Peter Green and Anne Green. (Doc.#133an). This will of Rebecca Reynolds, who was the wife of Richard Reynolds, Jr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and Joyce Staples, reveals that she had a son, Richard Reynolds, III, who had a son, Richard Reynolds, IV. This information corresponds with the deed and probate records listed above for Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Rebecca.

       1 Apr 1755, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.328; Richard Reynolds, Phillip Moody and Thomas Gale listed as witnesses to a deed of gift from John Murphrey to his son, John Murphrey, for love and affection...50 acres in Newport Parish (being part of a patent that was formerly granted to his father, William Murphrey) adjoining Wilkinson. Signed by John Murphrey. (Doc.#137k)

       3 Apr 1755, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.351; Richard Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds, John Smelley and George Wilson witnessed a deed of gift from Bartholomew Lightfoot of Newport Parish to his cousin John Lightfoot for love and affection and a promise made to his father Henry Lightfoot...70 acres adjoining Capt. Arthur Smith and James Calcote. Signed by Bartholomew Lightfoot, recorded 3 Jul 1755 (Doc.#137l)

       It is not clear from the wording of this deed as to whether Bartholomew is referring to Henry Lightfoot as his father or the father of John Lightfoot? The wills of Henry and Bartholomew Lightfoot should be searched in order to clarify these relationships.

       3 Apr 1755, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 7, p. 198; Richard Reynolds appraised the estate of Solomon Sanders along with George Whitley and Jonathan Godwin, recorded 2 Oct 1758 (Doc.#133ay)

       7 Oct 1755, Spotsylvania County, Virginia Deeds Bk. E, p. ?; James Reynolds and his wife Elizabeth of St. George Parish sold 300 acres in St. George Parish to Aquilla Johnson of St. Margaret’s Parish in Caroline County (Doc.#186a)

       This James Reynolds appears related to the Joseph Reynolds who is listed above as a witness in Spotsylvania County on 15 Nov 1744.

       17 Oct 1755, Newport Parish Vestry Book, p. 175; Richard Reynolds and Joseph Norsworthy listed as processioners; Christopher Reynolds and Arthur Applewhite listed as processioners; Christopher Reynolds and James Jordan listed as processioners; Christopher Reynolds received compensation for making garden on the Glebe (Doc.#151p-r)

       The glebe was cultivated land which belonged to or yielded revenue for the parish church. Evidently, Christopher Reynolds was responsible for cultivating the parish garden in 1755. Notice that there were two individuals named Christopher Reynolds who were listed as processioners in 1755.

       7 Nov 1755, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 204; Richard Reynolds assigned to examine the estate of Solomon Sanders along with Charles Fulgham (Doc.#133ao-p, 133ay)

       5 Feb 1756, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 211; Richard Reynolds appraised the additional estate of Solomon Sanders along with Jonathan Godwin and George Whitley (Doc.#133ap)

       6 Feb 1756, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.417; Christopher Reynolds bought from James Calcote, 150 acres (being part of a patent of 566 acres granted to Richard Reynolds on 10 May 1679), Witnesses: Thomas Brock and John Joyner, signed by James and Mary Calcote (Doc.#137m)

       Notice that a Thomas Brock is listed as having been a witness to this deed for Christopher Reynolds. As listed above, The Robert Reynolds Family web-site lists an Elizabeth Brock as the wife of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and his wife, Joyce Staples.

       30 Jun 1756, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.449; Christopher Reynolds listed as having sold land to John Wills, and Richard Casey having sold land to William Almand in regards to the dividing line between the two properties, Witnesses: Lemuel Riddick and John Scarsbrock Wills, signed by John Wills, recorded 3 Dec 1756 (Doc.#137n)

       1757, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 315; Isle of Wight County Order Bk. 1759-1763, pp. 330, 504; George Reynolds listed as having married Elizabeth Norsworthy, daughter of Joseph Norsworthy (Doc.#138e)

       Name and residence patterns appear to confirm that this George Reynolds was the son of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Rebecca, as listed above: 7 Apr 1741, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.326; Richard Reynolds notes receiving slaves and goods from his mother, Rebecca Reynolds, as part of the estate of his father, Richard Reynolds, deceased, signed by Richard Reynolds, Witnesses: George Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and Tabitha Reynolds, recorded 6 Mar 1755 (Doc.#137j). This deed reveals that Richard Reynolds, Jr., the father of George Reynolds and his siblings listed below, died in 1741. His wife, Rebecca Reynolds, deeded portions of their father’s estate to her children on 7 Apr 1741. This George Reynolds who is listed as a witness in this deed was a son of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and Rebecca as listed below. There was also a Capt. George Reynolds listed in the Pittsylvania and Henry County records of Virginia during the Revolution. Name and residence patterns suggest that they were related to this George Reynolds of Isle of Wight County, Virginia. George, Tabitha and Christopher Reynolds also received their portion of their father’s estate from their mother, Rebecca Reynolds; 7 Apr 1741, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.327; George Reynolds states that he received slaves and goods from Rebecca Reynolds as part of the estate of his father, Richard Reynolds, signed by George Reynolds, Witnesses: Richard Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and Tabitha Reynolds, recorded 6 Mar 1755 (Doc.#137j); 7 Apr 1741, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.327; Tabitha Reynolds states that she has received her part of her father’s estate, signed by Tabitha Reynolds, Witnesses: Richard Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and George Reynolds, recorded 6 Mar 1755 (Doc.#137j); 7 Apr 1741, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.327; Christopher Reynolds states that he received his part of his father’s estate, signed by Christopher Reynolds, Witnesses: Richard Reynolds, George Reynolds and Tabitha Reynolds, recorded 6 Mar 1755 (Doc.#137j); These last four deed records reveal that Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Rebecca, were the parents of Richard Reynolds, III, Christopher Reynolds, George Reynolds and Tabitha Reynolds. The earliest record we have for Richard Reynolds, Jr., listed with his wife, Rebecca is the following deed which is listed above: 25 Jun 1715, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 2, p.332; Richard Reynolds, Jr., and wife Rebeccah Reynolds, to Richard Jackson...100 acres bounded by Tarrapin Swamp, Witnesses: Joseph Chapman and William Ragdale, recorded 27 Jun 1715 (Doc.#135al) This reveals that the Richard Reynolds, who married Rebecca, was the son of yet a third Richard Reynolds who resided near the Tarrapin Swamp. The first deed mentioning the Tarrapin Swamp lists the following for Richard Reynolds, Jr., who married Rebecca: 13 Nov 1713, The Library of Virginia, Land Office Patents No. 10, 1710-1719, p. 98; Richard Reynolds, Jr., obtained patent for 200 acres on the south side of the main Blackwater Swamp beginning at the mouth of Tarrapin Swamp (Doc.#142u). Rebecca Reynolds also left a will, as listed below in this Chronology, which lists the following: 4 May 1745, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 156; Rebecca Reynolds’ will lists: Legatees - daughter Tabitha; son Richard; son George; son Christopher; grandson Richard, the son of Richard Reynolds. Executors, son Richard and daughter Tabitha Reynolds. Recorded 6 Mar 1755, witnessed by Robert Tynes, Peter Green and Anne Green. (Doc.#133an). This will of Rebecca Reynolds, who was the wife of Richard Reynolds, Jr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger and Joyce Staples, reveals that she had a son, Richard Reynolds, III, who had a son, Richard Reynolds, IV. 8 Jul 1754, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 115; Sharpe Reynolds’ will lists: legatees - cousin Richard Reynolds; cousin George Reynolds; Sarah Wooten; cousin Christopher, the son of Christopher Reynolds, deceased. Executor, cousin Christopher Reynolds (Doc.#133am). According to the will of Sharpe Reynolds, he appears to have died between 8 Jul 1754 when his will was recorded, and 5 Sep 1754 when his will was proved as listed below. According to his will, Sharpe Reynolds does not appear to have married. His will leaves his estate to his cousins Richard Reynolds, George Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds, Jr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr. Name and residence patterns indicate that his cousins Richard Reynolds and George Reynolds appear to have been sons of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Rebecca. This is the only George Reynolds listed in the above records. In regards to Sharpe Reynolds’ cousin Christopher Reynolds, Jr., he appears to have been the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., and Elizabeth, maiden name possibly Saunders or Brock who are listed above. It is interesting to note that these actually appear to have been second cousins of Sharpe Reynolds rather than first cousins.

       6 Jan 1757, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 252; Richard Reynolds and John Applewhaite assigned to examine the estate of Lemuel Goodwin/Godwin (Doc.#133aq)

       3 Feb 1757, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 262; Richard Reynolds and Thomas Miller examined the estate of Robert Driver (Doc.#133ar)

       4 Mar 1757, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.480; Christopher Reynolds, William Rand and Sophia Rand listed as witnesses to deed between Thomas Liles, Catherine Liles and Andrew Mackie (Doc.#137o)

       Apr 1757, Statutes at Large by William W. Henning, Vol. VII, p. 156; Vol. VI, p.288; Richard Reynolds’ land listed where the old bridge over the Western Branch of the Pagan River is being rebuilt and several new ferries were appointed (Doc.#178a, 179a)

       8 Jul 1757, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 300; Richard Reynolds, William Richard and Micajah Wills listed as a witnesses to estate of Ralph Gibbs, recorded 3 Nov 1757 (Doc.#133as)

       1 Jan 1758, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 10, p.28; Richard Reynolds leased to John Brantley....? acres(being the land where Mary Goodson last lived), Witnesses: George Benn and William Ponsonby, Jr., recorded 3 Aug 1758 (Doc.#137p)

       2 Feb 1758, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 325; Richard Reynolds appraised the additional estate of Joseph Bridger, Jr., along with Samson West and Thomas Miller (Doc.#133at)

       2 Mar 1758, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 385; Christopher Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of John Butler along with Bartholomew Lightfoot and William Allmand, recorded 6 Apr 1758 (Doc.#133aw)

       2 Mar 1758, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 387; Christopher Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Jesse Smith along with Robert Tynes and Thomas Brock, recorded 6 Apr 1758 (Doc.#133aw)

       21 Mar 1758, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 383; Christopher Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Elizabeth West along with Bartholomew Lightfoot and William Allmand, recorded 6 Apr 1758 (Doc.#133aw)

       6 Apr 1758, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 384; Christopher Reynolds examined account estate of Everitt West along with Bartholomew Lightfoot and William Allmand (Doc.#133aw)

       6 Jul 1758, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 10, p.27; Richard Reynolds and Augustine King listed as witnesses to deed of gift from Mary Gibbs, widow, to her son John Gibbs for love and affection, negroes viz Frank, Rose, Meanna and Juda, signed by Mary Gibbs, recorded 5 Aug 1758 (Doc.#137p)

       3 Aug 1758, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 409; Richard Reynolds appraised the estate of Joseph Norsworthy along with Samuel Holiday and Jonathan Godwin (Doc.#133au)

       This Joseph Norsworthy appears to have been the father of Elizabeth Norsworthy who married George Reynolds as listed above: 1757, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 315; Isle of Wight County Order Bk. 1759-1763, pp. 330, 504; George Reynolds listed as having married Elizabeth Norsworthy, daughter of Joseph Norsworthy (Doc.#138e).

       3 Aug 1758, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk.109, p.24; Christopher Reynolds and James Benn witnessed a deed from Charles Driver, Jr., and his wife, Keshiah Driver, of Isle of Wight to Samuel Cutchin of Nansemond County...100 acres adjoining Edward Grooms, John Wills and Joshua Cutchin (being part of 900 acres taken up by Giles Driver.) Signed by Charles and Kechiah Driver. Recorded 3 Aug 1758. (Doc.#137p)

       3 Aug 1758, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 10, p.26; Christopher Reynolds of Isle of Wight sold to Samuel Cutchin of Nansemond County....100 acres (being part of 200 acres granted Jeremiah Ruter (?) By Francis Morrison, Esq.) adjoining Thomas Jordan and the Cypress Cart Path. Witnesses: Samuel Cutchin, Jr. and Robert Driver (Doc.#137p)

       19 Aug 1758, The Library of Virginia, Land Office Patents No. 33, 1756-1761, p.469; Christopher Reynolds listed owning land which bounded a 46 acre patent issued to Richard Williams located in Nansemond County (Doc.#142j)

       20 Oct 1758, Newport Parish Vestry Book, p. 247; Christopher Reynolds received compensation along with William Smith, John Wills, Jr., Bartholomew Lightfoot and Joseph Hill from Robert Tynes, vestryman, for work done on the Glebe and Brick Church (Doc.#151t)

       7 Dec 1758, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 10, p.63; Richard Reynolds and Nicholas Parker agree on two slaves viz Stephen and Jude as his dower in right of his wife Mary Parker, the widow and relict of Robert Richards, deceased, and 1/3 part of said Richard’s land, signed by Richard Reynolds and Nicholas Parker, recorded 4 Jan 1759 (Doc.#137q)

       1758, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 414; Richard Reynolds appraised the estate of John Applewhaite along with Giles Driver and Charles Driver (Doc.#133aw)

       1 Mar 1759, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 10, p.132; Christopher Reynolds and John Stroud listed as witnesses to deed from Adam Brown, guardian to Herbet Haines, regarding slaves (Doc.#137r)

       3 May 1759, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 6, p. 481; Richard Reynolds examined account estate of Ralph Gibbs along with Augustine King (Doc.#133ax)

       2 Aug 1759, Isle of Wight Guardian Accounts 1740-1767, p. 173; Richard Reynolds listed in guardianship records for Randolph West, orphan of Everitt West, along with Richard Pierce, Benjamin Wester, Thomas Gay, John Stevens and Eupapheaditue (Doc.#135d)

       24 Sep 1759, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 10, p.203; Richard Reynolds and Richard Reynolds, Jr., witnessed a deed for slaves by Ann Holiday, recorded 1 May 1760 (Doc.#137s)

       Name and residence patterns for this time period indicates that this deed refers to Richard Reynolds, III, and his son, Richard Reynolds, IV.

       10 Dec 1759, Newport Parish Vestry Book, p. 243; Christopher Reynolds and Arthur Applewhite listed as processioners; Christopher Reynolds and Joshua Hunter listed as processioners with witnesses listed as Robert Fry, clerk of Vestry, Daniel Herring and John Wills (Doc.#151s)

       7 Aug 1760, Isle of Wight Guardian Accounts 1740-1767, p. 191; Christopher Reynolds, Giles Driver and others listed in guardian account for Samuel Simmons, orphan of James Simmons (Doc.#135c)

       6 Feb 1761, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 10, p.285; Christopher Reynolds and William Robertson purchased lot#32 in Smithfield Town (being the lot she now lives on) from Mary Jackson, Witnesses: Robert Fry, Robert Driver and Kezekiah Holliday, recorded 4 Jun 1761 (Doc.#137u)

       According to the Smithfield Town web-site, we located the following history of Smithfield:

              Smithfield and surrounding Isle of Wight County are as old as Virginia itself, having been first colonized in 1634. Located on the banks of the Pagan River, and lying on the opposite shore of the James River, accross from Jamestown, the area was soon discovered by Captain John Smith and other early settlers. Smithfield and surrounding counties saw action during the Revolutionary War and Civil War, mainly because of its proximity to the James River.

              The Town of Smithfield was born on the banks of the industrious Pagan River as a riverfront town and was established in 1752 by Arthur Smith IV. Mr. Smith parceled out his family farm into 72 lots and 4 streets to house British merchants and ship captains. Nurtured by trade and commerce, Smithfield soon became a town of industry, with four plants devoted to the art of curing the famous "Smithfield Ham". In 2002, Smithfield will celebrate its 250th Anniversary with a year long celebration including special events, festivals and parades.

       According to this history, Smithfield was founded by Arthur Smith IV in 1752. Arthur Smith was a descendant of Col. Arthur Smith I with whom your Reynolds ancestors were neighbors, exchanged land between them and no doubt served in the Colonial Militia during the Indian campaigns.

       11 Feb 1761, Augusta County, Virginia, Deeds Bk 9, p. 180; Francis Reynolds listed as a neighbor to a deed for 100 acres of 92100 from Borden’s executors to William Davis (Doc.#185a-c)
       
       2 Jun 1761, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 10, p.281; Richard Reynolds, Jonathan Godwin and Nicholas Fulgham witnessed the allotment of land to Mary Norsworthy, relict of Joseph Norsworthy, deceased (Doc.#137t)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that Joseph and Mary Norsworthy were the parents of Elizabeth Norsworthy who married George Reynolds as listed above.

       1 Jan 1762, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 11, p.4; Christopher Reynolds of Newport Parish sold to Andrew Mackie of the same place...700 acres on Cypress Swamp in Newport Parish (being part of a patent granted to Ambrose Bennett for 1150 acres on 3 Jun 1641...part was sold by said Bennett to Robert Coleman who willed on 8 Mar 1615/1616 [year should be listed as 1715] to Christopher Reynolds and wife, Ann Reynolds, and it descended to their son, the said Christopher Reynolds) adjoining Bullinges Branch and John Smelley, Witnesses: Richard Baker, Gardner Fleaming and Will Robertson, signed by Christopher Reynolds, recorded 7 Jan 1762 (Doc.#137v)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this deed refers to Christopher Reynolds, III, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Ann Coleman. Ann Coleman was the daughter of Robert and Mary Coleman. According to this deed, this land was bequeathed from the will of Robert Coleman to his daughter Ann, and his son-in-law, Christopher Reynolds, Jr.. From Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and Anne Coleman it descended to their son, Christopher Reynolds, III. However, this appears to conflict with the 1679 patent obtained by Richard Reynolds, Sr., the younger, which lists him as the only son and heir of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant: 10 May 1679, Virginia Land Office, Patents Bk. 6, p.684; Cavaliers and Pioneers, Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, Vol. 11: 1666-1695, p. 198; Richard Reynolds, the younger, of Isle of Wight County, 566 acres in the Lower Parish of said County, on northwest side of the head of the Lower Bay Creek; P. 684. Beginning at an Island near head of said Creek to Christopher Bly’s line; along Henry King; to Col. [Arthur] Smith & Mr. Driver; to head of West Freshett or swamp &c [calculated] 241 acres. Part of 450 acres granted Mr. Christopher Reynolds [Sr.], late of said County, 15 Sep 1636 and by will given to his eldest son Christopher [Jr.]and his heirs forever who bequeathed to said Richard, his only son and heir; 100 acres part of 350 acres granted to Mr. Richard Jordan, Sr., 18 Mar 1662, who conveyed it to said Christopher Reynolds [Jr.] on 17 May 1658, who bequeathed to said Richard [Reynolds the Younger]: 225 acres being waste together with said 341 acres, due for transporting of 12 persons. Witnesses: Daniel Hennon/Herron, John Champion, Lewis Davis, Edward Goodson (Note: Conveyance from Jordan to Reynolds antedates this patent) (Doc.#149,150a,140a). Though it is not listed under Richard Reynolds in the card catalog for the Library of Virginia’s collection of Land Office Patents & Grants, this patent and other deed records reveal that Richard Reynolds the younger was the only son and heir of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., the son of the immigrant, Christopher Reynolds, Sr. As listed above, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., obtained the original 450 acre patent on 15 Sep 1636. In 1657, Christopher Reynolds, Jr., obtained a 350 acre patent for land which bounded the 450 acre patent obtained by his father, Christopher Reynolds, Sr., as described in the following deed abstract which is listed above: 25 Nov 1657, The Library of Virginia, Virginia Land Office Grants No. 4, 1786, p.243; Christopher Reynolds obtained patent for 350 acres bounding Freshett by the miles end of 450 acres of land patented by Christopher Reynolds, deceased. This patent was renewed in Richard Jordans’ name on 18 Mar 1662 (Doc.#142). Christopher Reynolds’s will was made out on 1 May 1654, as listed above, and corresponds with this land patent. According to The Robert Reynolds Family web-site, they interpret the above land patent as confirming that Richard Reynolds the Younger was the only son and heir of Christopher Reynolds, Jr. and his wife, Elizabeth, whose maiden name is listed as Sharpe. The Robert Reynolds Family web-site also lists that Richard Reynolds, the Younger, is the same person as Richard Reynolds who married Joyce Staples (Doc.#140a). Though The Robert Reynolds Family web-site provides no documentation to support the theory that Richard Reynolds the Younger is the same person who married Joyce Staples, name and residence patterns suggest that it is certainly possible. Hence, in conclusion of our analysis of the above land patent, both Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his brother Richard Reynolds, Sr., had sons named Richard Reynolds. In regards to the accuracy of the land patent abstract which is listed above for Richard Reynolds the Younger, we obtained a copy of the original patent which appears to correspond with the transcription by Cavaliers and Pioneers. Hence, according to this 10 May 1679 land patent, Richard Reynolds the younger does appear to have been the only son and heir of Christopher Reynolds, Jr. However, this information does not correspond with the above deed which lists that Christopher Reynolds, Jr., had a son named Christopher Reynolds, III.

       2 Sep 1762, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 11, 1761-1765, p.73; Christopher Reynolds listed as having sold land to William Woodward on 4 Jun 1753, who sold the same land to George Hall, 230 acres adjoining the Western Branch, Martha Pledger, Willis Branch, James Parnall, Jones and Bridger, Witnesses: Moses Allmand and John Morris, recorded 7 Oct 1762 (Doc.#137w)

       1763, Isle of Wight County Order Bk. 1759-1763, p. 464; Christopher Reynolds listed as having been married to Mrs. Penelope Nolliboy (Doc.#138e)

       It is interesting to note that this Christopher Reynolds, who married Penelope Nolliboy prior to 1763, would have been born prior to 1743, probably about 1739 in the Lower Parish, Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

       22 Mar 1763, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 7, 1760-1769, p. 242; Christopher Reynolds’ will leaves his son Sharp Reynolds the plantation which he purchased from his cousin Christopher Reynolds, also a Negro boy named Coffee; Son Saunders Reynolds to receive the plantation that I now live on and a Negro boy named Toby; Daughter Sweeting Reynolds a Negro boy named Prince; all other Negroes to be hired out by my executor until son Saunders Reynolds becomes age 21 years of age at which time all money from Negroes to be equally divided among all my children. John Joyner appointed as sole Executor. Witnesses: Robert Tynes, Bartholomew Lightfoot and Charles Driver, proved 5 May 1763 (Doc.#158)

       This will abstract for Christopher Reynolds reveals that he had children named Sharpe Reynolds, Saunders Reynolds and Sweeting Reynolds. Name and residence patterns indicate that this was the same Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Saunders: 1747, Isle of Wight County Order Bk. 1746-52, p.29; Christopher Reynolds is listed as having married Elizabeth Saunders, sister of John Saunders (Doc.#138e). This Christopher Reynolds appears to have named one of his sons after his wife’s maiden name, a popular naming pattern for this time period. Christopher also named one of his sons Sharpe Reynolds, apparently after uncle who was also named Sharpe. It also appears to have been the maiden name for Christopher Reynolds’ mother, Elizabeth Sharpe. Hence, name and residence patterns indicate that this Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Saunders, was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr. (who married Elizabeth Sharpe), the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. The cousin of Christopher Reynolds, Jr. who married Elizabeth Saunders, whom he purchased land from that he willed to his son Sharpe, may have been Christopher Reynolds, III, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and Ann Coleman.

       2 Jun 1763, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 11, p.152; Christopher Reynolds and William Robertson of Newport Parish sold to Giles Driver of the same place...Lot#32 in Smithfield Town (being land bought from Mary Jackson on 6 Feb 1761), signed by Christopher Reynolds and William Robertson, recorded 2 Jun 1763 (Doc.#137x)

       6 Apr 1764, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 7, 1760-1769, pp. 337-340; Christopher Reynolds estate inventoried and appraised (Doc.#143m)

       This probate listing is for the estate inventory and appraisal of Christopher Reynolds who married Elizabeth Saunders whose will was recorded on 22 Mar 1763 and proved 5 May 1763 as listed above. He was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr. (who married Elizabeth Sharpe), the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. His will, which is abstracted above, lists the following: 22 Mar 1763, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 7, 1760-1769, p. 242; Christopher Reynolds’ will leaves his son Sharp Reynolds the plantation which he purchased from his cousin Christopher Reynolds, also a Negro boy named Coffee; Son Saunders Reynolds to receive the plantation that I now live on and a Negro boy named Toby; Daughter Sweeting Reynolds a Negro boy named Prince; all other Negroes to be hired out by my executor until son Saunders Reynolds becomes age 21 years of age at which time all money from Negroes to be equally divided among all my children. John Joyner appointed as sole Executor. Witnesses: Robert Tynes, Bartholomew Lightfoot and Charles Driver, proved 5 May 1763 (Doc.#158). This will abstract for Christopher Reynolds reveals that he had children named Sharpe Reynolds, Saunders Reynolds and Sweeting Reynolds. Name and residence patterns indicate that this was the same Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Saunders: 1747, Isle of Wight County Order Bk. 1746-52, p.29; Christopher Reynolds is listed as having married Elizabeth Saunders, sister of John Saunders (Doc.#138e). This Christopher Reynolds appears to have named one of his sons after his wife’s maiden name, a popular naming pattern for this time period. Christopher also named one of his sons Sharpe Reynolds, apparently after uncle who was also named Sharpe. It also appears to have been the maiden name for Christopher Reynolds’ mother, Elizabeth Sharpe. Hence, name and residence patterns indicate that this Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Saunders, was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr. (who married Elizabeth Sharpe), the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. The cousin of Christopher Reynolds, Jr. who married Elizabeth Saunders, whom he purchased land from that he willed to his son Sharpe, may have been Christopher Reynolds, III, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and Ann Coleman.

       5 Jan 1764, Isle of Wight Guardian Accounts 1740-1767, p. 260; Richard Reynolds, Charles Driver, Charles Fulgham and others listed in guardianship records for Mary Applewhaite, orphan of John Applewhaite, with Charles Fulgham her guardian (Doc.#135f)

       18 Mar 1765, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 11, p.332; Richard Reynolds and his wife Prudence Reynolds, John Godwin, John Bridger, John Godwin, Andrew Mackie and Pitt Reynolds petition to divide 300 acres in Newport Parish into equal parts. Richard Baker. Jury: John Newman, Wills Bullock, Thomas Howlett, Nicholas Wale, Giles West, William Green, Jonathan Godwin, Nicholas Fulgham, Augustine King, John Smelly, Francis Gross and Bartholomew Lightfoot, recorded 4 Apr 1765 (Doc.#137y)

       This deed abstract refers to a Richard Reynolds whose wife was named Prudence. Name and residence patterns, i.e. the presence of neighbors like Bartholomew Lightfoot, etc., indicate that this was Richard Reynolds, III, the son of Richard Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Rebecca.

       4 Apr 1765, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 11, p.327; Christopher Reynolds listed as having sold a larger tract of land to Andrew Mackie of Newport Parish, who sold a portion of it to William Allman of the same place...422 acres on Cypress Swamp in Newport Parish adjoining Butlers Branch, John Butler, John Wills and said Mackie, signed by Andrew Mackie, recorded 4 Apr 1765 (Doc.#137y)

       17 Nov 1766, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 11, p.82; Richard Reynolds listed owning land adjoining land leased from Thomas Smith of Newport Parish to William Robertson of the same place, ? acres (being land formerly rented by Batholomew Lightfoot and called “Driver’s Plantation”) also adjoining said Smith, Smith’s Creek, the Bridle Road to Cypress Mill, the old Warehouse Road and Mary Jordan, signed by Thomas Smith and William Robertson, Witnesses: Cornelius Deforest and William Martin, recorded 4 Dec 1766 (Doc.#137z)

       17 Jun 1767, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 11, p.176; Christopher Reynolds listed as having sold land to Andrew Mackie of Newport Parish who sold the remaining portion of land to Robert Driver of the same place, signed by Andrew Mackie, Witnesses: John Mallory, Bartholomew Lightfoot and William Mackie, recorded 2 Jul 1767 (Doc.#137aa)

       18 Aug 1767, Augusta County, Virginia, Bk. 4, p. 18; Mary Reynolds listed as orphan daughter of Henry Reynolds, Nathaniel Evans appointed as guardian of Mary Reynolds (Doc.#184)

       17 Feb 1770, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 11, p.359; Richard Reynolds leased to Joseph Brantley, both of Newport Parish...? acres (being the patent on which he now lives), signed by Richard Reynolds and Joseph Brantley, Witnesses: Anthony Holliday, Roland Reynolds and Samuel Godfrey, recorded 3 May 1770 (Doc.#137ab)

       4 Feb 1772, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 11, p.448; Richard Reynolds bought from Benjamin Applewhaite and his wife, Martha, all of Newport Parish...100 acres (being land willed by John Applewhaite to his son, Benjamin Applewhaite, signed by Benjamin and Martha Applewhaite, Witnesses: John Smelley, Ben Hawkins and Hugh Provary, recorded 6 Feb 1772 (Doc.#137ac)

       8 Feb 1772, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 11, p.459; Richard Reynolds conveys deed of gift to his son, Randall Reynolds...100 acres (being the land said Reynolds bought from Benjamin Applewhaite), signed, Richard Reynolds, Witnesses: Brewer Godwin, John Darden and Edmund Stuckey (Doc.#137ad)

       Name and residence patterns above indicate that this Richard Reynolds previously bought land from Benjamin Applewhaite as follows: 4 Feb 1772, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 11, p.448; Richard Reynolds bought from Benjamin Applewhaite and his wife, Martha, all of Newport Parish...100 acres (being land willed by John Applewhaite to his son, Benjamin Applewhaite, signed by Benjamin and Martha Applewhaite, Witnesses: John Smelley, Ben Hawkins and Hugh Provary, recorded 6 Feb 1772 (Doc.#137ac); Benjami Applewhaite’s father, John Applewhaite was also a neighbor and associate of this Richard Reynolds. In 1764, Richard Reynolds and others were appointed guardians for John Applewhaite’s daughter: 5 Jan 1764, Isle of Wight Guardian Accounts 1740-1767, p. 260; Richard Reynolds, Charles Driver, Charles Fulgham and others listed in guardianship records for Mary Applewhaite, orphan of John Applewhaite, with Charles Fulgham her guardian (Doc.#135f). The first reference of John Applewhaite appearing in the Isle of Wight County records is as follows: 22 Mar 1741, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 2, p. 403; Richard Reynolds listed as appraiser for estate of Samuel Goodwin/Godwin along with John Applewhaite and Joseph Wright, recorded 24 May 1742 (Doc.#133p). The next listing was for Richard Reynolds, Jr., (the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr.), and his wife Rebecca: 7 Apr 1741, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 9, p.326; Richard Reynolds notes receiving slaves and goods from his mother, Rebecca Reynolds, as part of the estate of his father, Richard Reynolds, deceased, signed by Richard Reynolds, Witnesses: George Reynolds, Christopher Reynolds and Tabitha Reynolds, recorded 6 Mar 1755 (Doc.#137j). Hence, subject to further research, name and residence patterns indicate that Richard Reynolds, III, was the father of Randall Reynolds. Randall Reynolds appears to have been the same individual listed as Randolph Reynolds who was appointed a 2nd Lt. on 23 Dec 1779 serving under Capt. James Wills in Isle of Wight County Court records which are listed below (Doc.#169d).

       1 Oct 1772, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 11, p.523; Richard Reynolds listed as having sold land next to Thomas Miller of Bute County, North Carolina, who then sold it to Thomas Pierce of Newport Parish...100 acres in Newport Parish adjoining Pagan Creek, Smithfield Town, George Purdie, Thomas Smith and said Thomas Pierce, signed by Thomas and Mary Miller, Witnesses: Jesse Atkins, Mallery Todd and Samuel Wilson, recorded 2 Oct 1772 (Doc.#137ae)

       25 Nov 1772, Augusta County, Virginia Deeds Bk. 19, p. 110; John Reynolds listed as witness to a deed on Dry River from Robert Hill to Abraham Smith (Doc.#185d)

       1773, Orange County, Virginia, Deed Bk. 17; Benjamin Reynolds married Elizabeth Jennings (Doc.#167a)

       15 May 1773, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 13, p.93; Sharp Reynolds of Newport Parish sold to Tristam Norsworthy the elder of the same place...130 acres (being land Christopher Reynolds, son of Richard Reynolds, bought from Christopher Reynolds the son of Christopher Reynolds, deceased, on 1 Feb 1769 and Christopher Reynolds, son of Richard Reynolds, willed land to his son, Sharp Reynolds), signed by Sharp Reynolds, Witnesses: Arthur Smith, John Taylor, Jr., and John Taylor, recorded 3 Jun 1773 (Doc.#137af)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this deed refers to Sharpe Reynolds who was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr. (wife’s name unknown),who was the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr., and his wife, Elizabeth Sharpe. Sharpe Reynolds appears to have been named after his uncle, Sharpe Reynolds, who never married and whose estate records are listed above. According to this deed, the will of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., lists his son Sharpe. The actual will reveals the following: 22 Mar 1763, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 7, 1760-1769, p. 242; Christopher Reynolds’ will leaves his son Sharp Reynolds the plantation which he purchased from his cousin Christopher Reynolds, also a Negro boy named Coffee; Son Saunders Reynolds to receive the plantation that I now live on and a Negro boy named Toby; Daughter Sweeting Reynolds a Negro boy named Prince; all other Negroes to be hired out by my executor until son Saunders Reynolds becomes age 21 years of age at which time all money from Negroes to be equally divided among all my children. John Joyner appointed as sole Executor. Witnesses: Robert Tynes, Bartholomew Lightfoot and Charles Driver, proved 5 May 1763 (Doc.#158). This will abstract for Christopher Reynolds reveals that he had children named Sharpe Reynolds, Saunders Reynolds and Sweeting Reynolds. Name and residence patterns indicate that this was the same Christopher Reynolds who married Elizabeth Saunders as listed above: 1747, Isle of Wight County Order Bk. 1746-52, p.29; Christopher Reynolds listed as having married Elizabeth Saunders, sister of John Saunders (Doc.#138e). This Christopher Reynolds appears to have named one of his sons after his wife’s maiden name, a popular naming pattern for this time period. Christopher also named one of his sons Sharpe Reynolds, apparently after uncle who was also named Sharpe. It also appears to have been the maiden name for Christopher Reynolds’ mother, Elizabeth Sharpe. Hence, name and residence patterns indicate that this Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Saunders, was the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the son of Richard Reynolds, Sr. (who married Elizabeth Sharpe), the son of Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant. The cousin of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., who married Elizabeth Saunders, whom he purchased land from that he willed to his son Sharpe, may have been Christopher Reynolds, III, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and Ann Coleman. 2 Jun 1763, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 11, p.152; Christopher Reynolds and William Robertson of Newport Parish sold to Giles Driver of the same place...Lot#32 in Smithfield Town (being land bought from Mary Jackson on 6 Feb 1761), signed by Christopher Reynolds and William Robertson, recorded 2 Jun 1763 (Doc.#137x). 6 Apr 1764, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 7, 1760-1769, pp. 337-340; Christopher Reynolds estate inventoried and appraised (Doc.#143m).

       1774, Orange County, Virginia, Deed Bk. 17; John Reynolds married Hannah Darnel, Joseph Reynolds married Susannah Wright (Doc.#167a)

       1774, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 11, 1796-1804, pp. 32-33, Estate Inventories, Accounts received 5 Apr 1797; pp. 66-67, Estate Inventories, Accounts received 4 Sep 1797 (Doc.#143d)

       6 Jan 1774, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 13, p.166; Richard Reynolds, Capt. Arthur Smith and Bartholomew Lightfoot listed owning land which adjoins land sold by John Lightfoot of Newport Parish to Josiah Wills of the same place, signed by John Lightfoot, recorded 6 Jan 1774 (Doc.#137ag)

       18 Jul 1776, William & Mary Quarterly, Series 1, Vol. XXI, Diary of Col. Landon Carter, p. 174; “George Reynolds sent yesterday 2 ½ bushels of wheat to be ground & bolted desiring it may be manufactured as before & he will pay the next time for the whole barrel it was done as I desired.” (Doc.#180b)

       Col. Landon Carter was a resident of Sabine Hall, Richmond County, Virginia. According to his diary he was born on 18 Aug 1710 in Virginia, the son of the extremely successful Robert Carter who died 4 Aug 1722 in Virginia, but whose will was probated in England. Hence, the above George Reynolds appears to have resided in Richmond County, Virginia.

       1777, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 188; Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. XI, p.83; Sharp Reynolds appointed a Second Lt. under Capt. Thomas Pierce(Doc.#131z, 171b))

       This appears to have been the same Sharpe Reynolds who was born about 1736, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Elizabeth Saunders. Sharpe is listed in the will of his father which reads as follows: 22 Mar 1763, The Library of Virginia, Index to Wills and Administrations Card Catalog, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 7, 1760-1769, p. 242; Christopher Reynolds’ will leaves his son Sharp Reynolds the plantation which he purchased from his cousin Christopher Reynolds, also a Negro boy named Coffee; Son Saunders Reynolds to receive the plantation that I now live on and a Negro boy named Toby; Daughter Sweeting Reynolds a Negro boy named Prince; all other Negroes to be hired out by my executor until son Saunders Reynolds becomes age 21 years of age at which time all money from Negroes to be equally divided among all my children. John Joyner appointed as sole Executor. Witnesses: Robert Tynes, Bartholomew Lightfoot and Charles Driver, proved 5 May 1763 (Doc.#158)

       1778, Orange County, Virginia, Deed Bk. 17; Richard Reynolds married Ann Roach, widow; Peggy Reynolds married Thomas Morris (Doc.#167b)

       23 Dec 1779, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, by John B. Boddie, p. 190; Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, Vol. XI, p.86; Randolph Reynolds appointed a Second Lt. Serving under Capt. James Wills (Doc.#169d, 171c)

       As listed above, Randolph Reynolds appears to have been the same individual who is listed as Randall Reynolds, the son of Richard Reynolds, III.

       1784, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 9, p. 230; Bk. 10, p. 205; Sharpe Reynolds married Sophia Godwin, daughter of Samuel Godwin (Doc.#138f)

       Name and residence patterns indicate that this was the marriage of 2nd Lt. Sharpe Reynolds, the son of Christopher Reynolds, Jr., and his wife, Elizabeth Saunders.

       28 May 1787, Augusta County, Virginia Deeds Bk. 26, p. 68; John Reynolds listed as a witness to deed from Michael Coulter to Philip Dalby (Doc.#185e)

       3 Jul 1787, Isle of Wight County Marriage Records; Rowland Reynolds married Martha Godwin, Surety: John Reynolds and Martha, the widow of Jeremiah Godwin (Doc.#138h)

       Name and residence patterns listed above indicate that Rowland Reynolds was a son of Richard Reynolds, III: 17 Feb 1770, Isle of Wight County Deeds, Bk. 11, p.359; Richard Reynolds leased to Joseph Brantley, both of Newport Parish...? acres (being the patent on which he now lives), signed by Richard Reynolds and Joseph Brantley, Witnesses: Anthony Holliday, Roland Reynolds and Samuel Godfrey, recorded 3 May 1770 (Doc.#137ab). According to the following marriage record, Rowland’s first wife appears to have died shortly after they were married and he subsequently married a woman wit the maiden name Chapman, the daughter of Joseph Chapman prior to 1791.

       1791, Isle of Wight County Wills and Administrations, Bk. 10, p. 220; Rowland Reynolds married a woman with the maiden name Chapman, daughter of Joseph Chapman (Doc.#138f)

       4 May 1791, Augusta County, Virginia, Wills and Administrations, Bk. 7, p. 376; Patrick Reynolds, Yeoman listed under surname of Ryndles, died testate. No Reynolds heirs listed. Proved 21 Jun 1791 (Doc.#184a)

       13 Jan 1792, Isle of Wight County Marriage Records; John Reynolds married Elizabeth Whitley, Surety: Charles Groce; Parent, Tabitha Whitley (Doc.#138h)

       9 Nov 1795, Isle of Wight County Marriage Records; Randall Reynolds married Martha Dickinson, Surety: Charles Groce (Doc.#138h)

       As listed above, Randolph Reynolds appears to have been the same individual who is listed as Randall Reynolds, the son of Richard Reynolds, III.

       17 Nov 1798, Isle of Wight County Marriage Records; John Reynolds married Polly Jordan, Surety: Richard Reynolds, Parent: Betsey Jordan (Doc.#138h)

       In conclusion of this session of research, though conclusive proof of the relationship of your Richard Reynolds, Sr., to Christopher Reynolds, Sr., the immigrant was not obtained, neither was evidence to the contrary. The frequency of the name Richard Reynolds in the descendants of Christopher Reynolds. Sr., the immigrant continues to indicate that your ancestor, Richard Reynolds, Sr., descends from this family in Isle of Wight County, Virginia. As we discussed on the phone, we have posted portions of this report on the Internet in order to promote the spirit of sharing information and hopefully learn more about your Reynolds line.

       In the meantime, as we also discussed, further research should be conducted in connection with the Perkins family which married into the Reynolds family. Your ancestor, Joseph Reynolds, Sr., married Sarah Perkins in about 1784. Sarah was the daughter of William Perkins, Sr., and Susannah Holland of Goochland and New Kent Counties of Virginia. Since Richard Reynolds, Sr., the father of Joseph Reynolds, Sr., was a close friend and associate of William Perkins, Sr., they appear to have known each other prior to settling in Pittsylvania and Henry Counties of Virginia. There are records listed for the Reynolds families of New Kent County where the Perkins family resided prior to coming to Goochland and Pittsylvania Counties which should also be searched. Hence, further research on the ancestry of William Perkins, Sr., will allow us to verify your Perkins lineage and should also enable us to locate additional information on your Reynolds lineage.


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