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Re: Brunson's from AL moved to TX
Posted by: Austin M. Cooper Date: January 25, 2002 at 19:43:19
In Reply to: Brunson's from AL moved to TX by Luther Follis of 1332

Is Almorane Brunson, the husband of Eliza Woodard, the same Brunson you have information about?
Looking forward to hearing from you.
Austin Cooper
Decatur, ALABAMA 35603

1.1.2.2.6       Eliza Woodard Brunson
       Born:       March 16, 1818, Sumter District, South Carolina [,]
       Married:       March 16, 1837, Lee County, Georgia []
       Spouse:       Almorane Brunson []
       Died:       February 22, 1891, Midland, Texas []
       Buried:       Midland Cemetery, Midland, Texas []

       Almorane Brunson was the son of David Brunson and was born on February 26, 1812, in Washington County, Georgia.[] Of all of the Brunsons recorded herein, he had the most unusual given name. This was a time when a child was named for a family member or for a Biblical or historically famous person. Perhaps the answer is in the family of his mother, about whom nothing is known. According to the available census records and a statement by his great grandson, Marcus Daniel Brunson,[] Almorane was the only surviving son of David Brunson. His siblings were girls.

       He spent at least his adolescence and young manhood in Houston County, Georgia, where his father appears on the 1830 Census next to his grandfather, Daniel Brunson. At some time between 1830 and 1840, Almorane and his father moved to neighboring Lee County, Georgia, where he married Eliza Woodard. According to the law at the time, marriage licenses were to be issued in the county of the bride. Eliza lived in Houston County, Georgia; however, a marriage license for Almorane and Eliza could not be found at the courthouse. Those for her siblings, who married in Georgia, were found. It is possible that if the marriage was performed in Houston County or if a license was issued in that county, the officiating minister failed to return it to the courthouse. Eliza was born in Sumter District, South Carolina, from where her father had moved to Houston County, Georgia. Sumter District, made from Clarendon, Claremont, and Salem Counties, was the old home of Almorane’s father and grandfather Brunson.

       Almorane and Eliza’s granddaughter, Susie Brunson Stell, wrote: “When Eliza Woodard had married Almorane Brunson, her father gave her $3,000 in gold and a number of slaves, one of them was a mulatto man who was skilled as a cobbler and a blacksmith valued at $1,000. (Her two brothers received a like gift.)”[] As was customary at the time of marriage, Isaac Woodard, Sr., very likely gave a slave or two and some money to Eliza. However, this amount of money is excessive. Isaac Woodard, Sr., was not a wealthy planter and had nine children, five of whom were sons. The bulk of any inherited slaves owned by Almorane and Eliza was due to the fact that Almorane was the only son of David Brunson. On the 1860 Lee County slave census, Almorane had 26 slaves.

       As evidenced by the birthplace of Almorane and Eliza’s children, they lived in or near the town of Smithville in Lee County, Georgia. Even though it has grown since that time, Smithville is still a sleepy little country town with only a few stores on one side of the railroad tracks. Almorane was enumerated as the head of a household on the 1840 Census for Lee County. He was not enumerated on the 1850 Census for Lee County, but his slaves were enumerated on the 1850 Slave Schedule. Almorane and his family were living in Lee County in 1850. A comparison of the 1840 and 1850 Census shows that not only Almorane, but all of the immediate neighbors on the 1840 Census, were missed by the census taken in 1850.

       On the 1860 Census for Lee County, Almorane Brunson was enumerated as the head of household #147, Starkville, Georgia. At 48 years and born in Georgia, his occupation is given as a planter with real estate valued at $10,200 and personal property, which included slaves, at $21,140. With him were Eliza, 42 years old and born in South Carolina, and their six children. Their immediate neighbors were William B. Richardson, whose assets totaled $48,000, and William D. Wright, whose assets totaled $61,000. Of the seven families enumerated with Almorane, only one’s assets were not large enough to be classified as a planter. Considering what one dollar would buy at the time, this was a neighborhood of prosperous planters. Prior to the Civil War, Almorane lived on a generous scale and in true Southern style;[] of this, there does not seem to be any doubt.

       It is most unfortunate that the Lee County courthouse burned. It would be interesting to see the deed concerning Almorane and his father and to know exactly when the family left the area. They were still living near Smithville in 1865 at the end of the Civil War.[]

       Daniel Thomas was the only son of Almorane to serve in the Confederacy. During the siege at Petersburg, Virginia, Almorane sent rations and his slave, Dick, to Daniel Thomas. They remained together until the surrender and returned home together.[] Dick’s wife was evidently a house slave and perhaps a favorite of Daniel Thomas, as he sent greetings to “Aunt Betty” in an 1862 letter from Virginia.[] Almorane was also a Confederate soldier, serving in Fannin’s Reserves.[] This was probably one of Georgia’s many Home Guard units. No details have been found as to the length and experiences of his service.

       At some time between the close of the Civil War and August 17, 1869, the date of Daniel Thomas’ marriage in Floyd County, Georgia, Almorane, Eliza, and their single children moved to Floyd County in northern Georgia. Reasons and circumstances concerning the move are not known. A search of the Floyd County deed books of this period reveals nothing. Either these deeds were not recorded at the time, the deeds of this period were lost, or the transactions were recorded elsewhere.

       On the 1870 Census for Floyd County, Georgia, Almorane Brunson, a farmer, was enumerated as the head of household #93 in North Carolina District of Rome, Georgia. Almorane declared real estate assets at $4,000 and personal property at $1,500. With him were Eliza, their children, Sarah, William, and David, and a black housekeeper, Hannah Gibson, 65 years old, who was born in Georgia. Their neighbors were their son, Daniel Thomas, and Obediah Payne.

       In 1873, the first of two moves to Texas was attempted by the Brunson family. There are two stories as to why the family of Almorane Brunson left Floyd County. One is that early in the 1870s, William H. Brunson, Almorane’s second son, went to Texas selling Aladdin lamps. He was so impressed with the country that he went back to Georgia and persuaded his family to move to Texas.[] The other is that Almorane and his son, Daniel Thomas, were in the Ku Klux Klan; because of trouble with the law, they went west.[] Both reasons could be true, especially since there were two moves.

       In 1872, the cotton crop produced a good yield and was sold for gold. The women made money belts for each adult to carry some of the gold, as they made preparations for the move to Texas. All went well until the caravan reached the Mississippi River, when cholera broke out among them. Some of the former slaves died, and Almorane was very ill. Eliza wrote her brother to come and take them back to Georgia. When all were well, they tried again. They moved to Stephens County, Texas, to a place called Eolian, north of Cisco and south of Breckenridge.[] They arrived in April, 1877.[]

       “The father [Almorane], although he had suffered reverses, especially during his early career and during the War, recouped his fortunes and gained a considerable degree of success as a stockman in Texas.”[] On the 1880 Census for Stephens County, Texas, Almorane was enumerated as the head of household #32, Beat #4, Enumeration District #172. It was noted that he was a farmer, 68 years old and born in Georgia, and that both of his parents were born in South Carolina. For the first time on a census record, it stated that he could not read or write. Assets were not declared on the 1880 Census. Eliza was enumerated as 62 years old, born in South Carolina, and that her father was born in North Carolina and her mother in South Carolina. It was noted that her mother was disabled, the cause given as “Annurism.” Also living in the household were their two sons, William and David, their daughter, Susannah Wright, and her two sons, Mark A. and Lee Wright. Under “Occupation,” it was stated that William was a stock herder, and David attended cattle. Their neighbors were Aaron W. Baty [blot on name, appears to be Baty] and Joel W. Blackwell. Of the nine heads of households that appear on the 1880 Census for Stephens County, only Joel W. Blackwell is given as a cattle raiser; the rest were farmers. However, most of their teenage and young adult sons were enumerated as cattle herders. It is not known how much land Almorane had in Stephens County. Only one record has been found: Patent #235, dated September 10, 1897, by H. McCain for 160 acres. The original grantee was Almorane Brunson.[]

       In 1887, the Brunson family was driven out of Stephens County by drought.[] At this time, the oldest son, Daniel Thomas, moved with his family to Fannin County, Texas. The rest pushed farther west. “Dave and Bill Brunson came out into West Texas looking for land. They finally made a deal for 60 sections of land between Seminole [Texas] and Hobbs, New Mexico, about where Monument, New Mexico, is today. I think that was called the ‘Hat Ranch.’ This was family cattle, as Almorane and his two youngest sons were in partnership.”[]

       It is not known if Almorane and Eliza ever lived on the New Mexico land. Texas and Texans states that they moved to Midland, Texas, in 1887. “The Brunsons bought some acreage in northeast Midland. They either built or bought a house and moved Grandfather and Grandmother Brunson and Aunt Sudie to this place.”[] Also in that household were Susannah’s sons, Mark A. and Lee Wright, when they were not working, and David Brunson’s son, William, who had been cared for by Susannah after his mother died.

       Almorane died in Midland on January 23, 1898.[] Almorane was of small build and an invalid for many years. His granddaughter, Susie Brunson Stell, recalls:[]

I remember him. I was about 4-1/2 years old when he died. . . . I would go to the bed and he would put his hand on my head and say: “Bless her—just give her a chance and she will bake your bread.”

Dave and Lula Brunson made a trip to Rome, Georgia, to sell some property and settle the estate. He delivered Nancy Brunson Pollock’s part to her at that time. As often happens in the settling of an estate, there is one that is not satisfied and often thinks the administrator is getting the better part. One granddaughter made many trips to our home and talked so ugly to my Dad, which really caused many heartaches. Sally Brunson Milligan had died, and her four children inherited her part; and that is where the trouble was. They were not satisfied. Each Brunson heir got his share of that gold.

1.1.2.2.6.1       Susan Elizabeth Brunson
       Born:       June 9, 1839, Smithville, Lee County, Georgia []
       Died:       December 25, 1839 []
       Buried:       

       Though it is not stated, probably all of the children were born near Smithville, as the family was living there at the end of the Civil War.

1.1.2.2.6.2       Daniel Thomas Brunson
       Born:       May 22, 1840, Lee County, Georgia
       Married:       August 17, 1869, Floyd County, Georgia
       Spouse:       Sarah Frances Cheves
       Died:       November 2, 1916, Glenwood, Arkansas
       Buried:       

       He attended Mercer University in Macon, Georgia, preceding his induction into the Confederate Army. In June of 1861, he joined Company K, the 4th Georgia Regiment of the Sumter Light Guards, and served with them until he surrendered at Appomattox. Sarah Frances Cheves was the daughter of Francis H. and Elvira Harris Cheves and was born on April 1, 1848, in Crawford County, Georgia. When a drought drove the Brunsons out of Stephens County, Texas, Daniel took his wife and children and traveled east to Fannin County, Texas. A short time later, he traded his land in Fannin County, Texas, for land in Pike County, Arkansas. In his later years, Daniel traded his farm land and home for a house in the town of Glenwood, Arkansas. After his death, his wife continued to live in Glenwood for awhile. She then sold the house and lived in Little Rock, Arkansas, with her married daughter. Frances died in Little Rock on July 24, 1922. Daniel and Frances are buried in Jones Cemetery at Amity, Arkansas. They had a total of fifteen children, among whom there were three sets of twins. The last set, their youngest children, was born when she was 44 and when he was 55 years old. Of the fifteen children, nine lived to maturity.

1.1.2.2.6.3       Nancy Brunson Pollock
       Born:       December 16, 1842 []
       Married:       February 8, 1859, Lee County, Georgia
       Spouse:       J. C. Pollock
       Died:       May 5, 1913
       Buried:       

       They lived in Rome, Georgia.[] Nancy Brunson joined the Hebron Baptist Church in 1858 and was dismissed according to the 1853-71 records of Smithville Baptist Church of Lee County.[] The name of the church was changed from Hebron to Smithville Baptist Church. The dismissal resulted from joining another church, probably after leaving Lee County.

1.1.2.2.6.4       Mary Brunson Barnes
       Born:       August 17, 1844 []
       Married:       February 11, 1866
       Spouse:       W. R. Barnes
       Died:       August 27, 1919
       Buried:       

       In 1914, she was called the wife of William Barnes of Oklahoma.[] Mary Brunson joined the Hebron Baptist Church in 1862 and was also dismissed as in the case of Nancy Brunson. It is not known whether the Barnes family moved west with Almorane. Their son, William Barnes, was living in Midland County on the 1900 Census. Listed as a cattle raiser, he lived between his uncle, William H. Brunson, and cousin, Lee Wright.

1.1.2.2.6.5       Susannah Brunson Wright
       Born:       February 22, 1847 []
       Married:       November 16, 1865, []
       Spouse:       Thad A. Wright
       Died:       August 20, 1934
       Buried:       

       She joined the Hebron Baptist Church in 1863 and was also dismissed. On the 1880 Census for Stephens County, Texas, Susannah Wright was living in the household of her father with her two sons, Mark A., age 12, and Lee, age 10. It was noted that she was “keeping house” and that she was divorced. In the 1900 Census for Midland County, Texas, she was enumerated as the head of household #225, Enumeration District #110, Justice Precinct #1, living between Presley W. Cook and her brother, David W. Brunson. It was noted that she was a widow, so perhaps Thad A. Wright was dead by that time. With her was her brother’s son, William, whom she reared.

1.1.2.2.6.5.1       Mark A. Wright
       Born:       
       Married:       
       Spouse:       
       Died:       
       Buried:       

1.1.2.2.6.5.2       Lee Wright
       Born:       
       Married:       
       Spouse:       
       Died:       
       Buried:       

1.1.2.2.6.6       Sally Brunson Milligan
       Born:       March 15, 1849 []
       Married:       1872 []
       Spouse:       Bob Milligan
       Died:       June 5, 1888
       Buried:       

       Sally Brunson joined the Hebron Baptist Church in 1864 and was also dismissed. On the 1860 and 1870 Census, when she was living at home, she was listed as “Sarah.” Robert Milligan was the head of household #29, Beat #4, Enumeration District #122, on the 1880 Census for Stephens County, Texas. Sally’s brother, Daniel Thomas, was living at household #26. It was stated that Robert Milligan was a farmer, 28 years old, and born in Georgia, and that both of his parents were born in Georgia. Sallie, as she was enumerated, fudged a bit on her age by declaring herself also 28 years old. Their youngest child, James, age two years, was born in Texas; the other two children were born in Georgia. It is very possible that Sally and Bob Milligan came to Texas with Almorane and Eliza.

1.1.2.2.6.6.1       James Milligan
       Born:       
       Married:       
       Spouse:       
       Died:       
       Buried:       

1.1.2.2.6.6.2       _____ Milligan
       Born:       
       Married:       
       Spouse:       
       Died:       
       Buried:       

1.1.2.2.6.6.3       _____ Milligan
       Born:       
       Married:       
       Spouse:       
       Died:       
       Buried:       

1.1.2.2.6.7       William Hodge Brunson
       Born:       January 21, 1852
       Married:       June 16, 1887
       Spouse:       Annie Lee Cook[]
       Died:       November 11, 1928
       Buried:       

       Annie Lee Cook was born in November 1864 in Alabama and died on January 1, 1941. William was enumerated as the head of household #262, Enumeration District #110, on the 1900 Census for Midland County, Texas. His wife’s father was born in South Carolina, and her mother was born in Alabama. Her two children, Glen S. and Alma, were with them. William was named for Almorane’s maternal grandfather.[] After William married Annie Lee Cook of Eolian, Texas, they moved to the ranch between Seminole, Texas, and Hobbs, New Mexico. His brother, David, lived about a mile from them after his marriage. In 1896, the Brunsons bought 150 sections in Glasscock County, Texas. For many years, the brothers worked the ranch together. David sold his sections; however, William retained his. His family was living on this land in 1978.[]

1.1.2.2.6.7.1       Glen S. Brunson
       Born:       
       Married:       
       Spouse:       
       Died:       
       Buried:       

1.1.2.2.6.7.2       Alma Brunson
       Born:       
       Married:       
       Spouse:       
       Died:       
       Buried:       

1.1.2.2.6.8       Martha Jane Brunson
       Born:       August 3, 1854 []
       Died:       August 25, 1854
       Buried:       

1.1.2.2.6.9       David Woodard Brunson
       Born:       October 1, 1856, Smithville, Lee County, Georgia
       Married:       August 1881
       Spouse:       Elizabeth McArver
       Died:       June 1, 1937
       Buried:       

       Elizabeth was born in Floyd County, Georgia,[] and died of tuberculosis on October 2, 1883.[] David had promised her that he would take her body back to Georgia for burial, so he took their one-year-old son, William Wallace, and made the sad trip by train with his wife in the baggage car.[] On September 21, 1890, he married Lula Veale, who was the daughter of Carol and Amanda Ables Veale and was born on January 20, 1870; and died on March 2, 1946. After the wedding in Breckenridge, Texas, they went by train to Midland, Texas, and then 85 miles north by wagon to the ranch between Seminole, Texas, and Hobbs, New Mexico, which was to be their home for over 50 years. On the 1900 Census for Midland County, Texas, David W. Brunson was enumerated as the head of household #226, Justice Precinct #1, Enumeration District #110, living between his sister, Susannah Wright, with whom his son, William, lived, and Robert D. Childs. It was stated that his occupation was cattle raiser and a farmer. His wife was born in Texas, and both of her parents were also born in Texas. She had given birth to four children, all living. The remaining information was taken from a sketch of David’s life, published in 1914.[] He was one of the organizers of the Midland National Bank and took a prominent part in the erection of the Llano Hotel, Bank, and Office and Store Building. He was one of the principal owners of the company which built up and owned these buildings. He was a director of the Home National Bank in Stanton, Texas.

       He and his family resided in one of the finest homes in Midland. They were members of the Baptist Church. Fraternally, David Brunson was affiliated with the Masonry, in which he had attained the Royal Arch degree. He was first and foremost a friend of education. He attained his early education in private schools in Georgia and had no opportunity to secure an advanced education. He thought that his children should not be so limited and spent his means liberally providing for their education. Believing that Midland could become a garden spot, he planted orchards and vines. He raised fine peaches, and single bunches of his Tokay grapes weighed from three to four pounds. As an example of his public spirit, David Brunson presented the city of Midland with the land from which was derived the municipal water supply.

1.1.2.2.6.9.1       William Wallace Brunson
       Born:       
       Married:       
       Spouse:       
       Died:       
       Buried:       


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