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Re: Wm Blake (Eng) m. Dorothy (Tweedy?) 1585
Posted by: Charlou Dolan (ID *****6447) Date: November 09, 2010 at 05:53:09
In Reply to: Re: Wm Blake (Eng) m. Dorothy (Tweedy?) 1585 by Tom Kellogg of 4509

ANCESTORS OF ABIGAIL SEDGWICK

FIRST GENERATION

1. Abigail Sedgwick was born on 21 Feb 1703 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. She may have been born on the 23rd of February instead of the 21st. She was christened on 28 Feb 1703 in Hartford First Church, Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. On 9 Nov 1721 in Hartford, she married Deacon Benjamin Kellogg, who was born 1 Jan 1701/2 in Hartford, and who died 22 Aug 1757 in Canaan, Litchfield Co., Connecticut.

SECOND GENERATION

2. Capt. Samuel Sedgwick was born in 1667. He died "in his 69th year" on 24 Mar 1734/35 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. He was buried in the West Hartford burying ground, West Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A.

Hartford Vital Records:
FFS, page 38:
Thankful Sedgwick, d. July 2, 1720.
Capt. Sam'll Sedgwick, d. Mar. 24, 1734/5.
- - - - - - - - - -
FFS, page 49:
Children of Samuel & Mary Sedgwick:
Samuel, born Aug. 22, 1690.
Jonathan, born Mar. 29, 1693.
Ebenezer, born Feb. 25, 1695.
Joseph, born May 16, 1697.
Stephen, born Mar. 17, 1701.
Abigail, born Feb. 21, 1703.
Mary, born May 24, 1705.
[William]
Elizabeth, born Dec. 10, 1708.
Thankful, born Nov. 3, 1710.
Mercy, born Feb. 16, 1712/13.
Benjamin, born Nov. 7, 1716.

Hartford First Church Records:
Mary Sedgwick, wife of Samuel, "owned the covenants," 4 Mar 1688/9 (1:20)
24 Aug 1690 Samuell Sedgwick bap., son of Samuell (1:169)
Ebenizer Sedgwick, son of Samuel, bap. 3 Mar 1694/5 (1:173)
Samuell Sedgewick admitted to communion Sep 22, 1695; d. 24 Mar 1735 (1:40)
1 Mar 1696 Mary (Hopkins) Sedgewick, wife of Samuell, admitted to communion; d. 4 Sep 1743 (1:41)
30 Mar 1701 Stephen Sedgwick bap., son of Samuell (1:179)
28 Feb 1702 Abigail Sedgwick bap., daughter of Samuell (1:179)
1 Jul 1705 Mary Sedgwick bap., daughter of Samuel (1:181)
29 Jun 1707 William Sedgwick bap., son of Samuel (1:184)
5 Dec 1708 Elizabeth Sedgwick bap., daughter of Samuell (1:185)
5 Nov 1710 Thankful Sedgwick bap., daughter of Samuell (1:187)
2 Jul 1720 Thankful Sedgwick died (1:258)
24 Mar 1735 Capt. Samuell Sedgwick died (1:259)

A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records, 1732 to 1737:
Page 303: Capt. Samuel Sedgewick, Hartford; inventory £2190-04-06, taken 10 Apr 1735, by Martin Smith, Daniel Webster, and Moses Nash; will dated 21 Jun 1722:
I, Samuel Sedgewick of Hartford, do make this to be my last will and testament:
I do give to my wife, the time of her natural life, half my dwelling house and half of my celler, and half of my barn and outhouses, and half my orchards. And I also give my wife the improvement of 1/3 part of all my land during her natural life, and also 1/3 part of my moveable estate to be at her own dispose forever.
I give unto my son Samuel Sedgewick's children, besides what I have already given by deeds of gift, 5 shillings apiece.
I give unto my son Jonathan Sedgewick the house he now lives in, and all the land on the east side of the brook between him and where I now live, butting on the land of Lt. Gillett south. I also give my son Jonathan all my plain lott, butting upon his brother Joseph's land east, and upon Lt. Gillett's south. Also, I give to my son Jonathan my old and new swamps, being known by that name, butting on Lt. Gillett's house partly, on land west belonging to the heirs of my son Samuel Sedgwick, partly on land formerly belonging to Jared Spencer, and east on land hereafter given to my son Benjamin. I also give unto my son Jonathan, after my son Stephen hath had 55 acres out of it, the rest of my mountain lott, to be equally divided between him and Benjamin, provided that my son Jonathan pay to his four sisters, Abigail, Mary, Elizabeth and Mercy, 50 shillings apiece within a year after my decease.
I give unto my son Ebenezer Sedgewick that house and lands I bought of John Peck and 40 shillings more.
I give unto my son Joseph Sedgewick 15 acres of land where his house now stands, butting on his brother Jonathan's land west and on land of Lt. Gillett's south, besides what I have already given him.
I give to my son Stephen Sedgewick that lott I bought of John Andrews, and the house he now lives in, and 55 acres of land on which his house now stands, and he shall have liberty to take the 55 acres in one piece, either east and west or north and south.
I give unto my son Benjamin Sedgewick my dwelling house, barn and all of my outhouseing and all my land at home, butting on his brother Jonathan's land east, and on Lt. Gillett's south. I also give unto my son Benjamin my hill, butting on the heirs of my son Samuel's children east and on land given to Jonathan west, and on Lt. Gillett's south. I also give unto my son Benjamin my Jared lott and swamp, being known by that name, and I give unto my son Benjamin the half of my mountain lott above mentioned, to be equally divided between him and his brother Jonathan, and provided he pay, when he comes of age, to his four sisters 50 shillings apiece, unto Abigail, Mary, Elizabeth and Mercy.
I give to my daughter Abigail 50 shillings, to my daughter Mary 50 shillings, to my daughter Elizabeth Sedgewick £40, to my daughter Mercy Sedgewick £40.
I appoint my two sons, Jonathan and Ebenezer, with my wife, executors.
Witness: Caleb Watson, Ebenezer Smith, Caleb Merrells.
- - - - - - - - - -
Court Record, page 24, 1 Apr 1735: Will exhibited. Benjamin Sedgewick, age 18 years, chose his mother Mary Sedgewick to be his guardian. Samuel Sedgewick, a grandson, age 15 years, chose his uncle Jonathan Sedgewick to be his guardian. (A son of Samuel Sedgewick deceased, who was a son of Capt. Sedgewick decd.)
- - - - - - - - - -
Court Record, page 30, 14 July 1735: Jonathan Sedgewick moves this Court for a distribution of the estate. This Court appoint Moses Nash and Martin Smith, of Hartford, distributors.
- - - - - - - - - -
Distribution File, 7 Feb 1737/8: Estate of Capt. Samuel Sedgewick: To the widow Mary Sedgewick, to Samuel, Jr., decd. (his 5 children), to Ebenezer, to Abigail Sedgewick alias Kellogg, to Mary Sedgewick alias Kellogg, to Elizabeth Sedgewick alias Orton, to Mercy Sedgewick alias Merrells. By Martin Smith and Moses Nash.

A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records, 1742-1745
Page 107-8-9 Name: Mary Sedgwick, Hartford
Inventory taken 25 November, 1743, by Daniel Webster and Moses Nash. Will dated 20 April, 1743.
I, Mary Sedgwick, relict of Samuel Sedgwick of Hartford decd., do make this my last will and testament:
I give to my son Jonathan all my rights in the lands in Hartford on the east side of the Great River. Also, a meat barrel and a suet tub and 2 meal barrells and my great glass bottle.
To my son Ebenezer I give one feather bed with 3 blankets, and my chest of drawers; also my old great kettle and my little iron pott.
To my son Joseph I give a chest, bed and bedsted, and one blankett; also I give him the £6-10-00 which he borrowed of me some time ago; also a trammell, frying pan, a meat barrel and suet tub and the old worm tub. I give him my cow and 3 chaires: also I give him my iron mortar and pestle; also, one paire of shoes.
To my son Stephen I give the bed on which I have been used to lye, with the bedsted and furniture, one trammell, one paire of hand irons, also ye fire shovel and tongs, and a meat barrel.
To my son Benjamin I give all my right in the still; also my measures, viz., quart, pint and half-pint, he paying 20 shillings to his brother Joseph, old tennor. I give to Benjamin all the cooper's tools and my great Bible.
And the rest of my books I would have divided among my children, also all my right in the undivided lands in Farmingtown.
To the children of my daughter Abigail decd., my colliminco frock and Barcelona handkerchief and Druget petticoat.
To the children of my daughter Mary decd., I give my best silk crape frock and sassenet hand-kerchief.
To the children of my daughter Elizabeth decd. I give my other silk crape frock and a gause handkerchief and a paire of red gloves, also a red quilt.
To my daughter Mercy I give my mourning crape frock, my black quilt and green riding hood.
My blue cloak I give to my granddaughter Mercy Merrells.
I give to my daughter Mercy my scarf and my silk apron, and my largest earthern pott, and my right in the side saddle. And my will is that if my daughter Mercy shall be taken away by death. my granddaughter Mercy Merrells shall have all I have bequeathed to her mother.
To my granddaughter Ann Sedgwick I give my new chest and old box and great chest with one drawer, my silk hood, a paire of new silk gloves, and my box iron and heaters, my great pott, quart skillett, and little brass kettle, also my chafing dish and half a dozen chaires, 4 new chaires and two high table chaires, all my pewter (excepting the measures which I have given to Benjamin), also all that carthenware not before disposed of, my cheese tub and churn and pilion, as also my table and looking-glass.
Moreover, my will is that my sons, Jonathan, Joseph, Stephen and Benjamin, have and injoy equally my right in the Farmingtown land butting on Hartford: as is also my will that my syder barrells be divided equally abong my sons.
My will further is that my linen and wearing apparrel not already disposed of be equally divided among the children of my three daughters decd. and my daughter Mercy.
Further, it is my will that my heifer and stilyards be sold to pay my debts.
I give to the children of my son Samuel decd. 20 shillings old tennor, 5 shillings to each of them, and order my hetchel be sold to pay the same.
I appoint my sons, Jonathan and Benjamin, executors.
[signed] Mary (X) Sedgwick
Witness: Benjamin Colton, Caleb Watson, Anne X Flower
- - - - - - - - - -
Court Record, Page 35--6 December, 1743: The last will and testament of Mary Sedgwick of Hartford, relict of Capt. Samuel Sedgwick of Hartford, was now exhibited in Court by the executors. Proven. Exhibit of an inventory, which was proven and ordered to be kept on file.

Capt. Samuel Sedgwick and Mary Hopkins were married in 1689 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A.

3. Mary Hopkins was born in 1670 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. She died on 4 Sep 1743 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. She may have died on the 14th of September rather than on the 4th. She was buried in the West Hartford burying ground, West Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A.

THIRD GENERATION

4. William Sedgwick was born about 1643 in possibly, Charlestown, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts, U.S.A. He was reportedly christened in Charlestown, but so far no record has been found. He died supposedly of the plague about 1679 in supposedly, Jamaica.

The Sedgwick Collection at the New Haven Colony Historical Society, Box 6, Folder B, Sheet 24:
WILLIAM SEDGWICK, second son [third child?] of General Robert Sedgwick and Joanna Blake his wife, was born probably in Charlestown, Mass., where he is reported to have been baptised in 1643. He is supposed to have died "of the plague" in Jamaica about 1674.
He married about 1666, Elizabeth Stone, youngest daughter of Rev. Samuel Stone and his second wife Elizabeth Allen. (See Samuel Stone in the Appendix) After their separation and William's death, his widow married (2nd) John Roberts, of Hartford. She had one son only by each of her husbands; by the latter John Roberts, Jr.
There is very little to be learned regarding William Sedgwick. He was admitted to the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company in 1666, probably removing to Hartford soon thereafter. He is spoken of as "of Hartford" as late as 1668.
Savage in his Genealogical Dictionary says; "William had probably been ruined in morals by serving in the Army of England," which is the only hint that he was in the Army.
Hinman in his "First Puritan Settlers" states that William Sedgwick proved to be of a roving character, and spent much of his time in passing to and from the West Indies, in the neglect of his family; his wife became dissatisfied with his absence and neglect, and petitioned the Court of Assistants (May 1673) for a bill of divorce, which the Court granted October 1, 1674. "Elizabeth Sedgwick is divorced from her husband upon her own application, provided he does not return by the first of January next."
Mr. Hinman also states that their child `was born after his father left for the West Indies the last time," but this does not agree very satisfactorily with the following taken from Goodwn's Genealogical Notes;
Middlesex County Land Records, Vol. III, p. 383. Sep. 7, 1668, by deed of this date "William Sedgwick of Hartford in Connecticut Colony in New England, gentleman, the second sonne of Major General Robert Sedgwick, sometime of the County of Middlesex in the Massachusetts Colony, New England aforesaid," sells and conveys to Francis Willoughby of said Charlestown, all his the said William Sedgwicks right and interest in and to the estate of his said father Robert Sedgwick in Charlestown.
The following extract from Wyman's Charlestown, refers to the same or another transaction which occured about the same time. "William Sedgwick, 2nd. son of Major Robert, received of F. Willoughby, quit claim of all right in his father's estate that he bought of bro. Samuel of London (Algate) Woolen Draper, May 84, 1667. Date Sep. 7, 1668. rec. 1668-9.

William Sedgwick and Elizabeth Stone were married about 1666. They were divorced in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. Apparently the grounds for the divorce was desertion. Theirs was the first divorce granted in the Colony of Connecticut.

5. Elizabeth Stone was born estimated 1645 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A.

6. Stephen Hopkins was born in Sep 1634 in New Town [now Cambridge], Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, U.S.A. He died in Oct 1689 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A.

TAG 38:204 (Dorcas Bronson)

A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records, 1687-1695:
Pages 16-18.
Stephen Hopkins, Hartford; inventory £591-09-06, taken 6 Nov 1689, by James Steele sen. and Joseph Mygatt. Will dated 28 Sep 1689.
I Stephen Hopkins sen. of Hartford do declare this to be my last Will & Testament:
My Just Debts being paid out of my Estate, I give all the remainder of my Moveable Estate, except what I do hereafter give unto my wife Dorcas during her life, and at her decease my Will is that she bestow it upon my Children as she shall see Meet. I give her the Use of the new End of my now dwelling house, half the Celler, half the Barn, half my Orchard, and half the Garden, during her life. I give unto my wife the Use of my Share in the Mills during her natural life, & the Use of 1/2 of my Lott by Hannison's during life.
I give unto my son John Hopkins, besides what I have already given him, my Lott in the Last Division in Hartford, about 50 acres; also 5 Shillings out of my estate.
I do give unto my son Stephen Hopkins, besides what I have already given him, my two parcels of Land in the Meadow called Indian Land, after my wifes decease; also give him 5 Shillings; also give him the Use of 2 acres in my Meadow Division until my son Joseph Comes of age. I also give unto my sd. son Stephen my Lott on the East side of the Connecticut River forever.
I give unto my son Ebenezer Hopkins my now dwelling house, Barn & Outhouses & Homelott, to have the same as soon as he comes of age, all except what my wife is to have so long as she lives, and at her decease the whole to be his forever.
I give unto my son Joseph Hopkins the 1/2 of my Lott by Hannison's as soon as he comes of age, the other half at my wife's decease, & 5 shillings.
I give unto my daughter Dorcas Webster 40 Shillings besides what I have already given her.
I give to my daughter Mary Hopkins £15 out of my Estate when she comes of age.
My Will also is that at my wife's decease my sons Stephen, Ebenezer & Joseph do pay unto my daughter Mary 40 shillings apiece.
And my Will also is that at my wiffe's decease my Right in the Mill shall be equally divided among my Children.
I appoint my wife & four sons, John, Stephen, Ebenezer & Joseph, Executors; and desire my friends John Easton and Joseph Mygatt to be Overseers.
Witness: James Steele sen., John Easton.
- - - - - - - - - -
Court Record, page 5, 6 Nov 1689: Will proved.

Stephen Hopkins and Dorcas Brownson were married before 4 Mar 1657 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A.

7. Dorcas Brownson was born before 19 Dec 1633 in Earls Colne, Essex, England. She was christened on 19 Dec 1633 in St. Andrews Church, Earls Colne, Essex, England. She died on 10 May 1697 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. She may have died on the 13th of May rather than on the 10th.

Fourth Generation

8. Major Gen. Robert Sedgwick was born before 6 May 1613 in Woburn, Bedfordshire, England. He was christened on 6 May 1613 in St. Mary's Church, Woburn, Bedfordshire, England. He died on 24 May 1656 in Jamaica. He was named in the 1647 will of his mother-in-law Dorothy Blake.

Genealogical Gleanings in England, page 260:
Stoe MSS. (Brit. Mus.) 215:
Inrollment of Letters Patent and other Instruments of State during the Protectorate of Oliver Cromwell, of his son Richard, and of the Government of the persons styling themselves Keepers of the Liberties of England, from 24 June, 1654, to 23 January, 1659.
Fol. 31. 6 June 1655. That the sum of 1793li 7s 8d remaining due and owing unto Major Rob't Sedgwick upon his Accompts (exam'd by the Com'rs of our Navy) as he was employed in the publique service in New England and elsewhere against the French, be paid to him.

Dictionary of National Biography <to type in>

Genealogical Gleanings in England, page 259:
September 1656
On the Thirtieth day issued forth Letters of Ad'con To Johanna Sedgwick widdow the relict of Major Robert Sedgwick late in the parts beyond the Seas Esq'r dec'd To Administer all and singuler the goods ch'ells and Debts of the sayd dec'd Shee being first sworne truely to Administrater &c. Fo. 221.

The Sedgwick Collection at the New Haven Colony Historical Society, Box 6, Folder B, Sheet 18:
ROBERT SEDGWICK of London, afterwards Major General of Massachusetts Colony, was, we believe, the first of our name to come to America. He is the ancestor of a very large family that is now scattered to every State in the Union.
He was born at Woburn, Bedfordshire, England, and baptised there May 6, 1613, according to the Register of St. Mary's Church at Woburn. He was the son of William Sedgwicke and Elizabeth Lowe (or Howe), whose marriage on April 10, 1604, is recorded in the same Register. It is said that Woburn, Mass., was so named as a compliment to Robert, who assisted in laying out the town.
All knowledge of his early life comes from Johnson's "Wonder Work of Providence", to the effect that he was "stout and active in all feats of war, nurst up in London's Artillery Garden. - "exact theory besides the help of a very good top piece."
There is no positive record of when he came to this country, but he is supposed to have been, "Jo Sedgwick, aged 24," licensed to be transported to New England, imbarqued in the Truelove 19 Sept. l635.
The first mention of him in New England is found in the First Record Book, of the First Church in Charlestown, which states that in 1636, 12 mo: day 27 (that is Feb. 27, 1637, our calen- dar) Robert Sedgwick, with Joanna Sedgwick, his wife were admitted to the church. He was made a freeman on March 9, following, when he was appointed Captain for the town "by our Court."
He became prominent in the affairs of Charlestown, Boston and the Colony. On March 13, 1638 "Robert Sedgwiok and others at their request, were ordered to form a Company, which shall be called the Military Company of Massachusetts." This was later called the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, and was the first organization of its kind in New England. He was Captain of the Company in 1840, Commander of Castle in 1641, and Head of Regiment of Middlesex in 1643.
He was appointed Major General of the Colony May 26, 1852, and was soon thereafter called to Military service by Oliver Cromwell, then Lord Protector of England. His first commission was an expedition against the Dutch in New York, but upon his arrival he found that peace had been made. He then sailed with his squadron to Boston and was commissioned for an expedition against the French Forts in Arcadia, with John Leveret (afterwards governor of the colony) as second in company. This was a very successful campaign, three forts being captured and English garrisons left in charge.
The above results so pleased Lord Protector Cromwell that in July 1854 Major General Sedgwick was sent from Boston in command of a fleet of about 23 vessels to relieve the British forces at Jamaica, which had recently been captured by Generals Venable and Penn, both of whom had returned to England by the time of Sedgwick's arrival. He found the army in a very de- moralized condition, and that no proper quarters had been constructed nor storehouses for supplies, which were scattered and exposed to the weather. The soldiers were dispirited and in very bad health, at one time some 250 dying per week.
With the aid of the sailors Sedgwick soon constructed a warehouse for the supplies and had them secure, and did all possible for the betterment of conditions.
General Sedgwick was at first one of the Commissioners for the government of the Island. I n fact several commissions were appointed but there were many deaths among them. Finally early in 1656 Sedgwick was appointed as Governor of the Island, his commission only arriving a few days before his death, May 24, 1656.
He had evidently been in ill health for some time, as in Nov. 1655, he had written to the Lord Proteotor and had prayed leave to come from Jamaica to London and had then commended his widow and five children to the kindness of the Lord Protector.
Robert Sedgwick married in England before coming to Charlestown, Joanna Blake, daughter of William and Dorothy Blake of Andover, England. The said William Blake by will in 1641 leaves to Jone Sedgwick, and her mother Dorothie Blake in 1647 leaves to Joanna Sedgwick £100 and to her two sonnes £20 each. Will also mentions her sonne in law Robert Sedgwick. There were also legacies from Jane, widow of Richard Blake, and from Mrs. Martha Blake.
Joanna, the widow of Robert Sedgwick, returned to England, and married the Rev. Thomas Allen, who had been a teaoher in the church at Charlestown.
Administration on the Generals estate was granted his widow in England, 30 Sep 1656.

The American Ancestors of William R. Benham (1823-1907) and his wife, Helen Maria Bingham (1827-1900) (Loretta Chpaman, Gladys Hall, June Stricklin, & Lela Wilkins--research begun in 1984; no publication date given)
Chapter 25 - The Sedwick Family, by Loretta Chapman (pages 88-97):
The story of his military and business life is told in the History of Charlestown by Richard Frothingham Jr., Esq. Frothingham says this about him:
"Robert Sedgiwck was one of the most distinguished men of his time. The family is supposed to have sprung from the northern counties of England...
"He was admitted an inhabitant of this town [Charlestown] June 3, 1836, a freeman in 1637... chosen a representative [several times]. He was also a selectman...
He was the captain of the "trained band, the major (1644) of the Middlesex regiment, and elected major general May 26, 1652."
Sedgwich had several other commands:
"In 1641, 1645, and 1648, he commanded the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company. He had a commission to take care of the fortifications of the town, and to keep it and the harbor 'from all hostile and mutinous attempts or insurections.'"
In this capacity, "he was to have always in readiness, 'a barrel of powder for every six pieces of ornance, with twelve shot and five pound of match, if any ships in the harbor shall quarrel, and shoot one another, whereby the people, or houses, might be endangered.'"
From here we take up the account of part of Sedgwick's military career from the segment about him in the history of The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts.
England was engaged in territorial disputes with both the Dutch (New Amsterdam -- later New York) and the French (territories that are now some of the eastern Provinces of Canada). With three English ships and a crew consisting of English sailors, plus local recruits, General Sedgwick and General John Leverett were assigned to solve some of those "problems." A portion of Sedgwick's 24 September 1654 letter to Cromwell is worth quoting:
"I know you cannot but be acquainted with our first business we were designed into. God did not seem to smile upon us in that business, in many of HIs workings toward us. But so it fell out, even when we were ready to advance with our forces to the southward, we had countermands as touching that business [an intended campaign against the Dutch]... we then, being in a posture of war, and soldiers here listed in pay, attended the other part of our commission against the French, and the fourth of July set sail for Nantucket with three ships, one Catch, and about two hundred land soldiers of old England and New. Our first place [was] St. John's Fort... and in four days took it in... Having sent away the French and settled in our Garrison, we set sail for Port Riall, and in five days after our arrival there, took in that fort, as also a ship of France, that lay under the fort..."
After describing more of the successful operation, Sedgwick continued:
"I am willing to hope God intends a blessing in this affair to the English Nation, and to the Plantations in particular. It's a brave Countrey full of fine Rivers, Airable Pastors, full of Timber, gallant Masts, full of Miines, coal, Marble, Iron, Lead, and some say, Copper. Many convenient places for fishing, making of Oyl, and good quantities of trade for Beaver and Mous-skins."
Sedgwick's next military assignment took him to the island of Hispaniola [the old name of the island that is now divided between Haiti and the Dominican Republic], from which the English had been routed, but they were successful in seizing Jamaica on May 17, 1655. General Sedgwick commanded one of four regiments there. His first letter back to England reported the army "...in a sad, deplorable and dejected condition." The soldiers were "so lazy and idle as it cannot enter into the heart of any Englishman that such blood whould run in the veins of any born in England."
To govern Jamaica, the principal military officers formed a new Supreme Executive Council, with Sedgwick as its head. Cromwell promoted him to the rank of Major General.
General Sedgwick died on 24 May 1656 at Jamaica, West Indies, soon after he received his new appointment. His widow outlived him. According to the account in The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts, she was living in Stepney, near London, in 1667.
Sedgwick's letter show the state of his feelings. Writing to Cromwell, September 1, 1655, he says:
"I must convess, I cannot bring my own spirit to stand and consider what I may understand of the mind and will of God, and what He speaks in so loud a voice as this. I must conclude this, that God is righteous in His proceedings, to curb and bring low the pride of men."
The same letter concludes:
"I am resolved to attend my business with as much wisdom and vigor as God shall assist me with, I thank God, my heart in some measure beareth me witness, that it is the glory of God, that I intended in this employment, and I hope He will yet own us. Our condition, I am confident, is often remembered by you in your approaches to Heaven, and I hope will yet be...
"Let your Highness be pleased to pardon my boldness and prolixity. I thank God my prayers are for you, and that the God of wisdom and grace may yet own you in your so many weighty affairs, that you may be a blessing to your generation, and serviceable to Christ, and to His people.
"Sir, I am willing to be, and wish I were,
Your Lordship's humbel Servant,
Robert Sedgwick."
General Sedgwick's letters are contained in Thurloe's [Secretary to Cromwell] State Papers. In one of them, he [Sedgwick] wrote the Protector on November 5, 1655:
"The truth is, God is angry, and the plague is begun, and we have none to stand in the gap."
"Sir, you cannot conceive us so sad as we are, broken and scattered, God rending us in twain, a senseless hearted people, not affected with His dealings towards us."
Sedgwick made two requests to the Protector:
"One is, if God spare me life, that Your Highness would be pleased to permit me to come to England..."
"The other petition is I left behind me a dear and religious wife, who through grace hath much of the fear and knowledge of God in her. I have also five children, to me dear and precious. I would only by this, Your Highness would cast one thought towards them, that whatever hazard or hardship I may go through, yet my relations may not be forgotten. I only expect what Your Highness was pleased to promise me, that she may not be troubled in obtaining it in such seasons, as may tend to her comfort."
His request to return to England was not granted. About money for his family, there is no clear answer. According to the Messrs. Roberts' summary of the Protectorate, England was often near bankruptcy in those years, and many soldiers were not being paid.
"Robert Sedgwick was a representative of the liberal Puritans of early New England... His regard for education is seen in his gifts to the College. He was a very brave, zealous and pious man, beloved and esteemed by all.[Aylesbury, June 26, 1656, in Thurloe, Vol. IV, page 604]
"He was truly a religious man, and of the most innocent conversation I ever accompanied."[History of Charlestown, by Richar Frothingham, Jun., Esq.]
As to Sedgwick's business career, both of my major sources say that he build many businesses. The biography recorded by The Ancient and Honorable, etc. stated that he was in partnership with John Winthrop, Jr., in establishing an ironworks at Lynn. His descriptions in his letters after the Feench campaign certainly pointed to a proclivity to see the country in terms of economic opportunities.
[Ancient and Honorable Artillary Company of Massachusetts (Oliver Ayer Roberts : Boston : 1895 : Alfred Mudge & Son)]

Major Gen. Robert Sedgwick and Joane or Johanna Blake were married on 6 Jan 1634/35 in Andover, Hampshire, England.

9. Joane or Johanna Blake was born before 16 Feb 1612/13 in Andover, Hampshire, England. She was christened on 16 Feb 1612/13 in Andover, Hampshire, England. She died in 1667 in Stepney, Middlesex, England.

By deed of this date, "Johanna Sedgwick, of the Parish of Stepney, in the
County of Middlesex, the widow and relict of Major General Robert
Sedgwick, lateof Jamaica, in the parts beyond the seas, deceased," for
the consideration of twelve pounds ten shillings, sells and conveys to
Francis Norton, of Charlestown, "a right of commonage in Charlestown, f
five cows." The deed is witnessed by Henry Moss, notary public, Jno.
Leveritt, Jere. Jenoway and Peter Tilley, Boston,--and to the same is
appended the following attestation:
"Boston, May 28, 1672. Massachusetts Colony. John Leveritt, Esq., deputy
governor,being sworn, do say and attest that he was present and saw
Joanna Sedgwick sign, seal and deliver this within instrument of
conveyance, to the grantee, Francis Norton, of Charlestown,
and that he subscribed his name as a witness thereto." Underneath is
endorsed,--Deed entered for Record, 1672.
Sources: Genealogical Notes, pages 175-6, F.A. Brown, Hartford, CT 1856.
History of Charlestown, by Richard Frothingham, jun., Esq.
Middlesex County Land Records, Vol. IV., page 230, May 20, 1657.

She married second Rev. Thomas Allen. She had no children by her second husband.

10. Rev. Samuel Stone was born before 30 Jul 1602 in All Saints, Hertfordshire, England. He was christened on 30 Jul 1602 in All Saints, Hertfordshire, England. In 1628 he was a curate in Stisted, Essex, England. About 1632 he was a lecturer in Torcester, Northamptonshire, England. He died on 20 Jul 1663 in Hartford First Church, Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. He was buried in Hartford Center Church, Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. He was named in the 1660 will of his uncle Ezekiel Rogers, and in the will of his cousin Edward Sams.

Abbreviations used below in The Great Migration Begins:
BChR = The Records of the First Church in Boston, 1630-1868, Publications of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, Volumes 39, 40 and 41, Richard D. Pierce, ed. (Boston 1961)
CaBOP = The Register Book of the Lands and Houses in the "New Towne" and the Town of Cambridge... (Cambridge 1896)
CATR = The Records of the Town of Cambridge (Formerly Newtowne) Massachusetts, 1630-1703... (Cambridge 1901)
HaBOP = Original Distribution of the Lands in Hartford Among the Settlers, 1639, Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society, Volume 14 (Hartford 1912; rpt. Bowie, Maryland, 1989)
Hartford PD = Hartford Probate District, original files, Connecticut State Archives (and on microfilm)
HaVR = "Early Hartford Vital Records" in Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society, Volume 14, pages 575-632 (Hartford 1912; rpt. Bowie, Maryland, 1989)
Magnalia = Cotton Mather, Magnalia Christi Americana..., 2 volumes (Hartford 1855)
Manwaring = A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records</FONT=gt%, Volume One, Hartford Probate District, 1635-1700, Charles William Manwaring, comp. (Hartford 1904)
MBCR = Records of the Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in New England, 1628-1686, Nathaniel B. Shurtleff, ed., 5 volumes in 6 (Boston 1853-1854)
Morison = Samuel Eliot Morison, The Founding of Harvard College (Cambridge 1935) [especially for Appendix B, "English University Men Who Emigrated to New England Before 1646," pages 359-410]
RPCC = Records of the Particular Court of Connecticut, 1639-1663, Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society, Volume 22 (Hartford 1928; rpt. Bowie, Maryland, 1987)
TAG = The American Genealogist, Volume 9 to present (1932+)
Venn = John Venn and J.A. Venn, Alumni Cantabrigienses, Part I (From the Earliest Times to 1751), 4 volumes (Cambridge 1922-1927)
WJ = John Winthrop, The History of New England from 1630 to 1649, James Savage, ed., 2 volumes (Boston 1853). Citations herein refer to the pagination of the 1853 and not the 1826 edition, even though the index to the 1853 edition continues to use the 1826 pagination.
WMJ = Medical Journals of John Winthrop Jr., 1657-1669, manuscript, Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, Massachusetts

Great Migration Begins: SAMUEL STONE
He was baptized in Hertford, Hertfordshire, 30 July 1602, the son of John and _____ (Rogers) Stone [TAG 36:34].
He matriculated at Cambridge [University, England] from Emmanuel College, Easter 1620; B.A. 1623-4; M.A. 1627 [ 4:168; Morison 401].
He married first by about 1634 _____ _____; she died shortly before 2 November 1640 [TAG 30:159, citing a letter written by Thomas Hooker].
He was the curate in Sisted, Essex, England, before he came to Massachusetts, sailing in 1633 on the Griffin [WJ 1:128-30].
He resided first in Cambridge, MA, removing 1636 to Hartford, CT.
He was a minister. (On 11 October 1633 Winthrop reported "A fast at Newtown, where Mr. Hooker was chosen pastor, and Mr. Stone teacher, in such a manner as before at Boston" [WJ 1:137].)
He was a teacher at Cambridge church from 11 October 1633 [WJ 1:137], continuing in this position at Hartford.
He was made a freeman on 14 May 1634 [MBCR 1:369].
He married second by 25 July 1641, Elizabeth Allen; on 24 March 1638/9 "Mrs. Elizabeth Allen" was admitted to Boston church, and on 25 July 1641 "Mrs. Elizabeth Stone lately called Mrs. Elizabeth Allen, but now the wife of Mr. Samuell Stone the teacher of the Church of Hartford in Conecticott, was granted letters of recommendation thither" [BChR 24, 34]; she married (2) after 1 January 1667[/8] George Gardner of Salem, as his third wife [TAG 30:158-60; WMJ 772].
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ESTATE:
"Mr. Samuell Ston[e]" was granted a cowyard of one acre in Cambridge, 4 November 1633 [CaTR 6]; granted "a garden plot in the meetinghouse," 5 May 1634 [CaTR 8]; granted two acres "in the meadow next Wattertowne weir," 21 April 1635 [CaTR 12]; granted twenty acres of salt marsh "on the south side Charls River," 21 April 1635 [CaTR 12]; received a proportion of zero in the division of meadow, 20 August 1635 [CaTR 13].
In a mutilated entry in the Cambridge land inventory on 1 May 1635, "[S]amuell Stone" held at least five parcels: "in the town one dwelling house with other outhouses with garden and backside"; "in the town one garden about half a rood"; "in Wigwam Neck about four acres"; "in Cowyard Row about one acre"; and another parcel of more than one acre [CaBOP 4].
In the Hartford land inventory of February 1639/40 "Mr. Samuell Stone, teacher," held eight parcels: "one parcel on which his dwelling house now standeth with other outhouses, yards, gardens or orchards therein being, containing by estimation two acres"; eight acres in the South Meadow; eleven acres in the South Meadow (six of meadow and five of swamp; ten acres in the swamp by the Great River; twelve acres at the end of the old oxpasture; two acres, three roods and twenty perches in the Little Meadow (purchased of "Mr. Willeyis"); one acre, one rood and six perches in the Little Meadow; and one acre and two roods in the Little Meadow ("bought of Mr. Hocker") [HaBOP 348-50].
"An inventory of the goods & chattels of Mr. Sam[ue]ll Stone, the late reverend teacher of the Church of Christ at hartford who departed this life July the 20th 1663," was taken in November 1663 and totalled £563 1s., of which £239 was in real estate: "house & houselot," £100; "meadow 20 acres," £129; and "four several woodlots," £10 [Hartford PD Case #5280].
In his will he made Rev. John Higginson of Salem his literary executor, to see which of his manuscripts might be fit for publication. His inventory included "books &c." valued at £127.
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ASSOCIATIONS:
In the Hartford records are the marriages on 2 July 1644 of William Wadsworth and Elizabeth Stone and on 28 September 1648 of Henry Hayward (or Howard) and Sarah Stone [HaVR 605, 607]. These two women were younger sisters of Samuel Stone, and the mother of these three siblings was sister of Rev. Ezekiel Rogers of Rowley [TAG 36:29-35].
- - - - - - - - - -
COMMENTS:
Beginning in 1628 the name of Samuel Stone, curate, is written at the bottom of each page of the Stisted, Essex, parish register, but by the middle of 1630 he had been replaced. According to Mather, Stone was "a lecturer at Torcester [= Towcester] in Northamptonshire" when he was chosen to accompany Hooker to New England [Magnalia 435]. (Morison curiously gives this as Taventer [Morison 401], which is not the name of any English parish.)
On 1 March 1654/5 the court examined the evidence brought by Walter Fyler charging Mr. Stone with "breach of a fundamental law" and the "elders in general sin and wickedness," but the court found Fyler's conduct to be insufferable and his charges baseless [RPCC 140].
On 28 February 1652/3 Samuel Stone wrote from Hartford to John Winthrop Jr. hoping for some medical advice regarding his ill son:
Worthie Sir, I am bold to write a few lines about our child. He is 23 weeks old, hath been somewhat ill 3 or 4 weeks, unquiet, his eyes looking yellow, having a cough, especially when he takes his victuals. We thought he might have been breeding teeth; but about a week past, we perceived that he had the yellow jaundise... [WP 6:256-57].
On 13 October 1654 Samuel Stone wrote again to John Winthrop Jr., urging him to come to Hartford the coming winter and plan to stay at his house. "I have not been well able to write to any, by reason of the flux of rheume into one of my eyes..." [WP 6:452]. Winthrop treated Rev. Stone and his family, who were quite prone to headaches, for many years.
Savage attempted to match the recorded births and baptisms of children of Samuel Stone at Hartford with the children mentioned by Samuel Stone and his second wife in their wills by assuming that Lydia or Abigail must be Elizabeth, and that the unnamed son born in 1649 must be Samuel. Approximate ages found in the Winthrop medical records show that this solution is unlikely for the daughters and not the only solution for son Samuel, and that Samuel Stone and his second wife had at least two children not recorded in the Hartford records.
After Thomas Hooker's death a serious controversy arose in the Hartford church, with Samuel Stone on one side and such prominent town residents as William Goodwin on the other. The parties could not be resolved, and in 1659 Goodwin and about thirty-five other families departed, moving upriver to found the town of Hadley [Mary Jeanne Anderson Jones, Congregational Commonwealth: Connecticut, 1636-1662 (Middletown, Connecticut, 1968), pages 151-53; see also Magnalia 436-37].
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BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: Samuel Stone is one of those few individuals who are treated in both the Dictionary of National Biography and the Dictionary of American Biography.

New England Historic Genealogical Register (NEHGR) (issue?):
Births, Marriages, and Deaths, Contained in the volume lettered "Original Distribution of the Town of Hartford (Ct.) amonth [sic] the settlers, 1639":
page 3: Joseph Stone, sunn of Mr. Samwell Stone was baptised October the eaigteneth one thousand six hundreeth forty and six.
page 4: Ledea Stone daughter of Mr. Samiwell Stone was borne Jeneuary the twenty and two one thousand six hundreth forty and seuen.
page 7: Abbigall Stone daughter of Mr. Samiwell Stone was borne Septm 9th one thousand six hundreth and fifty.

A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records, 1663 to 1677:
Name: Rev. Samuel Stone Location:
He died 20 July, 1663. Invt. £563-01-00. Taken November, 1663, by John Allyn, William Wadsworth. Will not dated.
Impr. It is my will that Mrs. Elizabeth Stone, my loving wife, shall be my Agent & Sole Executrix, and that wthout any intanglemt or feare; the legacyes given to her selfe being firstly possessed all & every of them as they follow, & the after legacyes to be made good out of the remayning estate if sufficient; otherwise, a distribution according to that proportion. Yet if there happen any overplus, to be wholy & solely at the dispose to my sd. wife. Also, I give unto my sd. wife, during the term of her life, halfe my howsing & land within the libertyes of Hartford, & to have the free dispose of the valew of the sd. halfe of my land at the time of her death, by legacy or otherwise; & also farther it is my will & I doe freely give unto my wife all the household stuff that I had with her when I married her, to be at her full and free dispose as shee shall see cause.
I give to my sonne Samuel Stone, at the time of my decease, the other halfe of my houseing & Lands within the liberties of Hartford aforesd., the other halfe of the houseing at the time of the death of my sd. wife, as also the other halfe of the land, but upon a valuable consideration as before specified. Also, I give unto my son all my books except such as are otherwise disposed of. Provided (that if) my sonne Samuell depart this life before he is married, that then the whole of this my prsent legacy shall return to & be wholly at the dispose of my wife.
Also, unto my daughter Elizabeth I doe give & order to be payd the full sum of £100 in household goods, Chattells & other country pay what my wife can best parte wthall, or in Two or three acres of Land at price currant before the sd. Land be divided betwixt my wife & sonne as aforesayd, & this sayd Legacy to be performed & made good wth in Two yeares after the marriage of my sayd daughter Elizabeth. Provided, that if my sayd daughter shall match or dispose of her selfe in marriage either wth out or Crosse to the minds of her mother & the minde & Consent of my Overseers, then this my Last will concerneing her to stand voyd & she gladly to accept of such summe & quantity or portion as her sayd mother shall freely dispose to her. Or And in case my sayd daughter shall dye & depart this world Before she receive her sayd portion, the whole thereof shall fully returne & belong unto my sayd wife at her dispose.
Also, as a token of my Fatherly Love & respect, I doe give unto my three daughters, Rebecca, Mary & Sarah, forty shillings each of them, to be payd them by my wife in houshold stuffe as it shall be prized in Inventorie.
I desire Mr. Matthew Allyn, my Brother William Wadsworth [husband of Samuel Stone's sister Elizabeth], Mr. John Allyn & my sonne Joseph Fitch, overseers.
Witness: Bray Rosseter.
Samuel Stone.
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Court Record, Page 12--3 March, 1663-4: Will proven.

Tombstone, Center Church, Hartford:
"An Epitapf on Mr. Samuel Stone, Deceased the 61 Years of His Age, July 26, 1663.
New englands Glory & Her Radiant Crowne
Was He who now in softest Bed of Downe
The Glorious Resurection Morne appears,
Doth Safely, Sweetly, sleepe in Jesus here;
In Nature's solid Art, and Reasoning well,
Tis Knowne beyond compare He did excell;
Errors corrupt, by Sinne would dispute,
He did opugne, and clearly them confute;
Above all things He Christ His Lord preferd,
Hartford! Thy richest Jewel is here interd."

Dictionary of National Biography, page 1302:
Stone, Samuel (1602-1663, puritan divine, son of John Stone, a freeholder of Hertford, was born in that town and baptised at All Saints on 30 July 1602. He was educated at Hale's grammar school, and proceeded to Cambridge in 1620 as a pensioner of Emmanuel College, matriculating on 19 April, and graduating B.A. in 1623 and M.A. in 1627. He studied theology at Ashen in Essex, under Richard Blackerby, a non-subscriber. In 1630 he went to Towcester as a private lecturer, and remained there about three years (Shepard, Autobiogr.; Young, Massachusetts Chronicles, page 518).
In 1633 Stone sailed for New England in company with John Cotton and Thomas Hooker, as an assistant to the latter. Hooker and Stone arrived in Boston on 4 September and went at once to Newtown (now Cambridge), where, on 11 Oct., they were chosen pastor and teacher respectively. In 1636 Hooker and Stone, with the majority of the inhabitants, removed to a new settlement on the Connecticut [River], which they called Hartford, after Stone's birthplace. In the following year Stone accompanied the Hartford contingent in the expedition against the Pequot Indians, which broke the power of that tribe.
In 1656 differences arose between Stone and William Goodwin, the ruling elder, concerning the former's method of exercising his functions of teacher. As a consequence Stone resigned his office, but was induced to resume it shortly after. The controversy ended in schism, Goodwin with several church members withdrawing to Hadley in 1659. Stone died at Hartford on 20 July 1663.
Stone was twice married. By his second wife, Elizabeth Allyn, whom he espoused in 1641, he had four surviving children--a son Samuel and four daughters, Elizabeth, Rebecca, Mary, and Sarah. [This is in error as the first three daughters named here were the children of his first wife.]
Stone published 'A Congregational Church, a Catholike Visible Church,' London, 1652, 4to, in answer to Samuel Hudson's 'Visible Catholick Church' (1645, 4to), and left two works in manuscript: a catechism and a confutation of the Antinomians.

Dictionary of American Biography <need this>

Rev. Samuel Stone and Elizabeth "Betsy" Allen were married in Jul 1641 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A.

11. Elizabeth "Betsy" Allen was born about 1616. She may have been born in 1606 instead of in 1616. She died on 6 Jun 1681 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. She married second George Gardner.

Alternate spellings in English records: Alen, Aleyn, Aleyne, Alin, Alleine, Allene, Alleyn, Alleyne, Allin, Alline, Alling, Allunde, Allyn

[second husband of Elizabeth Allen]
A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records 1677 to 1687:
Page 28-9-30 Name: George Gardner Location: Hartford
Died 20 August, 1679, at Salem, in the Colony of Massachusetts Bay. Invt. £3001-00-06. Taken (in Hartford) by Nicholas Olmsted, Caleb Standley. Will dated 21 July, 1679.
I George Gardner of Hartford do make this my last Will & Testament:
I bequeath to my wife Elizabeth Gardner my Income and my part in the Mills at Salem during her life. I give unto my wife the Rent of the Land I bought of Mr. Fitch, or Use of the Money if he pay for it according to the Contract, the term of her life. Again, I give her the Rent of that land I bought of John Terry during her life, and the two Cows & 2 Calves & 2 Swine at Home, forever, as likewise the Use of what household Stuff in my house is mine, for the term of her life.
I give unto my son Samuel Gardner my house & Land in which he now dwelleth at Salem, with all my Upland & Meadow in the South Field, & my part of the Mills after my Mother's decease, & the Farme & Meadow Thomas Gold lives upon, after his mother's decease, & the Houseing & all Appurtenances thereto belonging.
I give unto my son Ebenezer all my Houses and Land, with all the Appurtenances thereto belonging, at Hartford & Windsor & Simsbury, after his Mother's decease; likewise I give unto him presently, after my decease, that Land that lyeth by Mr. Babidg, and that acre of Salt Meadow I had of my Father.
To my daughter Buttolph I give £300 of my Debts owing me at Connecticut when they are got in, & to my son Buttolph I give £30 he was indebted to me at our last Reckoning, I mean the balance of that Account that was made in the Spring.
To my daughter Turner I give the House & Land they now live in, to him & her their natural lives, & then to whome of her children he shall give it after him, provided he give it to one or more of her Children, & £300 of my Debt at Connecticut as it can be got in.
To my daughter Hathorne I give £300 of my Debts of Connecticut;
but in Case my son Ebenezer doth dye before he be married, then the Estate given to him to be divided equally amongst the rest of my Children; & I likewise give unto my son Ebenezer the Rent of that Farme Thomas Gold liveth on, during his Mother's life,
& do give unto my brother Thomas Gardner £20 in provisions.
And I do give unto my two cousins, Miriam Hascall and Susannah Hill, £5 each, to be laid out by my sister Grafton.
I appoint my sons Samuel and Ebenezer Gardner to be my Executors, and what remaineth after my Debts be paid & Legacies, 2 parts to be to my son Samuel and one part to Ebenezer.
And to my servant Arrah I do give him £5 when he hath served my son Samuel 5 years, and then his time to be out.
I do intreat my friend Capt. John Allyn to Oversee the performance of this my Will, who liveth at Hartford, to whome I give £5 as a token of my Love, Also I entreat my friend Caleb Standly to oversee the performance of this my Will, who liveth at Connecticut, to whose two daughters I give 50 Shillings apeice.
And I do desire my two brothers, Thomas & Samuel Gardner, to oversee the performance of my Will at Salem.
George Gardner.
Witness: Thomas Gardner, Samuel Gardner, Joseph Williams.
Attest before Gen. Daniel Denison and Major William Hathorne, Esq., 1st September, 1679, by Hilliar Veren, Clarke.
This is a true Copy, compared with the originall left on file with the Records of the Court at Salem.
- - - - - - - - - -
Court Record, Page 18--4 December, 1679: An attested Copy of the last Will of Mr. George Gardner, as it was attested & proven at Salem, & it was also accepted and approved by this Court.
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Page 23--4 March, 1679-80: Invt. exhibited in Hartford by Nicholas Olmsted and Caleb Stanly.

A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records, 1677 to 1687, page 82:
Elizabeth Gardner, Hartford. inventory £381-00-10, taken 4 Jan 1681/2 by Jonathan Gilbert, Phineas Willson, William Burnham. Will dated 16 Jun 1681.
I Elizabeth Gardner of Hartford do make this my last Will & Testament:
I give to my son Samuel Stone my feather bed that I Ly upon, & my Green rugg & green curtains, two payre of sheets, halfe a doz of Napkins, halfe doz of Towells, two pewter dishes (one little one & one great one), Two porringers, one brass ketle that will hold about three payles full, one brass skillitt, the table that stands in the studdy, two old green cushions, The bigest Brass candlestick, two earthern blue drinking cupps, & a smale payre of Andirons, & Two Books of Mr. Greenhill's upon "ezekiel"; & it is my will that my son shall have no power to make sale of any of those things above mentioned, but to have the use of them only, for his benefit, as my overseers shall see reason to grant.
I give to Elizabeth my daughter all the rest of my houshold stuffe not particularly disposed of in this my will (she giving her engagement to pay to my Grand sonn Samuel Sedgwick sixteen pounds when he shall attayne the age of Twenty one yars), & my fower acres of Land in the upper end of the south meadow, & all the rest of my land not expressly disposed of in this my last Will & Testament, to be to her & her heirs forever.
I give to Samuel Sedgwick £16, to be paid by his Mother to him at the age of 21 years; as allso I give to my sd. Grand son Samuel Sedgwick my 6 acres of Land in the 40 acres with in the sowth mead, with my Long Lott on the east side of the river, & 7 acres of upland Bought of Richard Goodman, being cow pasture, as allso I give him the rest of my 6 acres of Land in the 40 acres from the day of my decease, to be improved for his advantage till he comes of age, as my overseers shall direct.
I give to John Robberts, my grand son, the west division Lot in Hartford & my cow pasture Lott neer the blue Hills, to be to him his heirs & assigns forever. I give to my daughters-in-law, Rebeccah Nash, Mary Fitch & Sarah Butler, to each of them 40 Shillings apeice in silver, If I leave so much; If not, in other pay equivalent; as allso to each of them a suit of my wearing lining, which I desire them to accept as a token of my love to them.
I give to Rebeccah Butler one acre of Land my husband bought of Nath. Ward, & is now in possession of Mr. John Whitting, to be to her, her heirs & assigns forever, she to possess it at the day of marriage, & her father to possess it till then.
I doe make my Daughter Elizabeth Roberts & my Grand son Samuel Sedgwick Joint Executors of this my last will & Testament.
I doe desire Major John Talcott & Capt. John Allyn to be the overseers.
And whereas my husband, Mr. Samuel Stone, desired in his last will & Testament that my son Samuel Stone should after my decease possess all my Lands, he paying the full value thereof according as I shall dispose thereof, I willingly submit thereto, & therefore doe appoynt my sd. sonn Samuel Stone, If he will hold the Lands I have disposed of as above, that then he doe pay unto each of them I have given Land unto, the full value thereof, which shall be to them, their heirs & assigns forever instead of sd. Land.
[signed] Sarah (X) Howard.
Witness: John Allyn,
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Court Record, page 51, 2 Mar 1681/2: Will Proven.

12. John Hopkins lived in Cambridge, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, U.S.A. in Mar 1634/35. He lived in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. in 1636. He died before 14 Apr 1654 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. (date of inventory) He was born in England.
SOURCES

*John Hopkins of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1634, and Some of His Descendants (Timothy Hopkins, 1932)

4 Aug 1634 -- Newtown (Cambridge), MA, John Hopkins received a grant of four acres of land, followed by others in the same year, and more in 1635. [Town and Proprietors' Records of Cambridge]

4 Mar 1634/5 -- John Hopkins was admitted Freeman by the General Court held at New Towne (Cambridge). [Records of Massachusetts Bay, 1:370]

8 Feb 1634 -- John Hopkins had a house at #24 Spring Street in Cambridge.
[Proprietors' Record, page 26] [History of Cambridge, pages xv, xvi]

1636 -- John Hopkins was an Original Proprietor of Hartford.

25 Sep 1637 -- John Hopkins deeded his house and all of his lands in Cambridge to Edmond Auger.

A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records, 1650-1663:
Hartford Probate Records, 2:54-57: Will of John Hopkins of Hartford.
Inv. £236-08, taken 14 Apr 1654, by John Cullick, John Barnard, James Ensign.
Will dated 1 Jan 1648/9:
I, John Hopkins of Hartford do make this my last Will and Testament:
I make my Wife Jane Hopkins my sole Executrix of my whole estate, out of it she to pay to my daughter Bethiah Hopkins £30.
And my will alsoe is that the one halfe of all my Lands & howsing should be my sone Stephen Hoopkins to be enjoyed by him and his heyers Forever, when he shall have attayned to adg off twenty two yeares.
And my will further is That iff my siad wiff should marry again, then the one half off the Estate that she shall then possess, the former portions being paid, shall be paid in Equall proportion to my said Son and daughter or their heyres after the decease of my wiff, these children to be under the control of their Mother.
Bethiah until 18 years of age and Stephen until 22 years of age Shall rermain with and under the Government of my Said wife until they have attayned their Several ages aforesaid, As also that they shall noe way Contract or Engadg themselves in way of marriage without the knowledge and Consent of my wife aforesaid.
I desire Mr. John Cullick & James Ensign to be Overseeers.
Witnesses: John Cullick, William Andrews, James Ensign.
- - - - - - - - - -
Note: 11 Nov 1679. A quit claim or Receipt to Stephen Hopkins from Samuel Stocking and Bethiah Stocking: We have received full satisfaction of Our beloved brother Stephen Hopkins for whatsoever is due unto us by the last will of our Hon'd Father John Hopkins, etc. John Hopkins and Jane were married before 1632 in England or Massachusetts.

13. Jane was born about 1615. She died before 11 Nov 1679 in probably, Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. She married second by 1657, Nathaniel Ward of Hadley, who died in 1664. She married third (as his third wife) before 24 Oct 1670 Gregory Wilterton (Wolterton, Walterton), whose inventory was taken on 6 Aug 1674.

14. John Brownson was born before 21 Sep 1602 in Lamarsh, Essex, England. He was christened on 21 Sep 1602 in Holy Innocents' Church, Lamarsh, Essex, England. He died before 28 Nov 1680 in Farmington, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. (date of inventory) He was also known as Bronson. He came to New England before 4 Aug 1635 (source?).

Parish Registers of St. Andrew's Church, Halstead, co. Essex:
[Not sure how many years were checked]
MARRIAGES
1626 John Browneson & Frances Hills, both single, 19 Nov.

Parish Registers, St. Andrew's Church, Earl's Colne, co. Essex:
1627 Mary daughter of John Brownson jun'r & Francis his wife, 12 Dec.
1628 John son of John Brownson jun'r & Frances his wife, 17 Feb. [1628/9]
1631 John son of John Brownson jun'r & Francis his wife, 28 Dec.
1613 Dorcas daughter of John Brownson jun'r & Francis his wife, 19 Dec.
BURIALS
1631 John son of John Brownson jun'r, 23 March. [1631/2]

Church Records, Farmington (NEHGR 11:323-328):
John Bronson's Children, Jan 1657:
Jacob Bronson, 17 years old.
John Bronson, 14 years old.
Isaac Bronson, 12 years old.
Abraham Bronson, 10 year old.

The American Genealogist (TAG) 38:201
It is not known just when John(1) Brownson, Bronson or Brunson moved from Hartford to Farmington. Farmington was founded by Hartford men in or about 1641, and Brownson was certainly there by 7 March 1649/50, when he served on the grand Jury; and was grand juryman again 15 May 1650; served as Deputy from Farmington to the Connecticut general Court four times, May 1651, Oct 1655, May 1656, and Oct 1656; was sworn Constable of Farmington for a year beginning 4 Mar 1651/2, and as such collected "the rate for the Fort at Seabrook" from his fellow-townsmen. He was one of the "seven pillars" of the church at Farmington from its foundation, 13 Oct 1652.
The Medical Journal of Gov. and Dr. John Winthrop, Jr., of Connecticut, mentions four of John Brunson's children as patients in 1657--Sarah, aged 18; John, aged 15; Isaac, aged 12; and Abraham, aged 10; and in 1669 referred to the son Jacob as 28 years old and still a bachelor. John Brownson was on the list of freeman of Farmington, 1659. He served on petit jury, 7 Mar 1660/1. On 4 Dec 1662, John Brunson was freed from "traineing, watch and ward," doubtless on account of his age, for he was then 60. On 16 May 1670 Cherry and Will, the Indians, with three of the Milford Indians, were adjudged to pay John Brunson 20s. for the "sider" they had stolen from him.

Served in the 1637 Pequot War; for his service he received land in the "Soldiers Field."

A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records, 1677 to 1687:
Page 52: John Brunson, Farmington, died 28 Nov 1680; inventory £312-01-06.
The children: Jacob, Isaac, Mary Ellis, John Brunson, Abraham Brunson, Dorcas Hopkins, Sarah Kilbourn.
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Court Record, page 32, 2 Dec 1680: Inventory now exhibited in Court by Jacob & Isaac Brunson & Dorcas Hopkins. This Court grant Adms. to the Children of the Dec. and appoint Marshall Grave to assist them in the division. There being no will made by the deceased, and finding the sayd John Brunson had in his lifetime allotted to his four sonns each of them a fifth part of his lands in Farmington, This Court confirms the same to them and to their heires forever; & whereas John had received short of his Brothers £8, it is now considered in the distribution, as also what his daughters have formerly received, and the distributions as followeth:
To Jacob Brunson Eldest son 72-02-00
To John Brunson 44-17-00 [deeds of heirs below]
To Isaac Brunson 36-17-00
To Abraham Brunson 36-17-00
To Mary Eldest daughter 35-16-00
To Dorcas 41-16-00 [deeds of heirs below]
To Sarah 45-16-00 [deeds of heirs below]
And this Court orders that there be payd towards the maintenance of the Widdow, yearly, the sum of £10 in good current pay, during the time of her natural life, to be paid by the children in proportion, and more if necessity arise.
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Vol. X, page 179, 5 Mar 1727/8: Whereas it is represented to this Court by George Kilbourn, Thomas Hopkins, John Bracy, Daniel Steele & Hezekiah Hopkins, Heirs by marriage and descent from John Brunson, formerly of Farmington, dec'd, that there is considerable Estate in Land of the s'd Dec'd that has not yet been Distributed, and necessary to be apprised in order to be Distributed to and among the heirs of s'd John Brunson, This Court grant Adms. on the s'd Real Estate which has not yet been Distributed unto the s'd Thomas Hopkins and John Bracy, and order that they make an Invt. thereof and exhibit the same to this Court as soon as may be, for Distribution.

[The following land records of Farmington, Hartford Co., CT, taken collectively, prove the identity of John Bronson, son of the above John Bronson. The land records in Farmington need to be searched further to look for the deeds for this same property signed by the heirs of Jacob, Isaac, Abraham, and Mary.]
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Vol. 6, page 206, 28 May 1739: Isaac Brounson, James Brounson, William Brounson, David Brounson, all of Crauen Co., S.C., the sons of Isaac Brounson the son of John Brounson sen'r which was formerly an Inhabitant of weathersfield, convey to John Brounson of Chauen County, S.C., all right in Farmington and Weathersfield.
- - - - - - - - - -
Vol. 6, page 207, 28 May 1739: Margaret Brounson Wid'w of Isaac Brounson the son of John Brounson sen'r Deceased which was formerly an Inhabitant of Weathersfield, conveys for love to my Children, that is to say my fiue sons George Brounson Isaac Brounson James Brounson Will'm Brounson Daued Brounson all of Crauen County, S.C., all right in Farmington and Weathersfield.
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Vol. 6, page 206, 20 May 1739: Mary Ford, of Prince Fredherick Parish, Crauen County, South Carolina, which was formerly Mary Brounson the Daughter of John Brounson Jun'r the son of John Brounson sen'r which was formerly an Jnhabitant of Weathersfield, Both Deceased, conveys to my Loveing Brother John Brounson of the Parish afores'd, all right in Farmington and Weathersfield.
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Vol. 6, page 206, 18 Jun 1739: Daniel McGrigor, son of Daniel McGrigor and Sarah his Wife which was formerly Sarah Brounson the Daughter of John Brounson formerly an Inhabitant or Resident in Weathersfield, he being a planter in Crauen County, S.C., conveys to John Brounson of the same, all right in Farmington and Weathersfield.
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Vol. 6, page 207, 21 Jun 1739: John Brounson, Joseph Brounson, Ebenezer Brounson, Thom's Brounson, allso two Daughters viz. Hannah wife of James Wrixham and Rebeckah wife of Isaac Bradwell, which was formerly Hannah & Rebeckah Brounson Daughters & sons of Joseph Brounson the son of John Brounson formerly an Inhabitant Resident Jn [= in] the Township of Weathersfield, all of us above Names Planters Jn Barkley, S.C., convey to John Brounson of Chauen County, S.C., all right in Farmington, etc.
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Vol. 6, page 207, 25 Jun 1739: Grace Martin, Wid'w of Moses Martine of Coleton County, S.C., planter deceased, which was formerly Grace Brounson the Daughter of John Brounson formerly an Inhabitant or Resident In Weathersfield deceased, conveys to John Brounson of Craneir County, S.C., all right in Farmington, etc.
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Vol. 6, page 208, 25 Sep 1739: John Brounson of prence Fredeerick parish, Crauen County, S.G., conveys to Aaron Brounson of Kensington in Farmington, one full fourth part of Land in Farmington originally Layd out to my honour'd predicessor John Brounson formerly of s'd Farmington deceased.
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Vol. 6, page 208: 5 Oct 1736.
*Thomas Hart [?],
*Thomas Hopkins [son of Hannah (___) and Stephen Hopkins, who was a son of Stephen Hopkins & Dorcas Bronson],
*Jonathan Hopkins [son of Mary Butler & Ebenezer Hopkins, who was a son of Stephen Hopkins & Dorcas Bronson],
*Ebenezer Hopkins [son of Mary Butler & Ebenezer Hopkins],
*Hezekiah Hopkins [son of Mary Butler & Ebenezer Hopkins],
*Stephen Hopkins [son of Mary Butler & Ebenezer Hopkins],
*Isaac Hopkins [son of Mary Butler & Ebenezer Hopkins],
*Daniel Steel and Mary [daughter of Mary Butler & Ebenezer Hopkins] his wife,
*Caleb Spencer and Sarah [daughter of Mary Butler & Ebenezer Hopkins] his wife,
*Jonathan Webster [son of Jonathan Webster & Dorcas Hopkins, who was the daughter Stephen Hopkins & Dorcas Bronson],
*Benjam'n Webster [son of Jonathan Webster & Dorcas Hopkins],
*Thom's Steel and Susannah [Susannah Webster, daughter of Jonathan Webster & Dorcas Hopkins] his wife,
*John Brace and Mary [Mary Webster, daughter of Jonathan Webster & Dorcas Hopkins] his wife,
*Daued Bidwell and Mehittabel [Mehitable Webster, daughter of Jonathan Webster & Dorcas Hopkins] his wife,
*Mary Sedgwick [Mary Hopkins, daughter of Stephen Hopkins & Dorcas Bronson, and the wife of Samuel Sedgwick],
*Joseph Hopkins [son of Hannah Peck & Joseph Hopkins, who was a son of Stephen Hopkins & Dorcas Bronson],
*Stephen Sedgwick [son of Samuel Sedgwick & Mary Hopkins] and Mary his wife,
*Thomas Ensign Ju'r and Hannah [Hannah Hopkins, daughter of Hannah Peck & Joseph Hopkins] his wife,
*Timothy Brounson and Dorcas [Dorcas Hopkins, daughter of Hannah Peck & Joseph Hopkins] his wife,
*Nath'll Thomson and Ruth [daughter of Hannah Peck & Joseph Hopkins] his wife,
*George Kilborn [son of John Kilbourn & Sarah Bronson],
*Josiah Kilborn [son of John Kilbourn & Sarah Bronson],
*Eliphalet Dickason [husband of Rebecca Bronson, who was daughter of Jacob Bronson, who was son of John Bronson & Frances Hills]
and
*John Hopkins [may be a great-grandson], all of Connecticut,
"heirs or Descendants of o'r Hon'd progenitor or predicessor mr. John Brounson formerly of Farmington afterwards of Hartford," convey to Timothy Brounson aboue Named, all right at Belchers farm. [Obadiah Dickinson signed with the others. Underneath, under date of 24 Sep 1739, is the statement that John Brounson [probably the John Bronson below] of Prince Frederick, Crauen County, S.C., one of the signers, appeared in Farmington and acknowledged. Evidently his signature to this deed was obtained almost three years after it had been drawn and signed by the others.]

John Brownson and Francis Hills were married on 19 Nov 1626 in Halstead, Essex, England.

15. Francis Hills was born before 23 Jul 1605 in Earls Colne, Essex, England. She was christened on 23 Jul 1605 in St. Andrews Church, Earls Colne, Essex, England. She died after 28 Nov 1680 in probably, Hartford Co., Connecticut, U.S.A. (died after husband)

FIFTH GENERATION

16. William Sedgwick died on 25 Jul 1632 in St. Mary's Church, Woburn, Bedfordshire, England.

Woburn Parish Register:
MARRIAGES:
10 Apr 1604 Wm. Sedgewicke & Elizabeth Howe.
BAPTISMS:
1 Apr 1607 Mary Sedgwicke chr., daughter of William.
17 Aug 1609 William Sedgewick chr., son of William.
5 Jun 1611 John Sedgwickes/Sedgwekes chr., son of William.
6 May 1613 Robert Sedgwickes chr., son of William.
16 Sep 1615 Thomas Sedgwicks chr., son of William.
6 Sep 1617 Rebecca Sedgswickes chr., daughter of William.
23 Jun 1619 Stephen Sedgwickes/Sedgesweke chr., son of William.
4 Jun 1621 Francis Sedgesweek chr., son of William.
20 Jul 1623 Thomas Sedgesweke/Sidgsweeke chr., son of William.
30 Aug 1627 Elizabeth Sedgweake chr., daughter of Mr. William.
BURIALS
11 Apr 1618 Thomas Sedgwickes bur., son of William.
27 Jun 1618 Rebecca Sedgwickes bur., daughter of William.
25 Jul 1632 Mr. William Sidgeweake bur.
CHURCHWARDENS:
1609 Harman Sheppard, Minister; Wm. Sedgwikes, John Coolman, Churchwardens.
1614 Wm. Sedgwickes & John Mears, Churchwardens.

Corporation of London Records Office:
CLA/002/04/335 = Stephen, Francis, Martha, Nathaniel, Sara, and Rebecca, orphans of William Sedgwicke, citizen and brewer, 1634. William Sedgwick and Elizabeth Howe were married on 10 Apr 1604 in St. Mary's Church, Woburn, Bedfordshire, England.

17. Elizabeth Howe died after 27 Nov 1638 in possibly, Woburn, Bedfordshire, England. (date of son John's will, in which he devised to her £500, at which time she was living in Woburn)

18. William Blake [linen draper, of Andover, Hants] was born estimated 1581 in probably, Andover, Hampshire, England. He died before 13 Jun 1642 in Andover, Hampshire, England. He was buried on 13 Jun 1642 in Andover, Hampshire, England. He was named in the 1641 will of his maternal uncle Nicholas Blake.

Parish Register of Andover, Hampshire, England:
MARRIAGES
1605[/6]. Willia' Blake and dorothy Magwk Febru' 6
BAPTISMS
1606. Richard the sonne of ___ Blake Juinr Novem'r 2
1610[/1]. Mary daught' to Will'm Blake March 10
1612[/3]. Joane daughter to Will'm Blake Feb 16
1614. Anne daughter of Wm. Blake April __
1615. Will'm son of Wm. Blake August 9
1617. Sara daught' to Wm. Blake May 11
1619. Peter son of Will'm Blake Apr 6
<need to finish>

LDS Film 92,154: Prerogative Court of Canterbury
[Transcribed by Charlou Dolan with paragraphs added for ease of reading]
In the name of God Amen I William Blake of Andover in the Countie of South'ton Lynendrap' being in reasonable good health (thankes be given to god) doe hereby make and declare my last will and testament in manner and forme followeing First I bequeath my soule unto the hands of allmightie god my Creator hopeing and nothing doubting but by and thorough the merrites of Jesus Christ my onely lord & Saviour my sinnes are remitted and that I shall inherit the kingdome of heaven my body I com'itt vnto thearth whereof it was made desireing yt may be decently buried and interred in the Church of Andover aforesaid there to rest in hope vntill the ioyfull day of resurrecion And as touching my worldly estate wherewith yt hath pleased god to blesse me I doe hereby dispose in manner & forme followeing
First I giue and bequeath vnto Dorothie my wife for and dureing her n'rall life (yf she shall soe longe continue my widdowe) all that my farme & Landes lyeing w'thin the p'ishe of Andover aforesaid called Cricklades. And alsoe all that the dwelling house w'th the landes proffites & com'odities thereunto belonging lyeing in Andover aforesaid wherein I now live. And alsoe all those landes called Fettiplaces lyeing & being w'thin the p'ishe of Andover aforesayd w'th all the proffites and comodities thereof; Except & reserved vnto Richard Blake my sonne one tenem't w'th a barne and backside thereunto belonging now in the tenure & occupacon of the said Richard my sonne
And from and after the death or marriage of my said wife I give & bequeath vnto my said sonne Richard Blake and to the heires males of his bodie lawfully begotten or to be begotten, all that my said Farme called Cricklades and all other my said landes called Fettiplaces w'th all and singuler the proffites and com'odities thereof together w'th my said dwelling house and the landes thereunto belonging Provided allwayes and my will & meaneing is that my said sonne Richard w'thin sixe monthes [from the time] my said landes shall come vnto him and that he shalbe thereof possessed and seized shall pay vnto my sonnes William Blake Peter Blake and John Blake; and vnto my daughters Elizabeth Blake and Martha Blake and to every of them threescore poundes apeece. And for want of such issue male of the bodie of my sayd sonne Richard I give & bequeath the said Farme and all other the lands before menconed vnto my sonne Willia' Blake and to the heries males of his bodie lawfully begotten or to be begotten; And for want of such yssue I giue & bequeath the said farme & landes before menconed vnto my sonne Peter Blake and to his right heyres foreu' vpon this provisoe & condicon neu'theles that yf my sayd sonne Richard shall depart this life w'thout yssue male of his bodie then liveing whereby the said Farme & lands shall descend & goe from his yssue to his younger brothers or one of them as aforesaid, my will & meaneing is that to w'ch of my said sonnes the said landes shall first come by force of this my last will & testam't & that he being thereof lawfully possessed & seised according to my true intent & meaneing shall pay or cause to be payed vnto the daughters of my said sonne Richard Blake then liveing the summe of three hundred poundes of lawfull money equally to be devided amongst them./
Item I giue & bequeath vnto my sonne Will'm Blake all those my landes and tenementes lyeing and being in Hurstborne Tarrant in the County of South't w'ch I purchased of one Robert Jeneway; and alsoe xxii acres of arrable lande lyeing in the Eastfeildes of Andover w'ch I purchased of M'ris Iremonger & alsoe 2 acres of land lyeing by Co'en? acre nere Walter Waites garden w'ch I purchased of m'r Bartholmew Waite w'th all the deeds writeings & evidence concerning the same landes. To haue & to hould the said landes & everie part & parcell therof vnto my said sonne W'm Blake his heires & assignes foreu' from & im'ediatly after my decease Alsoe I giue & bequeath vnto my said sonne Willia' Blake xxij acres of land lyeing in Andover feilds together w'th the lease thereof w'ch I hould by lease of the lady Sandys & Mr. Henry Sandys her sonne for divers yeares determinable vpon the lives of the said Wm. Blake Peter Blake and John Blake my sonns Alsoe I giue vnto my said sonne Will'm Blake one hundred & twentie pounds currant money to be paied vnto him w'thin 3 moneths next after my decease And I giue vnto him my best fetherbed furnished and the best peece of plate & my seale ring
Item I giue & bequeath vnto my sonne Peter Blake and to his heires foreu' all those my ten'tes and landes lately fallen vnto me by the death of my brother John Blake vizt the house or ten't called the Phienix now in the tenure or occupacon of the widdow Cooke, one other ten't parcell or the Phenix now in the tenure or occupacon of Robert Longe, one other ten't or house called the old hall now in the tenure or occupacon of Walter Waite w'th all & singuler their appurtennces To haue & to hould vnto the said Peter Blake his heires and assignes foreu' from & ym'ediatly after my decease. Alsoe I giue vnto my sonne Peter Blake one hundred & twentie poundes of currant money to be payed vnto him w'thin 6 months next after my decease. Alsoe I giue vnto my sonne Peter Blake my lease of Coops house and Orchard w'ch I hould of the Colledge of Winton and all my interest & terme therein to come; To haue & to hould ym'ediatly after his mothers decease; and I giue vnto him one fetherbed fully furnished and 2 peeces of plate worth Five pounds to be delivered vnto him shortly after my decease
Item I giue vnto my sonne John Blake & his heires all those houses and ten'te w'th their appurtennces w'ch I lately purchased & bought of Frances Blake lyeing in Andover neere Westbrook now in the severall tenures & occupacons of Alexander Cooper Anthony Tackuell Will'm Scullerd & others. To haue & to hould vnto my said sonne John Blacke his heires & assignes forever from & ym'ediatly after my decease. Alsoe I giue vnto my sayd sonne John one hundred poundes of currant money to be payed vnto him by my executrix w'thin 6 moneths next after my decease. Alsoe I give vnto him one good fetherbed furnished and soe much plate as shalbe worth Six poundes thirteene shillinges & foure pence to be delivered vnto him shortly after my decease./
[crossed out: Item I giue vnto my daughter Margaret Terry the sume of xx]
Item I giue vnto my daughter Dorothie Smith ten poundes currant money And my will is that my executrix shall dispose of the same to some frend in trust for her vse and benefitt
Alsoe I giue vnto my daughter Smiths 3 Children six poundes thirteen shillinges & foure pence to be disposed of by my executrix vnto some trustie frende for their benefit & vse towardes their bringing vp & breeding w'thin 3 moneths next after my decease And I desire my sonne in law Josias Terry to vnd'take the managing thereof
Item I give vnto my Daughter Speering & to her daughter Dorothie xxs a peece to be paied at my buriall
Item I giue vnto my daughter Jone Sedgwick xli to be payed vnto her out of the money her husband Doth owe me Item I give to her 2 Children five pounds a peece to be payed out of the same money their father doth owe me.
Item I giue vnto my daughter Crab six poundes thirteen shillinges & foure pence to be paied vnto her w'thin sixe moneths next after my decease
Item I giue vnto my daughter Elizabeth Blake two hundred and Fyftie pounds currant money to be payed vnto her at or before her age of xxty yeares or at her day of marriage w'ch shall first happen, and I giue vnto her one fetherbed furnished & one peece of plate
Item I giue vnto my daughter Martha Blake two hundred & fyftie poundes currant money to be payed vnto her at or before her age of xxty yeares or day of marriage w'ch shall first happen & I giue vnto her one fetherbed furnished & one peece of the best plate, And my will is in case the said Elizabeth or Martha or either of them shall happen to depart this life before their porc'ons shalbe due & payable to them then the legacie of her soe dyeing shall remaine & be to the survivor of them
Item I give vnto every of my sonne Richard Blakes Children xxs a peece to be payed w'thin one moneth next after my decease
Item I give vnto every one of my brothers & sisters vs a peece.
Item I give vnto the parrish Church of Andover vis viijd.
Item I give to fortie of the anncientist poore people of the Towne of Andover widdowers & widdowes & as are of good report xls to be given vnto them at my funerall
Item I give vnto the Viccar of Andover for the tyme being in liewe of all his dues payable vnto him at my funerall if he will accept of it, xxxs
Item whereas I haue heretofore purchased by way of mortgage of Thomas Blake the younger of Eastontowne in the Countie of South't gent certaine ten'te & lands lyeing & being w'thin Eastontowne aforesaid & in Andover & Enham in the said County part whereof being free landes the day of redempc'on whereof is longe since past and the other being lease lands & the covenantes & agreem'tes not p'formed Wherefore my will and meaning is and I doe devise & bequeath that yf the said Thomas Blake doe not or shall not redeeme the said lands by payment of such moneyes as is or shall be due vnto me or my executrix w'thin 6 moneths next after my decease that then I doe hereby give full power & authoritie vnto my executrix & my will is that she w'th thadvise & assistance of my ou'seers of this my last will herein named or any 2 of them to make sale of the said landes & tente and every part thereof and to grannt & convey the said ten'te & lands and my wholle tytle interest right & clayme therein to such p'son or p'sons as they shall contract w'th all for the same and the moneys ariseing by the sale thereof they or any 2 of them shall in convenient tyme after the said sale & receipt of the money pay or cause to be paied the said moneys in mann' & forme following that is to say
vnto Willia' Blake Peter Blake & John Blake my sonnes 60li a peece &
to Elizabeth Blake & Martha Blake my 2 youngest daughters threescore poundes a peece
And to the children of my daughter Smith twenty poundes to be equally devided betwixt them w'th xxli my will is shalbe disposed of by my executrix & overseers & the survivors of them to their vse, And my will & meaneing is that my daughter Smith their mother shall haue thuse [= the use] & benefit thereof towardes their educac'on & maintennce vntill they shalbe of thage of xxty yeares And if any of the said Children shall happen to Dye before the said age of xxty yeares Then the porcon of her soe dyeing shall remayne & be to the survivor or survivors of them./
Item all the residue of the said moneys comeing & ariseing of the said landes & all the residue of my goods cattles & chattles of what kinde or nature soever (my debtes & legacies being payed) I give & bequeath to Dorothie my loveing wife whome I doe hereby make & ordayne my full & sole executrix of this my last will & testament desireing her to see that this my last will may be truly and faythfully performed according to my true intent & meaneing
And I doe make & desire my loveing frendes Mr Henry Scudder Clarke [= cleric] my brother in law Mr Joseph Hinxman & my Vncles Mr Willia' Smith & Mr Nicholas Blake to be overseers of this my last will und for their paines & loveing assistance vnto my executrix in & ubout the same I give to every one of them xs
And in witness that this is my last will & testam't I have hereunto set my hand & seale the day & yeare first uboue written Willia' Blake witnesses hereunto Nicholas Blake
Vicosimo septimo die Novembris Anno regin Regis Caroli __ xvijo Anno D'm 1641
I the said Willia' Blake being sick in bodie, yet thankes be given to god of good & p'fect remembrance doe further declare my will and meaneing in manner & forme following That is to say whereas my sonne in lawe Willia' Speering doth owe vnto me the sume of one hundreth[sic] poundes of currant English money, w'ch heretofore I lent vnto him, My will and meaneing is that yf the same may or can be recovered of him by my executrix Then I doe giue and bequeath the said one hundred poundes to Dorothie Speering the daughter of the said Willia' Speering to be paid vnto her when shee shall attaine to the age of one & twenty yeares or shalbe married And that in the meane tyme after the recovery thereof and dureing such tyme as the said one hundred poundes shall remaine w'th my executrix; the vse and proffites thereof shalbe yearly payed vnto my daughter Mary Speering her mother, And in testmony that this is p'the & parcell of my last will desireing yt may be soe reputed and taken And confirmeing all and every part of my will before specified I haue herevnto sett my hand the day and yeare uboue written William Blake.
Wittnisses hereunto William Smith Joseph Hinxman./
[Proved in London by Dorothie Blake, relict, the nominated executrix, 18 Aug 1642.]

LDS Film 92,167 -- Prerogative Court of Canterbury, Essex 30:
Will of Dorothy Blake, dated 13 Oct 1647
[Transcribed by Charlou Dolan with paragraphs added for ease of reading]
[For some unknown reason the codicils were recorded before the will.]
In the name of God Amen I Dorothy Blake of Andover in the County of Southt' widdowe beinge sicke and weake in body but of sound mind and perfect memory I thank my God for the same doe by this present Codicill which I desire and my meaning is shalbee reputed and taken as part of my last will and Testament) order and appoint that whereas there ys Fifty poundes owing by bonde by M'r Richard Perrce and Mr Pistor Hyde w'th the interest thereof vnto mee as Executrix of the last will and Testament of my late Husband William Blake deceased for the vse and bennifitt of my Daughter Dorothye Smyth which sayd debt of Fifty Poundes w'th the Arreares of interest thereof beinge likely to prove a very desperate debt my will and desire ys that in these the sayd somme of Fifty Pounds w'th the interest thereof cannot bee recovered by suitt att Lawe That then my Executor doe allowe and pay tenn Poundes towardes the sayd Losse my sonne William Blake the summe of Tenn Poundes by way of abatement out of his Legacy given him by my last will and Testament and that my sonne Peeter Blake doe likewise abate and allowe towardes the sayd losse the somme of Tenn Poundes out of the Legacy given him as afforesayde And likewise that my Daughters Margarett Terry Mary Spearinge Jonne Sedgwicke and Ann Long doe allowe by way of Abatement owt of their severall Legacyes given them by my last will and Testament the Summe of Fiue poundes apeece for and towardes the sayd Losse) and the sayd moneyes soe allowed and abated as afforesayd amounting in all vnto the foresayd summe of Fifty Poundes to bee forthw'th delivered into the handes of some trusty freind or freindes whom my Overseer shall make Choise and approve of soe that my Daughter Dorathy doe receive and enioy the full benifitt and proffitt of the sayd moneys as the same shall arise and become due from time to time att the yearly Rate of Sixe Poundes in the Hundred
and in Case my sayd Daughter Dorathy Smyth depart this lyfe before John Smyth her husband then the benifitt and proffitt of the sayd moneye to bee and continue for and Towardes the maintenance of her Children But in case the sayd John Smyth happen to depart this lyfe before his sayd wyfe then my will and meaninge ys that the sayd summe of Fifty pounds bee w'thin six monthes next after his decease payd into the handes of my sayd Daughter Dorathy Smyth to bee and remayne to her sole propper vse and behoofe and to dispose of the same as shee shall think meete In wittnesse whereof and for the confirmacion of this present Codcill I have sett my hand and Seale this Third day of January Anno D'no 1647 Dorothy Blake Published sealed and subscribed in the pres' of Elnor Bunny her m'ke Elizabeth Wann Ex'tur
In the name of God Amen December the last An'o D'ni 1647 I Dorathy Blake of Andover in the County of South't wid'e beinge sicke in body yet (thankes bee given to god) of good and perfect mind and memory by way of Codicill w'ch I desire nay bee annexed to my last will and Testament and that the same may bee reputed and taken as part and parcell thereof) doe hereby further declare my will and meaninge in manner and forme followinge vizt my will and meaninge is that the legacyes which by my last will and Testament bearing date the xiiith of October 1647 I bequeathed to my sonnes William and Peeter Blake and to my Daughter Margaret Terry Marie Spearinge and Anne Long bee raysed and payed out of the moneys due vnto mee by bond or other specialtyes as the same shall aryse to bee due and can bee recovered by my Executor And yf the sayd moneys soe to become due cannot bee recovered but by suite in Lawe that then my sayd sonnes and Daughters aboue mencioned shall according to their severall proportions ioyne in the Charges of the Lawe s'th my Executo'r in the Prosecution thereof eyther as Plaintifes or Defendan'ts ag't those in whose handes the sayd moneys shalbee then due and shalbee soe deteyned And yf any losse shall happen to bee or that any of the sayd Debtes by specialtie or otherwise shall proove desperate and cannot bee recoverd then my will and meaninge ys that all the sayd Legatees (according to their severall proportions) doe beare att their owne costes their proportionable Partes of Demnity of the Legasies in my sayd last will given vnto them or eyther of them In witness whereof to this p'sent Codicill I have subscribed my name and sett to my Seale geoven the day and yeare above wrytten Dorothy Blake Read signed sealed and published as p'cell of my last will and Testament in the presence of William Smyth Nicho' Blake, Ex'tur
In the name of God Amen I Dorothy Blake of Andover in the County of Southt' widdowe being att this present of good and perfect memory this Thirteenth day of October 1647 in the three and Twentyth yeare of the Raigne of our Soveraigne Lord King Charles of England &c. doe make and ordaine this my last will and Testament in man'er and forme followinge That ys to say
first I Commend my Sowle into the handes of my Faithfull Creatour assuredly trusting through the only merrittes and mediation of Jesus Christ my blessed Redeemer to Obtaine remission of my sinnes and eternall happines by him, my body I Committ to the earth to bee decently interred att the good discretion of the Executor of this my last will there to rest in hope of Joyfull resurreccion
And as touching the disposicon of my worldly estate my will and meaning ys as followeth
Imprimis I give vnto my sonne William Blake Clercke [= cleric] the somme of twoe hundred Poundes lawfull English money to bee raysed and payd vnto him owt of my personall estate and the yearly Rent of my lease att Chilboulton in the sayd County the same to bee payd att fowre paymentes w'thin the space of two yeares next Cominge after my decease att the two most vsuall times or dayes of Payment in the yeare That is to say att the Fiue and Twentyth of March yearly and the nyne and Twentyth of September yearly in the sayd two yeares by equall portions, the first payment thereof to beginne att eyther of the sayd dayes which of them shall first Come after my Decease or sooner yf ytt can bee raysed owt of my estate vppen Condicion that hee vtterly relinquish and waive the benifitt of the Legacye of Threeskors [= three score = 60] Poundes bequeathed vnto him in or by the last will or Testament of William Blake my late Husband his late Father deceased
Item I give vnto my sonne Peter Blake the like somme of two hundred Poundes to be raysed and payd as afforesayd vppon the like Condicion as afforesayd And in case eyther of my sayd sonnes William or Peter shall dye before they or eyther of them shall haue receaved their or eyther of their Legacy or Legacyes soe bequeathed as afforesayd in part or in all my will ys that then the same or such remayning part thereof behind shalbee payd by my Executor according to and att the times herein before lymitted for the payment thereof to such as they or eyther of them by their or eyther of their last will or other disposall shall appoint
Item I give vnto my Daughter Margarett Terry the Somme of one hundred Poundes of like lawfull money to bee payd vnto her w'thin Three monthes after my two
[page did not xerox correctly]
soe soone then ym'ediately after the raysing thereof And in case the same bee sooner raysed then my Executor herein named [is] to allow and pay vnto them respectively for and towardes their maintenance att and after the yearly Rate or somme of Six poundes x[?] Centes for and duringe all suche time as the severall Legacyes aforesayd shall remayne vnsatiffyed
Item I give vnto Dorothy Speeringe the daughter of my Daughter Mary Speeringe the som'e of Five Poundes lawfull money of England and Vnto Dorothy Blake the Daughter of my brother Peter Blake the like somme of Five poundes To bee payd vnto them and to eyther of them w'thin Six months next after my Decease
And my will and meaninge ys That yf my whole estate willnot extend soe farre as to satisfye all the seuerall legacyes afforesayd Then every of the Legatees aforesayd shalbee abated owt of his her or their Legacyes soe much in proportion as the estate shalbee deficient and come short of the same And further my will ys That all such necessary Chardges and expences eyther in Howe[? or equity as my Executor heerein named shalbee putt vnto in or touching the due execution of this my last will shalbee deducted by him and allowed vnto him out of my estate
Item I give vnto Twenty poore widdowes of the parishe of Andover aforesaid of good report the summe of Twelve pence apeece and vnto Twenty poore widdowes of the parish of Overton afforesayd of like report the like somme of Twelve pence a peece to bee payd vnto them respectively ymmediately after my decease
Item I give vnto my sonne in Lawe Mr. Thomas Warren and to all my children and to my sonne Richard Blake his wyfe the somme of Three poundes a peece to buy them blacke for mourninge
and to my syster Clement Heuchins the somme of Fifty shillinges to buy her a mourninge Gowne
Ite I giue vnto my Sonne William Blake my second damaske Table Cloth one dozen of my best diaper Napkins one Dyaper Towell and one payre of my best Holland sheetes
Item I giue vnto my Sonne Peeter Blake my best brasse Pott one payre of Dowlas sheetes one payre of Dowlas Pillowbeeres one of my next best Table Clothes one dozen of Napkins and one Towell of the next best after my sonne William hath chosen his
Item I give vnto my Daughter Terry my best black Gowne a Petticote and to my Daughter Long my second best Gowne and mowheare [= mohair] Petticoate and vnto my Daughter Dorothy Smyth All the residue of my wearing apparell of what kind soever
The residue of All my goodes and Chattells whatsoever not heereby otherwise disposed or Charged I give and bequeath vnto my said sonne Richard Blake whom I make and ordaine sole Executor of this my last will and Testament
And I doe make and desire William Smyth of Waddiche and Nicholas Blake of Gavilacre in the sayd County gent my loving Freindes to bee Overseers of this my last will And for their Paynes and Faithfull Assistance vnto my Execut'r in and about the same I give to eyther of them Twenty shillinges a peece to bee payd at my buryall
In wittnesse whereof I have published this to bee my last will and Testament revoking hereby all former and have heerevnto sett my hand and Seale the day and yeare herein first above wrytten Dorothy Blake Subscribed
sealed and published in the p'sence of Thomas Chirck

William Blake [linen draper, of Andover, Hants] and Dorothy Madgwick were married on 6 Feb 1605/6 in Andover, Hampshire, England.

19. Dorothy Madgwick signed a will on 13 Oct 1647. She died before 15 Feb 1647/48 in Andover, Hampshire, England. Dorothy's will was proved 15 Feb 1647/8 in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury.

20. John Stone was born estimated 1575 in probably, Hertfordshire, England.

SOURCES
*TAG 36:29-38 = A Hartford Miscellany: Howard, Stone, Adsit-Edgett (George E. McCracken)
*The Great Migration Begins

NOTES
Spelling variations as found in old English records: Ston, Stone, Stones, Stonne, Stoone, Stoones, Stowne.

John Stone and daughter Rogers were married about 1599.

21. Daughter Rogers was born about 1577. Some sources say her first name was Sarah, but as yet no record of her given name has been found.

28. Roger Brownson was born before 15 Sep 1576 in Earls Colne, Essex, England. He was christened on 15 Sep 1576 in St. Andrews Church, Earls Colne, Essex, England. He was a tailor in Aldham, Essex, England. He died before 25 Aug 1635 in Aldham, Essex, England. He was buried on 25 Aug 1635 in Aldham, Essex, England.

Parish Registers of Holy Innocents' Church, Lamarsh, Essex:
BAPTISMS
1575 Marie Underwood, daughter of John Underwood, bapt. 2 Feb. [1575/6]
1601 Roger Brownson son of Roger Brownson, bapt. 12 Jul.
1602 John Brownson son of Roger Brownson, bapt. 21 Sept.
MARRIAGES
1600 Roger Brownson of Earls Colne & Mary Underwood of Lamarsh, married 12 May.

Parish Registers, St. Andrew's Church, Earl's Colne, Essex:
1604 Edith daughter of Roger Brownsonn, 13 Jan. [1604/5]
1609 Cornelius son of Roger Brownson, 18 Feb. [1609/10]
1612 Alse daughter of Roger Brownsonne, 22 Aug.
1615 Richard son of Roger Brownsonne, 23 July.
1617 Elizabeth daughter of Roger Brownsonne, 23 March. [1617/18]
BURIALS
1612 Alse the daughter of Roger Brownsonne, 30 Aug.
1618 Elizabeth daughter of Roger Brownson, 24 May.
1622 Mary wife of Roger Brownson, 18 March. [1622/3]

Commissary Court of London for Essex and Herts, D/ABW.53/47:
Will of "Roger Brownson of Aldham in the County of Essex, taylor," dated 4 Aug 1635:
To Margaret my wife, £6, furniture, and all that was hers before marriage.
To my daughter in law [step-daughter] Mary Brewer, 20s.
To Edith my daughter, wife of John Evered, £3.
To Susan, daughter of John Evered of Cogshall [Coggeshall, co. Essex], my grandchild, 20s at her age of 21 or marriage.
To my two sons John and Richard Brownson and to Mary Brownson my daughter, 12d. each if ever they come to demand the same.
Residue to Cornelius Brownson my son, he to be executor.
(signed by mark)
Witness: William Adams, John Brownson.
Proved at Colchester, 22 Oct 1635, by Cornelius Brownson, the executor named.

Roger Brownson and Mary Underwood were married on 12 May 1600 in Holy Innocents' Church, Lamarsh, Essex, England.

29. Mary Underwood was born before 2 Feb 1575/76 in Earls Colne, Essex, England. She was christened on 2 Feb 1575/76 in Holy Innocents' Church, Lamarsh, Essex, England. She died before 18 Mar 1622/23 in Earls Colne, Essex, England. She was buried on 18 Mar 1622/23 in St. Andrews Church, Earls Colne, Essex, England.

30. John Hills was born in probably, Essex, England.

Spelling variations as found on old English records: Heles, Helles, Hil, Hill, Hille, Hilles, Hills, Hils, Hilse, Hyles, Hyll, Hylles, Hylls.

SIXTH GENERATION

32. Mr. Sedgwick was born in an unknown place.

Spelling variations as found in old English records: Sedgesweek, Sedgesweke, Sedgeweeke, Sedgewicke, Sedgewickes, Sedgweake, Sedgweeke, Sedgwekes, Sedgwicke, Sedgwickes, Sedgwicks, Sedgwikes, Seeggeswyke, Siddswicke, Sidgeweake, Sidgeweeke, Sidgsweeke, Sidgswick, Sidgwick, Sidsweeke, Siggesweek, Segheswyk, Seghewyk, Sygeswyk.

33. His wife was born in an unknown place.

36. Richard Blake [linen draper, of Andover, Hants] died before 14 Jan 1622 in Andover, Hampshire, England. He was buried on 14 Jan 1622 in Andover, Hampshire, England. He signed a will. Richard's will was proved in 1622 in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. Richard Blake was named in the 1608 will of his son-in-law John Hapgood.

Andover Parish Register:
Baptisms [badly damaged, tattered & torn]
1589. [torn]ner, the daughter of Richard Blake xxiij of May
1592. [torn] the daughter of Richard Blake the 25 of Aprill
1593. Richard the sonn of Richard Blake the 30 of Sept
1596. Peter the sonne of Richard Blake the 25 of Julye
1598[/9]. [torn] the sonne of Richard Blake the 21st of February
1601. [torn]hn the sonne of Richard Blake the 21st of February
[end of tattered & torn book]
1604. Nicholas the sonne of Richard Blake 30 Mar

I-952 Film 186,893 will #24
William Fowles, shoemaker, Andover; will dated 5 Feb 1602; inventory 17 Feb 1602; will proved 4 Apr 1603
brother John Foules
sister Alse Foules
brother Richard Foules
brother Thomas Foules
brother-in-law John Gilbart senior [step-brother?]
children of uncle Rychard Blake (all cousins):
William Blake
Jone Blak
Elyzabeth Blake
Dorytye Blak
Margaret Blake
Rychard Blake
John Blake
Peter Blake
my man John Skulerd
minister Mr. Samboren
father-in-law Robert Blak
mother-in-law ___ Blak
dau. Mari
Henry Turnar, clothier
Marget Fay
wife of William Asshele
Elener Blake, dau. of uncle Rychard Blak
overseers:
John Wield/Wilde, mercer
Mr. Water Wayt
appraiser: William Butter

Film #92,092: Prerogative Court of Canterbury: Will of Richard Blake, dated 10 Sep 1622
[Transcribed by Charlou Dolan; needs to be proofread & corrected, at which time the numbering of the lines will be removed]
1) In the name of the eternall and everlasting
2) God father sonne and holly ghost In whose name I was babtized in whome only I hope and believe
3) to bee saved Amen The tenth daie of December in the yeare of our lord god one thowsand six
4) hundred and twoo and twentie And in the yeares of the raigne of our soueraigne Lord James
5) by the grace of god king of England France and Scotland Defender of the faith &c the twentieth
6) and of Scotland the six and fifftieth I Richard Blake of Andover in the Countie of South't
7) lynen Draper aged of yeares being sicke in boddie but of good and perfitt memorie I thanck
8) my god the giver and preserver thereof Doe make and ordayne this my last will and testament
10) made by mee And first with a free hart and willing mind I Doe yeild and render my soule
11) into thee hands o father sonne and holye ghost I Doe acknowledge with all my harte and Doe
12) confesse I am a greate sinner and haue neede of the greate mercy and favor of god and I hope
13) that I shall find both grace and merecie of god the father fore his beloved Christe senke? in him
14) I beleve hee is my redeemer hee liveth for ever and ever and maketh intercession for sinners
15) and this I knowe that now I am a corruptible body but I hope throughe Jesus christ to rise an
16) incorruptible boddie and I believe that the lord will have mercie vppon me for hee first made
17) mee see this I believe whether I live or dye I am the lords to whome bee all honor glory power and
18) Dominion both now and for evermore Amen. As concerning my boddie I bequeath itt to the earth
19) from whence itt Came. Item I give to Trynitie Church in wynton -- ijsvid. and to the church
20) of Andover -- xxs. Item I give and devise to Joane Blake my loving wife my howse wherein I
21) now Dwel in Andover and all the lands w'th thappurtenance therevnto belonging And all that
22) my house and lands therevnto belonging in Andover aforesaid heeretofore called the blew Ancker and
23) __ nowe called the Phenix in the possession of will'm Cooke And all other my lands and ten'tes in
24) Andover aforesaid w'ch _____ ____ of Mr. Palmer and of Mr Thomas Pettislace? and allsoe that house __ tennemt? in Andover aforesayd wherein walter waight shoomaker now Dwelleth And allsoe all that my messuage
25) or ten'te and one acre of land in Sox street als Soxlane in Andover aforesaid Ana allsoe
26) all that my mannor and farme of Cricklades with the water mill thereof in Andover
27) aforesaid and all the lands rents profitts and com'odities whatsoeuer therevnto belonging
28) And allsoe all that my messuage and Farme of Gallacre als Gavellacre and all the lands
30) hereditaments which I purchased of Sir Francis Peale lyeng in Forton in the p'ish of Longe
31) parish And all and euerie __ the rents of the saide seu'all mannors messuages lands ten'tes & p'misses
32) reserved vppon one lease or leases thereof or of anie p'te thereof made. To haue and to hould all
33) and singuler the said manner messuage Farmes mill lands ten'tes and pr'misses vnto the sayd
34) Joane my wief for and during her naturall lief if shee shall soe long continew and keepe her self sole
35) and vnmarried And after her Decease or mariadge w'ch shall first happen I Devise and bequeath
36) all and singuler the saide mannor messuages Farmes mill lands ten'ts and p'misses and the ____
37) and remaynder of them and evrie of them in manner and forme following that is to saie I give &
38) devise to William Blake my eldest sonne my saied dwelling howse and all that my saied mannor and
39) Farme of Cricklades together with the mill thereof and all the landes therevnto severllie and respectively
40) belonging and all the howses and landes with theire appurtenances which I purchassed of Mr. Thomas
41) Pettisface? aforesaide. To have and to hould to him the saide Will'm Blake and his heires for ever.
42) And I give and devise vnto John Blake my sonne All that my said messuadge or ten'te called
43) the blew Ancker or Phenix aforesaide and all other the messuage landes & ten'tes w'ch I purchased
44) of Mr. Palmer in Andover aforesaide and allsoe all that my said howse or ten'te wherein Walter
45) waight aforesaide now Dwelleth and all the lands therevnto belonging. To have and to hold vnto
46) my saide sonne John Blake and to the heires of his boddie lawfullie begotten and for Defaulte of
47) such issue the Remaynder thereof to my saide sonne Will'm Blake and his heires for ever.
48) And I give and devise vnto my sonne Nicholas Blake All those my landes ten'tes & hereditamentes
49) lyeing in Forton aforesaid w'ch I lately purchased of Sr. Francis Peale To have and to hold vnto
[defective right edge from here]
50) vnto [sic] my saide sonne Nicholas Blake his heires and assignes for ever Vppon this Condicion that my
51) saide sonne Nichas[sic] Blake and his heires shall paie to evrie of his brothers and sisters twenty powndes
52) apeece within five yeeres next after the Decease of Joane my saide wief. And further I give and
53) Devise vnto my saide sonne Richard Blake All that my messuage and Farme of Gallacre alias
54) Gavellacre and all the lands ten'ts and hereditam'ts therevnto belonging and the reversons & Remaynder
55) thereof with their appurten'ces To have adn to hould vnto my sayde sonne Nicholas Blake and
56) to the heires of his boddie lawfullie begotten and for Defaulte of such yssue the Remaynder thereof
57) to my sayde sonne Will'm Blake and to the heires of his boddie lawfullie begotten and for Defaulte
58) of such yssue the Remaynder thereof to him and his heires forever. Provided allwaies and my will
59) is that if itt shall happen my said Farme and lands of Gallacre to Come vnto my sayde sonne
60) wyll'm Blake or to his heires for Defaulte of heires of the boddie of my sayde sonne Nicholas lawfullie
61) begotten That then my saide sonne will'm Blake or his heire which att that time shalbe shall
62) paie vnto Richard Balke my sonne two hundred pounds, to Peter Blake my sonne one hundred pounds
63) and to John Blake my sonne one hundred pounds of Currant english money to bee paid w'thin two
64) yeeres nexte after the saide land shall come vnto my saide sonne wyll'm or to his heires as aforesaide
65) And yf my sayde sonne will'm or his heires to whome the sayde land shall happen to Come for default
66) of heires of the body of my saide sonne Nich'os shall make default of payment of the sayde sev'ral[?]
67) somes of money vnto my said sonnes, Richard, Peter, and John in manner as is aforesayd, That
68) then I give and devise the saide farme of Gallacre & landes therevnto belonging vnto my sayde sonne
69) Richard Blake and his heires vppon condicon likewise that the said Richard Blake or his heires
70) shall paie vnto my said sonnes Peter and John one hundred pounds apeece And I give and devise
71) vnto willm Blake my granndchilde second sonne of my sonne wyll'm All that my saide messuage
72) or ten'te in Soperlane als Soperstreet aforesaid and one acre of land therevnto belonginge
73) and the re__con and Remaynder thereof to have and to holde vnto him and to the heyres of his bodye
74) lawfully begotten and for Defaulte of such yssue the Remaynder thereof to Peter Blake his brother
75) one other of my grannchildren and to his heires for ever. Item I give & devise vnto Jone Blake
76) my sayde wief All that my moyety p'te and porcon of the Farme of Vpclafford and the ___
77) thereof which I sometymes held together w'th Mr. Richard Venables To have and receive the rents
78) and profittes thereof for and during all lthe estate and terme of yeers therein yete to Come
79) and vnexpired (if shee shall soe long live & keepe her self widdowe and vnmaryed and after
80) her decease or marriage w'ch shall first happen I give and Devise all my estate and terme of
81) yeares therein there to Come & vnexpired with the rents and profitts thereof vnto my sayde
82) sonne John Blake his executors and assignes, provided my will and meaning is that my said
83) wief shall paie out of the rents & proffitts of the sayd Farme of Clatford vnto my sayd sonne
84) John Blake for his mayntenance att Oxforde the some of xxiiij li by the yeer yeerly Item
85) I give and bequeath vnto my sonne Richard Blake Fower hundred pownds of currant
86) English money ouer and aboue all such moneys as hee hath allreadie had of mee to be paied vnto
87) him by my executrix in manner following, vizt One hundred pownds thereof within six months
88) next after my decease, and soe within evrie six moneths next following one hundred poundes
89) vntill the sayd some of Fower hundred pounds bee fullie paied Item whereas I promissed to
90) give vnto my sonne Peter Blake vppon his marriage with his now wief the some of Five
91) hundred pownds (Three hundred pownds whereof I have alreadie paied vnto him my will is
92) that my executrix shall paye vnto him one hundred pounds more within one yeere next
93) after my decease and in full satisffaction of the said Five hundred pownds I give vnto my
94) sayd sonne Peter my lease and terme of yeeres of the Salteren or Salthowse in or ___
95) the towne of sowthampton if hee shall accept thereof in satisffaction of the sayde
96) 500 li Item I give to everie of the children of Jone Bayly my Daughter x li apeece
97) Item I give vnto Dorothie Burningham[sic] my daughter X li and to evrie of her children
98) 40s apeece Item I give vnto Ellnor Hinxman my daughter one hundred pounds ___
99) regard her porcion hath beene lesse than the rest of her sisters and to evrie of her children
100) 40s apeece. Item I give vnto [rest of the lline missed getting xeroxed]
101) Children 40d apeece. Item I give to evrie of my sonne Will'm Blakes children 40d apeece item the residue
102) of all my goods Creddits debts Cattells & Chattells whatsoeuer not given nor bequeathed, moveable and vn=
103) moveable I give & bequeath fully and wholly to Jone Blake my sayd wief whom I make and ordeyne to
104) be my only & sole executrix of this my last will and testament to paie all my Debts and Discharge all
105) my legacies hereby given and bequeathed and to see my bodye Decentlie buried. Item my will is that all the
106) __yn plott? glasse benches shelves table bordes and ioynestooles of my Dwelling howse shall after my
107) sayd wifes Decease remayne and bee vnto my said sonne Will'm vndesared? My overseers of
108) this my last will I desire to bee my Cossen Mr. Peter Noyse thhelder my brother in law Mr. Richard
109) Blake my brother in law Mr. Will'm Smith and my sonne in law Joseph Hinxman and I
110) leave vnto each of them xxs apeece giving willing and grannting vnto them and the longest li=
111) ver of them full power and authoritie to Determyne Decyde and end all ambiguities Doubtes
112) questions and Debates whatsoev'r which shall arise amongest my sayd Children or anye of them
113) And further my will is that my executrix shall become bound by obligacon to my overseers as
114) they shall thinke reasonable before my will beee proved to p'fourme and paye all the legacyes be=
115) fore given & bequeathed whys[?] shee shall refuse to Doe Then my will is that will'm Blake my
116) somme shall bee my executor of this my last will becominge bound as aforesaide to perfourme
117) the same Provided allwaies and my will is that yf itt shall happen after my Decease anye of my
118) sonnes or anye other to whome I have lymited to enioye anye p'te of my lands or goods aforesaide
119) not to content himself or themselves with such porcion of lands or goods in such manner and
120) sort as I have before given and bequeathed the same or shall attempt practise or endeavor to
121) Disturbe alter channge frustrate or make voide in anie respect or point this my last will
122) and testament & the contents of the same or anie p'te thereof, that then my sayd sonnes he or
123) they and anye other p'son and p'sons to whome I haue given and grannted to have and enioye anye
124) p'te of my lands goods and Chattells shall for ever lose the benefitt of this my last will to all
125) intents and purposes and the legacies to them or any of them by the same given and Devised
126) And then I Doe give and Devise the same porcion of my lnads and goods to the residue of my sayde
127) sonnes not so offendinge to be equallie and indifferentlye devided amongest them. Item my will
128) and meaning is that my sayde wief shall receive and have all the rents and p'fitts of my
129) lands given vnto her as is aforesayde towards the paiement of the legacies in this my will
130) contayned yf my goods and Chattels shall not suffice to satesfie the same And lastely i give and
131) bequeath vnto the corporacon of the towne of Andover and theire successors for ever Thirty
132) pounds of currant english money vppon Condicon that the Baylieff and approved men for the
133) time being of the sayde corporacon shall with the same money either purchase land in fee
134) simple to the vse of the poore people of the same towne according to the proporcion of the sayd some
135) of Thirtie powndes and paye the rent thereof yeerelye vnto the sayde poore people or els that the
136) sayd Bailiffe & approved men shall give securitie vnto my executrix and Overseers & the s'vivors
137) of them by rent Chardge or otherwise by some other assurance as shalbee by my said executrix and
138) overseers or the survivor of them or theire counsell learned Devised to paye vnto the sayd poore
139) people such as haue most neede and to soe manie of them as the sayd Bailiffe & approved
140) men shall thinke fitt the some of Forty shillings at the Feast of St. Thomas thappostle yerely
141) for ever And further I give towards the paving of the waye to the Freescoolehowse in Andover
142) one some of twentie shillings In witness whereof I have to this my last will and testament sett
143) my hand and seale the Daie and yere aboue written. Richard Blake witnesses heereunto Hugh
144) Marshall: Nich: Blake John Elton./

K-175 Film 186,916 will #47
Jone Blake, widow, Andover; will dated 23 Apr 1631
grandson Willm. Baily
executor: eldest son William Blake (has children)
daughter Jone Bailie (has other children also)
children of dau. Jone Bailie above:
Katheren, under 21, single
Willm. [see Wm. Bailie above]
daughter Burmingham (has children)
daughter Hinxman (has children)
daughter Savage (has children)
son Richard Blake
son John Blake
son Hinxman

K-175 Film 186,916 will #47
[Transcribed by Charlou Dolan. The quality of this film is very poor, and the print made from it is nearly illegible; I plan to check this against the original on the film as soon as possible, in hopes that I can decipher more of it.]
1) In the name of God Amen the xxiijth Daye of Aprill in the yere of o'r Lord god 1632?, I Jone Blake of Andover in the county
2) of South' wid' being sicke in body but of good & p'fect memory (god be praysed r___) doe make my last will & testament in
3) manner & forme following revokinge hereby all former wills First I comend mysould into the handes of almightie
4) god my maker hopinge assuredly thorough the onely merittes and mediation of my saviour Jesus Christe to be saued and
5) be made an Inheritrix of his heavenly kingdome my body I comend to the earth to be buried in the Church of Andover
6) nere vnto the place where my husband was buried. Item I give to the Church of Andover xxs. Item I give to the
7) vse of the poore people of Andover the some of __xL to be bestowed & disbursed together w'hn? xxxs for_d [= 4 pence] given
8) by my husband by the Bailiff & approval ___ of the corporacon of Andover as is appoynted by my said husband
9) Item I giue to the Church of Knightes Enham ___ xxs? To the poore there __vs. to the poor people of Forton xs Item I
10) giue towardes the repayring of the Free Schoolehowse __ xxs To the poore people of Andover to be distributed amongst
11) them at my burial x _____ xxs Item I giue to Will'm Baily my grandchild xxli
12) of currant englishe money to be paide vnto him by my executor w'hin six moneths next after my decease Itm I giue to ___
13) of ___ eiughth ___ to be paide vnto him by my executor w'hin six moneths next after my decease Itm I giue to every of
14) my sonne Will'm Blakes children xxs a peece To my Daughter Bailies children (Katheren & Will'm excepted) xxs a peece
15) Savages children xxs. a peece. Item I giue vnto Richard Blake my sonne one hundred poundes of currant money lyke
16) paide vnto him w'thin one moneth next after my decease Item I giue to John Blake my sonne one hundred poundes
17) of like money to be paide by my executor vnto him his executor or assignes at the end or expiracyn of the lease of the Farme of ___
18) called ___ Lord Sandys Farme and in the meane tyme to be disposed of by my sonne Hinxman to the vse of my
19) saide sonne John at the rate of six in the hundred p'rcent if he shall haue occasion to disburse yt towardes the ___
20) ___ of the said Farme of vp clatford or otperioi(?) Vnot ___h's
21) when three moneths vpon wtice? thereof to him giuen Item I giue to my Daughter Jone Baily Fifty poundes current money
22) and my will is that my executor shall dipsose of the same to her vse and paye the ___ thereafter the rate of six ___ to her ___
23) the prin cipall to ___ ___ ___. item I giue vnto Katheren Baily my grandchild one hundred poundes currant
24) money to be paide vnto her at her marriage or age of xxi yeres w'ch shall first happen And in the mean thime
25) to be put out by my executor for her vse & benefitt at the ___ of six ___ hundred vntel that shee marry w'th the consent of my executor and
26) overseers ___ ___ ___ of them item I giue and bequeath to Nichos Blake my sonne halfe of my kyne and half my hogges at
27) and of wheat and six acres of barley sowen & ___ sowen at Fartoce(?) aforesaid and one hundred sheepe to be taken as
28) they shall rvn & by lot out at the felde ___ there to be kept till sheere tyme [several words crossed out] Item I
29) giue to my said sonnes Peter & Nichos my fouer Carthorses one Carte and d___gpots(?), two ploughes my ___ harnes and
30) furniture equally tobe divided betwext them All the residue of my stock of ___ ___ and other goods & householdstuffe ___
31) ___ at Farham(?) I giue & bequeath to Peter Blake my sonne Item I giue vnto my said sonne Nichos "Blake three ___
32) of barley Item I giue to my sonne John Blake one featherbed, one feather bolster, one
33) pillowe & pillowe ber, one pair of blankettes and one covverlett, Itm I giue vnto my sonne Peter Blake one pare
34) of home made sheetes and two pare of ordinary sheets Item I giue to my sonne Richard Blake my best covverlet saving
35) one and one pare of sheetes and one dozen of diap' napkins Item I giue to ___ Blake two she___ table clothes and pair of good ___ sheetes
and one ___ pare of ___ & halfe dozen of table napkins All the residue of my lynnen I giue & bequeath to my sonne
36) William Blake ___ afore___ ____ to my fower Daughters equally to be divyded betwext them provided allwaies & ___ condion(?)
37) and my will is that my sonne in law Richard Baily my sonnes Richard Blake John Blake Peter Blake Nichos Blake and
38) Cateren Baily to whome I haue giuen legacies as aforesaid and every of them at or before the ___ ___ ___ ___ as shall ___ ___
39) then ___ bondes to my said Executor w'h condicone to the ___ or the like offers(?) as my sone in lawes Peter Burningham and
40) ___ ___ haue already ___ to ___ ratally & ___ together w'h my executor according to the legacies to ___
41) them ___ towardes the
42)
43) the moitie or half of the orchard during the terme I haue theire w'ch I hold of ____ nerre winton the other
44) moitie of the lease thereof and of the ___ when
I giue to my sonne Willi'm Blake and my will and
45) desire is that my sonne Hinxman may ___ w'h my sonne William Blake in the nowe takinge of the said orchard when
46) ___ ___ shall first(?) happen Item I giue to Katherin Baily my cotton gown & my third best petticote, one of my best
47) ___ & two of my ___ my cloak & my ___ two kerc___rs & two ___ and ___ napkins all the residue of my wearing
48) apparell I will ___ my fower daughters equally to be divided betwext them: And as concerninge my Daughter Burningham ___
49) my daughter Hinxman and my daughter Savage I haue lately delivered vnto there husbandes Fifty poundes ___
50) ___ their fathers legacies And the residue of my goodes ___ & ___ ___ ___ or household stuffe not hereby
51) geuen nor ___ I giue vnto my saide sonne William Blake whome I doe make my Executor of this my laste will &
52) Testament to paie all my legacies & detes and to see my body decently buried my overseers of this my last will I desire
53) to ___ my brother Mr. Nich'as Blake & my brother in Lwawe William Smythe, and I geue vnto them xxs. apeece ___
54) ___ ___ grantinge vnto them & the lawfule heres of them full power & authorety to determyn decide and all
55) ambiguities doubtes questions & debates w'ch shall ___ arise amongest my saide children or any other to whome I
56) haue giuen my legacie Provided allwaies and my will is that if yt shall happen after my decease my ___ children
57) or any others to whome I haue given any legacy not to content himself or themselves w'th ___ porcion of my goodes
58) and ___ ___ received as I haue giuen ___ or shall attempt or endeavour to desturbe alter ___
59) or make voide this my last will & testament or any p't thereof that then he or shee or they ___ whene (?) if ___
60)
shall for ___ loose ___ ___ ___ of
61) ___ then I doe giue ___ ___ ___ of my goodes & landes to ___ ___ of ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
62) to be equally divided ___
my will is that my Executor shall become bounde by obligation ___
63) for the ___ of money as they shall thinke fit before my will be prouved to p'forme the ___
64) legacies before giuen w'ch if he shall refuse to doe then my will is that my sonne in lawe Joseph Hinxman shall ___
65) as aforesaide to my overseers to p'forme my said will
66) In wytnes whereof I haue hereunto set my hande
67) ___ herevnto Jone "B" Blake [her mark]
68) Nich: Blake
69) Mary Core[?]

Richard Blake [linen draper, of Andover, Hants] and Joanna Blake were married.

37. Joanna Blake signed a will on 23 Apr 1631. Joanna's will was proved in 1631 in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. She died in 1631 in Andover, Hampshire, England.

K-175 Film 186,916 - will #47
Jone Blake, widow, Andover; w.d. 23 Apr 1631
grandson Willm. Baily
executor: eldest son William Blake (has children)
daughter Jone Bailie (has other children also)
children of dau. Jone Bailie above:
       Katheren, under 21, single
       Willm. [see Wm. Bailie above]
daughter Burningham (has children)
daughter Hinxman (has children)
daughter Savage (has children)
son Richard Blake
son John Blake
son Hinxman
son-in-law Richard Baily, husband of daughter Jone Bailie
son Nich'as Bl
son Peter Blake
son-in-law Peter Burningham
son-in-law Richard Savage
son-in-law Joseph Hinxman
Willm. Coop
overseers:
       brother Mr. Nich'as Blake
       brother-in-law Mr. Willm. Smyth
witness: Mary Gore

42. Rev. Richard Rogers was born before 29 Jun 1551 in Chelmsford, Essex, England. He was christened on 29 Jun 1551 in Chelmsford, Essex, England. He was a lecturer in Wethersfield, Essex, England. He signed a will on 16 Apr 1618. Richard's will was proved 30 Apr 1618 in the Consistory Court of London. He died on 21 Apr 1618.

Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 85 Lewyn:
[1st husband of Susan (___), who was the 2nd wife of Richard Rogers]
John Ward, preacher of God's word in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, 9 October 1598, proved 31 October 1598:
To youngest son John one hundred pounds at twenty one; daughter Abigail one hundred pounds at eighteen, and daughter Mary one hundred pounds at eighteen. To son Samuel all my books and apparell, and to son Nathaniel six score pounds at two and twenty. Wife Susan to be sole executrix. If she refuse, then my brother Edward Ward to be executor.
Witness: Lawrence Neweman, John Woodd.

<***diary, memoir, page 117>

NEHGR vol. 17, pages 326-329:
Consistory Court of London, 314 Hamer:
Will of Rev. Richard Rogers of Wethersfield, Co. Essex, England:
In the name of God Amen the sixteenth day of Aprill in the yeare of o'r Lord God after the computation of the Church of England one thowsand six hundred and eightene I Richard Rogers of Wethersfeild in the county of Essex preacher beinge at this present praised be god for it in health of body yet consideringe the transitory and vncertaine estate of all earthly thinges doe therefore make and ordayne this my last will and testament in manner and forme followinge
First I co'mend my soule into the hands of Almighty God in sure and certaine hope of eternall life through the redemption purchased for me by Christ Jesus my body I co'mitte to the earth and to be buryed in Weathersfeild Church yarde nere vnto the body of my late deare wife
And as concerninge the orderinge and disposeinge of those outward thinges wherwith the Lord hath in his rich mercie blessed me
Imprimis I give to the poore of the said p'ishe of Weathersfeild the full some of eleaven powndes of lawfull englishe mony And I thinke my selfe bound in conscience so to doe & doe it partly for example to move others to more liberalitie and compassion to the poore And the said mony I give to be bestowed in such manner as followeth viz't that in both the moneth of November duringe the space of two yeares next after my decease there shalbe bestowed and layed out for the buyinge of a beast fifty shillings and the beast to be devided and given amongst the said poore in the begininge of every of the said monethes of November or a little before and all they to have a part of it who were wonte to have
Item I will that in every of the seu'al monethes of December January and February which shall followe and be w'thin the said two yeares next after my decease twenty shillinges shalbe given and distributed amongst them in the Church or Chancell of Weathersfeild aforesaid by and accordinge to the discretion of John Clarke my neighbo'r at the brooke Samuell Waight my sonn in lawe [step-son-in-law] Walter Wiltsheir and Jeremy Boozy or any two or three of them And the same severall times to be yearly paid to one of them before mentioned by myne executors hereafter named againste the severall times wherein the said su'mes are severally to be expended and layde out in manner and forme abovesaid
Item I give to two pore schollers eyther in Cambridge or goeinge to schoole in the Country at the discretion of my Executors after my decease twenty shillings a peece for the space of fowre yeares after. And the same gifte to beginne to be given one quarter of a year after
It'm I give forty shillings to the poore of Much Bardfeild to be paid w'thin ten weeks after my decease and to be distributed by Mr. Collard goodman Rich and goodman Searle and goodman Crowe
It'm I give to my loveinge and welbeloved wife Susan all such goodes and houshold stuffe as were hers before I marryed her And I will that she shall have and enioye the howse wherein Mr Cousens now dwelleth w'th a new crosse end sett vp to it for and duringe the tearme of her naturall life Provided that she keepe the same in good rep'ac'on Alsoe I will that she shall have other such necessary household stuffe as she shall have vse of for her selfe and bathe not already of her owne as all my linnen (except the diaper cloth) one table in the hall one chest the best save three one Cupbord in my Chamber one forme in the hall six high stooles two co'mon chayres Alsoe tongs fire pan Andirons trenchers and warminge pan &c
It'm I give to my wife ten Cart loades of my wood that is now in my yard and back side or to come in if soe muche be there and alsoe all my Corne and all my haye whitmeat butter cheese bacon and flesh exceptinge one only seame of wheate one seame of maulte w'ch I give to my sonne Danyell and I will it to be delivered vnto him w'thin twenty weekes after my decease or sooner if my wife can spare it And two as good cart loades of wood as he can carry from thence
It'm I give to my soune Danyell my best cloake and my best gowne save one w'ch one is faced w'th sattin w'ch I give to my wife
It'm I give to my sonne Ezekiell all my latten and hebrew and greeke bookes but if his brother have not St. Austines workes I give them him other bookes written by my selfe and all my written lectures and papers I give to my foresaid sonne Danyell and Ezekiell and to my Cosen Rogers [151.] of Dedham w'th those w'ch concerne my state in my christian practize w'ch are seaven which I will some to vse some of the and other some other of them as they please And I give my sermons one [on] the two bookes of the kinges and two bookes of Samuell to my sonne Danyell soe farr as I have p'ceeded and one the Acts wishinge him if he think good to take some paynes to correct and sett some of them forth [i.e. publish them]
It'm whereas there is some thinge remayninge of my annuities not yet given I doe give out of the same twenty powndes to my wife and whatsoever thereof shall remayne till after the discharge of my will I give it amonge all my six children equally to be devided as it comes out in the yeares followinge to the expirac'on thereof
It'm whereas Allen Mounteoy gent oweth me ninescore powndes and twenty markes I give the said ninescore powndes to my two sonnes Daniell and Ezekiell to be equally devided betweene them and them to demaund the said some when it is due. And the twenty markes to my daughter Hasselders children w'ch she had by her husband now liveinge
It'm I will that both the said twenty markes and all other gifts and legacies already or here followinge bequeathed by me to my daughter [166. Rebecca] Hasseler or her said children shall be co'mitted to the trust of my two sonnes Daniell and Ezekiell and my neighb'r John Clarke at the brooke that therew'th they may purchase some peece of land for the vse of the said children of my said daughter by this husband and the rest of it (in the meane time while they come to the age of twenty one yeares or the dayes of ther marryages) to come to their parents towardes theire education
It'm whereas I have one hundred powndes more due to me from an honest man I will that the said hundred powndes be equally devided betwene my wife and my fowre daughters
It'm I give ten powndes to certaine p'sons whome I have mentioned to my Executors.
It'm whereas I gave in my life time certaine p'cells of household stuffe to my children (as in a note w'ch I gave them appeares) I will that the remainder of my household stuffe and goodes whatsoever not yet disposed shall be devided amonge my six children by equall porc'ons
It'm I give to my wifes children forty shillings a peice to be paid w'thin a yeare after my death or lease
It'm I give to my sister Mary Duckfeilds [17.] three daughters and her sonne John [172.] forty shillings a peece to be paid w'thin a yeare after my decease
It'm I give my kinswoman Mary Smallwood twenty shillings at my death and twenty six shillings eyght pence by the yeare for seaven yeares next after my decease if she live soe longe and not otherwise and that to be paid to her quarterly the first payment to begin the first quarter day after my death
It'm I give to my Cosen Daniell Duckfeild [171.] twenty shillings
It'm I give to my sonne Ezekiell my medowe in Wethersfeild containinge by estimac'on one acre and a halfe more or lesse lyinge betwene the Lords medowe and John Clarkes
It'm I give to Widowe Barnard G. Parkers daughter forty shillings at my death and twenty shillings a yeare for seaven yeares if she live soe longe
And of this my last will and testament I ordaine and make my beloved cousen Mr. John Wright Esq'r of Romford in Essex and Susan my wife and Francis Longe my sonne in lawe [prob. step-son-in-law] my Executors and my brother Cooke [brother-in-law; prob. brother of 1st or 2nd wife of Richard or husband of a sister of Richard's 1st or 2nd wife] and my sonne [prob. son-in-law] Makin Overseers and I give to eyther of them both ten shillings a peece for their paynes Provided alwayes that if any question ambiguitie or doubt shall happen to rise amonge my children or any other clayminge any benefitt by this my last will or otherwise that that [sic] the only exposic'on and determinac'on thereof shall be iudged and determined from time to time accordinge to the trew sence of this my last will as nere as they can by the exposition and discretion of my Executors before named or any two of them that shalbe then liveinge or they beinge dead by my Overseers above named and not otherwise Provided alsoe if any of my said children shall goe aboute to hinder or molest mine Executors in any busines that I have comitted to them vnder any pretence whatsoever or shall by any suite or open acte declare and shewe that he she or they are discontented w'th it or give any Councell to the molestinge of my said Executors that then they or such of my children soe goeinge aboute to molest and hinder my said Executors as abovesaid or soe shall shewe his hers or their discontentment then they shall loose all suche legacies as I have given or bequeathed to them or their children by any gifte or bequest given to them vnder my hand in writinge and my seale and of any my goodes remayninge given or not given nor disposed my Executors shall determine the disposeinge of them accordinge to the faithfullness and trust I repose in them and none other to have to doe w'th it nor to aske a reason of it to whose truste and credite I shall leave it
And I doe by these presents revoke disanull frustrate and make voyd all former and other wills heretofore by me made And doe allowe publishe declare and testifie this to be my very true will and testament In witness whereof I have to eu'y sheete of this my said will subscribed my name w'th my owne hand (though the will be written w'th divers hands as I was fainte to take help) the day and yeare above named and interlyned the sixtenth of Aprill w'th interlyninge and the two lines crossed in the firste leafe w'th two or three in some other leafes I approve to be myne And that in the presence of the witnesses whose names are vnder written And in ther p'sence alsoe have sett to my seale.
[signed] Richard Rogers
Sealed and deliu'ed in the presence of John Clarke Samuell Wayte.
- - - - - - - - - -
Proved in the Consistory Court of London, April 30, 1618, by Francis Longe [step-son], John Wright Esq. [nephew] and Susan Rogers, widow, the Executors named.

Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 71, page 138:
Rogers, Richard (1550?-1618), puritan divine, born in 1550 or 1551, was son or grandson of Richard Rogers, steward to the earls of Warwick. He must be distinguished from Richard Rogers (1532?-1597) [q.v.], dean of Canterbury. He matriculated as a sizar of Christ's College, Cambridge, in November 165, and graduated B.A. 1570-1, M.A. 1574. He was appointed lecturer at Wethersfield, Essex, about 1577. In 1583 he, with twenty-six others, petitioned the privy council against Whitgift's three articles, and against Bishop Aylmer's proceedings on them at his visitation ("Second part of a Register," manuscript at Dr. Williams's Library, page 330; Brook, Puritans, ii. 275; David, Nonconformity in Essex, page 78). Whitgift suspended all the petitioners. After a suspension of eight months Rogers resumed his preachings, and was restored to his ministry through the intervention of Sir Robert Wroth. Rogers espoused the presbyterian movement under Cartwright, and signed the Book of Discipline (Neal, Puritans, i. 387). He is mentioned by Bancroft as one of a classis about the Braintree side, together with Culverwell, Gifford, and Others (Bancroft, Dangerous Positions, page 84). In 1598 and 1603 he was accordingly again in trouble; on the former occasion before the ecclesiastical commission, and on the latter for refusing the oath ex officio (Baker MSS. xi. 844; Brook, Puritans, ii. 232). He owed his restoration to the influence of William, lord Knollys, and acknowledged his protection inn several passages of his diary (quoted in David, u.s.). Under the episcopate of Richar Vaughan, bishop of London between 1604 and 1607, he enjoyed much liberty; but under Vaughan's successor, Thomas Ravis, he was again persecuted. Rogers died at Wethersfield on 21 April 1618, and was buried on the right side of the path in Wethersfield churchyard leading to the nave of the church (see his epitaph in Congregational Mag. new ser. April 1826). Rogers was the father of Daniel (1578-1652) and Ezekiel Rogers, both of whom are separately noticed, and the immediate predecessor at Wethersfield of Stephen Marshall.
<to be finished>

IDENTIFYING THE WIFE OF THE REV. MR. RICHARD ROGERS:
(by Charlou Dolan)

1. Rev. Richard Rogers, chr. 29 Jun 1551, Chelmsford, Essex, ENG; lecturer at Wethersfield, Essex, ENG; will dated 16 Apr 1618; d. 21 Apr 1618, in the 68th year of his age; will proved 30 Apr 1618, Consistory Court of London.
married first ___ ___.
m/2 aft. Oct 1598, Susan ___ (wid/o John Ward, preacher at Haverhill, Essex, ENG).
[Note: In his will, Richard Rogers names "beloved cousin (1) Mr. John Wright of Romford"(3) as executor.]
- - - - - - - - - -
11.. (daughter) Rogers m. John Stone.
- - - - - - - - - -
112. Rev. Samuel Stone, called "cousin" in will of Edward Sams, who married Bennet Wright, the daughter of John Wright of Romsford (2).

THINGS TO CONSIDER:

(1) 'Cousin' at that time could mean either cousin or nephew.

(2) There were two "John Wrights of Romford," father and son. Bennet Wright, wife of Edward Sams, was the daughter of John Wright of Romford (the father).

(3) John Wright of Romford (the father), however, would have been 70 years old when Richard Rogers wrote his will, and thus a bit old to be named executor of anyone's will. John Wright of Romford (the son) was clerk to the Parliament, and a man of considerable standing in Essex, as is shown by his appointment to the office of Recorder for Maldon. Moreover he is called a man of "godly zeal in religion," which would have made him quite attractive to the Rev. Mr. Richard Rogers, who was definitely also a man of godly zeal in religion.

(4) If Richard Rogers is referring to John Wright of Romford (the son), then that John is a half-brother of Bennet Wright, wife of Edward Sams, and is enough younger than Richard Rogers that the term 'cousin' meaning nephew fits the situation better than than cousin actually meaning cousin.

(5) Relatives who were clergymen were MUCH more likely to be given a bequest in a will than even someone who was more closely related to the testator. Thus the Rev. Mr. Samuel Stone probably received a bequest from Edward Sams because he was a clergyman rather than because Edward Sams had great affection for him due to their having close relationship.

(4) If John Wright of Romford (the son) is the nephew of the Rev. Mr. Richard Rogers, as I believe, then Bennett Wright (and by extension her husband Edward Sams) is the first cousin once removed of the Rev. Mr. Samuel Stone called "cousin" in Edward's will. If, however, the Rev. Mr. Richard Rogers was referring to John Wright of Romford (the father), then since their ages were almost identical, the term 'cousin' probably would have meant cousin, which would make Bennet (Wright) Sams the second cousin once removed of the Rev. Mr. Samuel Stone, and the sad fact is that most people -- back then and still today -- don't have any idea who their second cousins once removed are.

(5) If the Rev. Mr. Richard Rogers is, as I believe, the uncle of John Wright of Romford (the son), then he must be the brother-in-law of John Wright of Romford (the father). Since John Wright of Romford (the father) married Elmfell Linsell, then the Rev. Mr. Richard Rogers has to have married either a sister of Elmfell Linsell or the sister of John Wright of Romford (the father). Since I have found no mention of any Linsell anywhere in any Rogers record, it is more likely that the Rev. Mr. Richard Rogers married a sister of John Wright of Romford (the father), who had one sister Mary who married Robert Haseldon, and 3 sisters (Dorothy, Olive, and Agnes), whose marital status is unknown.

(6) Most of the marriages of the Wright family of Kelvedon Hatch took place in London, which was only a few miles distant, even though the people actually lived most of the time in Essex.

CONCLUSION: If we look at marriages in and around London, and if we find a marriage of a Richard Rogers with a Dorothy, Olive, or Agnes Wright, then we have undoubtedly found the Rev. Mr. Richard Rogers and his first wife, who was the mother of all of his children. Rev. Richard Rogers and his wife were married at a guess about 1569.

43. His wife was born in an unknown place. It appears that Richard Roger's wife was one of the sisters of John Wright of Romford & Wrightsbridge, i.e. either Olive Wright, Dorothy Wright, or Agnes Wright. Since no marriage record for Richard Rogers has been found in Boyd's Marriage Index for Essex, the London records need to be checked.

56. John Brownson was born between 1540 and 1550 in probably, Essex, England. He died before 4 Feb 1622/23. He was buried on 4 Feb 1622/23 in Earls Colne, Essex, England.

Parish Registers, St. Andrew's Church, Earl's Colne:
BAPTISMS
1576 Roger son of John Brownson, 15 Sept.
1580 John son of John Brownson, 8 Oct.
1584 Alice daughter of John Brownson, 30 Aug.
MARRIAGES
1617 John Brownson sen'r & Mathen Taylor, 19 May.
BURIALS
1616 Joan wife of John Brownson sen'r, 11 Feb [1616/17].
1622 Mathen wife of John Brownson sen'r, 6 Sept.
1622 John Brownson sen'r, 4 Feb [1622/3]. John Brownson and Phyllis were married in probably, Essex, England.

57. Phyllis died after 24 Oct 1587 in probably, Earls Colne, Essex, England. She was named in the 1587 will of her mother-in-law Elizabeth Brownson.

58. John Underwood lived in Lamarsh, Essex, England.

SEVENTH GENERATION

72. William Blake [3] [of Eastontown, Hants] lived in Eastontown, Andover, Hampshire, England. He was named in the 1593 will of his uncle Drew Rombold, and in the 1598 will of his uncle-in-law Richard Tutt.

In the 1606 will of his father William [2] Blake of Andover, he received the following legacies: "I give devise and bequeath vnto William [3] Blake my eldest sonne my tenement and howse with thapp'rtences wherin I now dwell commonly called Smithes tente scituate in Eastontowne aforesayd in the sayd Countie, And also one other Tenem't w'th thapp'rtennses commonly called Roses* lyeng in Kinges Enham aforesayd and all landes, errables, meadowes feedings pastures Commons Commodities and advantages whatsoever to the same Tenements called smithes and Roses... which Tenement called Smithes I latly purchased of the righte H'ble William Lord Sandes, And also one meadowe with the Appurtenannces the lying in Kings Enham aforesayd Commonly called Dichie meade* somtime hersies, And also the crofte with the appurtenennces called whitehares Crofte and all the landes with the appurtenannces somtymes Janies his land of Charleton lyeng in Kings Enham aforesaid./"
[*properties William [2] inherited by 1582 will from his father William [1] Blake] William Blake [3] [of Eastontown, Hants] and Anne Tutt were married.

73. Anne Tutt was born in an unknown place. She was named in the 1598 will of her uncle Richard Tutt.

74. William Blake [of Eastontown, Andover, Hants] was born in an unknown place.

84. John "the younger" Rogers died about 1575 in probably, Chelmsford, Essex, England. He was a joiner in Chelmsford, Essex, England.

SOURCES:
*NEHGR 5:105-152, 5:***-330 [need]; 12:337-342, 13:61-69 = Genealogical
Memoir of the Family of Rev. Nathaniel Rogers, of Ipswich, Mass., 1636 ("by a descendant")
*NEHGR 6:93, 265-266 = Abstracts of the Earliest Wills in the Probate Office, Plymouth (commissioned by Mr. Justin Winsor, of Boston)
*NEHGR 10:148 = Mascarene Family Papers (by ***)
NEHGR 10:265-*** [need] = Abstracts of Early Wills (by ?)
NEHGR 12:339 *** [need]
*NEHGR 17:43-50, 326-330 = The Rogers Family (Joseph L. Chester)
*NEHGR 21:172 = Sparhawk--Rogers--Stoughton--Cooper (William S. Appleton)
*NEHGR 21:284 = Notes and Queries (J.W.D.)
*NEHGR 32:240-241 = Notes and Queries (Mellen Chamberlain)
*NEHGR 39:225-230 = Descendants of the Rev. Daniel Rogers of Littleton, Mass. (John Ward Dean)
*NEHGR 41:158-188 = Family of John Rogers of Dedham (reprinted in Henry F. Waters' Genealogical Gleanings in England, pages 209-236
*NEHGR 61:41 = Descendants of Rev. John Wilson (by ***)
*TAG 36:34 = A Hartford Miscellany ***
*English Origins of New England Families, first series, vols. 1-3 (taken from the NEHGR)
*Harleian Society 13:27 = Visitation of Essex [Bennett Wright]
*Harleian Society 17:371= Visitation of London [Edward Sammes & Bennett Wright]
*Genealogical Gleanings in England, pages 94, 209-234, 1173-1176, 1201-1205 (Henry F. Waters--1901)
Dictionary of National Biography
Essex Wills (F. G. Emmison)
*vol. 4 - The Archdeaconry Courts, 1577-1584
*vol. 5 - The Archdeaconry Courts, 1583-1592
*vol. 6 - The Archdeaconry Courts, 1591-1597
*vol. 7 - The Archdeaconry Courts, 1597-1603
*vol. 8 - The Commissary Court, 1558-1569
*vol. 9 - The Commissary Court, 1569-1578
*vol. 10 - The Commissary Court, 1578-1588
*vol. 11 - The Commissary Court, 1587-1599
*vol. 12 - The Commissary Court, 1596-1603

NOTES:
Surname variations found in old English records: Rodgers, Roger, Rogere, Rogeres, Rogers, Roggeres, Roggers

Genealogical Gleanings in England (Henry F. Waters)
Parish Registers, Chelmsford, Essex, ENG:
[Note: These records were copied about 1900 by Henry F. Waters from what appeared to be the original register in the parish church at Chelmsford. At the end of his visit there, he discovered that the said volume was a copy, made ca. 1700. The original register was subsequently found but too late for Mr. Waters to check it. If it still exists, it has not yet been filmed.]
BAPTISMS:
John, of John Rogers the younger, 21 Nov. 1538.
Thomas, of John Rogers the younger and Ann, 25 Nov. 1540.
Mary, of John Rogers joiner and Agnes, 11 Feb 1542.
John, of John Rogers and Jone [sic], 19 Oct. 1545.
John, of John Rogers and Agnes, 10 Sept. 1548.
Richard, of John Rogers the younger, 29 Jun 1551.
Mary, of John Rogers the younger, 30 July, 1553.
Thomas, of John Rogers, 29 Oct 1557.
Ellyn, of John Rogers, 1 Nov. 1558.
[Note: Despite the differences in wives' names here, I believe the approximate spacing of two years between each of the children shows that these children were probably all offspring of only one John Rogers. The marriage and burial records for Chelmsford need to be checked for additional information.]

LDS Film #94,387
[transcribed by Charlou Dolan; needs to be proofread]
Commissary Court of London, Essex and Herts, 1575, 9th File, No. 17:
In the name of God amen. I, John Rogers of Moulsham joyner &c. My body to be buried in the churchyard of the parish of Chelmsford.
I give to my wife Annys my house wherein I dwell, so long as she liveth here in this world, and after her decease I will that my oldest son John Rogers shall have it, on this condition that within one year after his mother's decease he pay to my son Richard Rogers twenty nobles [an old gold coin worth 6 shillings 8 pence] and to my daughter Mary Rogers likewise twenty nobles of lawful money of England if the said John refuse so to do, or do it not, then I will that the goodman Graveley, the goodman Manne and the goodman Reade, or their assigns, shall sell the aforesaid house to the most advantage, and the money thereof to be equally divided amongst my children, John, Richard and Mary, and either of them to be the others' heirs.
I give to my son John a featherbed with all things belonging thereto.
I give to my son Richard a featherbed likewise with all things belonging thereto.
I give to my daughter Mary also a featherbed with all things belonging thereto; which featherbeds with all things belonging to them I will to be delivered to my forenamed children and either of them at the day of their marriage.
I appoint my neighbor John Gravely and my neighbor Nicholas Manne my assignees for the sale of the house of one Thomas Ashbey deceased to the use of the four children which he left behind him, as it appeareth in the last will and testament of the said Thomas Ashbey.
I will that my wife Annys shall receive and pay all my debts, and therefore I give unto her all the rest of my goods whatsoever they be, and I do make and appoint the said Annys my only executrix of this my last will and testament.
Finis. John "the younger" Rogers and Agnes [widow Carter] were married on 8 May 1541.

85. Agnes [widow Carter] was born in an unknown place.

112. Cornelius Brownson died before 1587 in probably, Essex, England.

Alternate spellings as found in old English records: Broncson, Bronson, Bronsun, Brounson, Brownson, Brownsonn, Brownsonne, Bruncson, Brunson, Brunsun.

SOURCES
*Essex will abstracts (by F. G. Emmerson)
*One Bassett Family in America (by ? )
*Bronson Brownson Brunson: Some Descendants of John Bronson of Hartford, Connecticut Including the Kilbourne, Welton, Hopkins, Enderton, Warner, and Other Allied Families (Herbert Bronson Enderton--1969) [need more of this]
*TAG 38:196-211 = The Brownson, Bronson, or Brunson Family of Earl's Coln, Essex, England,- Connecticut, and South Carolina (John Insley Coddington) [Note: This article is continued in TAG 39:113 (Oct 1962)]
*TAG 11:111-113 = Deeds of Bronson Heirs, Farmington, CT, Land Records (Donald Lines Jacobus)

Parish Registers of St. Andrew's Church, Earl's Colne, Essex:
BAPTISMS
1560 Priscilla, daughter of Cornelys Brownson, 12 May.
MARRIAGES
1563 Thomas Gore & Elizabeth Brownson were married 30 Dec.
[Charlou Dolan: This may be the widow of Cornelius Brownson; we need to check for a marriage of Elizabeth Gore to ___ Dirrick or ___ Hovell. We should also look for a probate record for Thomas Gore.]

Archdeaconry of Colchester (Emmerson):
Original will, vol. 2, folio 273:
Elizabeth Hovell of St. Giles, Colchester, widow, 24 Oct 1587.
To John Brownson my son dwelling in Earls Colne a pair of sheets and a blanket.
To my son Lancelot Dirrick in Suffolk my best coverlet.
To Priscilla Brownson my daughter all my apparel both linen and woolen, a post bedstead where I lie in the parlour, a feather bed, my table in the parlour with 4 joined stools, a chester by the bedside and all within it, and the joined bench belonging to the table.
To my daughter Cocke's children [not named] a trundle bedstead, a flockbed in the chamber, to be delivered to the overseers of the children in All Saints' parish [Colchester] to their use.
To Henry Cockes my son-in-law a table and a form in the chamber and my hollow-lid chest, also to his daughter Elizabeth a pewter salt.
To Phyllis Brownson my daughter-in-law a great brass skillet and a sheet.
To John Brownson my son all my brewing vessels.
To mother Rushton* a holland quarter.
The rest of my goods to Priscilla, whom I ordain ex'rix.
Witness: William Cock, Thomas Fyrfan.
Proved 9 Feb 1587/8.
[*This was probably just an elderly widow in the parish rather than the mother of Elizabeth; some testators left small legacies to several different "mothers" in their wills.] Cornelius Brownson and Elizabeth were married in probably, Essex or Suffolk, England.

113. Elizabeth signed a will on 24 Oct 1587 in St. Giles, Colchester, Essex, England. She died before 9 Feb 1587/88 in St. Giles, Colchester, Essex, England.

EIGHTH GENERATION

144. William Blake [2] [of Eastontown] died in 1606 in Andover, Hampshire, England. He signed a will in 1606. William's will was proved in 1606 in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. He was buried in Andover, Hampshire, England. He was named in the 1592 will of his mother-in-law Alice Hibbard and in the 1593 will of his brother-in-law Drewe Rombolde.

In the 1582 will of his father William Blake [1] of Eastontown, William Blake [2] receives the following legacies:
"And furfthermore I doe by this my last will and Testamente geve and bequeathe vnto the saide william Blake my seconde sonne one Tenemente withe Thappurtennances commonly called Roses lyinge within Kinges Enham aforesaide...whiche I late purchased of m'r Cauley And also one meadowe withe appertenannces llyinge in Kinges Enham aforesaide, whiche I late boughte of ___ Hersye commonlye called Dichis [also called Dichye] meade And also the Crofte withe Thappurtennces called whiteyeres crofte, and the saide Landes late purchased of the said John James withe thappurtennces of Charletonn lyinge in Kinges Enham aforesaide...
"I doe by this my last will and testamente geve and bequeathe vnto the same William Blake my saide seconde sonne my Tenemente and howse withe thapp'tennces whiche I nowe dwell in commonlie called Smythes...And also my Feeme[sic] of Andover..."

Film 92,029 = 1606 will of William Blake, proved Prerogative Court of Canterbury
[Transcribed by Charlou Dolan with paragraphs added for ease of reading]
In the name of God Amen _________ In the yeare of our Lord God one Thousand Six hundred and Six I William Blake of Eastontowne within the parrish of Andover in the Countie of South' the elder being in good and perfecte memory of mynde and health of bodie (Thancks bee giuen to Almightie God) Doe make and ordeine this my last will and Testament in manner and forme folowing, That is to say,
First I Commend my soule into the handes of God my maker, hoping assuredly through the only merittes of Jesus Christ my Sauiour to be made pertaker of life everlasting and my bodie after my decease to be buried in Christyan buryall w'thin the Church of Andover aforesayd neere vnto the place where my Father and mother were heretofore buryed./
Item I give to the parishe Churche of Andover Thirteene shillinges fower pence.
And to the poore people of Andover Fortie shillinges.
And to the parrish church of Knightes Enham Six shillinges and eight pence
Item whereas I haue heretofore by my seuerall Conueyances for the aduanncement of my younger sonnes, Peeter Nicholas and Thomas, conueyed and assured certaine of my landes messuages, leases, farmes, and tenem'tes viz my farme or Tenem't called Romboles, with the landes there vnto belonging scituat in Knightes Enham aforesayd in the Countie aforesayd, And also my Farme or Tenem't called Rawkins als Slyekes with the landes there vnto belonging; And also one Cotte w'th thappurten'ces called Chambers, Also one other Cotte called Cryses, scituate lying and beeing within the Townes, villages, Hamlettes and feildes of Kinge Enham, Knightes Enham and Eastentowne in the sayd County, Together with nynteene acres of errable lande called Lamas Lande lyeng in the common fyeldes of Kings Enham and Knightes Enham aforesayd belonging or vsuallie occupied with the aforesayd Tenement called Rawkins, And also Thurtie and six acres of Errable land lyeng in the Common fieldes of Andover and Enham aforesayd to the said Peeter, and to such seuerall vses and intents as in and by the sayd Conueyance therof made is expressed.
And also my messuage or Tenem't w'th the landes there vnto belonging scituat in Vp=Clatford in the countie aforesayd which I latly purchased of Walter waight of Andover aforesayd wollendraper to the sayd Thomas and his heires as by the conueyance thereof made is likewise expressed
And also my messuage or Tenement with thappurtences scituate in the Towne of Andover in a lane there called Soper lane, and now in thoccupac'on of one Richard Brodborne w'th an acre of land there vnto belonging w'ch messuag or tenem't was giuen to me in marriage with margeret my now wife by Robert Hibberd of Andover aforesaid deceased; To the said Nicholas and hys heires as by the conveyance thereof likewise appeareth my will and meaning is that the same assurances shall stand and be ___ [effertnal? or essertnal?; possibly should have been eternal] to the benefitt of my sayd children according to the true intente and meaning sett downe in the same writinges; And I doe by this my last will and Testament Ratifie and confirme, And further Doe will and devise ____ sayd landes leases farmes, messuages, Tenementes, and hereditamentes to my sayd sonnes seuerally and for such and the same estates to them perticularly and singularly as before mencioned and lymited by the said seuerall Conueiances./
Item I further giue and bequeath vnto my sayd sonne Nicholas Blake the some of Two Hundred poundes of lawfull English mony to be payd vnto him and his assignes yearly after my decease by one hundred pounds together by the yeare vntill the sayd some of two hundred poundes shalbe fully satisfied and payde./
Item my will and meaning is that my sayd sonne Nicholas shall haue his meate drink tabling and lodging w'th my executor vntill the sayd some of two hundred poundes be to him payd in manner as aforesaid
Item I giue and bequeath to Margaret my wife in Recompence of her third and Dowrie and vpon Condicon that shee shall Clayme no thirdes or Dowrie of my fee symple in lands whereof I shall die seised or which I have heretofore conveyed and assured to any of my younger sonnes aboue mencioned or which I have bequeathed by this my last will the ___ Annuitie of Twentie poundes during her lyfe to be yssuing and payable by my Executor out of all my landes leases and farmes giuen and bequeathed by this my will vnto my executor at fower feastes of the yeare quarterly to bee payd, viz't the first quarter to beginne the next feast either of Michellmas, Christmas the Annunciacion or Saint John the baptist which shall first happen after my decease. And so at the same feastes quarterly fiue poundes a quarter yerely to her to bee payd During her naturall lyfe. And yf it happen the sayd Annuitie of Twentie poundes or any parte thereof to be behinde and vnpayd at any tyme during the naturall lyfe of my sayd wife by the space of eight dayes after any of the feastes afore sayd in which the same ought to be payd vnto the sayd Margaret my wife That then and from thenceforth yt shalbe lawfull for the sayd Margeret my wife and her assignes to enter into the sayd landes Farmes and other the premisses, out whereof the said Annuitie is going yssuable and or payable And there vpon to distraine and the distresse to drive carry away and witholde vntill the said Annuitie and the arrerages thereof (yf any shall happen to bee behinde) bee to her and her assignes fully contented and payd./
Item my further will intent and meaning is, and so I doe will and bequeath, That my executor shall yerely synde allowe and prouide vnto Margaret my said wife during her life for her and her mayde sufficient and conuient meate drinck tabling wodd, fyreboote and lodging within my howse of Eastontowne wherin I now dwell, And that shee shall haue to her owne onely vse the Chamber that I and shee Doe now lodge in or any other chamber (the beste excepted) within the sayd howse at her Choyce during her naturall lyfe./
And further more yf my sayd wife shalbe mynded to remoue from my said howse of Eastentowne to Dwell elswhere att her better liking and contentment: Then I will that my Executor shall further yerely pay (over and besides the Annuitie of Twentie poundes before mentioned) vnto my sayd wife for and towardes her dyet and other necessaries, so long as shee shall continew out of my sayd howse of Eastentowne the yearely some of Six poundes Thirteene shillinges and fower pence by the yeare to be payd quarterly vnto her at such feastes and dayes and in such manner and sorte as her Annuitie of Twentie poundes before mentioned is appointed to be payd./
Item I further giue and bequeath vnto Margaret my wife the second best bed and bedsted with bolsters pillowes and blanckettes for her to lodge in, the second best couerlet, the second best flockbed furnished, Six paire of sheetes and all her wearing apparrell wollen and lynnen with cheste wherin shee doth keepe her lynnen and somuch pewter and bras as shalbe thought fitt by the discretion of my ouerseers
Item I giue vnto ech of my childrens children one chidd lambe to be deliuered the next yeare after my decease,
And for that my whole mynd and will is that so much of my landes wherein I haue an estate of inheritance in fee simple either by purchase distent or otherwise and which are not yet bequeathed nor disposed of shall remayne contineu and be for ever here after in my name and bloude without any alteration discontinuance or Devise to bee made or had thereof to the contrary by those or any of those or theme or any of theire heires or heirs males or any of them to whome I shall by this my last will and Testament Devise and bequeath the same or any parte thereof I doe by this my last will and Testament giue and bequeath my landes here after named in manner and forme folowing: That is to say I giue devise and bequeath vnto William Blake my eldest sonne my tenement and howse with thapp'rtences wherin I now dwell commonly called Smithes tente scituate in Eastontowne aforesayd in the sayd Countie, And also one other Tenem't w'th thapp'rtennses commonly called Roses lyeng in Kinges Enham aforesayd and all landes, errables, meadowes feedings pastures Commons Commodities and aduantages whatsoever to the same Tenementes called smithes and Roses or to any of them belonging or in any wise apperteining or as any parte or percell of them or any of them vsed or occupied, withall and singular the appurtenances whatsoever which Tenement called Smithes I latly purchased of the righte H'ble[?] William Lord Sandes, And also one meadowe with the Appurtenannces the [sic] lying in Kings Enham aforesayd Commonly called Dichie meade somtime hersies, And also the crofte with the appurtenennces called whitehares Crofte and all the landes with the appurtenannces somtymes James his land of Charleton lyeng in Kings Enham aforesaid./ To haue and to holde the sayd tenement called Smythes and the said tenement called Roses with all and singular the landes to these same Tenements seuerally belonging with all and singular theire appurtenannces, And the said meadow called Dichie meade with thappurtenances, And the said crofte called whiteheares Croft with the appurtenannces, And the sayd Landes sometymes called James w'th thappurtenannces and all other the last recyted premisses vnto the sayd William Blake bequeathed with all and singular theire appurtenannces vnto the sayd William Blake my eldest sonne for tearme of his naturall life and after his decease the remainder thereof to William Blake my grandchilde and eldest sonne of the said William, my sonne and to the heires males of his bodie lawfullie begotten, and for defaulte of such issue the Remainder to the right heires of my said sonne William for ever./
And further more to the intent that my farme of Andover and the landes there vnto belonging with theire and every of theire appurtenannces which I holde by lease of the grannte of the sayd Lord Sandes or of any of his ancestors shall continew Remaine and bee to my bloud and name with my said fee simple landes in such sorte and to such persons or some of them to whome I haue giuen and bequeathed my said fee simple Landes vnto. Therefore my will intente and meaning is that my said sonne William Blake shall haue the vse and occupation of my sayd Farme of Andover with all landes meadowes leasues pastures feedinges profittes Commodities and aduantages whatsoeuer, to the same farme belonging or in any wise appertenning./ To haue and to holde the sayd farme and all other the premisses last recited and bequesthed with all and singular their appurtenannces vnto the said William my sonne for so many yeares as hee shall lyue [= live], and yf he channce to dye within the tearme and before the yeares be expired then my will and meaning is that the residue and Remainder of the yeares in the said farme and all other the premisses last recited and bequeathed to remayne and bee to the said william Blake my grand childe and eldest sonne to my said sonne William, and to the heires males of his bodie lawfully begotten; And for defaulte of such yssue the same to remaine to the right heires of my sayd sonne William so long as my tearme of yeares which I haue in the grand lease of the same shall continue./
Neuerthelesse my will and meaning is that yt shalbe lawfull for my said sonne William to make a Iointer [= jointure] or ioynters of fortie markes by the yeare and no more out of my sayd landes and Chattels before mentioned and to him bequeathed to any wife or wifes that hee shall hereafter fortune to marrie and take to wife during their naturall life or lyues
The rest of my goodes before not bequeathed nor disposed, my debtes and legacies being payd, and this my last will and testament in all respectes iustlie performed and accomplished, I giue and bequeath to my sonne William aforesayd whome I doe make my executor of this my last will and testament,
And I doe by this my last will and testament appoint my very trustie and welbeloued friendes Richard Blake and Walter Wayte of Andover to bee my ouerseers, giuing, willing and grannting to them and the longest lyuer of them full power and authoritie to Determine decide and ende all ambiguities doubtes questions or debates whatsoeuer w'ch hereafter during theire liues or the longest liver of them shall happen to fall out amongest my sayd children or any other to whome I have giuen any of my landes or goodes by this my last will concerning this my last will or any matter conteyned therin And I doe bequeath vnto ech of ['them' crossed out] my ouerseers in toaken of good will for their paynes Thyrteene shillinges and fower pence./
In wytnesse whereof I haue to this my will sett to my hande in the presence of those whose names are vnder written;/.
Being conteyned in tenne sheetes. By me William Blake:,
witnesses to this will, John Blake
clarke, John Poores marke./ William Blake [2] [of Eastontown] and Margaret Hibbard were married.

145. Margaret Hibbard was born in Hampshire, England. She lived in Andover, Hampshire, England. She was named in the 1588 will of her father Robert Hibbard, and in the 1592 will of her mother Alice Hibbard.

146. Thomas Tutt [of Chilbolton, Hants] was born in probably, Chilbolton, Hampshire, England. He died in England. He lived in Chilbolton, Hampshire, England. He was named in the 1588 will of his sister Winifred Poynter, in the 1589 will of his brother Robert Tutt, in the 1589 will of his brother Henry Tutt, and in the 1598 will of his brother Richard Tutt. He may be the Thomas Tutt, yeoman, who witnessed the 1556 will of Joane (Waterman) Tutt.

147. His wife died in England.

NINTH GENERATION

288. William Blake [1] [of Eastontown] signed a will on 27 Jul 1582. William's will was proved Nov 1582 in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. He died by Nov 1582 in Andover, Hampshire, England. He was buried in Andover, Hampshire, England. He was named in the 1551 will of his step-father, Richard Munday, and in the 1558 will of his mother Margaret Munday.

LDS Film #91,963: Prerogative Court of Canterbury, Will of William Blake, proved 4 Nov 1582:
In the name of god amen: I william Blake of Estontowne within the parrishe of Andover in the Countie of Southampton yeoman, beinge in good and perfecte memorye of mynde and healthe of bodye (thanckes be given to allmightye god) Wayghinge and pondering withe my self the shortnes of the dayes of manne, and the vncertentie of the tyme when hit shall please Thallmightie to call vs to his mercye oute of this transitory lief, And that wee are but Stewardes here of this worldly gooddes and possessions to vse accordinge to the rules of christian charitie to Goddes honouor and glorye, and muste at the generall daie of Judgemente render accompte of the obteyninge houldinge and ymployinge thereof to his dyvine maiestie, Doe hereby of my self, and by the conncell and advise of my good Freindes make and declare this to be my last will and testamente in wrytinge, revokinge by theise presentes all ['form' crossed out] other former willes of myne made, either by worde ['of' crossed out] or wrytinge at anye tyme before the date hereof, And declaringe this to be my sole and onely last will and testamente in manner and forme foollowinge and none other (viz)
Firste I yealde my soule and spyrite to the moste highe and blessed Trinitie three personnes and one verye god the Father, the sonne and the holye ghoste, whoe hathe made redemed and sanctified all the electe people of god, of which nomber I doe hope that I am one, trustinge and belevinge onelye by the merittes of Jesus Christe his bitter passionne, the second personne in the same Trinitie to Bee a saved sowle and in him at the daie of Dome to haue a ioyful resurrectionn of this fleshe of myne, willinge my Bodye in the meane tyme after my deceasse to be buried in christian buriall within the churche of Andover aforesaid nere the cloke howse doore there and in suche sorte as shalbe thoughte most meete by my executors, protestinge also by this my laste will and testamente that I houlde and beleve all th't whatsoever was promised for me at the tyme of my Baptisme and all the articles of christian faythe whatsoever whiche I ought to houlde or beleve and whiche the moste holye visible Churche of Christe here yn earthe teachethe and houldeth, acknowledgeinge my self hereby through the grace of god to dye therein, wholye prostratinge and submittinge my self to the obedience of the same Churche wherre soever the same is dispersed thorowe oute the worlde, vtterlye renouncinge and defyinge all [false] Godes, heresies and dampnable opinions whatsoever theye be, and of whomesoevr there are houlden contrary to goddes holye worde, the true catholike faithe and the Churche of Jesus Christe oure Lorde and savioure for the whiche he shedde his most precious innocente and guiltles bloude./
And as concerninge the bestowinge of all my gooddes and chattelles I doe make thereof my laste will and testamente in manner and fourme followinge and no otherwyse, That is to saye,
I geve to thee Cathedrall Churche of Winton eighte pence, And to the parrishe churche of Andover Thirteene pence, And to the poore people of Andover aforesaide Three poundes sixe shillinges and eightie pence, to be amongest theme distributed by the discrecion of my executor and overseers./
Item I geve and bequeathe to Edmunde Blake my brother Tenne poundes of current Englishe money to be delyvered to him within one half yeare after my decease./
Item I bequeathe and geve to my sister Elizabeth Monday fyve poundes of the lyke currante englishe monneye to be paide vnto her within one yeare after my deceasse./
Item I geve to Alice Godwyn my sister twelve shillinges of the like current Englishe monneye./
Item I geve and bequeathe to everye one of my godchildrenn whiche shalbe lyvinge at the tyme of my deceasse one good ___dde lambe apiece./
Item I geve and bequeathe to Richard Blake my sonne Fyftye poundes of currant englishe monneye, to be paide vnto him or his assignes within one yeare after my decease./
Item I geve and bequeathe to Thomas Blake my sonne Two hundred and fyftie poundes of lawfull Englishe monneye to be paide vnto him and his assignes yearlie after my decease by fyftie poundes together by the yere, vntill the saide Somme Two hundred and fyftie poundes shalbe fullye satisfied and paide. ['Item' crossed out]
Item I geve to Amye Rombold my Daughter two kyne one bullocke and twentie sheepe to bee delyvered within one yeare after my deceasse, And the saide sheepe to be delyvered oute of my flock as theye shall ronne at leace./
Item I geve to Magarett[sic] Jarvis my daughter Fyve markes of currant englishe monneye to be paide her within one yeare after my deceasse.
Item I geve to Agnes Kynton my daughter one cowe and a bullocke,
And to Elizabethe Beale my daughter fowertie shillinges in monney./
Item I geve to Marye Rigges my daughgter Fortie shillinges of currante englishe monneye to be delyvered her within one yeare after my deceasse./
Item I geve vnto my eldeste sonne John one hundred sheepe to be delyvered ymmediatelye vppon my deceasse ronninge at leace And also twoe horsses or fyve poundes in monney at the electionn of my saide sonne John by hym to be takenn or delyvered vppon my deceasse
Item I geve and bequeathe vnto Elizabethe Blake my wieff two kyne to be delyvered vnto her ymmediatllye vppon my deceasse by her owne choyce owte of my herde of kyne, And also twoe sowes to bee delyvered vnto her by her owne choice owte of my herde of swyne./
Item I doe bequeathe and will vnto my saide wieff all that her apparrell woollenn and lynnenn whiche she shall have for her body at the tyme of my deceasse, And also two feather or downe beddes nexte to my beste bedde and one other flocke bedde for her maide to lye on, and twoe of my coverlettes to be chosenn by her, nexte my ['be' crossed out] Two best coverlettes, and also twoe paire of my beste blanckettes and one paire of my seconde blanckettes And also eighte pairs of my sheetes to be chosenn by her, nexte after my sonne William hathe chosenn fower payrs, And also two of my beste pannes, twoe of my beste brasse pottes, twoe of my beste kettelles twoe of my best skellettes and two of my beste brachets?, and two of my beste Andirons, And also one dozzenn of my best pewter platters, one dossenn of pottengers, and one dossenn of sawcers, Fower Candlesticks, and sixe ioyne stooles, one table borde, one cupborde borde, and the one half of my poultrye whiche shalbe aboute my howse at my deceasse, by her to be chosenn, and also my beste amblinge hackney that I shall have at the tyme of my deceasse and her saddle and furniture belonginge to her for her iourneyinge./
Item I geve and bequeathe to my sayde wieff (vppon condicion that shee shall clayme no Dowrie of my fee symple Landes whereof I shall dye seyzed or whiche I have bequeathed by this my laste will) the yearlye Annunytye of Twentye poundes duringe her lieff, to be issuinge and payable by my executoure owte of all my leasses and fearmes that I houlde of the righte honnourable the Lorde Sandys, at Fower feastes of the yeare quartly to be paide (viz) the firste quarter to begynne the nexte Feaste either of Michaelmas, Christmas Thannunciacionn of our blessed Ladye, or sainte John Baptiste whiche shall firste happenn after my deceasse, And so at the same Feastes quarterly fyve poundes a quarter, yerely to her to be paide duringe her lieff, And if it happenn the saide Annunytye of Twentie poundes or any parte thereof to be behinde and vnpaide at annye tyme duringe the naturell lieff of my saide wieff, by the space of eighte Daies after annye of the saide Feastes aforesaide in whiche the same oughte to be paide vnto the saide Elizabethe my wieff, That then and from thenceforth it shalbe lawfull for the saide Elizabethe my wieff and her assignees to enter into the sayde Fearmes and other the premisses oute whereof the saide Annuytie is goinge, yssuable or payable whiche I houlde of the saide Lorde Sandys, and therevppon to distrayne, and the distresse to dryve carrye awaye and withoulde vntill the saide Annuitie and Tharrearyes thereof (yf anny shall happenn to be behinde be to her and her assignees fullye contented and paide.).
Item I will and bequeathe vnto the saide Elizabethe my wieff duringe her lieff, the fyndinge and keepinge of two kyne to be found and kepte for her and to her vse and proffitte vppon the sayde Fearme groundes of the fearme of Andover, bothe in wynter tyme and in Sommer tyme And to herr aswell pasture for theme, as also fodder of sweete strawe to susteyne theme in good plighte, allwaies to be fodderd, pastured, watered, and vsed at the paynes and provision of my executor and by theire Servanntes and at their charge and industrye, And also I bequeathe vnto her my sayde wief the fyndinge of two sowe hogges for her and to her owne vse and profitte to be kepte vppon the sayde Fearme of Andover, and to be sounde and well harborred and well vsed and served within my said Fearme of Andover in suche sorte as is meete and as shall well contente my saide wieff ordered at the provisicion costes and charges of my executor and the industrye of theire servanntes Duringe her lief./
Item I bequeathe vnto her fower dossen of my poultrye of all sortes viz of Capons, hennes, and chickens suche as best shall fansye and like my saide wieff, and also the fyndinge so manye of poultrie during her lief to be founde fedde, harboured and well vsed and __ved within my said Fearme of Andover in suche sorte as is meete and as shall well contente my saide wieff at the costes and charges of my saide executor.
Item I geve and bequeathe my saide wief yearlie duringe her lief, for her necessary vse one waighte of woll to be paide yearlye by my executor oute of my Ferme of Andover the same yearlye to be deliu'ed at the shere tyme and that she choose yearlye the same waighte of woll of the firste weighte of wooll that shalbe weighed of the ferme sheepe yearlye at shepe theare./
Item I bequeathe and will that my wieff shall have howse rome during her naturall lieff for her abode within my howse of Estontowne that I nowe dwell in for her self and her maide, and that she shall have to her owne onely use, duringe her lief, the bedchamber that I and she doe nowe lye in, and that she shall have free concoursse and accesse into the hall, the kitchine, and the reste of my howses of office, as well within doores as without there allwaies to doe her necessairie busynes withall to her reasonable contemente, so as my executore maye haue with all, accesse quietlye into annnye romes within the howsses of office to serve his turne reasonablye, not disquietinge nor excludinge my saide wieff oute thereof at annye tyme to doe her necessarye busynes therein./
Item I will that my executoure shall at his coste and charges provide and fynde vnto my saide wieff sufficiente necessarye and ____ woodde and fyerboote as she shall spende in her saide chamber, or aboute the necessarye vsage of dressinge her meate, and drink w'thin my said howsse of Estontowne, And furthermore that if my saide wieff shalbe mynded to remove from my saide howsse of Estentowne to dwell at her pleasure and better lykinge and contentement within the Towne of Andover, Then I will that neverthelesse, my saide executoure shall at his and theire costes and charges provide and fynde vnto her sufficiente woodde and fyrebote for her chamber, bakinge, dressinge and brewinge of her necessarie meate and drincke in suche sorte as before is lymyted to her for her inhabitinge within my saide howse of Estontowne even in suche manner as thoughe she weare or shoulde be contynuallye resiant there in all respectes And shall further yearlie paye vnto my saide wieff for and towardes her howse rente, so longe as she shall contynue there or else wheare, oute of my howse at Estontowne the yearlie somme of Twentie shillinges, by the yeare to be paide quarterlye vnto her at suche Feastes and daies and in suche manner and sorte as her Annuitie of Twentye poundes before mencioned is appointed to be paide./
And furthermore if it shall lyke my saide wieff to enhabite in anye other place besydes the Towne of Andover owte of the same parrisshe, That then so longe tyme as she shall so enhabite owte of the same parrisshe, I doe will that my executoure shall yealde and paie vnto her for and in lewe of suche kyne, hogges, wooll, and poultrie as she shoulde otherwise have had goinge and founde by my executor vppon my saide Fearme of Andover the somme of fowertie shillinges of currante Englishe monneye yearlye to be paide her at the Feastes, daies, and tymes, and in suche sorte as her Annuytye of Twentie poundes before recyted is and oughte to be paide, And that so longe tyme as she shall so abide, and dwell owte of the saide parrishe of Andover, she shalbe excludedd to demande of my executor annye other duetye before to her limited bequeated or appointed owte of my sayde Fearme, besydes the saide Twentie poundes to her limited and bequeathed, w'ch nevertheles shalbe paide her, in manner and fourme aforesaide./
Prouided also and my will and entente is and so I doe declare it to be my mynde, That if my saide wieff shall happenn to marrye and not to lyve sole and in her widowhodd, That then she shall have the saide yearlie Annunytye of Twentie poundes, in manner and fourme as before is to her appointed onelye and shalbe excluded and barred for ever by this my laste will of all other benefitte whatsoever, if she shoulde otherwise haue owte of my saide Fearme of Andover (annye thinge mencioned in this my will to the co'trary notwithestandinge./
And for that my whole mynde and will is that my Fee symple Landes w'ch I have to me and myne heyres by purchase or discente or otherwise, shall remayne contynue and be forever hereafter in my name and bloude withoute anye alteracionn, discontynuance or devise thereof to be made or suffered to the contrarye by those or annye of those or theire or anye of theire heires, or heire males or annye of theme to whome I shall by this my Laste will and Testamente geve and bequeathe the same or annye parte thereof vnto, I doe by this my will and Testamente geve and bequeathe all my Landes and Tenementes withall and singler thee Appurtenances in manner and fourme followinge, That is to saye,
Firste I geve and bequeathe vnto John Blake my eldest Sonne All that my two Tenementes called Brownes and Cambers, with all and singuler the appurtenannces scituate in Knightes Enham and Kinges Enham within the saide Countie of Southamptonn, and all Landes arrables, meadowes seedinges pastures commons, commodities and advanntages whatsoever to the same Tenementes or to anye of theme belonginge or in annye wise appoteyninge or as annye parte or percell of themee or any of theme vsed or occupied withall and singular thappurrtenannces whatsoever, And also all thos my Landes Tenemetes and hereditamentes called Broyes, and all Landes errables, meadowes belonginge to the same with thappur tenannces, To haue and to houlde the saide two Tenementes called Brownes and Chambers with all and singular thappurtenannces, and also the said Tenemente called Broyes, and all other the Landes & p'misses last bequeathed and recited vnto the saide John Blake my sonne for terme of his naturall lieff, And after his deceasse to the heirs males of his bodye lawfully begottenn, And for defaulte of suche issue to Will'm Blake my seconnde sonne, for terme of his naturall lieff, and after the deceasse of the same William, to the heyres males of ["his body lawfullye begottenn" crossed out] the bodye of the saide William lawfullye begottenn And for defaulte of suche issue to the hieres males of the bodye of Peter Blake my Thirde sonne lawfully begottenn, And for defaulte of suche issue to the heires males of the bodye of Thomas Blake my fourthe Sonne lawfullie begottenn, And for defaulte of suche issue, to the heires males of the body of Richarde Blake my fyfte sonne lawfullye begottenn, and for defaulte of suche issue to the righte heires of my saide Ist sonne John Blake for ever./
And furthermore I doe by this my last will and Testamente geve and bequeathe vnto the saide william Blake my seconde sonne one Tenemente withe Thappurtennances commonlye called Roses lyinge within Kinges Enham aforesaide, And all Landes Tenementes, meadowes, pastures, seedinges, proffittes and commodities and advanntages whatso ever to the said Tenement beonginge or in any wise apperteyninge, whiche I late purchased of m'r Cauley And also one meadowe withe appertenannces lyinge in Kinges Enham aforesaide, whiche I late boughte of one[?] Hersye commonlye called Dichie meade And also the Crofte withe Thappurtennces called whiteyeres crofte, and the Landes with the appurtennces whiche I late purchased of John James of Charletonn lyinge in Kinges Enham aforesaide, To haue and houlde the said Tenement called Roses with thappurtennces and the saide meadowe called Diches meade withe theappurtennces and the said Lande called whiteyeres crofte, and the said Landes late purchased of the saide John James withe thappurtenances and all other the laste recited premisses vnto the saide william Blake bequeathed withe all and singuler their appurtennces vnto the saide william Blake my ['sonne' crossed out] second Sonne for terme of hys naturall lief, And after his deceasse to the heires males of his bodye lawfully begotten, And for defaulte of suche issue to the said John Blake my eldest sonne for terme of his naturall lief, And after the deceasse of the same John to theires [= the heirs] males of his bodye lawfullye begottenn withe the lyke lymytacions in everie respecte and degree as before is lymitted to the said Peter Blake and the others followinge him,
And furthermore I doe by this my laste will and Testamente geve and bequeathe vnto the saide Peter Blake my thirde sonne all that my Eleaven Tenementes and one Cottage withe all and singular there appurtenannces scituate and beinge in Andover aforesaide, nowe at the daie of the date of this my will in the severall tenure or occupacions of William Northe Hughe Tydder, William Hussie, Christopher Broughe, and Goodman wilson, william Bathe, Robert Carde, George Masonn, John Prosser, Robert Newell, Katherine Hinde and [blank] Wigge widdowe, And also all that my three meadowes withe thappurtenannces lyinge within Charletonn within the saide Countie of Southampton, nowe at the date of this my will in the severall tenures and occupaciones of John Purham, John James and John West To haue and to houlde all the saide eleven Tenementes and cottage and three meadowes laste recyted withe all and singuler theire appurtenannces vnto the saide Peter my Thirde Sonne to him and to his heires forever./
And to thentente that suche Fearmes, Landes, Tenemetes, withe all and singuler thappurtennces whiche I houlde by Lease or Leasses, and of the grannte of the saide Lorde Sandys, or of annye of his Lo: Ancestors shoulde contynue, remayne, and be to my bloudde and name withe my saide fee symple Landes in suche sorte and to somme of those personnes to whome I haue gevenn and bequeathed my sayde Fee symple Landes vnto Therefore I doe by this my last will and Testamente geve and bequeathe the saud Landes in manner and fourme followinge, That is to saie,
I geve and bequeathe to my said [son] John Blake one Ten'te withe thappurtenannces commonlie called tholde haule [= the Old Hall] lyinge in Knightes Enham aforesayde, And all Landes and meadowes whatsoever Leasues, pastures, seadinges, com'ons, proffittes commodities and advanntages whatsoever to the same Tenemente belonginge or in anye wise appurteyninge, And also one severall close withe thappurtenannces commonnlye called walworte, And also twoe meadowes in Andover beinge Lammas Lande houlden by Tenne shillinges rente by the yeare And also all my Lammas Lande and meadowe whatsoever withe thappurtenannces lyinge in Andover, or Andover feilde aforesaide, And all other my Landes and tenementes whatsoever conteyned and mentionned vppon the ground Lease to me made of the last recited premisses (excepte the Tenement called Smythes and the percell of grounde called Evattes Okes als Glosshanger and suche Lammas Landes as the said William Blake my sonne nowe houldethe whiche saide Tenement called oulde hall and closes called walwort meadowe, and Lamas Lande and other the laste recited premisses I doe houlde of the saide Lorde Sandys for terme of yeares not yet expired, To haue and to hold all the saide Tenemente called oulde hall, the said close called walwortt and the meadowes and Lammas Lande aforesaide and all other the premisses withe all and singuler, thappurtenances laste recited (except before last excepted) vnto the saide John Blake for terme of his naturall lieff, yf my terme of yeres thereof so longe shall endure, And after his deceasse the saide Tenemente called old hall the said close called walwort and the meadowes and Lammas lande and all the laste recited premisses withe thappurtenances (excepte before excepted) to remayne contynewe and be to the heires males of the bodye of my saide sonne John lawfullye begottenn, and so to contynewe in my bloude and name from one to an other in lyke manner and sorte and in everye respecte and degree accordinge to my sayde lymytacion made of my sayde fee simple landes called Brownes, Cambers, and Brayes so longe as the terme of yeares whiche I haue in the ground leasses of the same or of annye parte thereof shall contynewe The saide John Blake and the heyres males of his ("bodye" crossed out) bodye lawfullye begotten, and all other the persons before lymyted to enioye the saide Tenemente called oulde haule & the saide close called Walworte and the said two meadowes and Lammes Lande and other the premisses laste recited (excepte before excepted) yealdinge payinge doinge and performinge all suche rentes dueties and covenanntes whiche shalbe after my deceasse at annye tyme due, paieable or to be donne to the saide Lorde Sandys his heires or assignes or anye other personne or personnes whatsoeuer by reasonn of the grounde Leasse or Leasses made thereof or of annye ['othar' crossed out] parte or parcell thereof, Other than suche rentes and duityes as shall grewe due by reasonn of the saide Tenemente called called [sic] Smythes and the saide groundes called Evattes okes alias Glosshanger and other then for the said Lammes Lande in the tenure of the saide william Blake my sonne viz for the sayde Tenemente called Smythes fowertene shillinges by the yeare for the saide grounde called Glosshanger Fyve shillinges by the yeare and for the saide Lammas Lande Twelue shillinges by the Yeare
And furthermore to thintente that my sonne William Blake and thother personnes hereafter lymyted to haue my Fearme of Andover shall contynewe hospitalitie withe the same accordinge to the prapartionn thereof within the parrishes of Andover and Knightes Enham or one of theme duringe the terme of yeares w'ch shalbe therein to comme after the tyme of my deceasse, I doe by this my last will and testamente geve and bequeathe vnto the same William Blake my saide seconde sonne my Tenemente and howse withe thapp'rtennces whiche I nowe dwell in commonlie called Smythes and all landes, meadowes, leasues, pastures, seadinges, commons, proffittes, commodities and aduantages whatsoever to the said tenemente belonginge or in anye wise apperteyninge, And also my Feeme[sic] of Andover withe all Landes, meadowes, Leasues pastures, seedinges, proffittes, commodities, and advanntages whatsoever to the same ferme belonginge, or in anye wise apperteyninge, whiche saide Fearme and Tenemente and other the last recyted premisses I doe lykewise houlde for terme of yeares not expired of the said Lo: Sandis (Excepte and allwayes rekued? oute of this my last gifte and bequeste all suche percell of Lande as bene before by me gevenn vnto John my sayde eldeste sonne, To haue and to houlde the saide Tenemente Ferme and all other the premisses withe all and singuler theire appurtenannces last recited and bequeathed (excepte last before excepted) vnto the saide william my sonne for terme of his naturall lief, yf my terme of yeares thereof to me made shall so longe endure And after his deceasse the saide ferme and Tenemente and all other the premisses laste bequeathed and recited (excepte before laste excepted) to remayne contynewe and be to the heyres males of the bodye of the sayde William my sonne lawfullye begottenn and so from one to an other in like manner and sorte and in everye respecte and degree accordinge to my saide Lymytacionn made of my Fee symple landes called Roses Dichie meade and whiteyeares crofte, so longe as my terme of yeares whiche I haue in the grannde leasse to mee made of the same or of annye parte thereof shall contynewe, The saide William Blake and y'e heires males of his bodye lawfullye begottenn and all other the personnes before lymyted to enioye th'e sayde Ferme or Tenemente and other the premisses laste to him bequeathed yealdinge payinge doinge & perfourminge all suche rentes dueties and couenanntes whiche shalbe after my deceasse at annye tyme due paiable or to be donne to the saide Lo: Sandys his heires or assignees or annye other personne or p'sonns whatsoever by reasonn of the saide grannde Leasse or leasses made thereof or of annye parte or percell therof or of annye the premisses laste recited and to the said William bequeathed./
The residue of my goodes, (before not bequeathed nor disposed, my debtes and legacies beinge paide and this my laste will and testament in all respectes iustlie performed and accomplished) I geve and bequeathe to my sonne William aforesaide to thintente that he and thother personnes before lymyted to haue my saide Fearme of Andover shall contynewe hospitalitie within the parishe of Andover Knightes Enham or one of theme, duringe thee terme of yeares of my saide Fearme of Andover./
Prouided allwayes and my will and whole entent is, That if it shall fortune after my deceasse anny of my said sonnes, or anny others to whome I haue limited to haue and enioye annye parte of my Landes or gooddes aforesaide, not to contente himself or theme selues withe suche porcions of Landes or gooddes, and in suche manner and sorte as I haue before gevenn and bequeathed the same vnto him or theme, and vnto euerie or annye of theme, Or that theie or annye off theme shall shewe themselves or annye of theme shall shewe himselff or herself to haue mislike withe the same or of this my last will or of annye parte of the contentes of this my testament, Or shall endever themselves or annye of theme shall endever him or herself to devise Doe practise attempte or putte in v_e, or cause to be Deuised donne prassised attempted or putte in v__ or assente, consent, agree vnto or suffer annye ____ thinge or thinges whatwoever or by what meanes soeuer whiche shall disturbe alter violate frustrate, break or make voide, or shall or maie be by annye meanes intended construed or ymagined to disturbe, alter, change, violate, frustrate, breake or make voide in annye respecte or pointe this my last will and testament, and the contentes and Limitacionn of the same or of annye parte, pointe, limitacionn, Legacie, bequeste, gifte or contentes thereof, or of annye parte thereof, or shall not stande to and obeye the order and iudgemente of my overseers and the longest lyveer of theme duringe theire lyves in suche ambiguities, Doubtes, provisions, and controuersies as shall happen to aryse hereafter vppon or by consern? of this my last will and testament ___ all ententes and purposes That then in all and everie the cases laste recyted my saide sonnes and everye other personn and personnes shall and everie of theme to whome I haue givenn grannted or lymyted to haue or enioye annye parte of my Landes gooddes or chattelles aforesaide and everie of theme in so doeinge and offendinge this my mynde in my last will and testament shall for ever lose the benefitt of this my laste will and Testamente, to all ententes and purposes and the Legacies and devises to theme and everie of theme or annye of them by the same gevenn devised or bequeathed, and whiche otherwise theye or annye of theme in not so doinge or offendinge mighte haue had and enioyed, As thoughe no mencionn at all hadd beene made in this my laste Testamente of annye suche gifte devise or Legacie, And that then in everie suche case as aforesayde I doe geve and bequeathe by this my last will and Testament the same porcionn of my sayde goodes and Landes to the resydue of my sayde sonnes not so offendinge, and to suche others aforesaide not so offendinge to whome I haue made the lymytacionn of the contynnanne and enioyinge the residue of my sayde Landes, goodes and chattelles to be equallye and indifferentlie devided and apportioned amonngeste theme./
And I doe make my sayde sonne William Blake my executor of this my last will and testament Provided neverthelesse and this my last will is, That if the said William shall not or doe not take vppon him the execucionn and executorshipp of this my last will and Testament, or that he and his issue male aforesaide shall not trewlye and instlie paye all the legacies of this my last will and also shall not doe accomplishe and performe the same thorowlye accordinge to my entente and meaninge expressed in this my last will and testamente in all respectes whatsoever, or shall not within one monneth after my deceasse become in sufficient bond vnto my overseers or suche of theme as shalbe lyvinge at the tyme of my decease, or if theye shall happenn to be deceased to the Bisshopp of the Dioces for the tyme beinge to obeye and performe this my laste will and Testament, That then I will my saide Legacie and gifte before to him and his heires males bequethed and geven aswell of my Landes as of my goodes vtterlye to surceasse and to be voyde and of none effecte, And then I doe make my saide sonne John my executor of this my last will and testament to see the same well and trulye performed Annye thinge before mencioned to the contrarie notw'thstandinge.
And I doe by this my last will and testament appointe my verye trustie & welbeloved freindes Rychard Sotwell Doctor of the Ciuill Lawe, and Andrewe Reade gent to be my ou'seers gevinge willinge and granntinge theme and the longest lyver of theme full power and Awthoritie by this my last will and testamente yf theye shall so please to determyn decide and ende all ambiguities, doubtes, questions or debates whatsoever whiche hereafter duringe theire lyues or the longest lyver of theme shall happen to fall owte amonngest my saide childrenn, or annye other to whome I have gevenn annye of my Landes or gooddes vnto by this my will concerninge this my last will and Testamente or anny matter conteyned therein./
And I doe bequeathe to eche of my saide overseers in tokenn of my good will towardes theme for theire paynes Fowrtie shillinges a peece to be delyuered within one monneth vppon my deceasse./
In witness whereof I haue to everie paper leaffe of this my will setto my Signe and marke, Geven the Seaven and twentithe daie of Julye one Thowsande fyve hundred eightie two, Anno Regni Regine nre? Elizabethe viersimo Quarto. And further haue to theise presentes putte my mark and setto my seale./
witnesses the same those whose names are vnder writtenn./ William Spotwell Richarde Spotwell, John Sotwell[sic], An: Reade, John Deane./
Probatum fuit suprascriptum testamentum apud London Coram venerabili viro mayro Willimo Drurye Legum doctore curie prerogative Cantuariey commissorio etc Decimo Quarto die mensis Novembris Anno Domini millimo quingentesimo ___ Secundo. Juramento Petri Johnson notarij publici procuratoris Willmi Blake filij et executoris etc Cui commissa fuit administraco bonorum etc De bene etc Jurat./ William Blake [1] [of Eastontown] and Elizabeth were married.

289. Elizabeth was buried in Andover, Hampshire, England.

290. Robert Hibbard , tanner, of Andover signed a will on 16 Jun 1588. Robert's inventory was taken 26 Apr 1589; his will was proved 28 Jun 1589. He died before 26 Apr 1589 in Andover, Hampshire, England.

I-36 Film 186,881 will #56
Robert Hibbert, tanner, Andover, will dated 16 Jun 1588; inventory 26 Apr 1589; will proved 28 Jun 1589
wife Ales, executor
son Thomas Hibbard
son-in-law Willm. Hawkins (has wife & children)
son-in-law Jesp. Long (has wife & children)
son-in-law Thomas Lyme/Lyna (has wife & children)
Robert Hibbard
Elizabeth Hibbard, sister of Robart Hibberd above
Robert Long
Willam. Lyme
godson Rofe? Pile
godson William Blake
William Bla., husband of Margaret
son Willam. Blake
overseers: brother John Hibberd; Thomas Hibberd, tanner; John Smyth; Robert Kilbery; Christofer Asshely; Richard Blake

I-343 Film 186,885 #68
Alice Hibbard, widow, Andover; will dated 31 Dec 1592; inventory 1592; will proved 18 Apr 1593
nephew Robt. Hibbard, elsewhere
William Hawkyns, tanner, of Wherwell, Hants
daughter Dorathye Lyme
daughter Joane Longe
Willm. Lyme
Suzan Braye
Elizabeth, dau. of Suzan Braye above
Dorothy Blake [WHO IS THIS?]
Christofer Hibbard
Elizabeth Hibbard
servant Joane Goodale
daughter Elnor Smith
Joane James
daughter Margaret Blake
Rose Pyle, dau. of John Pyle deceased
Agnes Hawkins
Alice Hawkins
son Thomas Hibbard, executor
overseers: son-in-law Willm. Blake; Robt. Kilberye
appraisers: Walter Wright; Richard Brown
witnesses: James Samborn, vicar Thomas Pullerd Robert Hibbard , tanner, of Andover and Alice were married.

291. Alice signed a will on 31 Dec 1592. Alice's will was proved 18 Apr 1593. She died before 18 Apr 1593 in probably, Andover, Hampshire, England.

292. James Tutt [gent., of Chilbolton, Hants] signed a will on 21 Apr 1552 in Chilbolton, Hampshire, England. James's will was proved 19 May 1552 in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. He died before 19 May 1552 in Chilbolton, Hampshire, England. He was a gentleman in Chilbolton, Hampshire, England.

Film 91,926 = 39:14 HAVE COPY OF WILL TO TRANSCRIBE
will proved 19 May 1552 = James Tutt, yeoman, of Chilbolton; will dated 21 Apr in the sixth year of King Edward the Sixth, PCC.
wife Johanne Tutt
son Thomas Tutt [3rd son], residual heir & executor
every of my unmarried daughters, viz Alice, Agnes, and Margery Tutt
eldest son John Tutt
son Robert Tutt [2nd son]
son Henry Tutt [4th son]
son Richard Tutt [5th son]
[can't read a lot]
four children of my daughter Winifred Poynter
daughter Elizabeth Nicholas.
her daughter Agnes
[difficult to read]

C-1127 Film 186,694 #147
Jone Tutt, widow, of Chilbolton; will dated 14 Apr 1556; inventory 3 Jul 1556
son Robert Tutt, executor
son Henry Tutt
son Richard Tutt
son Thoms. Tutt
daughter Winifride Poynter (has children)
daughter Elizabeth Nicholas (has children)
cousin William Dowce of Andover
his son Thomas
aunt Waterman
James Waterman
brother Christopher Waterman (has children)
daughter Alice Tutt
daughter Anne
daughter Margerye Tutt
deceased husband James Tutt
John Tutt
son John Tutt, executor
appraiser: Thoms. Poynter of Whitchurch
witnesses: Robert Williams of Enford, Wilts, yeoman; Thomas Tutt, yeoman; Henry Braban, gent.

James Tutt [gent., of Chilbolton, Hants] and Joane Waterman were married.

293. Joane Waterman signed a will on 14 Apr 1556 in Chilbolton, Hampshire, England. Joane's inventory was taken 3 Jul 1556; her will was proved in Hampshire. She died before 3 Jul 1556 in Chilbolton, Hampshire, England. She died before her father and was therefore not named in his will.



Tenth Generation

576. Nicholas Blake died in 1547. [Charlou Dolan: I am not sure where this date comes from.] He was named in the 1527 will of his mother, Joan Blake. He was named overseer in the 1542 will of his brother Robert Blake.

[which court?]
Will of Niclas Blake dated 1 May 1547.
Nicholas Blake and Margaret were married.

577. Margaret died before 8 Feb 1558. (date of her inventory) She married second Richard Munday, who died in 1551, leaving a will.

[2nd husband of Margaret]
C-866 Film 186,691 will #117
Rychard Mundaye, Monkston; will dated 11 May 1551; inventory 23 May 1551; will proved 28 Aug 1551
son John Mundaye, overseer & appraiser
son Rychard Mundaye, properties elsewhere
tenant Mathew Kyngton
dau. Jone
dau. Annys
dau. Elyzabethe
Rychard Kyngtone
Annys Noysse
Thomas Blake
godson John Munday
wife Margaret, previously married to Nycholas Blake
wife's son Edmnde Blake
wife's dau. Elyzabethe Blake
son Willm Mundaye, executor & appraiser
Willm Hopkins, overseer & appraiser
Wyllm Aldred, overseer & appraiser
witnesses: Sir Hewghe Tunkes, clerk; John Mundaye; Wyllm Mundaye; Willm Hopkyns; Wm Aldred

C-1268 Film 186,697 will #52
Margaret Mondy/Mundy, Monkston; will dated 18 Dec 1558; inventory 8 Feb 1558; will proved 13 Feb 1558
son Edemond Blake
son Wyllm Blake (has children)
overseer Alysander Model
Wyllm Mondy
Steuen Blake, son of Edemond Blake
Wyllm Hopkyn (has Children)
Alys Klene
overseer Richard Hopkyns
son John Mody, executor
deceased husband Rychard Mody
appraisers: William Mody, John Smyth, Ryhchard Buxe, Rychard Spenser
witness: Sir Martyn Vaysee

580. Mr. Hibbard or Hibbert was born in an unknown place.

584. John Tutt [gent., [of Chilboulton, Hants] signed a will on 30 Jan 1521 in Chilbolton, Hampshire, England. John's will was proved 1523 in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. He died in 1523 in probably, Chilbolton, Hampshire, England.

Film #91,911 - Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 10 Bodfelde
In the name of god amen The xxxti day of Januariy The yere of our Lord god a thousande fyve hundred and xxij I John Tutt of the parishe of Chilbolton w'tin the dioces of wynchester hole of mynde and of parfete Remembranns make this my will & testament in maner and fourme folowing First I geve and bequeth my soule to almighty god to his blissed moder [= mother] saint mary and to all the holy company of hevyn
And my body to be buried in the Church of our lady of Chilbolton aforsaid
Also I bequeath to the Cathedrall Church of wynchester iiijd
Also I bequeth to the parson of Chilbolton aforsaid for tithes and oblacions [sic] necligently forgotten vis viijd
Also I bequeth to the rep'acion of the body of the said Church of Chilbolton xl shepe
Also I bequeth towardes the pavyng of the body and fles of the said Church xls
Also I bequeth to the foure orders of Freres at wynchester to haue at my burying iiij trentalles saide xs.
Also I bequeth to the Freres obser___ces of hampton for a Trentall to be saide xs.
Also I bequeth to every of my godchildern iiijd
Also I bequeth to Johane my wyfe xxL in money
Also I bequeth to John Tutt my sonne ___ of my best shepe called wethers shepe to be chosyn by him /
Also I will that myn executours fynde a prest synging for my soule in the said Church of Chilbolton by the space of two yeres.
Also I bequeth to every of the Children of Alice Salmon my daughter x shepe
Also I bequeth to Johane Rabigge and Isabell my doughters towardes their mariage and to either of theym vjL xiijs iiijd And that Johane my wife haue the custodye therof during the tyme she is sole widowe to be deliuered when they or any of theym come to conuenient mariage. And yf the said Johane my wife happen to marry or decesse before tyme they come to suche mariage that then I will my executours haue the custody therof And yf any of my said doughters happen to decesse before tyme they be of lawfull age or before they come to convenient mariage Then I will the porcions of hir or of them so decessed be equally deuided betwene theym which ouerlyveth.
And yf they all decesse before such tendre of payment be made then I will that the one half therof be distributed for the wealth of my soule and all xpen [?Christian] soules to pour people by myn executours And the other half to goo to the vse of the Chyldren of Willim Cowper to be equally deuided betwene theym.
Also I will that my said wife be dend'ant[?] vpon the Ferme [= farm] of Chilbolton during her widowed by the licence of James Tutt and John Tutt ten'ts of the same and to haue mete and drynke convenient her Chamb'r with necessary apparell for the same Chamb'r and two beddys with thapparell necessary for the same and fyve Toddys of wolle yerely deluded[?] by him which hath the occupacion of the said Ferme And she to haue no farder occupacion no medling vpon the said Ferme
Also I geve and bequeth to John Tutt my sonne all my purchased landes and tenementes in Newton Andover and Farley in the Countie of South't and Wiltes To have and to holde to the said John Tutt and to his heires foreuermore
The Residue of all my goodes and Catalles not bequest my dettes fully paide I geve and bequeth to Jamys Tutt and John Tutte my sonnes whom I ordeyn and make myn executours
And Robert Tutt and John Salmon Ouerseers of this my present testament and Last wille And I geve and bequeth to euery of them for his or their labour xls
In witnesse wherof to this my present last wille and testament I haue called to these witnesse will'm Suffugan to the Bisshop of wynchester and parson of Chilbolton Robert Tutt John Salmon John Batt the elder Richard Strong with many other
[Will proved 1 Jul 1523]

ARMS: Quarterly, Argent and Gules in the first quarter a crescent of the second
CREST: A talbot sejant Or collared and lined Argent.

pedigree [source?], page 217:
[Charlou Dolan: I have added the numbering in brackets to take the place of the lines & symbols in the original.]
[1.] John Tutt of Chilboulton in co. Southampton, gent.
m. Joane, d. of ... Smith of Abingdon in co. Wilts.
- - - - - - - - - -
[second generation]
[11.] Jone
m. ... Moody of Abbott Sande in co. Southampton.
[12.] Alice
m. John Salmon of Barton Stasye in co. Southampton.
[13.] James Tutt of Chilbouolton in co. Southampton, gent., son and heir.
m. Joane, d. of ... Waterman of Andover in co. southampton.
[14.] John, 2nd son
[15.] Rabidge
m. Thomas Godwyn of Sarsall in co. Southampton.
[16.] Elizabeth
m. ___ Ayliffe of Deane in co. Southampton.
- - - - - - - - - -
[third generation]
[131.] John Tutt of Oxenwood in co. Wilts, gent., son and heir of James
m. Ellenor, d. of William Poyonter of Whitechurch in co. Southampton, widow of Thos. Hall.
[132.] 2 Robert
[133.] 3 Thomas
[134.] 4 Henry
[135.] 5 Richard
[136.] Winyfride
m. Thomas Poynter of Whitechurch in co. Southampton.
[137.] Elizabeth
m. Edward Nicholas of Brokenborough in co. Wilts.
[138.] Anne
m. William Poore of Long Stoke in co. Southampton.
[139.] Margery, unmarried.
- - - - - - - - - -
[fourth generation]
[131.1 Sir Alexander Tutt, Knt. of Idmiston, son and heir apparent, 1565.
m. Millicent, d. of George Bawley of Long Parish.
[131.2] Anne
m. Thomas Garrard of Lamborne co. Berks.
[131.3] Margery
m. Thomas Garrard of Sherfield, Berks.
- - - - - - - - - -
[fifth generation]
[131.11] Alexander
m. Ann, d. of Richard Swayne of Blandford.
[131.12] Thomas
[131.13] Richard
[131.14] Edward
[131.15] Robert
[131.16] Ann
[131.17] Millicent
[131.18] Jane
m. John Bowles of Burcombe in co. Wilts
- - - - - - - - - -
[sixth generation]
[131.111] John, ęt 13, 1623
[131.112] Richard
[131.113] Millicent
[131.114] Joan
[131.115] Ann
[131.116] Mary
[131.117] Elizabeth John Tutt [gent., [of Chilboulton, Hants] and Joane Smith were married.

585. Joane Smith lived in Abingdon/Avington, Wiltshire, England.

586. William Waterman [of Polyng, Odiham, Hants] died before 12 Aug 1558 in Polyng, Odiham, Hampshire, England. (date of inventory)

C-1340 Film 186,698 #67
Wylliam Waterman, Polyng, Odiham; will dated 1 Aug 1558; inventory 12 Aug 1558; will proved 1 Sep 1558
son Christofer Wat.ma., executor
son John Wat.ma.
son Wylliam Wat.ma. of Alton, overseer
son Edward Wat.ma.
Thomas Serle of North Warnborough
Robert Wat.ma.
Peter Barnes
Alys Creswell
Alys Adams, single
son-in-law Ryc. Hooker, overseer
appraisers: John Cann., Williaml Serle, Henry Cawle, George Collocke
witnesses: John Wat.ma.; Edward Waterma.; Sir Hew Laner, clerk, vicar William Waterman [of Polyng, Odiham, Hants] and his wife were married.

587. His wife died before 1 Aug 1558 in Hampshire, England. (date of husband's will)

ELEVENTH GENERATION

1152. Mr. Blake died before 28 Mar 1527. (date of widow's will)

Arms: Argent, a chevron between three garbs sable, a crescent or for a difference.
Crest: On a cap of maintenance gules, turned up ermine, a martlet argent.

DEFINITIONS
From: A Glossary of Terms Used in Heraldry, by James Parker http://www.heraldsnet.org/saitou/parker/Jpglossa.htm

argent = silver
sable = black
or = gold
gules = red

Arms in heraldry signify the Armorial bearings (fr. Armoiries), and strictly speaking the term is applied only to those borne upon the shield. Crests, badges, and the like are not properly so described. The origin, or even date, of the earliest examples of armorial bearings has occasioned much dispute, so that the subject requires a treatise to itself.

Chevron (fr. chevron, old fr. cheveron): an ordinary* [see below] occupying one-fifth of the field. The origin and meaning of this term has afforded ground for many guesses, but in diversifying the forms which bars across the shield may take, that of the chevron is a very natural one. The name itself is derived directly from the fr. chevron, i.e. rafter of a roof. It is found in the earliest of the Rolls of Arms, and is one of the most frequently employed of the Ordinaries. [= an upside-down V]

Garbe, or Garb, (fr. gerbe): a wheat-sheaf. When a sheaf of any other grain is borne the name of the grain must be expressed; e.g. the barley-garbs in the Company of Brewers.

Crescent, (fr. croissant, old fr. cresaunt, pl. cressanz): a half-moon with the horns uppermost. The other positions of the half-moon are increscent (horns pointing to the right) and decrescent (horns pointing to the left).

Cadency, marks of, otherwise called Distinctions, or Differences (fr. brisures): variations of the original arms of a family, or marks attached to them for the purpose of pointing out the several branches, and the relation in which they stand to each other and to their common ancestor.
The differences now in use for all families except that of the sovereign may be partially traced to the time of Edward III. They are as follows:--
First House.
First son. A label of 3 points.
Second son. A crescent.
Third son. A mullet.
Fourth son. A martlet.
Fifth son. An Annulet
Sixth son. A fleur-de-lis.
Second House.
First son. A crescent charged with label of three points.
Second son. A crescent charged with a crescent.

Crest, (fr. cimier): a figure anciently affixed to the helmet (fr. casque) of every commander, for his distinction in the confusion of battle, and in use before the hereditary bearing of coat armour: it is not unfrequently confounded with the badge or cognizance, which is a different thing. The word timbre includes the crest, helmet, wreath, &c., in short every-thing which is above the shield.

Ermine, or Ermin, (old fr. armine, fr. hermine): the fur most frequently used in heraldry. It derives its name from the Ermine or mus Armenicus(so call from being found in the woods of Armenia), a small white animal whose fur it is. The black spots are supposed to represent the tails of ermines, sewed to the white fur for its enrichment.

Martlet (fr. Merlette, possibly the diminutive of the merula, merle, or blackbird): a bird resembling a swallow, with thighs but no visible legs. They form a very common bearing, being found in early Rolls, and are as common in French arms as in English.

Cap of Dignity or maintenance, called also Chapeau, is a cap generally of red velvet turned up with ermine, formerly peculiar to dukes (whence it is sometimes called a duciper), but now often used to place crests upon instead of a wreath.

*Ordinaries are certain charges in common use in arms, and in their simple forms are bounded by straight lines, so that they may well be supposed to have had their origin in the bars of wood or iron of different shapes used for fastening together or strengthening the portions of which the Shield might be composed. Their number has never been precisely agreed upon, but most heralds reckon nine principal ones which they call honourable, namely, the cross, the chief, the pale, the bend, the bend sinister, the fesse, the bar, the saltire, and the chevron.

Mr. Blake and Joan were married.

1153. Joan signed a will on 23 Mar 1527 in Enham, Hampshire, England. She died after 23 Mar 1527. (date of will)

A-**** LDS FHL Film 186,682 will #163
Jone Blake, widow, Enham; will dated 23 Mar 1527
Sir Rychard Mersser, curate
Sir John Whyte, friar
daughter Elsabet Mylne
son Nicholas Blake, executor
son Robert Blake, executor
overseer: Thoms. Jefra of Fosket [Foxcott?]
witnesses: Sir Richard Mersser Sir John Batte Nycolas Blake Robert Blake

The Ancestry of Eva Belle Kempton, 1878-1908 (Dean Crawford Smith, C.C.: 1996, Boston, New England Historic Genealogical Society)
vol. 1, pages 145-6:
Consistory Court of Winchester, Register D, folio 118:
In dei no'ie Amen The yere of o'r lorde gode ml vc xxvii the xxviii day of m'che I Johane Blake, wydow w't a hole mynde & a gudde memory make my last wyll & testament in this man'
First I com'end my soule to all myghty gode, o'r lady seynt mary & to all the seynts in hevyn and my body to be buryed in the Churche or in the churche litten of seynt Michaell of Enahm[sic]
It'm I gyve & bequeth unto the mother churche of seynt Swyth' xiid
It'm I gyve & bequeth to the churche of Enah'm vis viiid
It'm I guve & bequeth xxvis viiid to be distribute unto pore people in peny dole
It' I gyve & bequeth to my Curate S Ryc Mersserxxd
It' I gyve & bequeth to S John Batte xxd
It'm I gyve & bequeth to the maynteyning of the morow masse prest in Andov' xxd
It'm I gyve & bequeth to the mayntenyng of Jhus masse in the churche of Andov' xxd
It'm I gyve & bequeth to the p'ror of Freers Augustines in Wync' xxd
It'm I gyve & bequeth to s John' whight freer xxd
It'm I gyve & bequeth to ev'y freer of theseid augustines that ys a prest iiiid & to ev'r noves iid of theseid place
It'm I gyve & bequeth to my douzter Elsabeth mylne xxli shepe beside those she hath All'redy & one cow th't I bouzt of her & xiiis iiid of money & my gretyst panne & foure platters
It'm I give & bequeath unto my son Nycholas Blake the tabull in the hall & one clothe called the hallyng & ii Iron rakks
It'm I gyve & bequeath unto my son Rob't Blake one Iron broche & xviii shepe the wheiche shepe he hath in his kepying
It'm I gyve & bequeth to Thoms Iesra off foskett one Iron broche
The residue of my goos moveable & unmoveable above not legate I gyve & bequeth unto my children Nycholas Blake Robt Blake & to Thoms Iesra of Foskett & theseid goods to be devyded amongs them equally evy of them lyke moche
It'm I make my sones Nycholas Blake & Robt Blake my trewe executors and Thomas Iesa of Foskett my supviso'r that he se my last wyll & testament Implete & fulfilled & theseid execut to dispose for the heithe of my soule as the shall se most expedyent
These witnesse S Ryc Mersser
S John Batte
Nycholas Blake
Robt Blake w't other mo


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