Starting Sept. 5, 2014, Genealogy.com will be making a big change. GenForum message boards, Family Tree Maker homepages, and the most popular articles will be preserved in a read-only format, while several other features will no longer be available, including member subscriptions and the Shop.
 
Learn more


Chat | Daily Search | My GenForum | Community Standards | Terms of Service
Jump to Forum
Home: Surnames: Beshears Family Genealogy Forum

Post FollowupReturn to Message ListingsPrint Message

Computer Glitch
Posted by: Charles Brashear (ID *****0446) Date: May 26, 2002 at 08:00:55
  of 369

I sent out about 350 e-mails saying that vol 4 was ready (actually it will be delivered to me on Tuesday, says UPS), but I got back about 100, for one reason or another, many of them "timed out."

So, Now, I don't know who I have notified and who I haven't. Would all of you be so kind as to pass the word. Tell all your relatives and associates who might be interested about the book:



Vol 4. Brashear(s) Families of the Ohio Valley

As early as the 1750s, Americans began crowding Western Maryland, the Monongahela River valley in southwestern Pennsylvania, and by about 1775, the Ohio River Valley. A fair number of Brashear(s) families and their relatives were among these emigrants— the Elder and Younger William Brashears; Otho Brashear and his wife Ruth Brown (along with two of her brothers who had married two of Otho's sisters); Ignatius "Nacy" Brashear; Marsham Brashear (and his father, Benjamin, and brothers, who, however, moved on to Mississippi); remnants of older Maryland families, like Lt. Rezin Brashears, Nathan Brashears/Brashares Jr, Zachariah Brashears/Broshars; and strays like Joseph M. Brashears of Steubenville. This book is about these people and their families.
The book is 6" x 9", hardbound, 676 pages (xx + 656), with 59 pages of index, about 50 pictures and seven maps. $40, plus $3 postage and packaging.

Abbreviated Contents of Vol 4:

1. The First Five Generations................................... 1
2. Brashear Families of Western Pennsylvania......... 11
3. The Brownsville Colony........................................ 39
4. William Brashear and Anne Ray........................... 123
5. Marsham Brashear and Lucy Phelps
Of Louisville............................................... 235
6. Benjamin Brashear, of Menallen Twp.................... 261
7. Eden Brashear and Priscilla Gilliland.................... 287
8. Edward Brashear and Nancy Dyson
And Other Kentucky Strays......................... 335
9. Ignatius "Nacy" Brashear Sr
And Frances Permelia Catheral.................... 352
10. Lt. Rezin Brashear Sr and His Four Wives............ 398
11. Nathan Brashears Jr
And His Brashares Descendants.................. 410
12. Zachariah Brashears
And His Broshar Descendants..................... 446
13. Thomas Broshears and His Sisters....................... 473
14. Samuel Mason Brashears/Broshears
And Hannah Standiford............................... 491
15. Joseph M. Brashears and Rebecca Viers
Of Steubenville, Oh...................................... 552
Index.......................................................................... 597


I also write fiction (mainly historical fiction about American Indians) and books about the writing process. If any of you are interested, here are some descriptions:

Killing Cynthia Ann, a novel, published 1999 by Texas Christian University Press. $21.50. In 1836, blonde, blue-eyed Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnaped by Comanches in East Texas. She refused to be repatriated and lived with the Indians almost 25 years, marrying and raising a family (Quanah Parker, last chief of the Comanches, was her oldest son). In 1860, Texas Rangers captured Cynthia Ann and her toddler daughter, Toh-Tsee-Ah-ne, and took them to East Texas, where her Parker relatives held her prisoner the rest of her life. She wanted nothing but to return to her family on the Comanchería, but her Parker relatives could not imagine why anyone would want to be an Indian. Unwittingly, they psychological tortured her to death. The book is a documentary novel about those last ten years of Cynthia Ann Parker's life. Footnotes in the margins tell the reader where the data comes from.

Comeuppance at Kicking Horse Casino, and Other Stories, published in 2000 by American Indian Studies Center, UCLA, $15. This collection of stories is a mix of historical and contemporary fictions. The historical stories provide a background for the contemporary stories, so that the entire collection becomes a loose chronicle of the Native American experience since the European settlement of North America. A wide range of tribes is represented--Powhatan, Cherokee, Creek, Comanche, Lakota, Navajo, Ute, Keres, Ácoma, Zuni, and an unnamed southern California tribe. Each story highlights some individual's quandary--and often alienation--in negotiating and adapting to a face to face encounter with the whites.

Brain, Brawn, and Will: The Turmoils and Adventures of Jeff Ross. Published in 2001 by 1stbooks Library. 6x9 Paperback: $19.95; electronic book (go to www.1stbooks.com and search for my name): $3.95. Jeff Ross was a quintessential 19th century man. As a child in Tennessee, he lay on the bank of the river and watched the Battle of Shiloh. A few years later, he rode in a vigilante party that gunned down his father's murderer. Thus, he learned early that violence was a socially approved way of achieving social goals. At the same time, he went to college and graduated from Cumberland University Law School in 1872 at the head of his class. He then embarked upon a career in which the mind was the instrument of social progress. Thus, his personality was formed by the twin and contradictory forces that have permeated American culture from the beginning— violence and intellect.
In 1878, at the age of 27, he ran away from his law practice and home. He traveled for a time in New England with a circus, running a "panorama" side show and hawking a "magic solder" for mending pots and pans. He hitch-hiked through Europe for a couple of years, shipped for Rio de Janeiro on a Norwegian freighter, led exploring parties into the interior of Brazil. He then took a job, running a mule team to supply railroad-building enterprises. Soon, he had worked his way to transportation chief, then to construction chief, eventually to a licensed civil engineer, who actually designed and built railroads and bridges.
In 1893, he got involved in the Brazilian revolution— on both sides: he sold to each, what he had discovered from the other. When the police came looking for him, he conned the American Consul in Rio into smuggling him out of the country. In New York, he bought a boat-load of munitions for the government, then hired a crew of rebels to transport it.
Back in small-town Tennessee, he became a town character, curmudgeon, and philosopher of sorts. He once proposed that "the world" should dam Gibraltar, drain the Mediterranean, and claim a continent of naturally irrigated farm land that would have fed the world for many generations to come. "It would work, too," he told a Memphis reporter in 1924, "if we had the brain, brawn, and will to accomplish it, just as the Panama Canal was accomplished."
The book is a story of his life, told largely through his own letters, essays, fragmentary novels, etc.

Order books from me, Charles Brashear, P.O.Box 38, Clearlake Oaks, CA 95423

$40, plus $3 postage and packaging.

Thanks,
Charles Brashear
P.O.Box 38
Clearlake Oaks, CA 95423
707/998-1008
brashear@mail.sdsu.edu

Some of you may know that I also write fiction. If you'd like to read a sample, go to:
http://wordcraftcircle.org/natreal/V2N1/write4.htm


Notify Administrator about this message?
Followups:
No followups yet

Post FollowupReturn to Message ListingsPrint Message

http://genforum.genealogy.com/beshears/messages/183.html
Search this forum:

Search all of GenForum:

Proximity matching
Add this forum to My GenForum Link to GenForum
Add Forum
Home |  Help |  About Us |  Site Index |  Jobs |  PRIVACY |  Affiliate
© 2007 The Generations Network