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Re: Cheif Benge killed his parents John Benge, stuff to fix
Posted by: Ace Maupin (ID *****4165) Date: July 14, 2012 at 14:50:57
In Reply to: Re: Cheif Benge killed his parents John Benge, stuff to fix by Larry Rogers of 1295


Hi Larry. If you notice I said Does not mean everything is absolute You can do your review see where you come to.. history and genalogy are always full of contraversy and its good because someone sometimes finds a piece missing. in any case I only compile date and share. Not my intent to convince. A reader may take it as grain of salt agree or disagree

The Benges and similar surnames- Background DNA PROJECT

231514 Trader John Benge, b. 1730 and d.1800 I1


I1 Benge, Thomas 1734 VA
50986 King David Benge Borned 1762 I1

95110 James Benge I1


above is a except of from the family DNA project. It is scientific match the DYS is a match for Trader John benge Thomas Benge and King David Benge.
So they are not different familes, By the timeline and naming pattern it indicates the 2nd William Benge thought to have gone to South Carolina. But the Maryland archives document he went to Maryland. From there we find the son William or one of them migrated to New New York. His son John Bench also a noted nothern trader was lsited as father French..
Now we cant say for sure the John Binge of 1748 Maryland was a son of John of New York junior. We next find him in the French Indian War Maryland musters as John Bench.
In the 1760s David Lewis sued Thomas Benge a next name is John Bange . At the same time though there was a John Benger in Virginia but his movemnts and life records show he was the John Bange listed with Thomas Benge Lewis suit 1760s.

There is still even a little bit moore
(Excerpts from the Dickey Diary -
Elijah Combs CORNETT, Hazard [Perry Co], KY
I think the CORNETTS came from Holston River to Kentucky
Rebecca Maggard BOGGS Combs, Hazard [Perry Co], KY
Old Wm CORNETT came with my uncles to Ky; also Richard SMITH, great grandfather of "Bad" Tom SMITH. He settled on Troublesome.

I have heard my mother tell often of the killing of BENGE, the renegade. She saw the Indians and told of one fellow hiding in the loft and falling through while the Indians were cooking below and scaring them away

The Cornnetts were indian too and stongly intermarried with Clay Co Benge line

Margaret Peggy Cornett (daughter of Robert Robin Cornett and Charlotte Callahan) was born Nov 22, 1804 in Clay Co., Ky, and died Oct 24, 1884 in Clay Co., Ky. She married Lewis Franklin Benge on Aug 17, 1831 in Clay Co., Kentucky, son of David "King David" Benge and Lucinda Lucretia Perry.

More About Margaret Peggy Cornett:
Blood: 1804, 1/4 Cherokee.
Burial: 1884, Benge Cemetery.

William Cornett was born Abt. 1802 in Madison Co., Kentucky, and died date unknown. ... More About William Cornett and Nancy Benge: Marriage: Jan 08, 1825 ... ect
Chief Arlie Strong, a descendant of Aaron Brock's daughter Mahala who md. Edward "Ned" Callahan, is related to Chief Red Bird through Jim Bowling of the "Bear Creek" Bowlings in Clay Co., KY, and wife Martha "Patsy" Benge, daughter of John Benge. The Bowlings then married into the Wilson family (a Cherokee family through Henson), who married Elizabeth Strong, daughter of John Strong.

John Benge was the son of King David Benge,
Chief Arlie Strong, a descendant of Aaron Brock's daughter Mahala who md. Edward "Ned" Callahan, is related to Chief Red Bird through Jim Bowling of the "Bear Creek" Bowlings in Clay Co., KY, and wife Martha "Patsy" Benge, daughter of John Benge. The Bowlings then married into the Wilson family (a Cherokee family through Henson), who married Elizabeth Strong, daughter of John Strong.
John Benge was the son of King David Benge,
Savannah Cornett lived in Voca, McCulloch Co., TX, on 18 Jul 1907 when she signed a Power of Attorney and contract to Anderson P. Cagle of Konawa, Indian Territory to prosecute her claim pending before the Special Commissioners Court of Claims, Washington, DC for money due the Eastern Cherokee; she listed her husband's and parents' deaths, and the birthdates of her siblings, their place of residence, or date of death.
She received a letter dated May 7, 1908, from the Special Commissioner asking why she, her parents, and her grandparents were never enrolled? Were any of your ancestors slaves? Do you pass as white or colored in the community in which you reside? Were any of your ancestors parties to the Treaties of 1835-6 and 1846? (In Eastern Cherokee App. #30921)
She wrote letter to Mr. Guion Miller, Washington, DC, dated May 13th 1908:
Dear Sir, Relative to my application for Participation in the EASTERN CHEROKEE fund, will state that I do not know why myself my Parents or my Grandparents were never Enrolled, there were none of my ancestors Slaves as far as I know of, I have allways Past as a white woman in all the communitys I have Ever resided. I never knew or heard of any of my Ancestors having any Negro Blood in them, we all have bin considered all through our lives Just as white as any American, if there were any of My Ancestors Parties to the treaties of 1835-6 annd 1846 I do not know anything about it. Hoping I have given you the desired replyes I remain as Ever Yours respectfully,
SAVANNA MILLER, Voca, Texas
On 24 Sep 1908 in Goldthwaite, TX, She gave a deposition in EASTERN CHEROKEE application No. 30921 ~ SAVANNA MILLER being first duly sworn deposes and says:
My name is SAVANNA MILLER, and I live at Voca, Tex. I am 59 years old. I claim my Indian blood through my father, SAMUEL CORNETT. My father died in 1870 in the CHEROKEE NATION. He was 68 years old at the time of his death (Showing the family Bible pages) SAMUEL CORNETT was born Dec. 27 1802, in Clay County, Ky. He lived in Ky. until some time after his marriage, and went to Mo. after the births of three or four of his children. I was born in Mo., but I was next to the youngest child. I have heard my mother say that my brother WM. CORNETT, born May 9, 1833, was also born in Mo. and JOHN CORNETT, born Nov 29, 1835, was also born in Mo. as were all the rest of us children. My father got his Indian blood through his mother, SUSAN BROCK. I can tell nothin about SUSAN BROCK only that she lived in Ky. and she died there. She was said to be a full blood Indian. She never got any money or lands from the Government on account of her Indian blood. My father went to Tahlequah in 1869 to have his Indian rights recognized, but he did not get his claim fully established.

. I suppose you can Google John benge you will pretty much come up with the same thing. Here is excerpt one dozens of the same things by google search.

John BENGE

Father: Thomas BENGE
Mother: MARTHA
Birth: ABT 1735, Albermarle County, Virginia



Partnership with: Elizabeth LEWIS

Child: Obediah Martin BENGE Birth: 1763, Albermarle County, Virginia

Partnership with: WURTIH.
I like to term it pass the buck genealogy




Now if you examine Obediah Martin BENGE depostion he stated he had brother whom died in the revolution. But by traditonal lore he was a son
of John Benge and Elizabeth Lewis and only one son Yet Obediah said he had a
brother. Valid question why did William Terrell Lewis in his book never mention John Benge?

Statement of John Fields
was called by the name of General Binge and
that this is the same person who took Elizabeth Livingston, wife of Peter
Livingston and after {?} taken to little Stony Gap. After the skirmish with
Binge and the Butcher soldiers at Chicamago(?)

In general lore he is named as Capt Bench. Can anyone find a document near the time with the name Capt Bench. A deposition war record milirary record ect.. The answer is yes a story handed down
"August 26, 1791, a party of Indians headed by a Captain Bench, of the Cherokee tribe, attacked the house of Elisha Ferris, two miles from Mockison [sic] Gap, murdered Mr. Ferris at his house, and made prisoner Mrs. Ferris and her daughter, Mrs. Livingston, and a young child together with Nancy Ferris. All but the latter were cruelly murdered the first day of their captivity." [Bledsoe et al, in Summers, 1903, p. 438]

Arthur Campbell tried again. On July 9th, the same year, he wrote as follows: "By intelligence from Knoxville, the uncle of Capt. Bench is out with thirty warriors to take revenge in Virginia.
FOOTNOTES: (1) Will book 1, page 73 Abingdon Court Records; (2) Summers, L. P., ANNALS OF SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA; (3) Cole, Charles B.; LIFE OF WILBURN WATERS; (4) Calendar Virginia State Papers, Vol. 7, pp. 111-112; (5) Summers, L. P. ANNALS OF SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA; (6) Draper, L. C., 12CC60; (7) Virginia State Papers; (8) Summers, L. P., History of Southwest Virginia, pp 441-442 further quoting Sharp's MS; (9) Ibid p. 441 (10) Virginia State Papers, Vol. 7, p. 115; (11) Draper 12CC60; (12) Ibid; (13) Virginia State Papers, Vol. 7, p. 118; (14) Ibid, Vol. 1 pp 117-188; (15) Ibid, pp 210.
THREFORE YOU HAVE 3 VERSIONS


From Colonial Office Records (, Vol 80) in Public Records Office, London U. K.
Transcribed from microfilm copy in Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. by Jerry L Clark

Letter dated April 9, 1779
Ustenalla Town [upper central Georgia]
Robert Dews to Alexander Cameron:

This will be handed to you by the bearer of Mr. Scott's letters which was to have been dispatched the day after they were dated. Anthony Foreman, who was to have carried them, was prevented by sickness. I then applied to an Indian who promised to sett out in four days after Mr Scott left this [place]. He came at the time appointed [&] said that he missed his horse. It was with some difficulty that the Cowee Warrior engaged the bearer.


Mr Scott sett off on his expedition the 30th ult. accompanied by the Good Warrior & ten men from

party setting out at the Island is intended as a reinforcement of the Illinois so that Mr McDonald have left Jud's Friend with about Seventy five men to prevent their passing & take as many prisoners as Possible, if the Rebels should not be superior in force.


I am proud to inform you that the whole Nation seems Unamimous against the Rebels. Even Quallakee [?] where the Esemakia [?] Indians live. The Raven and Categiskee with fifteen men from Salugoe, white men, Greaves, Proctor, Row, Springston, Riley, Cery, & Vernon of your company, John Ramsay, John Christie, and Samuel Benjamin from the Rebel towns & Charles Hughes and Joseph Vann. Since passes this [force?] to join him, Six of the Cohutta Indians & followed by John Brown, the Bear & Charles Beamer & the day following the Young Turkey & Terrapin (the Great Warrior's son) with twenty five men. James Hughes & this day twenty four of the Toquoa people & twenty one of the Cossacohatchee [?] people accompanied by Hicks, Morross & Luke sett off from Cusachetehee [?]. The Little Bird & a large party with him likewise sett off this day from the town to join the former parties & a Considerable number from the disaffected towns is expected to join the last parties.


Mr McDonald passed this river at Cusawahtee yesterday with a number of his division, the Bloody Fellow or Nenetuya. [Parted?] from them three days since with an order for Ammunition. He took about twenty Indians and four white men is with Mr McDonald: John Vann, Campbell, Levett, & Bench. [Benge] This party was to have joined Mr Scott at this place but a report [was?] transmitted that a number of Rebels were on their way from the Long Island in Boats to Rout the towns on [the] Tennessee [River]. However town & village in the woods have sent & are daily sending men against them. The disaffected in the Valleys, Middle & Lower Towns are daily falling off from them & surely Believe that with a little encouragement at this time from you would in the course of this summer bring them entirely out of the Old Towns.
The Raven & Old Tassel have been with Mr McDonald. I have not heard the particulars of their Business but the Great Warrior has left his medal with his son the Terrapin, who intends seeing you after his return from the War.


By two fellows from the Esenota [?] settlement now in the House I am informed of a large party consisting of Highawassee & Chestee people on their way to join Messers McDonald & Scott at the Rendevous at the Standing Peach Tree so that a moderate computation [shows] those gentlemen will have 300 men exclusive of what may join them from the disaffected Towns. This much Sir, I have taken the liberty of Acquainting you with, as I thought it a part of my duty being subsequent to Mr Scott's departure.


I must begg your patience a little to acquaint you that the number of Traders on this River is too great for the number of hunters, they not being sufficient to support five of us: viz. John Morris at Cusawahtehee, John Yarwook [?] at Saligoe, John Seeke [?] & James Ramsay & myself at this place. As I am the latest I hope you will grant me a permit for some other town. Of them on [the] Tennessee, I would prefer Tuskegee as many of my old customers reside in & about that town. My reason for applying to you at this time is that I may not be too late as the Fall of the Year with time enough for me to move to that place should it be to your pleasure.

Your Obediant Servant,
Robert Dews


Mr McDonald passed this river at Cusawahtee yesterday with a number of his division, the Bloody Fellow or Nenetuya. [Parted?] from them three days since with an order for Ammunition. He took about twenty Indians and four white men is with Mr McDonald: John Vann, Campbell, Levett, & Bench. NOTE robert dewes Said bench was a white man therefore Trader John Benge.



NOTE Robert dewes said

The Raven and Categiskee with fifteen men from Salugoe, white men, Greaves, Proctor, Row, Springston, Riley, Cery, & Vernon of your company, John Ramsay, John Christie, and Samuel Benjamin from the Rebel towns & Charles Hughes and Joseph Vann. Since passes this [force?] to join him, Six of the Cohutta Indians & followed by John Brown, the Bear & Charles Beamer & the day following the Young Turkey & Terrapin (the Great Warrior's son) with twenty five men. James Hughes & this day twenty four of the Toquoa people & twenty one of the Cossacohatchee [?] people accompanied by Hicks, Morross & Luke sett off from Cusachetehee [?]. The Little Bird & a large party with him likewise sett off this day from the town to join the former parties & a Considerable number from the disaffected towns is expected to join the last parties

Notes for JOHN CHEROKEE VANN III:
Moravian Journals, 12/20/1806; refers to Polly Terrapin's husband as having died of Small Pox at Hightower. Presumably, this was John "Cherokee" Vann. His father, John "Trader" Vann, was also a "linguister" (or interpreter).

To confuse the issue more... In 1770 Alexander Cameron appointed John Vann (apparently a white trader) as official interpreter, replacing another white trader, John Watts (deceased). In 1775 another interpreter, Joseph Vann, was involved with the Henderson land sale at Sychamore Shoals acting contrary to the orders of his employer, Alexander Cameron. In 1779 Robert Due (another white trader) wrote to Cameron that a number of white men, including John Vann and Joseph Vann, had joined war parties.

Therefore; there are probably two seperate Vann mixed-blood families descending from their white projenitors, John and Joseph Vann, and their Cherokee wives.

.
Statement of John Fields:
That the enemy consisted of Indians,
Tories and fragments of Ferguson's army. That there was a certain general as
he called himself that the settlers despised more than any other. He was a
half-blood white and Indian and was called by the name of General Binge IN OTHER WORDS the settlers called him Capt Bench Benge but he called himself General Binge

Long Island (Tennessee) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_Island_(Tennessee) - CachedSimilar
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Long Island, also known as Long Island of the Holston, is an island in the Holston River at Kingsport in eastern Tennessee. The Long Island was a sacred ...

Statement of John Fields:
That their operation was
mostly confined to the valley of the Holstin River as that was then the western
frontier.

Robert Dewes said.
Bench. [Benge] This party was to have joined Mr Scott at this place but a report [was?] transmitted that a number of Rebels were on their way from the Long Island in Boats to Rout the towns . No contradictions here.

NOTE most citations on cheif benge are by summers.
Summers, L.P., 1903, History of southwest Virginia 1746-1786, Washington County 1777-1870
Full text of "History of southwest Virginia, 1746-1786, Washington ...
archive.org/.../historyofsouthwe00lewi/historyofsouthwe00lewi_djvu...
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BY LEWIS PRESTON SUMMERS, OF THE ABINGDON BAR, Alumnus of the University of Virginia, and of Tulane ... J. L. Hill Printing Company, 1903. .... History of Southwest Virginia, 1746-1786, Washington County, 1777-1870. ...... The above is all the information that the records contain of the controversy in regard to the ...

Full text of - Internet Archive
www.archive.org/.../historyofsouthwe01summ/historyofsouthwe01su...
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BY LEWIS PRESTON SUMMERS, OF THE ABINGDON BAR, Alumnus of the University of Virginia, and of .... L. P. Summers, June 13, 1903. Abingdon, Va. History of Southwest Virginia, 1746-1786, Washington County, 1777-1870. ...... The above is all the information that the records contain of the controversy in regard to the ...

Note between Summers 2 volumes the contraversy and contadtions between 1 -2 There again Summers work is not absolute.

Folklore--Misinformation and untrue legends

Brewer, M.T., 1978, Rugged trail to Appalachia. Graphics Arts Press, Viper, Kentucky, 139 p

Journal of Cherokee Studies
The Cherokee Sotry-teller: Laura King page 55
The Cherokee Sotry-teller Turtle
by Laura H. King page 110

Notable Persons in Cherokee History: Bob Benge
by E. Raymond Evans page 98

Benge's Axe
by Duane H. King page 107

note the cherokee journal is full of headings such as,

Cherokee Story-teller

the myth

Cherokee Sotry-teller NOTE quots from Evans and most of the Journal use myths and Cherokee Story Tellers



Notes for Col. Arthur Campbell:

He was taken prisoner by the Indians when only sixteen years of age, while with his father on a short campaign against them. The hardships which he endured during the three years' captivity were very severe, until he was finally protected by an aged Chief, who carried him to Canada and to the old French Fort at Detroit. The Jesuit Fathers, who had established a mission for the Indians at this fort, were pleased with the bright, interesting English boy, and taught him while he was there; therefore, upon his escape, and recapture by the English Army in 1760 (which was commanded by General Johnson in his campaign against the French and Northern Indians), he was much better educated than other boys of his age in Western Virginia at that time. He afterwards acted as pilot to the Colonial Army in the Northwest, and served as Lieutenant in the Army on the Western frontier. His knowledge of the Indian character, language and customs was of great value to him as an officer in the Colonial and Continental Armies. He was a delegate to the Virginia Constitutional Convention of May, 1776, from Fincastle County; served in the War of the Revolution as Captain and Colonel, received one thousand acres of land, which was located in Kentucky, for his military services. He was afterwards one of the leading men in forming the State Government of Tennessee, was a man of influence and great learning, a cultivated gentleman, of courtly manners and bearing, though dominant and accustomed to ruling those around him.

Historical Sketches of the Campbell, Pilcher, and Kindred Families

one of the captured women asked Benge

I live in Leslie County, I am 55 years old. I was born in Clay County. My father's name is Aaron Brock. My mother was Barbara Shepherd. Her father's name was James Shepherd. He was born in Virginia. I don not know what county it was; it was near Fort Yokum and Fort ---, which was taken when he was about ten years old by the Indians who were led by Benge, the white man who was taken by the Indians when a boy seven years old. His capture was as follows. His mother had sent him to gather elderberries for the ducks. A party of Indians came upon him and attempted to kill him. He gathered stones and began to fight them. Pleased with his valor they took him prisoner saying, "He will make a good warrior." I have heard my grandfather tell this and many other things, among them the taking of Fort --- and the killing of Benge.
At the taking of this last mentioned fort, the Indians killed all but two women, the wives of George and Peter Levice. (Livingston in Collins.) Among the slain were the aged mother and father of Benge. After the massacre one of the captured women asked Benge if he did not remember an old man and an old woman who were killed. He said he did. She said, "They were your father and mother." He dropped his head and wept

As Benge retreated he bounded from side to side to prevent his pursuers from hitting him. Vinton Hobbs saved his load till Benge would get into the narrow gap and then at a distance of 55 yards he put a ball through his head.

George Levice's wife clenched the Indian to who she was tied and held his arms. He struck at her with his tomahawk over his shoulders but she had his arms pinioned and he could only use them below the elbows. She would dodge his lick as far as her head was concerned but her collar bone received the blows. She held him till her husband came to the rescue and dispatched him. Soon after she died.
George Levice's wife was enciente. Peter Levice's wife was sitting awake.

last mentioned fort, the Indians killed all but two women, the wives of George and Peter Levice. (Livingston

NOTE, what Araon brock had to say was not to much different than what Elizabeth Livingston told Aurther Campbell. but Brock was not reating to what Elizabeth livingston had to say he was relating that of her sister inlaw told Benge, or perhaps Elizabeth Livingston was not aware that Trader John Benge was there. Or she may have just omited it from Arthor Campbell on purpose. Harbouring a Tory could of serious consequences for Elizabeth Livingston and after the ordeal she had been through. It was also common for the settlers to have Indian Women not to mention John and MikeBbolling whom Capt Jarvis said were full bloods who settled with the Melungeons in Hawkins Tenn, or Jock Bolling descibed as full blood melango low grade indian by Osborne, And the Cornetts

CHIEF BENGE'S LAST RAID
By Luther F. Addington


April 6-9, 1794: The story in Elizabeth Livingston's own words [from interview of Mrs. Livingston by A. Campbell in Summers, 1903, p. 439-441]:

This day two of the party were sent by Benge ahead to hunt.
"April 9th. After traveling about five miles, which was over Powell's mountain, and near the foot of the Stone mountain [near Dorchester], a party of thirteen men under command of Lieutenant Vincent Hobbs, of the militia of Lee county, met the enemy in front, attacked and killed Benge the first fire, I being at that time some distance off in the rear

My sister-in-law, Susanna, was with the remaining children in an out-house.

Now let's have the story as told by Elizabeth Livingston, wife of Peter Livingston, to Arthur Campbell, military officer of the area, and certified by him to the Governor of Virginia, April 15, 1794.

NOW WE HAVE A 3RD VERSION OF EVENTS

It ran as follows: April 6, 1794, about 10 o'clock in the morning, I was sitting in my house when the fierceness of the dog's barking alarmed me. I looked out and saw seven Indians approaching the house, armed and painted in a frightful manner. No person was within but a child ten years old, another of two, and my sucking infant. My husband and his brother Henry and just walked out to a barn at some distance in the field. My sister-in-law, Susanna (Henry's second wife) was with the remaining children in an out-house. Old Mrs. Livingston (Sarah, Peter's mother) was in the garden. I immediately shut and fastened the door; they (Indians) came furiously up and tried to burst it open, demanding several times of me to open the door, which I refused. Then they fired two guns; one ball pierced through the door but did not harm. I then thought of my husband's rifle, took it down, but it being double triggered, I was at a loss; at length I fired through the door, but it not being well aimed I did no execution. However, the Indians retired from that place, and soon after I found an adjoining house was on fire, and I and my children were suffering much from smoke. I opened the door and an Indian immediately advanced and took me prisoner, together with the two children. (There were three children in the house, one an infant; this one she carried herself.)

I then discovered that they had my remaining children in their possession, my sister-in-law Susanna, a Negro wench and her young child, a negro man of Edward Callahan's, and a negro boy of our own about eight years old. They (Indians) were fearful of going into the house to plunder, supposing that it had been a man that had shot at them and he was yet within. So our whole clothing and household furniture were consumed in the flames, which I was then pleased to see, rather than it should be of use to the savages.

We were all hurried a short distance, where the Indians were busy dividing and putting in packs for each to carry his part of the booty taken. I observed them careless about the children, and most of the Indians being some distance off in front, I called with a low voice to my eldest daughter (Susanna), gave her my youngest child (Henrietta), and told them to run toward neighbor John Russell's. They with reluctance left me, sometimes halting, sometimes looking back. I beckoned them to go on, although I inwardly felt pangs not to be expressed on account of our doleful separation. The two Indians in the rear either did not notice this scene, or they were willing the children might run back. That evening the Indians crossed Clinch Mountain and went as far as Copper Creek, distance about 8 miles.

April 7. Set out early in the morning, crossed Clinch River at McClain's fishdam (just below the present town of Dungannon) about 12 o'clock, then steered northwardly towards the head of Stony Creek. Then the Indians camped carelessly - had no back spy nor kept sentries out. This day's journey was about twenty miles. April 8. Continued in camp until the sun was more than an hour high; then set out and slowly traveled five or six miles and camped near the foot of Powell Mountain. This day Benge, the Indian chief, became more pleasant and spoke freely to the prisoners. He told them that he was about to carry them to the Cherokee and Shawnee towns; that in his route in the wilderness was his brother with two other Indians hunting, so that he might have provisions when he returned; that at his camp were several white prisoners taken from Kentucky, with horses and saddles to carry them to the towns. He made inquiry of several persons on Holston, particularly Old General Shelby, and said he would pay him a visit during the ensuing summer and take away all his Negroes. He frequently inquired who had Negroes and threatened he would have them all off North Holston. He said all the Chickamooga towns were for war and would soon be very troublesome for the white folks.

This day, April 8, Benge sent two of the Indians ahead to hunt.

April 9. After traveling about five miles, which was over Powell's Mountain and near the foot of Stone Mountain, a party of 13 men, under command of Lieutenant Vincent Hobbs, of the militia of Lee County, met the enemy in front, attacked and killed Benge the first fire. I was at that time some distance off in the rear. The Indian who was my guard at first halted on hearing the firing. He then ordered me to run which I performed slowly. He then attempted to strike me in the head with the tomahawk, which I defended as well as I could with my arm. By this time two of our people came in view, which encouraged me to struggle all I could. The Indian at this instant pushed me backward, and I fell over a log, at the same time aiming a violent blow at my head, which in part spent its force on me and laid me out for dead. The first thing I afterward remembered, was my good friends around me giving me all the assistance in their power for my relief. They told me I was senseless for about an hour.
Certified this 15th day of April, 1794. A. Campbell (4)

Eventually Peter and Henry Livingston saw smoke boiling above the low rolling hills between their barn and their home; they ran homeward but when they arrived, the houses were nearly burned down. Lying on the ground were the bodies of Sarah Livingston and one Negro child, each having been tomahawked. The Livingston men knew there were about three trails the Indians could take across Clinch Mountain, or they could go by way of Moccasin Gap and there take the Wilderness Road. Trail signs showed they had likely gone toward Hamilton Gap in Clinch Mountain. The little settlement did not have enough men to pursue and hope to get in sight of the party. But they could hurry to other settlements and get enough help to overpower the Indians if they cut them off somewhere to the north.

So, one man, John Henderson, was sent on horseback to alert the settlers in Powell Valley, about seventy miles to the northwest on the Wilderness Road. The two Livingston men, Peter and Henry, set off in the direction of Castle's Wood to the northeast. It was their plan to get help at this settlement and to block all trails in the Cumberland Mountains. The Livingston men, knowing that the Indians had taken white women, and Negroes whom they could sell, would not likely kill any of them on the march. Believing this, the men decided to risk going long distances for help rather than to try to pursue directly. If just a few men should have overtaken the savages, the women would have been killed, they knew.

Now let's examine the records and try to straighten out a few points of contention existing even today in the area where Chief Benge was killed. To begin with, several years ago a marker was put up just south of Norton, VA, saying that a little way above it, at the base of High Kob, the highest peak of Powell Mountain, Benge was slain by Vincent Hobbs of the Lee Co. Militia. The little stream which flows out of the mountain at this point bears the name Benge's Branch.

The facts do not bear out the correctness of this marker. We can see by Mrs. Livingston's account of the 9th day's traveling that, after camping the night before at the base of Powell Mountain, they went about five miles, which was over Powell Mountain and to the foot of Stone Mountain, where Hobbs and his men met them. Stone Mountain has its beginning west of Norton and continues until it is broken by the well-known Big Stone Gap, situated just north of the town of Big Stone Gap. The mountain here has been worn into a great, ragged, stone gap by the northern tributary of Powell River. Now it was at this great Stone Gap that Chief Benge was mostly likely slain by Hobbs. Charles B. Cole in his account of Mrs. Scott's capture by Chief Benge in Lee County in 1785, said, "Benge was killed nine years later (after the Scott captivity) as he was making his way to Big Stone Gap with the Livingston captives." (5)

Summers, quoting a manuscript letter of Benjamin Sharp, further states, "Vincent Hobbs was a lieutenant in the militia of Lee Co., VA, and, at the time in question, he was attending court of that county which was in session. Upon the arrival of the express with the news of the Indian invasion, the court immediately adjourned and a party was organized upon the spot, under command of Hobbs, to waylay a gap in the Cumberlands called Stone Gap, through which the Indians were supposed to pass." "In this party, besides Vincent Hobbs, were: John Van Bever, Job Hobbs, Stephen Jones, James Huff, James Van Bever, Peter Van Bever, Abraham Hobbs, Adam Ely, Samuel Livingston, George Yokum and _____ Dotson." (6) Although Elizabeth Livingston in her account said there were thirteen men in Hobbs party, only twelve are named by Sharp. One of these had a blank instead of the first name. This was probably Capt. William Dorton, a scout for Andrew Lewis, who was in the party.

Under date of April 19, 1795 Andrew Lewis wrote the governor of Virginia as follows: "The inhabitants in pursuit of the Indians retook the prisoners and killed two of them. The rest ran off. Capt. William Dorton, one of my scouts, who was with the party, endeavoring to head them off, fell in with them that ran off, being three in number, two of which he killed on the ground; the other ran off mortally wounded. Only one escaped without a wound. (7) "Prior to this battle, Lieutenant Hobbs on reaching Stone Gap, discovered that Indians had just passed through before him; he therefore pursued with eagerness and soon discovered two Indians kindling a fire; these they instantly dispatched, and finding some plunder with them, which they knew must have been taken from the Livingston house, they at once came to the conclusion that these two had been sent forward to hunt for provisions and that the others were yet behind with the prisoners." (8)

Now since Stone Gap was closer to Lee County than any other Indian trail crossing the Cumberlands, and since Benge had come this way with Mrs. Scott in 1785, it is hardly likely that Hobbs would have gone beyond this pass up the North Fork of Powell to the present town of Norton. Furthermore, Peter and Henry Livingston, together with another posse, had come around through Russell County to examine other trails. Summers states that Benge was most likely slain at the present town of Dorchester, about three miles northwest of Norton. (9) However, Dorchester is about as far from Stone Mountain as Norton is.

Further on this point, Andrew Lewis, military officer in command of the southwestern Virginia militia, wrote to the governor of Virginia as follows: "By their (Benge and party) passing through the Stone Gap in Powell's Mountain suspect they were southern Indians. (10) It seems that Andrew Lewis knew that there was a stone Gap, but he was not acquainted well enough with the geography of the southwestern mountains of Virginia to know that Powell Mountain has no Stone Gap but that Stone Mountain, the next range north of Powell, does have one. As to the trail Benge took after his camping at the foot of Powell Mountain (southern side) April 7, he must have gone down Hunter's Valley, alongside the southern foot of Powell Mountain until striking Cove Creek, thence up it to its headwaters, through Maple Gap, down Cracker's Neck to the present town of Big Stone Gap, and thence to the entrance of Stone Gap in Stone Mountain.

Now let's view the site as described by the last surviving member of the Hobbs' party, Dr. James Huff of Kentucky, in an interview 1846 for the Jacksonian, a newspaper published in Abingdon and filed in the Draper Papers." (11) "Some time in the month of April 1794, just before daylight a man by the name of John Henderson rode up to Yokum Station in Powell Valley and informed the station that Indians had taken the wives of Peter and Henry Livingston.... "....the writer has seen this spot where Benge was killed; it is one of those deep, dark mountain passes where the ridge on each side seems to reach the clouds, an the center of the deep, gloomy valley below is covered with large masses of unshaken rocks, with a wild furious stream, tumbling and rolling in the midst. "These backwoodsmen sat but a short while in their hiding places until two of them highest up the precipice, V. Hobbs and J. Van Bever saw an Indian and the wife of Peter Livingston coming." (12)

' However, it was not Peter's wife but Henry's. Now there is no such rugged terrain as described here just south of Norton: no great boulders, no great gorge; no cliffs, merely a small bump of stone which is claimed to be Hobbs' hiding place; no stream which could be called a furious one, just a small branch which today is called Benge's Branch. Now it must be recognized that there were no white settlers in Norton until about 1890, nearly a hundred years after Benge's demise; consequently, traditional stories, and the failure to study facts as recorded in reports of responsible persons of the time, have led to errors in designating the scene of Benge's death. Hobbs and Van Bever reached Elizabeth soon after she was struck with the tomahawk, an hour later she regained consciousness. Shortly thereafter her husband, Peter, together with Henry, arrived on the scene, happy that their wives had been rescued. Susanna, Henry's wife (his second wife) had been in the group immediately led by Benge.

As soon as Elizabeth was recovered sufficiently to travel, she and her kinsmen started back home. Settlers on the frontier rejoiced when they heard that the renegade, half-breed Chief Benge was dead. Arthur Campbell, in a letter to the governor of Virginia dated April 29, 1794, said, "I send the scalp of Captain (Why he used the term captain, it is not known) Bench, that noted murderer, as requested by Lieutenant Hobbs, to your excellency...as a proof that he is no more, and of the activity and good conduct of Lieutenant Hobbs, in killing him and relieving the prisoners. Could it be spared from our treasury, I would beg leave to hint that a present of a neat rifle to Mr. Hobbs would be accepted as a reward for his services, and the executive may rest assured that it would serve as a stimulus for future exertions against the enemy." (13) In accordance with the recommendations of Colonel Campbell, the General Assembly of Virginia voted Mr. Hobbs a "beautiful silver-mounted rifle." Although there was gladness at the Livington home on the Holston over the return of the captives and the killing of the notorious Chief Benge, it wasn't long until the event brought a threat of war from the Cherokees and the frontier was again thrown into panic.

Of the pending trouble Arthur Campbell wrote the governor, April 2, 1794, "Although this success (the killing of Benge) lessens the apprehensions of the inhabitants, yet from the declared intention of the Chickamooga party of the Cherokees to go to war, and their actually having lately 200 warriors out in small parties, the western settlements of this county and the adjoining settlements in Lee County talk of moving off it there is not some protection by the government afforded them." (14) The Virginia government seemed in no hurry to send military help to the settlers of Washington and Lee Counties and consequently the state of fear of revenge attacks grew more tense. In regard to the situation Arthur Campbell tried again. On July 9th, the same year, he wrote as follows: "By intelligence from Knoxville, the uncle of Capt. Bench is out with thirty warriors to take revenge in Virginia. The necessity of having some men on duty near Moccison Gap, the former place of his haunts, and now we suppose of his avengers, seems urgent. Were Captain Lewis' company so arranged as to cover that settlement, and he be active in ranging the woods, it might in a degree appease the fears of the inhabitants. That part of Lee County which turned out so cleverly under Lieutenant Hobbs in pursuit of Bench, is altogether exposed; that is, they have no part of the guard on duty nearer than forty miles. My own conjecture is that, Hobbs and his friends may be the sufferers. All late accounts say that the whole of the lower Cherokees are for war." (15) The revenge threat, however, failed to mature and, to the joy of the settlers, Benge's was the last invasion by a marauding Indian band on this, Virginia's last frontier.

FOOTNOTES: (1) Will book 1, page 73 Abingdon Court Records; (2) Summers, L. P., ANNALS OF SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA; (3) Cole, Charles B.; LIFE OF WILBURN WATERS; (4) Calendar Virginia State Papers, Vol. 7, pp. 111-112; (5) Summers, L. P. ANNALS OF SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA; (6) Draper, L. C., 12CC60; (7) Virginia State Papers; (8) Summers, L. P., History of Southwest Virginia, pp 441-442 further quoting Sharp's MS; (9) Ibid p. 441 (10) Virginia State Papers, Vol. 7, p. 115; (11) Draper 12CC60; (12) Ibid; (13) Virginia State Papers, Vol. 7, p. 118; (14) Ibid, Vol. 1 pp 117-188; (15) Ibid, pp 210.

Administrators BENGE DNA PROJECT
donchesnut@hotmail.com , Group Administrator
Surnames
Bange, Belinger, Bellenger, Bellinger, Bench, Benge, Bengen, Benger, Benges, Bengesson, Bengey, Bengier, Bengs, Bengsch, Beninger, Benjey, Beringer, Binch, Bing, Binge, Byng, Bynge This project will test whether people with the following surnames are related, and, if so, how distantly related they are. The surnames to be tested are: Benge, Bange, Binge, Bench, Bynge, Benjey, Bengey, Bing, Bunch and others.
Scientific evidence proves Trader John Benge Thomas Benge and King David Benge have the same raicial haplogroup and share the same DYS, Therefore they are one family not a different family. But DNA cannot prove in the past 2 or 3 men were brothers It only Proves they are the same family. But mutation rules usualy mean one mutation indiactes a distance of 7 to 17 generations, but in this case they all match so distance was not that far.


Full text of "Maryland historical magazine" F&I WAR

Capt John White muster roll to John Bench ditto.

MD Provincial Court Land Records, 1749
On the 2.d Day of May 1756 M.r John Binge Jun.r made oath on
the Holy Evangelis of Almighty God that he saw M.r John Stewart sign
and seal this Power of Attorney for himself and M.r Andrew Armour


Thomas Benge [x mark ] Castleton Harper Albemarle 1748. NOTE IN THE TIMELINE John Benge was Maryland The elder Thomas Benge was in Albemarle Va

Notes for JOHN BOWLES, SR, CHIEF:
Starr, A33, pg 472: John Bowles was the son of a Scotch trader and a full blood Cherokee woman. His father was killed and robbed by two North Carolinans while on his way home from Charlestown with goods for his establishment. This murder was in 1768 when the son was only twelve years of age, but within the next two years the fair complexioned, auburn haired boy had killed both his father's slayers.
NOTE the mix up or mistake by earkier writers is the names are simular john bowles father was scotland whereas nuguents quality immigrants has no listing for the name john benge as coming from scotland

Republic of Texas Treaty
with the Texas Cherokee Nation

at St. Felipe, and dated 13th November AD 1835.

Article, Tenth,

The Parties to this Treaty agree agree that so soon as Jack Steele, and Samuel Benge, shall abandon their improvements, without the limits of the before recited tract of country, and remove within the same, that they shall be valued and paid for by the Government of Texas, the said Jack Steele and Samuel Benge having untill the month of November next succeeding from the date of this treaty,

Eighteen hundred and thirty six, and the first Year of the Provisional Government of Texas.--.-

Samuel Benge (mark)
John Bowl (mark)

John Bowles was the son of a Scotch trader and a full blood Cherokee woman

Note since Samuel Benge and John Bowls wives are not mentioned either one or the other may have had wife each ones sister. Causing the mix up between the 2 simular names John bowls father Trader from Scotland., and the name John Benge.


Virginia Legislative Papers - from the originals in the Virginia State Archives.
"Dissenters Petition"* - Albemarle, Amherst and Buckingham, November 9 1776.
To the honorable Delegates and Senators, representatives of several counties and corporations of the Commonwealth of Virginia, assembled at the city of Williamsburg.
The Memorial and Petition of the Dissenters from the Church of England and others in the counties of Albemarle, Amherst and Buckingham, humbly sheweth:
[Page 256] That your Memorialists have never been on an equal footing with the other good people of this colony in respect of religious privileges, having been obliged by law, to contribute to the support of the established church, while at the same time, they were moved from a principle of conscience to support that church of which they called themselves members; yet, in as much as this was the form of government established, either when they came into the colony, or being natives, when they became dissenters from the Church of England for the sake of good order

Benage Gentry
., Thos Benge
John Wingfield
, Henry Harper
Cotton Benge
John Martin,
Alex Gordon
Benjamin Lacy
Chas. Lewis, Jun'r
Thomas Smith
Jesse Melton
John Melton

Virginia Land Grants, Albemarle County:
157.
1766 - William Melton, 600 acres from John Smith, Jr. Book 4 Page
Page 433*
1768- William Melton, 100 acres from Samuel Binge. Book 4 Page 518.


Note by the timeline the elder Thomas Benge and Samuel Benge appear to be brothers with Cotton apprearing to be at least 1son of Samuel Benge.

NOTE THE OLD 1st Samuel Benge removed to Whitley Ky as old man. The archives of Surry Va note after 1790 census The name Samuel Benge

Samuel Benge—Relieved of paying taxes in Whitley Co., KY, due to infirmity
1818-20.
17 1 Woo*ley Samuel pg0110a.txt
12 9 Worley Wiley pg0110a.txt
10 Benge Anne pg0110a.txt
Madison Ky
Benge, Joel Barnett, Jenny 40 Sep 01 1809
Benge, Polly Worly, Samuel 178 Jun 23 1827


1800 Surry co., N C census
Samuel Benge 2 M < 10
1 M 26-44
2 F < 10
1 F 26-44
1820 Surry co. census
Samuel Benge 2 M 16-26
1 M > 45
2 F < 10
2 F 10-16
2 F 16-26
1 F > 45
1830 Surry co., census
Samuel Banze 1 M 50-60
2 F < 5
1 F 10-15
1 F 15-20
3 F 20-30
1 F 30-40
1 F 50-60
James Bange 1 M < 5
1 M 5-10
1 M 30-40
2 F < 5
1 F 5-10
1 F 20-30
William Bange 1 M < 5
1 M 20-30
1 F < 5
1 F 20-30
1840 Surry co., census
Samuel Bange 1 M < 5
1 M 5-10
1 M 60-70
1 F 5-10
2 F 10-15
1 F 20-30
2 F 30-40
1 F 50-70
William Benge 1 M < 5
1 M 10-15
1 M 30-40
2 F 5-10
2 F 15-20
1 F 30-40

Surry co. marriages
Micajah Benge to Polly Crickmore 9 April 1823
Thomas Benge to Nancy Bawl; Bond date 19 January 1826; Bondsman, Thomas Carter
Mary Benge to William Sparks; Bond date 5 September 1844; Bondsman, George Sparks
Patsy Benge to William Cook; Bond date 29 November 1833; Bondsman, Lewis Mock
1850 Surry co., North Division census
Katy Benge 52 b. North Carolina
South Division census
Richard Burrage age 60 b. North Carolina
Elizabeth 57 "
Lydia 29 "
Joseph 23 "
Edmond 21 "
Bethilda Bange 9 "
Mary Bange 21 "
Martha [unreadable] 4/12 "
Nancy Bange 35 b. North Carolina
Lydia 27 "
Nathan 7 "
Phebe A 7 "
William Sparks 58 b. North Carolina
Mary 37 "
James 21 "
Uriah Bange 10 "
Elisha Benge 21 b. North Carolina
Nancy 24 "
Marthan 4 "
Sally 4/12 "
George Combs 65 "
Andrew J Combs 20 "
Patsy Benge 39 "
Sally 37 "
James or Junis C 16 "
Peggy 8 "
Rebecca 20 "
Jincy 16 "
Per above marriages
1850 Fox twp., Davis co., Iowa census
Micjah Bange age 50 b. North Carolina
Elizabeth 37 Kty
Samuel 23 Kty
Joshua 14 Kty
Sarah 13 Kty
Margaret 12 Kty
Martin 10 Kty
Milla A 6 Iowa
James M 5 Iowa
Francis M 2 Iowa
Josiah Shuck 45 Kty
Mary L 9 Iowa
Sarah 8 Iowa
Susannah 6 Iowa
William 2 Iowa

1850 Chester twp., Wabash co., Indiana census
Thomas Benge 59 North Carolina
male 18 "
female 24 "
Nancy 45 Virginia
Nathan 13 Indiana
Julia 10 Indiana
Thomas 8 Indiana
John 6 Indiana
Any

Note James is DNA match to Thomas Benge Trader John Benge and King David Benge

I1 14 23 14 10 14-15 11 16 11 12 1128 TRADER John Benge



I1 14 23 14 10 14-15 11 16 11 12 11 28 King David Benge, b. 1762


1820 Surry co. census
Samuel Benge 2 M 16-26
1 M > 45
2 F < 10
2 F 10-16
2 F 16-26
1 F > 45
1830 Surry co., census
Samuel Banze 1 M 50-60
2 F < 5
1 F 10-15
1 F 15-20
3 F 20-30
1 F 30-40
1 F 50-60
James Bange 1 M < 5
1 M 5-10


I1 14 23 14 10 14-15 11 16 11 12 11 28 James Benge


14 23 14 10 14-15 11 16 11 12 11 28 2ND Thomas benge born 1734.

They all match but DNA Can not determine if 2 or 3 persons were brothers but can detrmine that the males match are from the same family.

In this case without muatations about 7 generations from now without any mutations,

Full text of "Maryland historical magazine" F&I WAR

Capt John White muster roll to John Bench ditto.

NOTE Between here late 1750s to her below 1762 john bange appears being sued by David Lewis. With Thomas Benge it does not mean they were brothers but they solid Relatives.

Jul 1762 David Lewis of St. Anns Parish, Albemarle Co., appointed
Alexander Baine of Henrico Co., his attorney to recover from
several persons the sums of money or tobacco listed by their names
which are now due and owed to him/ Dated 23 Jul 1762.
David Lewis Junr. seal

William T. Lewis do
John Fielder do
Thos. Benge do John Bauge Bange do



William T Lewis was also an opportunist- he tried to illegally acquire William Ridge's estate and the underage children fought back. Most of the depositions that William T. Lewis, Jr. recorded used the same language- many read verbatim or had similar sentence structure and organization. And many of the deponents were members of his family. Did he ask his family to lie? Most of the deponents did not know first hand about the issues he used to discredit the plaintiff's witnesses- the murders, thievery, or bastardy- but the wording was typically "I was told that...." or "I understood that

William T Lewis did a good job documenting the whereabouts of Captain John Fielder, Junior and wife Nancy Ridge Fielder in Georgia.- William Terrell Lewis filed notices with the court and with the plaintiffs on his travels to obtain depositions (or was this just a delaying tactic?). He also mentioned John's brother, James Fielder, and Micajah Benge, their half-brother:


NOTE James Fielder, and Micajah Benge, their half-brother:

Captain John Fielder, Jr., was a central player in the law suit, unfortunately his depositions, or those of his brother, James Fielder or his wife, Nancy Fielder, have not survived, if they indeed were ever taken. John was accused of helping Winneford Ridge, wife of William Ridge, deceased in 1780, and William T. Lewis to illegally dispose of property to defy the Confiscation Act, whereby the General Assembly authorized the seizure of all property of known Tories. The properties in question were William Ridge's slaves- namely Nan and Sal, who John Fielder, Godfrey Ridge, his brother-in-law, and Winny Ridge sold to William T. Lewis, and also slaves Cate and her son Jim, who ended up in William T. Lewis' possession, through a more convoluted route through the Thomas Ayers family. In addition, some of William Ridge's slaves were taken directly by Captain John Fielder without any payment to the estate.

Book 2 page 328.
April Term Wilkes County, North Carolina 1811.

Will of Thomas Benge, deceased.
In the name of God, Amen. I, Thomas Benge of the County and State aforesaid &&being of sound mind and perfect memory blessed be to God do this Twenty First &day of January in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Eleven &(1811)
I give to my sons Micajah Benge, David Benge

unto my son James Benge: I also &leave to my wife, Susannah Benge the household

to my Grandson Micajah M. Benge, son of William &Benge &and said William Benge or Micajah M. Benge receiving one said Negro &Jack must pay Richard Benge in two years after my wife’s death on hundred &dollars to be paid fifty dollars in each year.

I shall also attend at the house of James Fielder in Green County in the State of Georgia on the 29th-30th-&31st days of August next say 1804 in order to take the depositions of said James Fielder, Captn. John Fielder, Nansey Fielder, Micajah Benge Esqr and others...I am, Wm T. Lewis March 1804"

"I shall also attend at the house of Micajah L. Benge in Jackson County in the State of Georgia on the 6th day of February next say 1806 in order to take the deposition of said Micajah L. Benge, John Fielder, James Fielder, Nansey Fielder and purhaps others, but should I not be able to Take there depositions on the 6th day of February 1806, I shall attend on the 7th & 8th days of said month for that purpose at said Benges, which testamony when taken as afoursaid and then shall be read as evidence in the suite now defending in the Court of Equity held for the District of Salibsury... I am yours, Wm T. Lewis Served 22nd day of October 1805"


NOTE Micajah Benge was a son of Thomas Benge but William Terell Lewis said Micajah Benge was half brother of James Fielder.

I give to my Daughters, Elizabeth Sparks, Anne Samuel, Sally Gray, and Susannah &Martin five shillings each.
after my &wife Susannah’s death to be sold and the money arising there from on twelve &months credit to be equally divided between my two daughters, Nancy Bryan and
&Mary Ray note the 1st set of girls recieved 5 shillings each wheres mary benge married to zacharia ray was to inherit any credit after his died. shortly put she cut out

"I shall also attend at the house of James Fielder in Green County in the State of Georgia on the 29th-30th-&31st days of August next say 1804 in order to take the depositions of said James Fielder, Captn. John Fielder, Nansey Fielder, Micajah Benge Esqr and others...I am, Wm T. Lewis March 1804"

Note William Terrell Jewis said James Fielder, and Micajah Benge, their half-brother:

THEN we go back to albemarle 1762. this may then indicate that john benge married a sister of john fielder not elizabeth lewis the sister of william t lewis sometimes cousins raised together called eachother my brother.

Jul 1762 David Lewis of St. Anns Parish, Albemarle Co., appointed
Alexander Baine of Henrico Co., his attorney to recover from
several persons the sums of money or tobacco listed by their names
which are now due and owed to him/ Dated 23 Jul 1762.
David Lewis Junr. seal

William T. Lewis do
John Fielder do
Thos. Benge do John Bauge Bange do

Obediah Martin Benge entered the service as a private under Captain James Sheppard in 1780. He was 16or 17 years of age. He was forced into service by , John Fielder, as a substitute for James Green. FIELDER received a horse, bridle and saddle for the veteran's service. His company marched to King's Mountain. On the march, they met other companies and Obediah was allowed to transfer to another company as he had a brother in that company. He was wounded in the battle of King's Mountain ( his brother was killed ). Obediah was commissioned Captain.
Obediah M. Benge , entered service from Surry county , North Carolina.
Didn't apply for pension until the Cherokee Nation of Indians was sent West. He resided among them by permission " of the head man of the Nation". Veterans was not advised of being able to secure pension, His application was rejected.
Obediah lived in Surry county, North Carolina 14 to 15 years after the war, then moved to Davidson county, Tennessee for eight years. Then moved to Franklin county, Tennessee until 1814, then moved to Walker county , Georgia where he was in the limits of the Cherokee Nation. While living with the Cherokee he taught them some of the arts of husbandry. He then moved to Dekalb county , Alabama when the people of Georgia drove the Cherokee out.

Obediah was commissioned Captain.
Obediah M. Benge , entered service from Surry county ,

Surry County, North Carolina
1790 Tax List



Part of this list appears to be missing.

Captain Benge's District

Benge, Obadiah 125 1 1
Fielder, John 500 1 1
Lewis, T. William 1811 1 20 1 40/-
Ray, Zachariah 325 1
Martin, Obadiah - 1 1 1 30/- - -
Martin, Salathiel 870 1 1 -


"Genealogy of the Lewis Family in America" by William Terrell Lewis, published in 1893.THE GENEALOGY OF THE LEWIS FAMILY IN AMERICA, by William Terrell
Lewis, The Courier Journal Press, Louisville, KY, 1893

Susannah, daughter of Wm. T. Lewis, Sr., and his wife,
Sallie Martin, was born in Hanover county, Va., in 1742. She
moved, with her father, to North Carolina and settled in Wilkes
county, where she died at the foot of Brushy Mountain at a very
advanced age. She married in Albemarle county, Va., about 1760, Mr. Thomas
Benge, Sr., who emigrated with her to Wilkes county,



Elizabeth, bom 1740; married John Fielder. papers Elizabeth Lewis, bom 1740 ; married John Fielder; had
three children, and died in Williamson county, Tenn.
Jack Fielder, married a Miss McCutcheon
Nimrod Fielder, married Elizabeth Riggs
Miriam Fielder, married Thos. Bibb, NOTE. JOHN BENGE is never mentioned..

Mary Benge married Zach Ray. Removed to Kentucky


David, son of Thos. Benge, was a soldier of the Revolu-
tionary war, and was killed by the Tories in North Carolina. He
left a widow and, perhaps, children.

Obadiah Martin Benge--Revolutionary War Pension Application--R743

DECLARATION

In order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed 7th June 1832.

State of Alabama
DeKalb County S. S. On this 22nd day of February 1843. Personally
appeared before me, Judge Polydore Naylor, judge of the county court for said
county of DeKalb and the state of Alabama at his residence in the said
county, Obediah M. Benge, who from age and infirmity is unable to appear in
open court, aged seventy nine years, who being first duly sworn according to
law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the
benefit of the act of Congress, passed June 7, 1832.

That he entered the service of the United States as a private soldier under
the following named officers, and served as herein stated, "He first belonged
to the company of Captain James Sheppard which he joined in the month of May
1780 for the term of nine months. When he entered the service he was between
sixteen and seventeen years old and was forced into the same by his
step-father John Fielder, as a substitute for one James Green, his said
Step-father received from said James Green a horse, bridle and saddle for the
same. He resided when called into the service in the Surry County in the
State of North Carolina. He remained under the said Capt. Sheppard as a
mounted man, scouting and ranging through the said County of Surry and the
adjoining country for the purpose of counteracting the operations of the
Tories untill the fall of the same year, when he with his company was marched
for King’s Mountain in the state of South Carolina and on the way in Burk
County in the State of North Carolina, they were joined by other troops for
the same point. On meeting said troops in Burke County, he was there by
consent of the Captains transfered to the company of Capt. McDowel or Capt.
White. The one being a Lieutenant and the other Captain, but he is not now
able to say which was Captain and which was Lieutenant. This transfer was
made on account of this declarant, having a older brother in the company to
which he was transfered. Here his Colonel was Benjamin Cleveland. We were
then marched to Kings Mountain, which this declarent thinks is in South
Carolina, and on their approach to Kings Mountain they were joined by other
troops under Col. Shelby and Col. Campbell and in October or November, he
under Col. Cleveland went into the battle of Kings Mountain. He was in the
front rank. Marched up a hollow towards the enemy and the battle began. And
when this declarent had his tun to his face on the 3rd or 4th fire, he
received a wound in his right arm which entered his body on the inside and
near the body. The ball ranged back under his shoulder blade where it yet
remains, and from which he to a great extent had ever since been a cripple.
After the battle was over and on the following day, his said brother being
killed in the same, this declarent was taken to the house of a distant
relative about four miles distant from the battle ground where he remained
about three months. He never again joined the Army, his company being
disbanded or discharged. He never obtained a discharge. He never had any
documentary evidence of his service, and he knows of no one living by whom he
can prove the same, but he will state a fact which was done in his favor. It
is this, in 1791, as will be seen by the enclosed commission he was made a
Captain in his neighborhood and some 4 or 5 years afterwards, when he
resigned the same the court martial made an order and presented him with an
attested copy. The names of all the members of the court being signed to the
same, he, this declarant being then about to remove to Davidson County,
Tennessee, or as it was then called Cumberland, in which it was stated among
other things "That the declarent was a true Whig, a brave soldier and had
been wounded in the battle of Kings Mountain, and recommending him to all the
good people of Cumberland" as such which paper he has lost or mislaid, he has
not seen it for many years. He states as reasons why he never before applied
for a pension; that for the last twenty years and until the Cherokee Nation
of Indians was sent west, he resided among them by permission of the head men
of the nation and that he never until lately was properly advised of his
privileges or rights to obtain the same. He hereby relinquishes every claim
whatever to a pension or an Annuity, except the present, and declares that
his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.
O. M. Benge
Sworn to and subscribed
before me this 23rd day of
February A. D. 1843


Interrogatories:

1st Where and in what year were you born?
Answer. I was born in Albemarle County Virginia. Cannot say in what year, but
suppose it was in 1763.



forced into the same by his
step-father John Fielder, as a substitute for one James Green,

this declarant, having a older brother in the company to
which he was transfered.

his said brother being
killed in the same, this declarent was taken to the house of a distant
relative about four miles distant from the battle ground

as a substitute for one James Green
taken to the house of a distant
relative about four miles distant

The following is the first Census (1790) for York Co., SC.
alphabetized by last name NOTE YORK CO where the Battle of Kings Mountain took place. There no Benges Lewis or fielders Living here at this time but James Green and Micah Martin were

029 2 79 GREEN James 1 1 7 0 0
030 3 39 MARTIN Micah 1 4 3 0 0




Jul 1762 David Lewis of St. Anns Parish, Albemarle Co., appointed
Alexander Baine of Henrico Co., his attorney to recover from
several persons the sums of money or tobacco listed by their names
which are now due and owed to him/ Dated 23 Jul 1762.
David Lewis Junr. seal

William T. Lewis do
John Fielder do
Thos. Benge do John Bauge Bange do

Note William Terrell Jewis said James Fielder, and Micajah Benge, their half-brother:

having a older brother his said brother being
killed I was born in Albemarle County Virginia suppose it was in 1763

Elizabeth, bom 1740; married John Fielder. papers Elizabeth Lewis, bom 1740 .

the possible and logical conclusion goes back to the dates above the suit of David Lewis aginst William T Lewis John Fielder Thomas Benge John Bange Jul 1762 of St. Anns Parish, Albemarle Co. Elizabeth Lewis would of been a young teenage girl posssibly to young to have borned 2 sons. In a logical sense both Thomas Benge and his relative John Bange married sisters of John Fielder. The sister died from any amount of reasons according to the conditions of the time. Therefore Thomas Benge producing at least one son Micajah from a Fielder girl died, John Bange producing 2 sons from a Fielder girl a older brother of Obediah MBbenge unnamed and Obediah M Benge Therefore Thomas Benge would have married 3 times a part Indian girl 1st having daughter Mary then son King David. Then having a short marriage to a sister of John Fielder whom died then a 3rd marriage According to william t lewis She Susannah married in Albemarle county, Va., Mr. Thomas
Benge, Sr.,

in this case Trader John Benge being a widower with 2 baby sons, the Court or the the Church Wardens would have sent the boys to be raised by relatives highly likely Obediah M Benge was given to John Fielder and his wife Elizabeth Lewis. In this scenario would of left Trader John Benge a free man to go off south and become a Indian Trader and father Cheif benge and others,

Keep in mind William T Lewis knew and grew up and lived with all these people but he was rather old when he wrote his book the
Genealogy of the Lewis Family in America" by William Terrell Lewis, he may of had some of his dates off

1810 GARRARD KENTUCKT CENSUS.

FEMALES 10 16 26 45 up

229 24 Wray Zach. 4 2 1 . 1 3 2 1 1 1

Zacharia RAY signed on pg 313 and the on-line account only goes to 250.

RAY/MAUPIN Families, to be able to place a Zachariah RAY in Albemarle Co., VA "On The Ground" in the area where Samuel RAY m Jane/Jean/Jan MAUPIN lived and then write a "Preponderence of Evidence Letter" as in a Court of Law that:

"Zachariah RAY was indeed the son of Samuel RAY and Jane/Jean/Jan MAUPIN."

Here Is One Document For That Purpose:

ITEM: TEN THOUSAND NAME PETITION, pg 313

"Some individuals from Albemarle Co., VA":
Samuel RAY
Zacharis RAY"

For Zachariah RAY:

Ten Thousand Name Petition, pg 313
Samuel RAY b Louisa Co., VA {Son of Andrew}
......................d 9th October 1788 Albemarle Co., VA
......................m Jean/Jane MAUPIN Louisa Co., VA

Extracted from "Genealogy of the Lewis Family in America" by William Terre ll Lewis,

Sarah "Sally" Marti n A few years before she died she was unable to walk, but retained her mi nd and memory to the last. She had been unable to get out of her bed for m onths before she died; but the day before she died she got up and sat on h er bed and sang an Indian song in the Indian language and then sa ng it in English, and remarked that she had not sung that song in fifty ye ars before."

EVANS on Zacharia- Mary Benge


Zachariah�s trip to the Benge�s resulted in him getting to know Thomas� daughter Mary Benge. No record of their marriage apparently exists, but they must have been wed during 1781 or very early 1782 as their first born, Samuel, arrived 9 Oct 1782. Note: Samuel may have been named for Zachariah�s probable father or Samuel Benge
On 17 Dec 1804, Zachariah�s oldest child, Samuel, was married to Susan Teator

In Jan 1816, Zachariah served as one of three appraisers for the estate of Elijah Evans. One of the others was William McQueery. The executors were Pleasant Alverson and Paris Teator.
Frequent marriage between the Ray, Evans, Teator, Alligree, and McQueery families suggests that they were part of some kind of identifiable social or cultural group. Evidence suggest that they were all of mixed Native American, dark skinned European, and white European blood. Some of those, including some relatives of this group, were given the name of Melungeon During the 1820�s Zachariah�s sons Samuel and William moved out of the County. Also, his beloved wife, Mary Benge, passed away. She was buried in the Zachariah Ray Cemetery. No dates are visible on her tombstone. .


NOTE mary considered to be eldest of Thomas benge not accurate date birth except the 1810 Garrard Co census states she over 45 years old in 1810.


Extracted from "Genealogy of the Lewis Family in America" by William Terre ll Lewis,

David, son of Thos. Benge, was a soldier of the Revolu-
tionary war, and was killed by the Tories in North Carolina. He
left a widow and, perhaps, children.
.
NOTE the Will of Thomas Benge
I give to my sons David Benge
Book 2 page 328.
April Term Wilkes County, North Carolina 1811.


A family record left by one of King Davids daughters
Thomas Benge had 1st wife mother of Mary David and Nancy Susannah Lewis through two of their daughters, Sarah "Sally" and Susannah. the statements that their brother,"King David" Benge, was a quarter Cherokee through his grandmother,
It was not until King David benge was near death, in 1854, that he openly acknowledged his Cherokee ancestry.

THERE IS purportedly A PHOTO OF King David Benge (b. ca 1760 VA), ancestor of the Kentucky Benges. He died in 1854. Photography was very rare or non-existant in southeastern Kentucky then, so I wonder if this is another David Benge, perhaps Smiling Dave Benge, grandson of King David Benge
Below would be the photot of the correct David Benge A.K.A. Smiling Dave

BIOGRAPHY: DR. JOHN J. DICKEY DIARY, FLEMING CO., KY. RECORDED IN THE 1870 S
AND BEYOND. REPRINTED IN KENTUCKY EXPLORER, VOLUME 10, NO. 5, OCTOBER 1995 ,
PAGE 84:

BIOGRAPHY: David Benge, Wednesday, June 15, 1898: My grandfather, David Be nge
(called King David) came to KY and settled in Madison Co. While living the re
he used to drive stock to this section and herd them on the range. If he h ad
any brothers and sisters, I never heard of them. Thomas Benge, son of Davi d
and father of Jane Benge, killed _____ Porter, stood his trial, came cle ar and
then went first to Indiana and then to Iowa. It occurred near McWhorter. I t
was a corn shucking, the pile was divided and these men fell out, perha ps were
captains, and Benge struck Porter with a rake. He lived a week or ten days
and died. My grandfather was a soldier in two wars, Revoluntionary War and
War of 1812. My father was John Benge. He volunteered in the War of 1812.
My grandfather would not let him go but he went in his stead. His other so ns
were William, Joseph, and Lewis Franklin. His daughters were Nancy (Willia m
Cornett son of Roger), Sallie Ann (George Freeman), Adeline (Elisah Stiver s),
Zilpah (Robert Stivers), Lucinda (Benjamin Johnson), Mary (Elijah McGee).
John, my father, had 13 children, ten girls and three boys, all still livi ng
but one, eldest is 86. My brother's name was James, he lived here in Clay
County. He married Benge's second cousin. I am the next to the oldest. I
married Nancy Lynx, daughter of Fred Lynx. I had twelve children, all livi ng
but number two. My oldest sister, Sallie Ann, married John Johnson and liv es
near Bernstadt. Lucinda married Zeesa McWhorter, they had a large family.
Lydia Ann married James Hawes. They had a large family. Martha married Jam es
Bolling, lives on Goose Creek. Betsey married Henderson Howes, parents of
Mark and William Howes. They had a good family. Eliza married Adam Bowling ,
both are living and have eight or nine children. Bina married Gillum House ,
both are living. Jennie married William Bolling, both living on Little Goo se.
Nancy married Byrd, she died in childbirth. Evaline married William Martin ,
had a large family. I have lived where I now reside for 60 years. I used t o
make whiskey before the war. I think it was a bad business. I never drank
much whiskey, ruins a neighborhood.



(2) Eliza "Lizzie" or "Louisa" Benge
b: Abt 1842
m: James Lewis "Jim Crow" Benge, on 15 Jul 1858, in Clay Co, KY
son of John "Jackie &Delphia(Harrison-Hart) Benge

David&Lucretia(Perry)Benge
cobbsasser.com/BengeDavidLucretiaPerry.html LOOK HERE. The photo of Lizzie Benge. Shes not white has almost full Indian features.

PDF] Database of Cherokee BengesFile Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - Quick View
Lizzie Benge. 1849N cher Dawes card# 1389. 1880 CNW se85. Tommie Benge. 1868N cher Dawes card# 1394. 1880 CNW se86. David Benge. 1870N cher Dawes card# 1369 ...

His daughters were Nancy (Willia m
Cornett son of Roger),
THE CONETTS Benges inlaws applied later date
On 24 Sep 1908 in Goldthwaite, TX, She gave a deposition in EASTERN CHEROKEEmy father, SAMUEL CORNETT. My father died in 1870 in the CHEROKEE NATION. He was 68 years old at the time of his death (Showing the family Bible pages) SAMUEL CORNETT was born Dec. 27 1802, in Clay County, Ky. He lived in Ky. until some time after his marriage, and went to Mo. after the births of three or four of his children. I was born in Mo., but I was next to the youngest child. I have heard my mother say that my brother WM. CORNETT, born May 9, 1833, was also born in Mo. and JOHN CORNETT, born Nov 29, 1835

EVANS
Frequent marriage between the Ray, Evans, Teator, Alligree, and McQueery families suggests that they were part of some kind of identifiable social or cultural group. Evidence suggest that they were all of mixed Native American, dark skinned European, and white European blood. Some of those, including some relatives of this group, were given the name of Melungeon

some relatives of this group, were given the name of Melungeon THIS MAY be in referance to King David Benges inlaws the Bunch Bollings and Freemans.


Bunch Bollings VARIANTS core Melungeon Surnames.
Sally "Ann" Benge
Abt 1789 Wilkes Co, NC
d: Aft 1860
m: WILLIAM L. BUNCH, on 28 Jan 1812, in Clay Co, KY
son of James &Elizabeth Ann "Betsy" or "Annie"(Asher) Bunch
b: Abt 1787 NC
d: Bet 1851-1859 Walker Co, GA

Sarah Benge
b: Abt 1788 Madison Co, KY
m: GEORGE FREEMAN, on 18 Nov 1810, in Clay Co, KY

Algonquian East Family Tree DNA Project Look here,
www.familytreedna.com/public/algonquian_east/ - Cached
You +1'd this publicly. Undo
The Algonquian East Project is a Family Tree DNA project to identify direct maternal and direct paternal lineal descendants (blood relatives in the direct line of ...
Algonquian East is a DNA project for original, first, indigenous people who inhabited eastern north America prior to European colonization. These original people include, First Nations, Native American, Aboriginals, American Indians and Indians, U.S. and Canadian government recognized or not. The Algonquian East Project is a Family Tree DNA project to identify direct maternal and direct paternal lineal descendants (blood relatives in the direct line of descent), tribal community names, community locations, and current day surnames of Algonquian speaking communities previously located in Eastern North America along the Atlantic coast; also known as the Dawn-land, Eastern Seaboard, tidewater region, Martime Provinces, and Atlantic Canada. The Algonquian communities were located in the current day coastal areas of northeastern South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Main, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, Labrador, and the Gaspé or Gaspésie Peninsula. This project is administered by yDNA Q1a3a1 (Q-M3) haplogroup individuals (Native American) who are direct lineal descendants of Algonquian speaking tribes, nations, and tribal Elders throughout eastern north America.

24479 Freeman ISAAC FREEMAN, B.C.1787, NORTH CAROLINA Q1a3a1

109170 Freeman Freeman Q1a3a1 13 23 13 10 17-17 12 12 13 14 14 32 14 9-9 11 10 27 14 21 32 13-13-18-20 11 11 19-23 15 16 19 20 36-36 13 11 11 8 15-16 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21-24 20 11 12 12 15 8 12 25 21 13 12 11 13 11 11 12 12
201189 Freeman John Freeman 1774 - 1870, Yancey County NC Q1a3a1 13 23 13 10 17-17 12 12 13 14 14 32 14 9-9 11 10 27 14 21 32 13-18-19-20 11 11 19-23 15 16 18 20 36-36 12 11 11 8 15-16 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21-23 20 11 12 12 15 8 12 25 21 13 12 11 13 11 11 12 12
81415 Freeman John Freeman, b.1771, Bedford Co., VA Q1a3a1 13 23 13 10 17-17 12 12 13 14 14 32 14 9-9 11 10 27 14 21 32 13-18-20-20 11 11 19-23 15 16 19 20 36-36 12 11 11 8 15-16 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21-23 20 11 12 12 15 8 12 25 21 13 12 11 13 11 11 12 12
194216 Marsh Q1a3a1 13 23 13 11 17-17 12 12 13 14 14 32 14 9-9 11 10 27 14 21 32 13-13-18-20 11 11 19-23 15 16 19 20 36-36 12 11 11 8 15-16 8 11 10 8 12 10 12 21-23 20 11 12 12 15 8 12 24 21 13 12 11 13 11 11 12 12
177132 Marsh Elijah Freeman b c 1802-1875, NC,TN,Ala Q1a3a1 13 23 13 11 17-17 12 12 13 14 14 32 14 9-9 11 10 27 14 21




Note this family is strickly Native American Indian DNA

1810 Clay County Kentucky Census

John Maupin 0 1 1 0 1 - 1 1 1 0 1 - 0
Dabney Maupin 0 0 1 0 0 - 1 1 1 0 1 - 0
Isham Boling 1 0 0 1 0 - 1 0 1 0 0 - 0
David Benge 3 2 0 0 1 - 2 3 0 1 0 - 0
George Freeman 0 0 1 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 - 0
Joseph Boling 3 0 1 0 0 - 1 0 1 0 0 - 0
Ely Boling 1 0 1 0 0 - 2 0 1 0 0 - 0
William Boling 2 0 2 0 1 - 2 1 0 1 0 - 0
John Boling 2 0 1 0 0 - 3 1 0 1 0 - 0
James Boling 0 0 1 0 1 - 0 0 0 0 1 - 0
Christopher Boling 1 0 1 0 0 - 0 0 1 0 0 - 0
John Fields 3 1 0 1 0 - 2 0 1 0 0 - 0
Samuel Cornett 3 1 0 1 0 - 3 2 1 1 0 - 0
Will Cornett 3 2 1 0 1 - 3 1 2 0 1 - 0
Perry Maupin 0 0 1 0 0 - 0 0 1 0 0 - 0
Jesse Boling 2 2 0 0 1 - 2 1 0 0 1 - 0---------- NOTE Reverand minister of the Melungeons Stoney Creek Baptist Church
Justus Boling 1 0 1 0 0 - 0 0 1 0 0 - 0
Roger Cornett 3 1 0 1 0 - 1 0 0 1 0 - 0

1820 Clay County Census
William Benge 1 0 0 0 1 0 - 2 0 1 0 0 - 0 - 0
Nath Cornet 1 1 1 1 0 1 - 1 0 1 0 1 - 0 - 0
James Bowling 3 1 0 0 1 0 - 2 1 2 0 0 - 0 - 0
George Freeman 2 1 0 0 1 0 - 2 1 0 1 0 - 0 - 0
William Cornett 2 1 1 2 0 1 - 0 1 0 0 1 - 0 - 1m NOTE ONE INDIAN OR FPC
Samuel Cornet 3 2 0 1 0 1 - 2 2 3 0 1 - 0 -2m1f NOTE 3 INDIAN OR PFC
George Freeman 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 - 1m6f NOTE 7 INDIAN OR FPC
John Benge 1 0 0 2 0 0 - 2 0 1 0 0 - 0 - 0
Samuel Bunch 1 0 0 1 0 0 - 0 0 1 0 0 - 0 - 0
George Bunch 1 0 0 4 0 0 - 1 1 0 1 0 - 0 - 2f NOTE 2 INDIAN OR FPC
Roger Cornet 3 1 2 3 0 1 - 0 0 1 0 1 - 0 - 2f NOTE 2 INDIAN OR FPC
William Bowling 1 1 0 1 0 1 - 0 1 2 0 0 - 0 - 0
Jesse Bowling Sr. 0 2 0 0 0 1 - 0 1 0 0 1 - 0 - 0 Minutes of Stony Creek Church)
Justus Bowling 2 0 0 0 1 0 - 2 0 0 1 0 - 0 - 0
John Bowling 0 0 0 0 1 0 - 2 0 1 0 0 - 0 - 0
Elijah Bowling 0 0 0 1 0 0 - 1 0 1 0 0 - 0 - 0
Jesse Bowling Jr. 1 0 0 1 0 0 - 0 0 1 0 0 - 0 - 0
David Benge 0 0 1 1 0 1 - 1 1 2 0 1 - 0 - 0

EXCERPTS BY History of the Melungeons - Article by Jack H. Goins. Jack is a Melungeon project co-administrator, the coordinator for the Goins DNA Project
The 1830 Hawkins County census showed the number had grown to 331 Free Persons Of Color. In order to save space I will only use the last names of these FPC families. 3- Bowlin, families
By 1810 it was certain that a colony of dark-skinned people inhabited the ridge land and valleys near the Clinch River in what is today Hancock County, TN., but was part of Hawkins County until 1844. The 1810 Hawkins County Tax list for Puncheon Camp Valley
John Fieldsland records with the notation “mulatto, or free person of color.”

Attorney Lewis M. Jarvis born 1828
interview with the Sneedville, Tennessee Times in 1903;
The Melungeons were the friendly Indians who came with the whites around 1795, they came from the Cumberland and the New River stopping at various points west of Blue Ridge some stopped on Stony Creek, where Stony Creek empties into the Clinch River.” He names the following Paul Bunch chiefs, and the rest of them settled here in 1804 he also names these who were in the war of 1812-14,John Bolin and Mike Bolin who were quite full blooded and some others not remembered.” (Jarvis interview 1903 Sneedville Times.)


Stony Creek Church minutes,
1813. Some of the people who became know as Melungeons joined the Stony Creek Church at Fort Blackmore, Virginia beginning in 1801.
At this time Fort Blackmore and the Stony Creek area were in the lower district of Russell County, Virginia. The 1802 tax list enumerated them with number of tithes; Valentine Collins 1, Charles Gibson 1, David Gibson 1, James Gibson 2, James Gibson 0, Martin Gibson 1, Molly Gibson 2, Rubin Gibson 1, Samuel Gibson 1, Sharud Gibson 1, Thomas Gibson 1, William Gibson 1, Willis Gibson 1, Benjamin Bolen 1, William Bolin 1. (Virginia State Library and archives)Jarvis plainly states they were the Friendly Indian who helped build Fort Blackmore. The church clerk spelled it “Melungin.” A lady in the church accused another lady of housing the Melungeons, This accusation is factual evidence they were applying this word to a person, or persons and it suggest that person being housed may not have been living in the area.

What makes this name so unique is the first 3 times it can be found in writing it is spelled differently 1- Melungin 2- Malungeon 3- Melungeon.

Part of 1810 list, Grainger Co., TN:
William Bolen fpc's8

Sims grant opened to claims between 1830 and 1840: Records in Register's Office,
William Bowlin-500 acres-north side of Clinch River-p. 6
William Boling-50 acres on Blackwater Creek-p. 86

District No. 5: Beginning on Clinch river at Kyles ford thence along the road leading to Lee by John Wallen's to a small school house thence a due north course to
the Virginia line thence eastwardlywith said line to the Claiborne County line thence with said line to Clinch river at the mouth of Greasy rock thence up the river to the beginning. The Election to be held at the house of Jacob Delp
Isham; Boling,.
William; Boling, Rosick; Boling,
Rev. Hughes Bowling - Hector Creek, April 22, 1898

I was born in Leslie County, Key. then Clay, April 8, 1857.
I was born on Bull Creek.а My father was John Bolling.а My
mother was Susan Napier.а My paternal grandfather was
James Bowling.а His wife was Mahala Wilson.а My great
grandfather Bollling was named Eli.а He came from Licking
River, Tenn. to Clay County, Key. in 1807.а His sister Mary
called Mollie, came with him and became the wife of Rev. John
Gilbert.а His brothers Levi, John and James came with him also
a sister Nancy who married a Sizemore.а My great grandfather
settled on Bear Creek, Clay Co..а He paid for a tract of land on
that creek, containing 1500 acres by herding hgs one winter on
the mast.а Dan and Dave Bowling (sons of James Bowling) own and
residee on it.а They sold it in the boom for $7,000 but the parties
failed to pay for it.аа Rev. Jesse Bowling who settled on the North
Fork in Breathitt County was the unclue of Eli, John, James, Levi,
Mary and Nancy Bowling.а This is the way I've always heard it.а I
have heard my father say that he heard Rev. John Gilbert say that
he had the settling of Clay County.а He first thought that he would
settle the mouth of Hctor but he finally had to settle higher up
Red Bird.а Taylor Gilbert says that his grandfather Rev. John
Gilbert preached in "hard shell" doctrine but I have heard many
old people say that he did not, but preached a free salvation for
all.а Hector Creek was named by John Gilbert in honor of a
favorite bear dog by that namewhich was killed by a bear on it.
Old JohnHays who lived and died on Hector said that the Bowlings above
mentioned all came from Tennessee that is, that Jesse Bowling
ogNorth Fork came from the same place that the others did.а Hays
dided five year ago, at the age of 93.а He said there was a Levi
Bowling in that neighborhood, Uncle to Eli and perhaps brother of
Jesse above (mentioned).а I think od JohnGilbert came from the
same place.а Taylor Gilbert wrote them a few years ago to get the
ordination record of Jesse Bowlingand others who ordained John
Gilbert but failed to get them.а I have always learned that the Hard
Shells broke off from the Baptist Church in 1833.а They were
100,000 strong at firstand in 60 years that had fallen off to
40,000.а I learned it from Throckmorton and Potter debate held
in Indiana.а Silas Hensley, on this creek has a copy.а I joined the
church in 1884, am a preacher in the Missionary Baptist Church.
Justice Bolling

THE BLUEBOLLINGS AND THE MELANGO TRIBE
By Mark French Jr.
Of Clintwood, Virginia

Paper Originally Written, November 22, 1947.
.


Uncle Wash Osborne of Copper Ridge near Dungannon in Scott County gave me more information about the Melungeons than anyone else. Uncle Wash's full name is George Washington Osborne.

From what I gathered from Uncle Wash, the Melungeons started coming to Wise and Scott Counties about 1820. These people came in about equal numbers from Kentucky from Newmans' Ridge and lower end of Lee County. A few came from North Carolina.

The first Collins family, who came to Scott County from Newmans Ridge were white.

From Kentucky came the following families; Collins, Gibsons, and Sextons. From Newman's Ridge; Collins, Littons and Bollings. Very few people with these names came from Newman's Ridge.

From Blackwater, Tennessee came the Sweeneys, Adkins, Lucas, Bollings, Goins and Baldwins.

Also the Melungeons came to Scott County from Letcher County, Kentucky near Whitesburg at a place called Lick Rock. These people lived in large numbers. Uncle Poke Gibson came to Scott from Letcher about 1820. He claimed to be Portuguese Indian. A few Littons came from Newman's Ridge who are member of the Melango Tribe. There are two groups of Littons members of the Melango Tribe who live in Scott County and the Littons of Wise County who are not members. The Littons of Wise are no relation to the Littons of Scott.

The Bollings, who are numerous in Scott and Wise Counties, came from Newman's Ridge. The have all the features of the Indian race.

Old Jack Bolling, the originator of this family, is believed to have come from a low life grade of Indian. He married a melungeon by the name of Collins or Sexton but this is the first and last crossbreed in the family. His people were strong and spoke half-broken English. He was pure bred Melango and had no other blood in him. In this case word Melango pertains to Indian blood only.


BY Smiling David Benge

My grandfather, David Be nge
(called King David) came to KY My father was John Benge. He volunteered in the War of 1812.
My grandfather would not let him go but he went in his stead.His daughters were Nancy (Willia m
Cornett son of Roger), Sallie Ann (George Freeman), Martha married Jam es
Bolling, lives on Goose Creek.Eliza married Adam Bowling ,
both are living and have eight or nine children.Jennie married William Bolling, both living on Little Goo se.


LOOK HERE THIS WEBSITE. a photo of Lizzie Benge and the Bolling Benge family, They all have black hair brown skin and high Indian features.

Laurel County KyGenWeb David Matthew Watkins photographIf you have any old photographs of Laurel County ancestors you would like to ... Green High School Class 1952-1953 new | Terrell's Creek School Class 1917-1918 ... BENGE, | Henry and Thenie Benge

Bunch Bollings VARIANTS core Melungeon Surnames.

Sally "Ann" Benge
Abt 1789 Wilkes Co, NC
d: Aft 1860
m: WILLIAM L. BUNCH, on 28 Jan 1812, in Clay Co, KY
son of James &Elizabeth Ann "Betsy" or "Annie"(Asher) Bunch
b: Abt 1787 NC
d: Bet 1851-1859 Walker Co, GA
James Bunch was the father of William Bunch, Capt Jarvis related that some of the Bunchs were friendly indians some called Melungins who helped build Fort Blackmore
Bowman and Johnson Killed, James Bunch Wounde d in Powell's Valley By
Emory L. Hamilton
-------------------------------- ---------------------------------
--------------- From the unpublished manus cript, Indian Atrocities Along
the Clinch, Powell and Holston Rivers, pages 4 2-45. James Kincaid, son
of John Kincaid, who lived across Clinch River from St. Paul, VA, and
who, in the year 1779, moved with his father to Kentucky a nd later
settled in Missouri, tells of this incident in his Revolutionary War
pension statement filed in Lafayette Co., MO, in 1833. I entered the
serv ice of the United States under the command of Captain John Dunkin
(1). At thi s time his father lived in a settlement called Castle's Woods
on Clinch River , about 25 miles north of Abingdon, Virginia, a frontier
fort. Powell Valley had been settled, but the settlers had been run off
by the Indians. A good ma ny of them could not bring their plunder with
them, but hid it. John Dunkin w as ordered out with a company of militia
in order to guard the people who had left their property behind them, to
collect it together and bring it into th e settlements. He (Kincaid) was
one of Dunkin's company. At this time Captain Joseph Martin was stationed
at the Rye Cove Fort on Clinch River in order to guard the frontiers of
Virginia. He (Martin) kept two spys, who were brother s, to-wit: John and
James Bunch. When we got into the valley we met with the se spys. They
then returned with us down to what was called Martin's Station in said
valley, but we found no one there - they had all fled. One of the
s ettlers that was with us, who had fled from the valley by the name of
Davis ( called Captain Davis). Before the people fled he lived at Owen's
Station, (2) ten miles below Martin's. We took up at Martin's Station.
Sometime after, Da vis petitioned Dunkin for a few men to go down to
Owen's Station with him to collect his plunder. Five men was granted him,
one of whom was James Bunch. T hey went to the Station and collected the
plunder accordingly, as I understoo d, and returning back to the camp the
Indians waylaid the path and fired upon them, and wounded Bunch, and
killed a man by the name of (Robert) Bowman at the place, and wounded
another by the name of Johnson, as Bunch related, for he returned with
him (Johnson) a piece, but he (Johnson) never got in. Three of the party
got in that night, two of whom was Bunch and Davis. The next da y Dunkin
went down with all his force, save a few left to guard the wounded. This
affiant was one that went down. We went to the place and there found
B owman dead. Davis took us to a tree where he said an Indian stood whom
he sho t at. We went to the place and found a great deal of blood. We then
took his trail and followed them, but not a great ways, as it appeared
they had scatte red. We returned back and buried the dead, thence to camp
(at Martin's Statio n). This circumstance broke up the expedition. Bunch
grew very sick and we h ad to take him to this company at the Rye Cove. We
were then all dismissed an d returned home. As well as he can recollect,
he states this took place in 17 76. He does not recollect the particular
month, except that it was in warm we ather. Andrew Lynam in his
Revolutionary War pension statement filed in Bath Co., KY, on June 23,
1833, also tells of the above killing in this manner: In the month of
June, he thinks the 1st, but cannot say as to the particular day, he
entered the service of the United States under Captain John Dunkin, a s a
volunteer for three months in 1776. At the end of this three month tour
he again volunteered in Captain Dunkin's Company of militia for three
months . Was in the month of September the same year as before. We were
commanded by John Dunkin as Captain, and as our tour was to prevent the
Indians from comm itting outrages upon the defenseless inhabitants
The following article is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.

The following Myths are from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter click here for his full list.
Myth #5: Our family always spelled the name as ...
Fact: The moment that you insist your surname was always spelled a particular way, you have just labeled yourself as a beginning genealogist. Name spellings have varied widely and, in fact, have only become standardized in the past 100 years or so. The people who created earlier records often were census takers, town clerks, tax collectors, clergymen, and others, who wrote down what they heard. In the days when most people could not read or write, many did not know how to spell their own names. When a clerk asked, "How do you spell that?" the most common answer was, "I don't know." A census taker late for dinner on a long, hot, dusty, summer day may not have cared whether a name was spelled STUART or STEWART.





Index to Maryland Provincial and General Court Deeds, 1658-1790 BENDER, PHILIP. Lib. J.G. No. 1 (17273), Bond, p. 79.
BENGE, WILLIAM. Lib. F.F. (17246), Indicted, p. 653

Judicial and Testamentary Business of the Provincial Court, 1649/50-1657

Bence, William, 193, 201.
Binge, Anthony, 303.
Judicial and Testamentary Business of the Provincial Court, 1649/50-1657
Sett my hand and Seale the 27th day of October in the
yeare of our Lord God 1653.
Richard Thurston
Sealed and Delivered in the psence of
Anthony Binge, James Hitchcocke
Nathaniell Gowther Norus publicus
Bichard, son of Thomas Binge, 1672; NOTE RICHARD BENGE son of thomas benge when migrated to virginia

note WHEN RICHARD BENGE removed from maryland the son of thomas benge the SON William benge 2nd
he used the french form benger
Anne BENGER was born Bef 1690 in VA, and died Bef 27 Mar 1749 in Westmoreland Cou,VA. She was the daughter of 30. Richard BENGER
Contents
- by Slave Owner/Birth Date of Child

Binge, William Else 12/7/1804 Caty Maidenhead Twp
An Exact List of all Ye Inhabitants Names wthin Ye Towne of fflushing and P'cincts of Old and Young ffreemen and Servants White & Blacke &c. 1698

French Inhabits

William Benger and Elizabeth his wife
John, Jacob and Eliz
Colonial New York 1664-1788
Tax Lists, Inhabitants

1701 Signers of the
Petition to King William, III

Jn. Bench (French
New Jersey Marriage Records - 1728

Vol. XXII of the Archives of the State of New Jersey page 25
Binge, Jacob / (Hunterdon) / [N/A]
Smith, Hetchel / (Hunterdon) / [N/A]

14-Oct 1775
N/A
Vol. XXII of the Archives of the State of New Jersey page 25 Binge, William / (Hunterdon) / [N/A]
Drake, Sarah / ( ) / [N/A]
NJ /
27-Jan 1780
N/A

note awhen william benge the 2nd arrivalIndex to Maryland Provincial and General Court Deeds

BENGE, WILLIAM. Lib. F.F. (17246), Indicted, p. 653 his grandson by son Thomas Benge fled to New york

An Exact List of all Ye Inhabitants Names wthin Ye Towne of fflushing and P'cincts of Old and Young ffreemen and Servants White & Blacke &c. 1698

French Inhabits

William Benger and Elizabeth his wife
John, Jacob and Eliz
Colonial New York 1664-1788
Tax Lists, Inhabitants

1701 Signers of the
Petition to King William, III

Jn. Bench (French NOTE they used French Variants spellings of Benger Bench and one son Jacob Binge went to New Jersey

Alphabetical Rent Roll of Virginia 1704/05
Benge Robert James City County 1704

NOTE that while in Virginia Robert Benge used the Enlish version but while in Maryland he and Samuel used the French accent
Proceedings and Acts of the General Assembly, October 1678-November 1683
Beniger, Samuel, 249.
Proceedings and Acts of the General Assembly, October 1678-November 1683
Bengar (Benjor), Robert, 210, 284.
Beniger, Samuel, 249.

Katherine Therrold, dau. of Margaret Therrold. She m. 2nd, by 1677, Robert Benjer (MWB 5:347; MDTP 8:247, 9:335). Shafe, Jacob, m. Margaret, dau. of Henry Webb of

Provincial Court Proceedings, 1681. 37 THE TIME LINE SHOWS they came from the 2nd william benge who has by lore said to have gone off to south carolina. but he did not he and his lline are well documented in the maryland archives.

John Bearecroft Liber W. C.
David Jones & ux This accon being Upon Appeale from Baltemore agt County Court is Continued untill next Provinciall Robert Benjor Court
Thomas Hebb Comand was given to the sheriffe of st Maryes agt County That of the goods and Chattles of Hugh
Hugh Reynolds Reynolds If they should be found in his Baliwick hee Cause to be made the sume of seaven hundred

Beniger, Samuel, A. A. Co., 2nd May, 1692;

6th Aug., 1692.
Wife Mary, eztz. and sole legatee of estate, real and per-
sonal, during life.
To dau. Martha, sd. estate at death of wife afsd.
Test: Geo. Fjrpes, Isabell Capell, Jno. Meriton, Eliza: Stone.
Howard, Philip, Severn R., A. A. Co., 29th July, 1701 ;

24th Feb., 1701.
, 150 A.,
"Howard's and Porter's Bange"; 200 A.,

Provincial Court Proceedings, 1668. 371 St Marys Maryalnd
The Court adjourns till the afternoon [p. 672]
The Justices all prsent as in the morning
Came John Perce and William King of Petuxent riuer into Open
Court and Acknowledged themselues to be seuerally endebted to the
Lord Proprietary in the sume of twenty pounds sterling each prson to be leauyed of theire Goods and Chattles lands & tenements to the use of the said Lord Proprietary, under the Condicons fol-lowing (uizt) that william Benge of the place aforesaid shall per-sonally appeare at the next Prouinall Court to be holden att St Marys
wthin this prouince and in the meane time that hee shall be of hisgood behauiour towards the said Lord Propr and all Other the people
of this prouince Daniel Jenifer

Provincial Court Proceedings, 1668. 353
Let it be Enquired for the Rt Honble the Lord Proprietary whether [p. 653]
William Benge of st Josephs mannor in C�luert County the first day Wm Benge his of December in the Seauen & thiretyth yeare of the Dominion of Indictment
Caecilius &c at the howse of George Beckwith in St Josephs Mannor in the County aforesaid Three Whisks of the price of Twenty two shillings of the Goods and Chattles of Richard Taylor marriner

Thomas Smith was in Baltimore Co., Maryland by 18 March 1688/9 when Thomas Richardson assigned him a certificate of survey. Smith laid out 100 a., Smith’s Beginning (Baltimore Co. Land Records RM#HS:422). Thomas Smith and his wife Isabella conveyed the 100 a. to Robert Benger on 6 June 1693 (Baltimore Co. Land Records SM#HS:381). John Parker, Sr., of Bush River, and Isabella Smith, of Gunpowder River, widow, were married in St. George’s Parish, (now Harford Co.), on 12 Sep 1699 (PAGE:5). On 03 November 1701, Isabell Parker, wife of John Parker, administered the Estate of Thomas Smith (INAC 28:150). John Parker’s Estate was administered on 5 July 1708 by Capt. Thomas Preston and William Hicks, who also filed an additional account of Thomas Smith’s Estate on the same day (INAC 28:150, 152).

Note while in virginia he used Benge

Baltimore County Land Records, 1665-1687, From the Maryland Historical
Magazine, With a New Introduction and Index by Robert Barnes, Louis Dow Sisco,
1929-41, 1995. Soft cover, 5-1/2x8-1/2, 113 pages
Surnames include:
Bengar, Benger, Benjar NOTE all being names Richard Samuel Robert John ALL BEING SONS OF THOMAS BENGE a son of the 2nd William Benge who also had another son William that removed to New York. having one noted son a Indian Trader John Bench

Richmond Co Deed Book 8 p. 522. March 10, 1729/30 from John Garner of Hanover Parish in King George Co, planter, to Joshua Singleton of North Farnham Parish, Richmond Co, for 2000 pounds of tobacco, 60 acres in North Farnham Parish near the northwest branches of Toteskey Creek, which land was left to Jeen Banger, the daughter of John Bangar, given to her by her grandfather.
Signed by John Garner.
Witnesses were Nathaniel Hilton, Thomas (I his mark) Payn, Catran (T her mark) Gorny.

I102378: John BENGER (BEF 1690 - Sons, Thomas, Joseph, James and John. Daughters, Mary Gaines, Agnes Gaines and Rebecca

Therefore this leaves 2 possiblitiesfor trader john benge.
Full text of "Maryland historical magazine" F&I WAR

Capt John White muster roll to John Bench ditto.

MD Provincial Court Land Records, 1749
On the 2.d Day of May 1756 M.r John Binge Jun.r made oath on
the Holy Evangelis of Almighty God that he saw M.r John Stewart sign
and seal this Power of Attorney for himself and M.r Andrew Armour
.

Note his name was Junior therfore being of one of the 2 earlier John Benges. The John Benger a son of Richard Benger son of Thomas Benge son of the 2nd William Benge or Thomas Benge brother William whom moved to New York and son a Indian Trader named John Bench

A SIDENOTE one John Benges friend andrew amour ANDREW ARMOUR was born Abt. 1732 in Ireland, and died Bef. 1815. He married ELIZABETH Bef. 1771.
She died Aft. February 15, 1795 in Greene Co., GA.

other names, Andrew Armour, decd; subject, claims that in 1787
Creek Indians stole a horse from his father, Andrew, now deceased and that the horse was
worth 200.00 page 167,

Trader John Benge King David Benge Thomas Benge are scinetic proven DNA Haplogroup Viking Norseman not Celtic Scotland.

anomaly" in the rate of haplogroup I1 in Normandy and Brittany.
Is it a coincidence because of a lack of sample?
In any case, only the departments close to the Channel had a above average than in the French average

the impact of genetic Viking invasions in Normandy.
But in analyzing the sample data on french dna in ysearch, I found a few things that could be interesting with haplogroup I1
The haplogroup I1, is over 30% in scandinavia.
The haplogroup I1, is nearly 10% in the north-west of France while in the rest of France, the rate is around 5% (except in Alsace where the rate is also 10%)

If we examine more closely the situation in the north-west:
At the regional level:
Bretagne: I1: 15% (3 / 20)
Bsse Normandie: I1: 9% (2 / 22)
Hte Normandie: I1: 10.5% (2 / 19)

At the level of departments:
Calvados (Bsse Normandie): 33% (2 / 6)
Ille et Vilaine (Bretagne): 33% (2 / 6)
Cotes d'Armor (Bretagne) 20% (1 / 5)
Seine Maritime (Hte Normandie): 12% (2 / 17)

Manche (Bsse Normandie): 0% (0 / 4)
Orne (Bsse Normandie): 0% (0 / 12)
Finistère (Bretagne): 0% (0 / 7)
Morbihan (Bretagne): 0% (0 / 1)

The low number of sample is problematic but if we assemble all departments bordering the English Channel (where the Viking presence has been strongest)
we get 18% (7 / 38) which is not bad!

If in these regions, the rate is around 10% higher than the rest of France, if it comes from the invasion wiking and as haplogroup I1 is at 33% in scandinavie, then we must believe that in regions near to the English Channel in France, half of male ancestors of these people were vikings!!!

One thing everyone generally agrees on is that the Scandinavians settled primarily in only part of what later became the Duchy of Normandy. This is clearly illustrated by maps which show the location of Scandinavian placenames in Normandy. In some areas they are quite common, in others non-existent. Mikew once posted a nice map showing the areas where Scandinavian placenames were concentrated on another forum. Perhaps he could do so again here. ...
, Haplogroup I1 is a Y chromosome haplogroup associated with Nordic descent and occurs at greatest frequency in Scandinavia. The mutations identified with Haplogroup I1 (Y-DNA) are M253, M307, P30, and P40. These are known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). It is a subclade of Haplogroup I. Before a reclassification in 2008,[1] the group was known as Haplogroup I1a.[2] Some individuals and organizations continue to use the I1a designation.

The group displays a very clear frequency gradient, with a peak of approximately 40 percent among the populations of western Finland and more than 50 percent in the province of Satakunta,[3] around 35 percent in southern Norway, southwestern Sweden especially on the island of Gotland, Denmark, and northern Germany, with rapidly decreasing frequencies toward the edges of the historically Germanic (especially Viking) sphere of influence
Ace





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