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Re: Laura Caskey Beals' death cert.
Posted by: jc (ID *****5058) Date: December 24, 2006 at 16:38:21
In Reply to: Laura Caskey Beals' death cert. by robert eagle of 976

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Sharrow, Charron, Sharon, Carveth, Abbott, Armstrong and other Ancestors
Entries: 840923 Updated: 2006-12-21 19:57:53 UTC (Thu) Contact: Craig Sharrow Home Page: Sharrow/Charron Ancestors from the Detroit River area of Michigan & Ontario and other Relatives

This family tree shows Sharrow families who lived in Michigan in the 20th century.

I have NO additional information about these ancestors.
See First Families of Detroit or U.S. Presidents.

http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=craigsharrow&id=I118120
ID: I118120
Name: John Alden
Given Name: John
Surname: Alden 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Name: John "Pilgrim" Alden
Given Name: John "Pilgrim"
Surname: Alden
Sex: M
Birth: 1598 in Harwich, Essex, England 8 4 5 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 6 7
Note:
Ancestral Summary:

Extensive research has been done into the ancestry of John Alden, but nothing has conclusively been found. There are two major theories that have been presented over the years:

Charles Edward Banks, in his book The English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers, 1929, puts forward a theory that John is the son of George Alden and Jane (---) and grandson of Richard and Avys Alden of Southampton, England. Since Bradford says John Alden was hired in Southampton, this would be a logical place to start looking for Aldens. No other supporting evidence has been found, and it has been noted by many researchers that the names George, Richard, and Avys do not occur anywhere in John Alden's family. Naming children after parents and grandparents was an extremely common practice in the seventeenth century, and the absence of such a name is nearly enough evidence to disprove this theory.

The currently popular theory is that John Alden came from Harwich, Essex, England. There was a sea-faring Alden family living there, who were related by marriage to Christopher Jones, captain of the Mayflower. It has been suggested John Alden may be the son of John Alden and Elizabeth Daye, but this is not fully proven either.

William Bradford wrote, in his history Of Plymouth Plantation: "John Alden was hired for a cooper [barrel maker] at Southampton where the ship [Mayflower] victualed, and being a hopeful young man was much desired but left to his own liking to go or stay when he came here; but he stayed and married here." and later wrote "John Alden married Priscilla, Mr. Mullin's daughter, and had issue by her as is before related."

John Alden was an assistant for the Plymouth colony for many years, and was deputy governor for two years. His marriage to Priscilla Mullins was the subject of the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow poem, "The Courtship of Myles Standish", which although a classic has little factual basis. John and Priscilla were among the founders of the town of Duxbury.

In 1634, John Alden was on the Kennebec River assisting in the forceful removal of John Hocking who was illegally fishing and trading on land that had been granted to the Pilgrims. Hockings refused to leave, and when the party arrived at his ship by canoe to board and remove him, he shot and killed Moses Talbot. In return, Hockings was shot and killed. The Massachusetts Bay Colony took matters into its own hands, and arrested John Alden (even though he was not the one who fired the shot). Myles Standish was sent by Governor Bradford to obtain Alden's release, which he successfully did.

In his later years, John Alden was on many juries, including even a witch trial--though in Plymouth's case, the jury found the accuser guilty of libel and the alleged witch was allowed to go free. Plymouth Colony only had two witch trials during its history, and in both cases the accuser was found guilty and punished.

John and Priscilla Alden probably have the largest number of descendants of any Mayflower passenger, but with stiff competition from Richard Warren and John Howland. They are ancestors to Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams, poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Vice President Dan Quayle.

Two commemorative broadsides (elegy poems) survive from John Alden's 1687 death. The first broadside is by an unknown author, and the second broadside was written by John Cotton.



False and Faked Mayflower Genealogy
---------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------

Over the past two centuries, many people have--either deliberately or because of poor research--published accounts of Mayflower ancestry that are completely false. Here is a collection of the most commonly known false and faked Mayflower lines. This list is based on a series of articles appearing in the Mayflower Descendant, volume 20, 21, 23, 34 titled "False and Faked Mayflower Lines"; the Mayflower Descendant article in volume 43 entitled "A Mayflower Hoax Resurfaces"; published articles in the Mayflower Descendant, The American Genealogist, the New England Historic and Genealogical Register, Mayflower Families and Mayflower Families in Progress series of books, and my own experiences answering visitor questions.

The list is organized alphabetically by the surname involved. Source abbreviations are as follows: MD = Mayflower Descendant; MQ = Mayflower Quarterly, NEHGR = New England Historic and Genealogical Register; MF = Mayflower Families for Five Generations; MFIP = Mayflower Families in Progress, TAG = The American Genealogist, NYGBR = New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, and TG = The Genealogist.

---------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------

ALDEN. John Alden did not have a son named Zachariah, nor did he have a son named Henry. [MD 35:182; MD 43:14,20]

BRADFORD. Dorothy Bradford did not commit suicide or have an affair with Captain Christopher Jones as often claimed; that was a fictional story made up for a women's magazine (Harper's Monthly) in 1869; the fictional story made it into "popular myth". [MD 29:97-102; MD 31:105]

BREWSTER, William. William Brewster of the Mayflower had a wife named Mary. There is no evidence she is Mary Wentworth or Mary Wyrrall, both which have been claimed as his wife, and both of which have royal ancestry. His wife was not Mary Welles either--the William Brewster who married Mary Welles moved to Jamestown, Virginia and died there. [The Great Migration Begins 1:229; The Virginia Magazine, 75:407]

BREWSTER. William Brewster of Jamestown, Virginia was not a son of William Brewster of the Mayflower. [MFIP Brewster; The Virginia Magazine 75:407]

BREWSTER. Hannah3 Brewster (Jonathan2, William1) did not marry John Thompson, of Long Island. She married Samuel Starr of New London, Conn. [MD 23:75; MFIP Brewster]

BREWSTER. Rev. Nathaniel Brewster, of New Haven, Conn., and Setauket, L. I., was not descended from Elder William Brewster. [MD 23:75, MFIP Brewster, TAG 12:199]

BREWSTER. Jonathan2 Brewster, son of Elder William Brewster, did not marry a first wife in Holland as has been claimed. [MQ 51:161-167; MQ 52:6-16]

BREWSTER. Wrestling2 Brewster, son of Elder William Brewster, died a young man, unmarried. He did not settle at Piscataqua, NH, and was not the father of John Brewster, of Portsmouth, NH [MD 23:75; MD 43:12; MFIP Brewster]

BROWN. Mary1 Brown, daughter of Peter Brown of the Mayflower, married Ephraim Tinkham, of Plymouth. She did not marry John Moses, of Windsor, Conn., nor did she marry Thomas Willett of Duxbury. [MD 23:76; MF 7:4]

BROWN. Peter Brown of the Mayflower does not have royal ancestry as published. [MD 43:13]

BROWN. Peter Brown, of Windsor, Conn., was not a son of Peter Brown, the Mayflower Passenger. [MD 23:76, MD 43:14; MF 7:3]

CARR. George Carr did not come to America on the Mayflower. He arrived and settled at Ipswich about 1632. [MD 23:75; Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England 1:338; Gov. William Bradford's Of Plymouth Plantation]

COOKE. Josiah Cooke of Eastham was not a descendant of Francis Cooke, the Mayflower Passenger. [MD 5:185; MD 23:76; MF 12]

DOTY. The IGI entry for Edward Doty's baptism in Shropshire, England in 1599 is fictional. [MF 11; MD 43:13; TAG 63:215]. His alleged 14 May 1598 baptism that occurred at St. Mary le Strand, Thurburton Hills, Suffolk is also completely fictional. There is no such place as Thurburton Hills, Suffolk according to the Suffolk Records Office; and the parish of St. Mary le Strand, London was searched (at my expense) for Edward Doty from 1595 through 1600 and no relevant entries were found. No baptisms at all occurred on 14 May 1598 in that parish.

DUNHAM-GOODMAN. John Goodman, the Mayflower Passenger, and Deacon John Dunham, of Leyden, Holland (and later of Plymouth) were not the same person. [MD 23:76; MD 37:198; MD 43:14; English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers by Charles Banks; Plymouth Colony: Its History and Its People, 1620-1691, by Eugene Stratton; The England and Holland of the Pilgrims by Henry Martyn Dexter.] Those interested in Dunham's English origins are referred to TAG 71:130-133.

FULLER. Elizabeth, the second wife of Rev. Samuel2 Fuller (Dr. Samuel1), was the widow of Thomas Bowen. She was not a descendant of Elder William Brewster. [MFIP Brewster; MF 1:51-52; MD 23:76]

GOODMAN-DUNHAM. John Goodman, the Mayflower Passenger, and Deacon John Dunham, of Leyden, Holland (and later of Plymouth) were not the same person. [MD 23:76; MD 37:198; MF 43:14; English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers by Charles Banks; Plymouth Colony: Its History and Its People, 1620-1691, by Eugene Stratton; The England and Holland of the Pilgrims by Henry Martyn Dexter.] Those interested in Dunham's English origins are referred to TAG 71:130-133.

GOODMAN. John Goodman most likely did not marry Sarah Hooper. [Plymouth Colony: Its History and Its People, 1620-1691, by Eugene Stratton, page 297]

GRAY. Mary Gray, daughter of Edward Gray by his first wife, Mary Winslow3 (Mary2 Chilton, James1), died without issue, and probably was unmarried. She did not marry William Abbott. [MD 23:76; MF 2]

HOPKINS. Stephen Hopkins' first wife was not Constance Dudley. Stephen's first wife will be correctly identified in an article authored by myself in the upcoming July 1998 issue of The American Genealogist.

HOPKINS. John Hopkins of Cambridge, Mass., and Hartford Conn., was not a descendant of Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower. [MD 23:76; MF 6]

HOPKINS. William Hopkins of Southold, Long Island, was not William3 Hopkins, the son of Gyles2 Hopkins (Stephen1) of Eastham. [MD 23:76; MF 6]

HOWLAND. John Howland married Elizabeth Tilley, not a daughter of John Carver. [Gov. William Bradford's Of Plymouth Plantation; MD 43:13]

MULLINS. William Mullins is not descended from any Molyneaux family, nor does he have any proven royal ancestry. There is no evidence that his wife Alice was named Alice Atwood or Alice Poretiers. [MD 44:38-43]

ROGERS. The only children of Thomas Rogers to have known descendants are Joseph Rogers who married Hannah, and John Rogers who married Anna Churchman. Just about every other Rogers in New England has been incorrectly tied to Thomas Rogers of the Mayflower in some publication or another. [MF 2:157-160; NYGBR 60:102-104 specifically disproves William Rogers of CT/Long Island as a son].

SAMPSON. Abraham Sampson is not a brother to Henry Sampson of the Mayflower. Henry Sampson of the Mayflower did have a cousin named Abraham, and possibly this was the man who settled in Plymouth near Henry. [TG 6:166-186]

SAMPSON. John Sampson who married Mary Pease was not a son of Henry Sampson. [MFIP Samson]

STANDISH. Thomas Standish. There is no evidence Thomas Standish of Wethersfield, Connecticut, was a son of Myles Standish. [MFIP Standish; see also the will of Myles Standish, which does not mention a son named Thomas]

TILLEY. John Tilley is not the Jan Tellij who married Prijntgen van der Velde in Holland. John Tilley married Joan (Hurst) Rogers in Henlow, Bedford, England, and it was Joan that came on the Mayflower with him. Jan Tellij was a Dutchman with no connection to the Pilgrims. [TG 6:166-186; MD 10:66-67]

WARREN. Richard Warren's wife was not Elizabeth (Juett/Jewett/Jonatt) Marsh. Richard Warren's parents have not been identified, and he has no documented descent from Sir John de Warrene, Charlemagne, or anybody else. Royal descent might be very likely for Richard Warren, given his surname and apparent financial soundness in Plymouth; but his parents will have to be identified first before any such claim can be made. [MD 23:76, MFIP Warren; MQ 51:109-112].

WHITE. William White's wife Susanna was not Anna Fuller sister of Mayflower passengers Samuel and Edward Fuller; nor was she Susanna Tilley. Susanna's maiden name remains unknown. [MF 1:96-98; MF 5:7]
---------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------
Mayflower Web Pages. Caleb Johnson (c) 1998


THE GREAT MIGRATION BEGINS

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Search Terms: ALDEN (23), JOHN (1733)
Database: Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-33
Combined Matches: 18
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ALDEN, JOHN [1620, Plymouth]



JOHN ALDEN


ORIGIN: Southampton
MIGRATION: 1620 on Mayflower
FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth
REMOVES: Duxbury 1632

OCCUPATION: Cooper
FREEMAN: In "1633" Plymouth list of freemen, among those admitted prior to 1 January 1632/3 [PCR 1:3]; also in lists dated in or near 1637, 1639 and 1658 (in the latter two listed as of Duxbury) [PCR 1:52, 8:174, 198].
EDUCATION: Although there is no direct evidence for his literary and educational attainments, his extensive public service, including especially his appointments as colony treasurer and to committees on revising the laws, certainly indicates that he must have been well-educated.
OFFICES: "Mr. John Alden Sen[ior]" is in the Duxbury section of the 1643 list of men able to bear arms [PCR 8:189].
Assistant, 6 February 1631/2 [WP 3:65], 1 January 1632/3, 1 January 1633/4, 1 January 1634/5, 5 January 1635/6, 3 January 1636/7, 6 March 1637/8, 4 March 1638/9 [PCR 1:5, 21, 32, 36, 48, 79, 116 (the assistants elected on 3 March 1639/40 were not sworn until 2 June 1640, so John Alden continued to serve as assistant at a few courts in early 1640)]. Deputy for Duxbury to Plymouth General Court 1641, 1642, 1644 and 1646 to 1649, and also at courts of 20 August 1644, 28 October 1645 and 3 March 1645/6 [PCR 2:16, 40, 72, 75, 94, 95, 104, 117, 123, 144]. Assistant each year from 1650 to 1686 [PCR 2:153, 166; 3:7, 30, 48, 77, 99, 114, 134, 162, 187, 214; 4:13, 36, 60, 90, 122, 147, 179; 5:17, 34, 55, 90, 112, 143, 163, 194, 229, 256; 6:9, 34, 58, 83, 106, 127, 164, 185]. Acted as Deputy Governor on two occasions, in absence of Governor, 7 March 1664/5, 30 October 1677 [PCR 4:81, 5:245]. Treasurer, 3 June 1656, 3 June 1657, 1 June 1658 [PCR 3:99, 115, 135]. Council of War, 27 September 1642, 10 October 1643, 2 June 1646, 6 April 1653, 12 May 1653, 1 June 1658, 2 April 1667 [PCR 2:46, 63, 100; 3:26, 28, 138; 4:145]. Committee to revise laws, 4 June 1645, 3 June 1657 [PCR 2:85, 3:117]. Committee on Kennebec trade, 3 March 1645/6, 7 June 1648, 8 June 1649, 5 March 1655/6 [PCR 2:96, 127, 144; 3:96]. Appointed to numerous other minor posts and committees by Plymouth General Court.
ESTATE: In 1623 Plymouth land division granted an unknown number of acres as a passenger on the Mayflower in 1620 [PCR 12:4]. In 1627 Plymouth cattle division, included in company of John Howland, along with wife Priscilla, daughter Elizabeth and son John [PCR 12:10].
Assessed 1 4s. in Plymouth tax lists of 25 March 1633 and 27 March 1634 [PCR 1:9, 27].
Assigned mowing ground for the year, 14 March 1635/6, 20 March 1636/7 [PCR 1:40, 56].
On 6 March 1636/7, "A parcel of land containing a knoll, or a little hill, lying over against Mr. Alden's land at Blewfish River, is granted by the Court unto the said Mr. John Alden in lieu of a parcel of land taken from him (next unto Samuel Nash's lands) for public use" [PCR 1:51].
Granted "certain lands at Green's Harbor," 5 February 1637/8 [PCR 1:76]. Granted to Miles Standish and John Alden three hundred acres "on the north side of the South River," 2 July 1638 [PCR 1:91]. Granted "a little parcel of land... lying at the southerly side of his lot," 3 September 1638 [PCR 1:95].
On 3 June 1657 "Liberty is granted unto Mr. John Alden to look out a portion of land to accommodate his sons withall, and to make report thereof unto the Court, that so it may be confirmed unto him" [PCR 3:120].
13 June 1660: "In regard that Mr. Alden is low in his estate, and occasioned to spend much time at the courts on the country's occasions, and so hath done this many years, the Court have allowed him a small gratuity, the sum of ten pounds, to be paid by the Treasurer" [PCR 3:195].
Granted "a competency of land" at Namasskett, 7 June 1665 [PCR 4:95]. Granted one hundred acres at Teticutt, 4 March 1673/4 [PCR 5:141].
On 1 April 1679 John Alden gave to his son Joseph "all that my share of land... within the township of Bridgewater" [PLR 3:194].
On 8 July 1674 John Alden of Duxbury "for love and natural affection and other valuable causes and considerations" deeded to "David Alden his true and natural son all that his land both meadow and upland that belongs unto him situate or being at or about a place called Rootey Brook within the Township of Middleborough ... excepting only one hundred acres," containing about three hundred acres [PLR 3:330].
A description of the land of "Mr. John Aldin, of Duxbery," is entered under date of 4 December 1637, but with the modern annotation that this is a later entry, and with the internal statement that one of the abuttors was "Philip Delano, deceased," which means that the entry must have been made in 1681 or later; this is immediately followed by an entry for another parcel of land which Alden bought of Edward Hall in 1651 [PCR 1:71, 73].
On 1 January 1684[/5] [36 Charles II] John Alden Sr. of Duxbury for "that real love and parental affection which I bear to my beloved and dutiful son Jonathan Alden" deeded to him all my upland in Duxbury, for which "see old book of grants and bounds of land anno 1637 folio 137," and all other lands at Duxbury whether granted by court at Plymouth or town of Duxbury [PLR 6:53].
On 13 January 1686[/7] [2 James II] John Alden Sr. of Duxbury for "that natural love and affection which I bear to my firstborn and dutiful son John Alden of Boston" deeded him one hundred acres at Pekard Neck alias Pachague with one-eighth of the meadow belonging to that place, and one hundred acres at Rootey Brook (brother David Alden is to have first right of purchase if John should wish to sell this hundred acres), together with a sixteen shilling purchase being the fifteenth lot, all in Middleborough, and one hundred acres, the first in a division of one thousand acres in Bridgewater [PLR 5:427].
On 19 August 1687 John Alden Sr. of Duxbury, cooper, gave to his sons Jonathan and David Alden five acres of salt marsh at Duxbury and "my whole proportion in the Major's Purchase commonly so-called being the thirty-fifth part of said purchase" [MD 9:145, citing PLR 4:65].
The inventory of John Alden's estate was taken on 31 October 1687 by Jonathan Alden, and totalled 49 17s. 6d., all movables. On 13 June 1688 the heirs of John Alden Sr. of Duxbury signed a release in favor of Jonathan Alden, stating that they had received their portion of the estate; those signing were Alexander Standish (in the right of his wife Sarah deceased), John Bass (in the right of his wife Ruth deceased), Mary Alden, Thomas Delano, John Alden, Joseph Alden, David Alden, Priscilla Alden and William Pabodie [PPR 1:10, 16; MD 3:10].

BIRTH: About 1599 (deposed aged 83 on 6 July 1682 [MD 3:120]; in his 89th year at death on 12 September 1687 [MD 9:129]; "about eighty-nine years of age" at death on 12 September 1687 [MD 34:49]).
DEATH: Duxbury 12 September 1687 [Sewall 150; MD 9:129, 34:49].
MARRIAGE: Plymouth about 1623 PRISCILLA MULLINS, daughter of WILLIAM MULLINS; she died after 1651, when she is mentioned in Bradford's summary of Mayflower passengers.
CHILDREN:

i ELIZABETH, b. about 1624; m. Plymouth 26 (or 20) December 1644 William Pabodie [PCR 2:79; DuVR]; she d. Little Compton 31 May 1717 [LCVR 143], "a. 92" [Boston News-Letter]. (Her tombstone at Little Compton gives her age at death as "in the 94th year of her age," but as the current monument was erected in 1882, this may not have been on the original stone.)


ii JOHN, b. about 1626; m. Boston 1 April 1660 "Elizabeth Everill, widow, relict of Abiell Everill, deceased" (although the correct date should probably be 1659, as a child was born to John and Elizabeth Alden on 17 December 1659 [BVR 69], and in the original form of the vital records, given in the second of the following citations but not in the first, this record is imbedded among others for 1659) [BVR 76; NEHGR 18:333; but see NEHGR 52:162 and Munsey-Hopkins 55, which interpret the 1659 birth record to imply that John Alden had had an earlier wife, also named Elizabeth]; she was born before 1640, daughter of William Phillips, and m. Boston 6 July 1655 Abiel Everill [BVR 52]; John Alden d. 14 March 1701/2 [Sewall 463]

iii JOSEPH, b. about 1627 (in list of men able to bear arms in 1643, and therefore at least 16 [PCR 8:189]); m. by about 1660 Mary Simons, daughter of MOSES SIMONS or SIMONSON and Sarah _____ [MD 31:60].

iv PRISCILLA, b. say 1630; living unm. in 1688 [PPR 1:16].

v JONATHAN, b. about 1632; m. Duxbury 10 December 1672 Abigail Hallett; he d. Duxbury 14 February 1696/7 "in the 65 year of his age" [MD 9:159; NEHGR 52:365]. (The date on the tombstone is 14 February 1697, but the double-dating problem is resolved by the probate papers, as administration on the estate was granted on 8 March 1696/7 [MD 6:174-78].)

vi SARAH, b. say 1634; m. by about 1660 Alexander Standish (date based on approximated birthdates of children [NEHGR 52:363-65]).

vii RUTH, b. say 1636; m. Braintree 3 February 1657/8 John Bass [BrVR 716].

viii MARY, b. say 1638; living unm. in 1688 [PPR 1:16].

ix REBECCA, b. say 1640; subject of unfounded rumor that she was "with child," 1 October 1661 [PCR 4:7]; m. in 1667, before 30 October, Thomas Delano [PCR 4:168, 8:122; NEHGR 102:83, 86].

x DAVID, b. say 1642; m. by 1674 Mary Southworth, dau. of CONSTANT SOUTHWORTH and Elizabeth Collier (in his will, dated 27 February 1678, Constant Southworth bequeathed to daughter Mary Alden [PCPR 4:1:18-20]).

COMMENTS: According to Bradford, "John Alden was hired a cooper at Southampton where the ship victualled, and being a hopeful young man was much desired but left to his own liking to go or stay when he came here; but he stayed and married here" [Bradford 443]. In his accounting of the Mayflower families in 1651, Bradford stated under William Mullins that "his daughter Priscilla survived, and married with John Alden; who are both living and have eleven [sic] children. And their eldest daughter is married and hath five children" [Bradford 445]. (As the marginal annotation for this entry gives the "increasing" as fifteen, and the eldest daughter already had five children, the correct number for John and Priscilla is more likely ten [MD 39:111].)
Many suggestions have been made as to the English origin of John Alden. Alicia Crane Williams has recently examined all the relevant evidence carefully and exhaustively, and comes to the conclusion that, although one or two of the suggested origins are "tempting," all are far from proved [MD 39:111-22, 40:133-36, 41:201]. By entering "Southampton" under ORIGIN above, we are only taking note of Bradford's statement that Alden was hired at that port; we are not implying that he was born or raised there.
The present account differs somewhat from other accounts in the birth order of the children, and the approximated ages. The estimated dates of birth for the first two children (Elizabeth and John) are reasonably well-defined because they fell between the 1623 land division and the 1627 cattle division. The third child (Joseph) must have been born late in 1627 to appear on the 1643 list of men able to bear arms. The next date which we are able to fix is that of Jonathan, who was said at his death early in 1697 to be in his sixty-fifth year, and so born in 1632 (or possibly early in 1633); note that this gives us a gap of about five or six years between Joseph and Jonathan. We arbitrarily place one of the unmarried daughters, Priscilla, in this gap, although it might as well be Mary who fits here. The remainder of the children are then ranged after Jonathan at two year intervals. This makes Ruth about twenty-two when she married John Bass, and Rebecca about twenty-one when she was the subject of the unfortunate rumor. Given the paucity of solid evidence on many of these points, other plausible arrangements may be easily constructed.
Some accounts of the family of John Alden include a son Zachariah, who had a daughter Anne Alden who married in 1699 Josiah Snell. In 1948 Hallock P. Long demonstrated that this son never existed, and that Anna Alden was almost certainly the daughter of John Alden's son Jonathan [NEHGR 102:82-86].
Attempts have been made to include Henry Alden of Billerica, Roxbury and Dedham as a descendant of John Alden, but this cannot be. Henry Alden was rated in Billerica in 1688 [NEHGR 31:303], so he must have been born no later than 1667. The wills of John Alden's sons John and Joseph make it clear that neither of them had a son Henry. John Alden's son Jonathan did not marry until 1672, and his son David apparently even later than that. Henry Alden must have been a late immigrant to New England, with no known genealogical connection with John Alden of Plymouth and Duxbury [MD 42:21ff.].
As noted above, John Alden was frequently a member of the committee on the Kennebec trade. He had actively participated in the trade himself, and in early 1634 he became involved in an incident in which a party of Plymouth men led by himself and John Howland became embroiled with a group of men from the Piscataqua settlement which would grow into Dover. One man on each side was killed, and in the aftermath Alden was detained at Boston as security against the final resolution of the conflict. [See WJ 1:155-56, 162-63; WP 3:167-68; MBCR 1:119; and Bradford 262-68, for the particulars of this incident.]
The results of a 1960 season of digging are given by Roland Wells Robbins in Pilgrim John Alden's Progress: Archaeological Excavations in Duxbury (Plymouth: The Pilgrim Society 1969).

-- Winthrop Papers, 1498-1654, 6 volumes, various editors (Boston 1925-1992)

-- Mayflower Descendant, Volume 1 through present (1899-1937, 1985+)

-- The Diary of Samuel Sewall, Volume One 1674-1708, Volume Two 1709-1729, M. Halsey Thomas, ed. (New York 1973)
Death: 12 Sep 1687 in Duxbury, Plymouth County, Massachusetts 9 13 15
Burial: 12 Sep 1687 Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts 3 18 18 19 20
Event: LONG NOTE
Note:
The 1623 division of land among the Plymouth colonists (probably made in early 1623/4) placed John Alden in the group that received land on the "north side of the towne." Others in this group were Edward Winslow, Richard Warren, John Goodman, John Crackston, Mary Chilton, Captain Myles Standish, Francis Eaton, Henry Cooper, and Humility Cooper (Plymouth County Records, vol. 12:4; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 416). The acreage that John Alden is illegible, but was probably four acres - representing on share each for himself and Priscilla, and for her deceased parents William and Alice Mullins (Mayflower Quarterly Feb. 1974, 13).

In 1626 Isaac Allerton negotiated an agreement between the Merchant Adventurers in England who had financed the Plymouth Colony, whereby 53 members of the colony (including John Alden) and five London men (called the "Purchasers") were to pay L180 for all of the stocks, lands, and merchandise that belonged to the Company (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 2:177; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 419-20). In May 1627 John Alden joined with William Bradford, Capt. Myles Standish, Isaac Allerton, Edward Winslow, William Brewster, John Howland, and Thomas Prence, to undertake (thus they ere called the "Undertakers") the debt owed by the "Purchasers." In return, this group of eight men received the boats, furs, and other stores that had belonged to the Company as well as rights to trade for themselves for six years. Payment was to be made in corn and tobacco (Of Plimoth Plantation, 194-195).

The division of cattle made 22 May 1627 placed John Alden, Priscilla Alden, and their children Elizabeth and John in the fourth lot that "fell to John Howland & his company Joyned to him." The lot received "one of the 4 heyfers Came in the Jacob Called Raghorne" (Raghorne is a breed of cattle) (Plymouth County Records, 12:10; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 422).

The colonists began to spread out from Plymouth and settle on the land they had been granted. At first, the families would end to their land during the summer and return to the Plymouth settlement during the winter where they could attend church. The original Alden house in Duxbury was probably begun during the summers and by 1631 the family was staying longer, perhaps the whole year. Bradford and others in Plymouth were worried about losing the families from the original settlement, and in April 1632 John Alden, Capt. Standish, Jonathan Brewster and Thomas Prence signed an agreement promising to bring their families back to Plymouth during the winter. However, as Bradford later wrote, "First those that lived on their lots on the other side of the Bay, called Duxbury, they could not long bring their wives and children to the public worship and church meetings here, but with such burthen as, growing to some competent number, they sued to be dismissed and become a body of themselves" (Bradford's History, 253). thus the Alden family took up permanent residence in Duxbury.

The Alden grant in Duxbury was accessible by water from the bay and up the river, so that the whole length of the farm had water transportation. The Green Harbor Path, running from Plymouth to Marshfield passed along the west end of the farm. The bounds of the farm were described in a document dated 4 December 1637, but recorded in 1681 or later.

The bounds of the land of Mr. John Alden of Duxbery, as it was layed out by Gov. Bradford, Mr. Edward Winslow, Joshua Pratt, and Edward Bangs. It begines, for the breath of it, att a place where formerly an old pine tree stood, where now there is a gravelly hole, and from thence to a burnt walnut stump, and runinge for the length, and from thence to take its length unto a whie oake tree standing a little within the land of Phillip Delano deceased, the root of that tree still remaining, and from thence for the breadth att the had of the lott up to the old Greens Harbor Path; on the southerly side bounded with the meddow of the said John Alden in part and with the land of Experience Mitchell att the upper end (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:71).

This description was amended under the date 1 January 1637/8 (Alden Family in the Alden House, 14):

The bounds of the land of MR. John Alden att Duxburrow, as it was layed forth by Gov. Bradford, Mr. Edward Winslow, Joshua Pratt, Edward Bangs, as followeth: from an old pine tree by the meddow, which meddow was afterwards allotted unto mee, the said John Alden, and for the breadth of the said land buting upon and ranging along the said Blew Fish River to a burnt walnut stump; and from thence to a walnut tree ranging from the abovesaid stump west north west, which was sum tim after run by Joshua Prate and Phillip Delano, Senior, unto a white oake tree, standing a little within the bounds of Phillip Delanoes land, there being a stump or root of that tree still remaining, and from thence for the breadth att the head, up to Greens Harbour, old path; and on the southerly side of he land bounded ptly with my owne meddow, and with the land of Experience Mitchell towards the upper end.

The first house built and occupied by John and Priscilla was a long, narrow house with a field stone foundation and a root cellar under the west end. Archeological excavations made in 1960 by Roland Wells Robbins revealed the cellar stones and that the house was about 10 1/2 feet in width and 38 feet in length (here the Aldens raised 10 children!). Its size would have been similar to a modern mobile home, although the Alden house would have had a loft or second floor. Evidence at the site of the old house proved that the old house had not burned, as many old stories claimed. It had definitely been moved or dismantled. The dimensions of the old house led Robbins to believe that it had been dismantled and moved up the hill to be incorporated as the kitchen, borning room, and buttery of the existing Alden House, which are exactly the same dimensions (Pilgrim John Alden's Progress, 15).

The present Alden house was believed to have been built in 1653, a date reputedly found carved in one of the beams or boards of the house. However, recent archeological work indicates the house may have been built sometime in the latter two decades of the 1600s. It is still believed that beams from the original house were used in the construction of the newer one. Further research is being undertaken by the Alden Kindred of America, Inc., which owns and maintains the house. The Alden house remained in the possession of members of the Jonathan2 Alden family until 1892 and was transferred to the Alden Kindred in 1907 (Alden Family in the Alden House, 128).

John Alden was on the 1633 list of Plymouth freemen among those admitted prior to 1 Jan 1632/3 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:3). The tax list of 25 March 1633 assesses John Alden 1.4s. The highest tax was assessed to Isaac Allerton (3.11s.). John Alden was assessed the same tax on the 27 March 1634 list (the highest then being Edward Winslow at 2.5s.) (Plymouth County Records, vol. 19, 27; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 427-429).

In 1634 a list was made of all colony men able to bear arms (between the ages of 16 and 60). "Mr. John Alden, Sen., John Alden, Jun., and Jos. Alden" were all listed for the town of "Duxborrow" (Plymouth County Records, vol. 8:187-196) Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 441).

Also in 1634, John Alden found himself imprisoned in Boston as the results of an incident on the Kennebec River involving parties from the Massachusetts Bay Colony and Plymouth Colony. The Bradford Patent gave Plymouth the right to settle and trade on the Kennebec River. John Howland was in charge of the Plymouth trading post on the river in 1634 when a trading ship from the Piscataqua settlement, under John Hocking, attempted to horn in. After they ignored his warnings to leave, Howland ordered their ship's mooring lines cut. Hocking shot and killed the man who cut the line, and one of the Plymouth men shot and killed Hocking. John Alden had been in Kennebec bringing supplies to the post at this time, but was not a party to the shootings. However, by the time he returned to Boston, a one-sided version of the news had arrived before him, and as he was the nearest Plymouth Colony representative at hand, Alden was arrested. Captain Myles Standish was dispatched with letters from Thomas Prence, Governor of the Plymouth Colony to straighten out the officials in Boston. Prence was successful in convincing Governor Dudley that they had heard only half of the story, the part about Hocking having killed a man being omitted. Alden was released, but the dispute over trading rights on the Kennebec continued acrimoniously between the two colonies (Bradford's History, 263-265).

For a young man hired as a cooper, John Alden soon assumed a place of high responsibility in the Plymouth Colony, serving as an Assistant many times between 1632 and 1640 and 1650 to 1686. He acted as Deputy Governor on two occasions when the Governor was absent. In March 1664/5 and October 1677; was Treasurer for three terms 1656 to 1658; and served on numerous committees and councils of war. This extensive public service indicates that he must have been well educated. Whether he received that education in England or from his fellow Pilgrims such as Winslow and Bradford is not known (Great Migration Begins, 1:21).

In 1636 and 1637 John Alden as assigned mowing ground for the year (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:40, 56). John Alden's cattle mark recorded at Plymouth 15 November 1636 was "a peece like a long round cut" (Plymouth Town Recs, 1). On 6 March 1636/7, "A parcel of land containing a knoll, or a little hill, lying over against Mr. Alden's land at Blewfish River, is granted by the Court unto the said Mr. John Alden in lieu of a parcel of land taken from him (next unto Samuel Nash's lands) for public use" (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:51). Bluefish River is a marshy brook in he eastern part of Duxbury.

On 5 February 1637/8 John was granted "certain lands at Green's Harbor" (later Marshfield). John Alden and Myles Standish were granted 300 acres "on the north side of the South River" on 2 July 1638, and John was granted "a little parcel of land ... lying at the southerly side of his lot" on 3 September 1638 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:76, 191, 195). The South River rises in Duxbury and flows through Marshfield to the sea.

In 1638 Assistants Thomas Prence and John Alden were dispatched to Sandwich to settle a dispute over how that town's granted land was to be divided (Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 65).

In October 1645 the General Court granted the inhabitants of Duxbury "a competent Porcion of lands about Saughtuckquett, towards the west, for a plantacon for them, and to have it foure miles every way from the place where they shall set up their center ... and have nominated Captaine Miles Standish, Mr. John Alden, Georg Soul, Constant Southworth, Joseph Rogers, and Willm Brett to be feoffers in trust for the equall devideing and laying forth of the said lands to their inhabitants." These lands became known as Duxbury, New Plantation, incorporated in 1656 as the town of Bridgewater (Plymouth County Records, vol. 2:88, 2:101, 143; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 79).

Robert Hicks of Plymouth mentioned in his well dated 28 May 1645, a field on the north side of Plymouth that he had "lately purchased of Mr. John Aldin" (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 8:144). John Alden bought land from Edward Hall in 1651 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:73).

On 2 February 1657/8 John Copeland and William Braind, Quakers, were charged with verbally abusing John Alden and Thomas Southworth among others. They were ordered to leave the colony, but either did not or returned, and on 8 February the two men were publicly whipped. While Plymouth Colony's treatment of Quakers was milder than Massachusetts Bay Colony, which hanged four, the Quakers were not welcomed in either place and were urged to move on. In 1658 James Cudworth of Scituate, who had lost his position as head of the Scituate military company when he was accused of aiding Quakers, wrote to England to complain about the treatment Quakers were receiving. In his letter he wrote, "Mr. Alden hath deceived the Expectations of many, and indeed lost the affections of such, as I judge were his Cordial Christian Friends; who is very active in such Ways, as I pray God may not be charged him, to be Oppressions of a High Nature." Apparently, Cudworth and others had expected Alden to be more sympathetic to the Quaker's plight (Plymouth County Records, vol. 3:130, 115, 162; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 91-92).

"Liberty is granted unto Mr. John Alden to look out a portion of land to accommodate his sons withall, and to make report thereof unto the Court, so it may be confirmed unto him" on 3 June 1657 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 3:120). At the Duxbury town meeting on 19 January 1659, the town granted to Mr. John Alden, Sen., "all that piece of common land, from the south of Philip Dillano's" (Duxbury Town Records, p. 54).

On 13 June 1660 John Alden was allowed "In regard that Mr. Alden is low in his state, and occasioned to spend much time at the courts on the country's occasions, and so hath done this many years, the Court have allowed him a small gratuity, the sum of ten pounds ..." (Plymouth County Records, vol. 3:195). This did not mean that John was destitute, only that he was short on cash needed to travel on colony business.

In June 1661 the Plymouth Court granted liberty to "Major Josiah Winslow and others the first born children of the jurisdiction of New Plymouth in reference unto an order or grant of the Court bearing date 1633 to purchase certain parcells of land for their accommodation; viz. a parcell next to the Massachusetts bounds, and another parcell between Namassakett and Bridgewater, and to make report thereof unto the Court that all such may be accommodated as aforesaid." The purchase was made in 1662 from Josiah Wampetuck, Sachem. Mr. Aldin was fourth on the list of those granted land in what was called the Purchade Purchase" (Pachade/Pochade/Pachage/Purchade Neck on the Nemasket River near the border of Middleborough and Bridgewater) and his lot was bounded "with two red Oak trees marked" (New England Historical & Genealogical Register, vol. 3:336). In 1669 the court determined that the first tract should belong to those eight who had their allotments upon Pochade neck and to their heirs; and the second tract to those eight plus those who had their allotments on the east side of Nemasket River in Captain Southworth's purchase.

John was granted a "competency of land" at Namasskett, 7 Jun 1665, and 100 acres at Teticcut, 4 March 1673/4 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 4:95; 5:141). Namasket and Titicut were villages in the area that became the town of Middleborough.

At the Plymouth Court of General Sessions held in July 1667, Robert Finney was granted 100 acres "where mr Alden and Captaine Southworth hath land att Namassakett River, if it may be had there ..." (Middleboro History, p. 545).

Mr. John Alden was one of the members of a Council of War assembled at Plymouth in April 1667 to deal with threats from the French and Dutch, and the increasing problems with King Philip and the Narragansetts. They commissioned officers of the military companies and arranged for military watches during any possibility of danger. Plans for evacuation of women and children and orders of war for horse and foot soldiers were made. When King Philip's War broke out in 1675, John Alden was a senior advisor to Gov. Josiah Winslow (Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 102, 110).

In 1675, "The Sixteen Shilling Purchase" was made by Constant Southworth and John Tompson (for 33) from the Indian sachems of Middleborough. The largest purchase of land in that town, it included what is now the own of Lakeville running to the Dartmouth line. John Alden was one of the 71 original proprietors of this purchase who were assigned lots on 21 November 1679. John received the 15th lot (Middleboro History, p. 621). The list of proprietors in Middleborough taken 28 Jun 1677 includes Mr. John Alden (Middleboro History, p. 551).

On 6 July 1682 Mr. John Alden made a deposition to the Plymouth court (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 3:120-121; Plymouth County Records, vol. 2:32):

John Alden Esqr Aged 83 years or thereabouts Testifyeth and saith that I this Deponant being one of the first Comers into New England to settle att or about Plymouth which Now is about 62 yeers since Doth know and understand by Osamequine the Great Sachem of these pttes that then was; and alsoe from Divers other prsons both English and Indians That the little Iland lying Neare the southerly point of Mount Hope Neck. Called by the Indians Chessawanuck by the English hoge Iland Did then blonge and appertaine to the said Sachem Sachem Osamequin as the other lands adjacent upon the Maine then Did and that the said Iland was Called by the English att the Trading house att Sowamsett then belonging to the Companie of Plymouth Collonie, hog Iland, upon this ocation that the said Companies People att the said Trading house; had then the posession and Improvement of he said Iland by keeping hoggs for theire use thereon; and further I this Depondant Doe Testify that both the said Sachem Osamequin and Wamsitta his reputed Eldest son; Did Give Graunt Allianate Infeoffe and Confeirme the Iland aforesaid unto Richard Smith Now of Naragansett; The said Iland being thus posessed and Improved; att the pleasure of the Colonie of New Plymouth aforesaid, a long time before Rhode Island was Posessed or Improved by any English.

In lieu of a will, John distributed his real estate among his sons by a series of deeds. On 8 July 1674, "for love and natural affection and other valuable causes and considerations," John deeded to "David Alden his true and natural son all that his land both meadow and upland that belongs unto him situate or being at or about a place called Rootey Brook within the Township of Middleborough ... excepting only one hundred acres," totaling about 300 acres (Plymouth County Land Records, vol. 3:330). Rootey Brook apparently flowed into the Nemansket River near Nemansket (Assawampsett) pond.

On 1 April 1679 John gave to his son Joseph "all that my share of land. ... within the township of Bridgewater (Plymouth County Land Records, 3:194).

On 1 January 1685[/6] John Alden, Sr., of Duxbury for "that real love and parental affection which I bear to my beloved and dutiful son Jonathan Alden" deeded all of his upland in Duxbury for which "see old book of grants and bounds of land anno 1637 folio 137," and all other lands at Duxbury whether granted by court at Plymouth or town of Duxbury (Plymouth County Land Records, 6:53).

On 13 January 1686[/7] "for that natural love and affection which I bear to my firstborn and dutiful son John Alden of Boston," John Alden, Sr., of Duxbury, deeded 100 acres at Pekard Neck alias Pachague with one-eighth of the meadow belonging to that place, and one hundred acres at Rootey Brook (brother David Alden to have the first right of purchase if John, Jr., should wish to sell this hundred acres), together with a sixteen shilling purchase being the fifteenth lot, all in Middleborough, and one hundred acres, the first in a division of one thousand acres in Bridgewater (Plymouth County Land Records, 5:437).

John Alden, Sr. of Duxbury, cooper, gave to sons Jonathan and David Alden five acres of salt marsh at Duxbury and "my whole proportion in the Major's Purchase commonly so-called being the thirty-fifth part of said purchase" (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 9:145; Plymouth County Land Records, 4:65). The Major's or Five Men's Purchase had been bought by Major Josiah Winslow from sachem Tispequin in 1663 and consisted of a narrow tract on the east side of Nemasket River between the upper and lower Indian paths to Plymouth, extending to the Carver line (Middleboro History p. 600).

John Alden died on 12 September 1687 by the old calendar. His death was noted by Judge Sewell, "Monday, Sept. 12. Mr. John Alden, the ancient Magistrate of Plymouth, died" (Sewall Diary, 150), and in two broadsides printed to commemorate the passing of the last signer of the Mayflower Compact. Reproductions of the broadsides ere published in The Mayflower Descendant (vol. 9:129, vol. 34:39). John and Priscilla were buried in the old Duxbury burying ground, but he exact location of their graves is not now known. In the 1950s stones were erected by the Alden Kindred in an area where other Alden graves were marked.

Administration of the estate of Mr. John Alden of Duxbury was granted to Lt. Jonathan Alden on 8 November 1687. Inventory was taken on 31 October 1687 by Lt. Jonathan Alden who made his oath on the day administration was granted to him. It consisted entirely of moveables and totaled 49.17s.6d. (Plymouth Co Probate Records, vol. 1:10, 16; The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 3:10-11):


s d
Neate Cattell sheep Swine & one horse
13
one Table one forme one Carpit one Cubert & coubert Cloth 15
2 Chaires 3
bedsteds Chests & boxes 15
Andirons pot hookes and hangers 8 6
pots Tongs one quort kettle 10
by brass ware 1 11
by 1 ads 1s 6d & saws 7s 8 6
by Augurs and Chisells 5
by wedges 5s to Coupers tooles 18 2s 1 7
one Carpenters Joynters 1 6
Cart boults Cleavie Exseta 13
driping pan & gridiorns 5
by puter ware 1 pound 12s by old Iron 3s 1 15
by 2 old guns 11
by Table linen & other linen 1 12
To beding 5 12
one Spitt 1s 6d & baggs 2s 3 6
one mortising axe 1
marking Iron a Case of Trenchers with other things 7
hamen and winch exse 2 6
by one goume and a bitt of linnin Cloth 7
by one horse bridle and Saddle
liberary and Cash and
wearing Clothes 18 9
by other old lumber 15


On 13 June 1688 the heirs of John Alden, Sr., of Duxbury, signed a release in favor of Jonathan Alden stating that they had received their portion of the estate. Those signing were: Alexander Standish (in ye Right of my wife Sarah deceased), John Bass (in ye right of my wife Ruth, deceased), Mary Alden, Thomas Dillano, John Alden, Joseph Alden, David Alden, Priscilla Alden and William Paybody (Plymouth Co PR, 1:10, 16; The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 3:11).
11
Event: LONG NOTE
Note:
John Alden was hired for a cooper, at South-Hampton, where the ship victuled; and being a hopfull young man, was much desired, but left to his owne liking to go or stay when he came here; but he stayed, and maryed here. (Bradford's History, p. 443, The Mayflower Descendant vol. 1:228)

On 11 November 1620 John Alden joined with the other free adult male passengers of the Mayflower to sign the Compact whereby they agreed to make and abide by their own laws (Bradford's History, 75; New Englands Memorial, p. 15-16)

That is all that is known about the origins of John Alden. Efforts to locate his birthplace and parentage have so far been inconclusive. Although he joined the Mayflower at Southampton, co. Hampshire, England, no records have been found of John in Southampton, and he was not necessarily a native of that place.

Several theories regarding the origins of John Alden were discussed in The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 39:111-121 and vol. 40:133-136. Of these theories, the one with the most prospects is that of the Harwich Alden family. A John Alden of Harwich married the daughter of William Russell, a merchant of that town. When William Russell wrote his will on 1 August 1586, he mentioned his son-in-law John Alden who was at that time in captivity in Spain (these were the years just before the Spanish Armada when English and Spanish ships competed for rule of the seas). He also mentions a number of children of John Alden. Interpretation of Russell's will seems to indicate that the captured John Alden had two sons named John. John "the elder" was probably the child of an earlier, unknown, first wife; and John "the younger" was the child of William Russell's daughter. Other children of the captured John Alden were Peter, William and Thomas. Any of these sons could have been the father of John Alden of the Mayflower.

The most appealing facet of the Harwich theory is that William Russell's son Robert, brother of the Elizabeth Russell who married the captured John Alden, married the widowed mother of Captain Christopher Jones of the Mayflower. Thus, if this theory is correct, Capt. Jones would have been this step-son of our John Alden's great-uncle! Certainly, this theory offers ample opportunity for John Alden to have learned about Captain Jones's trip to New England and to gain the job of cooper/carpenter for the voyage. Unfortunately, no records have been found in Harwich or the county of Essex of a John Alden who could be ours. If Captain Jones was related to John Alden, William Bradford did not know if it when he wrote his history or he almost certainly would have mentioned the connection.

John, himself, left us no information about his past. We estimate the year of his birth as 1598 using John's own deposition and a broadside published upon his death. In the deposition made on 6 July 1682 John stated he was "aged 83 yeers or thereabouts" (Plymouth Colony Records, Judicial Acts, Part 2, p. 32; The Mayflower Descendant vol. 3:120-121, which would indicate he was born between 6 July 1598 and 6 July 1599. When John died on 12 September 1687, a broadside published to commemorate the occasion stated he was "about eight-nine years of age, " indicating he was born between 12 September 1687 and 12 September 1598 (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 9:129). Combining the two ranges results in an estimated birth date between 6 July and 12 September 1598 or thereabouts.

Thus John was a about twenty-two years old in 1620 and very likely had just finished an apprenticeship in cooperage or carpentry. No letters, no family Bible, no journal, no writings survive for either John or Priscilla. All that survives is the story of their courtship.
11
Occupation:
Note: Cooper On Mayflower
Occupation: cooper 8 15 13
Event: Alt Birth 1599 Southampton, Hampshire, England
Emigration: 21 Nov 1620 On "Mayflower" 7
Change Date: 19 Dec 2006 at 12:21
Note:
John Alden appears to have originated from an Alden family residing in Harwich, Essex, England, that was related by marriage to the Mayflower's master Christopher Jones. He was about 21 years old when he was hired to be the cooper, or barrel-maker, for the Mayflower's voyage to America. He was given the option to stay in America, or return to England; he decided to stay.

At Plymouth, he quickly rose up from his common seaman status to a prominent member of the Colony. About 1622 or 1623, he married Priscilla, the orphaned daughter of William and Alice Mullins. They had their first child, Elizabeth, around 1624, and would have nine more children over the next twenty years. John Alden was one of the earliest freemen in the Colony, and was elected an assistant to the governor and Plymouth Court as early as 1631, and was regularly re-elected throughout the 1630s. He also became involved in administering the trading activities of the Colony on the Kennebec River, and in 1634 witnessed a trading dispute escalate into a double-killing, as Moses Talbot of Plymouth Colony was shot at point-blank range by trespasser John Hocking, who was then shot and killed when other Plymouth men returned fire. John Alden was held in custody by the neighboring Massachusetts Bay Colony for a few days while the two colonies debated who had jurisdiction to investigate the murders. Myles Standish eventually came to the Bay Colony to provide Plymouth's answer in the matter.

Alden, and several other families, including the Standish family, founded the town of Duxbury in the 1630s and took up residence there. Alden served as Duxbury's deputy to the Plymouth Court throughout the 1640s, and served on several committees, including the Committee on Kennebec Trade, and sat on several Councils of War. He also served as colony treasurer. In the 1650s, he build the house at left, in Duxbury, which still stands today. By the 1660s, Alden's frequent public service, combined with his large family of wife and ten children, began to cause his estate to languish, so the Plymouth Court provided him a number of land grants and cash grants to better provide for his family. Throughout the 1670s, Alden began distributing his land holdings to his surviving sons. He died in 1687 at the age of 89, one of the last surviving Mayflower passengers.


---------------------
Ancestral Summary:
Extensive research has been done into the ancestry of John Alden, but nothing has conclusively been found. There are two major theories that have been presented over the years:

Charles Edward Banks, in his book The English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers, 1929, puts forward a theory that John is the son of George Alden and Jane (---) and grandson of Richard and Avys Alden of Southampton, England. Since Bradford says John Alden was hired in Southampton, this would be a logical place to start looking for Aldens. No other supporting evidence has been found, and it has been noted by many researchers that the names George, Richard, and Avys do not occur anywhere in John Alden's FAM. Naming children after parents and grandparents was an extremely common practice in the seventeenth century, and the absence of such a name is nearly enough evidence to disprove this theory.

The currently popular theory is that John Alden came from Harwich, Essex, England. There was a sea-faring Alden FAM living there, who were related by marriage to Christopher Jones, captain of the Mayflower. It has been suggested John Alden may be the son of John Alden and Elizabeth Daye, but this is not fully proven either.

Two commemorative broadsides (elegy poems) survive from John Alden's 1687 death. The first broadside is by an unknown author, and the second broadside was written by John Cotton.

Biographical Summary:
William Bradford wrote, in his history Of Plymouth Plantation: "John Alden was hired for a cooper [barrel maker] at Southampton where the ship [Mayflower] victualed, and being a hopeful young man was much desired but left to his own liking to go or stay when he came here; but he stayed and married here." and later wrote "John Alden married Priscilla, Mr. Mullin's daughter, and had issue by her as is before related."

John Alden was an assistant for the Plymouth colony for many years, and was deputy governor for two years. His marriage to Priscilla Mullins was the subject of the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow poem, "The Courtship of Myles Standish", which although a classic has little factual basis. John and Priscilla were among the founders of the town of Duxbury.

In 1634, John Alden was on the Kennebec River assisting in the forceful removal of John Hocking who was illegally fishing and trading on land that had been granted to the Pilgrims. Hockings refused to leave, and when the party arrived at his ship by canoe to board and remove him, he shot and killed Moses Talbot. In return, Hockings was shot and killed. The Massachusetts Bay Colony took matters into its own hands, and arrested John Alden (even though he was not the one who fired the shot). Myles Standish was sent by Governor Bradford to obtain Alden's release, which he successfully did.

In his later years, John Alden was on many juries, including even a witch trial--though in Plymouth's case, the jury found the accuser guilty of libel and the alleged witch was allowed to go free. Plymouth Colony only had two witch trials during its history, and in both cases the accuser was found guilty and punished.

John and Priscilla Alden probably have the largest number of descendants of any Mayflower passenger, but with stiff competition from Richard Warren and John Howland. They are ancestors to Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams, poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Vice President Dan Quayle.

John Alden's House built in 1653 still stands, and tours are given by the Alden Kindred of America.

THE 1653 ALDEN HOUSE MUSEUM

Directions to the John Alden House:

Pick up State Route 3 south from Boston (Rte. 95 or Rte 128) or north from Plymouth and Cape Cod. Get off at Exit 11, the Duxbury/Pembroke exit. At the end of the ramp, head east towards Duxbury on Rte. 14. Bear right on Rt. 14 just beyond the Police Station. In about 2 miles, Rte. 14 intersects with Rte. 3A at a traffic light. Continue straight through the traffic light less than a mile until you come to a small group of stores. Watch for Railroad Avenue entering on the right just past Millbrook Market. Turn right onto Railroad Avenue which ends shortly at Alden Street. Almost directly across Alden Street is the entrance to the John Alden House.

Sources:
Alicia Crane Williams, ""John Alden: Theories on English Ancestry", Mayflower Descendant 39:111-122; 40:133-136

Alicia Crane Williams, Families of Pilgrims: John Alden and William Mullins (Massachusetts Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1986).

Robert C. Anderson, The Great Migration Begins, 1:21-26 (Boston: New England Historical and Genealogical Society, 1995).

William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation, ed. Samuel Morison (New York: Random House, 1952).

Eugene Aubrey Stratton, Plymouth Colony: Its History and Its People, 1620-1691 (Ancestor Publishers: Salt Lake City, 1986).

Harry Hollingsworth, "John Alden--Beer Brewer of Windsor?", The American Genealogist 53(1977):235-240.

John Alden (d.1687) and Priscilla Mullins (1600-1685) were Pilgrims on the Mayflower which landed at Plymouth, Masschusetts in 1620. The events leading to their marriage were described in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's "The Courtship of Miles Standish" (1858}.

JOHN ALDEN
ORIGIN: Southampton
MIGRATION: 1620 on Mayflower
FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth
REMOVES: Duxbury 1632
OCCUPATION: Cooper
FREEMAN: In "1633" Plymouth list of freemen, among those admitted prior to 1 January 1632/3 [PCR 1:3]; also in lists dated in or near 1637, 1639 and 1658 (in the latter two listed as of Duxbury) [PCR 1:52, 8:174, 198].
EDUCATION: Although there is no direct evidence for his literary and educational attainments, his
extensive public service, including especially his appointments as colony treasurer and to committees on revising the laws, certainly indicates that he must have been well-educated.
OFFICES: "Mr. John Alden Sen[ior]" is in the Duxbury section of the 1643 list of men able to bear arms [PCR 8:189]. Assistant, 6 February 1631/2 [WP 3:65], 1 January 1632/3, 1 January 1633/4, 1 January 1634/5, 5 January 1635/6, 3 January 1636/7, 6 March 1637/8, 4 March 1638/9 [PCR 1:5, 21, 32, 36, 48, 79, 116 (the assistants elected on 3 March 1639/40 were not sworn until 2 June 1640, so John Alden CONT to serve as assistant at a few courts in early 1640)]. Deputy for Duxbury to Plymouth General Court 1641, 1642, 1644 and 1646 to 1649, and also at courts of 20 August 1644, 28 October 1645 and 3 March 1645/6 [PCR 2:16, 40, 72, 75, 94, 95, 104, 117, 123, 144]. Assistant each year from 1650 to 1686 [PCR 2:153, 166; 3:7, 30, 48, 77, 99, 114, 134, 162, 187, 214; 4:13, 36, 60, 90, 122, 147, 179; 5:17, 34, 55, 90, 112, 143, 163, 194, 229, 256; 6:9, 34, 58, 83, 106, 127, 164, 185]. Acted as Deputy Governor on two occasions, in absence of Governor, 7 March 1664/5, 30 October 1677 [PCR 4:81, 5:245]. Treasurer, 3 June 1656, 3 June 1657, 1 June 1658 [PCR 3:99, 115, 135]. Council of War, 27 September 1642, 10 October 1643, 2 June 1646, 6 April 1653, 12 May 1653, 1 June 1658, 2 April 1667 [PCR 2:46, 63, 100; 3:26, 28, 138; 4:145]. Committee to revise laws, 4 June 1645, 3 June 1657 [PCR 2:85, 3:117]. Committee on Kennebec trade, 3 March 1645/6, 7 June 1648, 8 June 1649, 5 March 1655/6 [PCR 2:96, 127, 144; 3:96]. Appointed to numerous other minor posts and committees by Plymouth General Court.
ESTATE: In 1623 Plymouth land division granted an unknown number of acres as a passenger on the Mayflower in 1620 [PCR 12:4]. In 1627 Plymouth cattle division, included in company of John Howland, along with wife Priscilla, daughter Elizabeth and son John [PCR 12:10]. Assessed 1 4s. in Plymouth tax lists of 25 March 1633 and 27 March 1634 [PCR 1:9, 27]. Assigned mowing ground for the year, 14 March 1635/6, 20 March 1636/7 [PCR 1:40, 56]. On 6 March 1636/7, "A parcel of land containing a knoll, or a little hill, lying over against Mr. Alden's land at Blewfish River, is granted by the Court unto the said Mr. John Alden in lieu of a parcel of land taken from him (next unto Samuel Nash's lands) for public use" [PCR 1:51]. Granted "certain lands at Green's Harbor," 5 February 1637/8 [PCR 1:76]. Granted to Miles Standish and John Alden three hundred acres "on the north side of the South River," 2 July 1638 [PCR 1:91]. Granted "a little parcel of land... lying at the southerly side of his lot," 3 September 1638 [PCR 1:95]. On 3 June 1657 "Liberty is granted unto Mr. John Alden to look out a portion of land to accommodate his sons withall, and to make report thereof unto the Court, that so it may be confirmed unto him" [PCR 3:120]. 13 June 1660: "In regard that Mr. Alden is low in his estate, and occasioned to spend much time at the courts on the country's occasions, and so hath done this many years, the Court have allowed him a small gratuity, the sum of ten pounds, to be paid by the Treasurer" [PCR 3:195]. Granted "a competency of land" at Namasskett, 7 June 1665 [PCR 4:95]. Granted one hundred acres at Teticutt, 4 March 1673/4 [PCR 5:141]. On 1 April 1679 John Alden gave to his son Joseph "all that my share of land... within the township of Bridgewater" [PLR 3:194]. On 8 July 1674 John Alden of Duxbury "for love and natural affection and other valuable causes and considerations" deeded to "David Alden his true and natural son all that his land both meadow and upland that belongs unto him situate or being at or about a place called Rootey Brook within the Township of Middleborough ... excepting only one hundred acres," containing about three hundred acres [PLR 3:330].
A description of the land of "Mr. John Aldin, of Duxbery," is entered under date of 4 December 1637, but with the modern annotation that this is a later entry, and with the internal statement that one of the abuttors was "Philip Delano, deceased," which means that the entry must have been made in 1681 or later; this is immediately followed by an entry for another parcel of land which Alden bought of Edward Hall in 1651 [PCR 1:71, 73]. On 1 January 1684[/5] [36 Charles II] John Alden Sr. of Duxbury for "that real love and parental affection which I bear to my beloved and dutiful son Jonathan Alden" deeded to him all my upland in Duxbury, for which "see old book of grants and bounds of land anno 1637 folio 137," and all other lands at Duxbury whether granted by court at Plymouth or town of Duxbury [PLR 6:53]. On 13 January 1686[/7] [2 James II] John Alden Sr. of Duxbury for "that natural love and affection which I bear to my firstborn and dutiful son John Alden of Boston" deeded him one hundred acres at Pekard Neck alias Pachague with one-eighth of the meadow belonging to that place, and one hundred acres at Rootey Brook (brother David Alden is to have first right of purchase if John should wish to sell this hundred acres), together with a sixteen shilling purchase being the fifteenth lot, all in Middleborough, and one hundred acres, the first in a division of one thousand acres in Bridgewater [PLR 5:427]. On 19 August 1687 John Alden Sr. of Duxbury, cooper, gave to his sons Jonathan and David Alden five acres of salt marsh at Duxbury and "my whole proportion in the Major's Purchase commonly so-called being the thirty-fifth part of said purchase" [MD 9:145, citing PLR 4:65]. The inventory of John Alden's estate was taken on 31 October 1687 by Jonathan Alden, and totalled 49 17s. 6d., all movables. On 13 June 1688 the heirs of John Alden Sr. of Duxbury signed a release in favor of Jonathan Alden, stating that they had received their portion of the estate; those signing were Alexander Standish (in the right of his wife Sarah deceased), John Bass (in the right of his wife Ruth deceased), Mary Alden, Thomas Delano, John Alden, Joseph Alden, David Alden, Priscilla Alden and William Pabodie [PPR 1:10, 16; MD 3:10].

BIRTH: About 1599 (deposed aged 83 on 6 July 1682 [MD 3:120]; in his 89th year at death on 12 September 1687 [MD 9:129]; "about eighty-nine years of age" at death on 12 September 1687 [MD 34:49]).
DEATH: Duxbury 12 September 1687 [Sewall 150; MD 9:129, 34:49].
MARRIAGE: Plymouth about 1623 PRISCILLA MULLINS, daughter of WILLIAM MULLINS; she died after 1651, when she is mentioned in Bradford's summary of Mayflower passengers.

CHILDREN:

i ELIZABETH, b. about 1624; m. Plymouth 26 (or 20) December 1644 William Pabodie [PCR 2:79; DuVR]; she d. Little Compton 31 May 1717 [LCVR 143], "a. 92" [Boston News-Letter]. (Her tombstone at Little Compton gives her age at death as "in the 94th year of her age," but as the current monument was erected in 1882, this may not have been on the original stone.)

ii JOHN, b. about 1626; m. Boston 1 April 1660 "Elizabeth Everill, widow, relict of Abiell Everill, deceased" (although the correct date should probably be 1659, as a child was born to John and Elizabeth Alden on 17 December 1659 [BVR 69], and in the original form of the vital records, given in the second of the following citations but not in the first, this record is imbedded among others for 1659) [BVR 76; NEHGR 18:333; but see NEHGR 52:162 and Munsey-Hopkins 55, which interpret the 1659 birth record to imply that John Alden had had an earlier wife, also named Elizabeth]; she was born before 1640, daughter of William Phillips, and m. Boston 6 July 1655 Abiel Everill [BVR 52]; John Alden d. 14 March 1701/2 [Sewall 463]

iii JOSEPH, b. about 1627 (in list of men able to bear arms in 1643, and therefore at least 16 [PCR 8:189]); m. by about 1660 Mary Simons, daughter of MOSES SIMONS or SIMONSON and Sarah _____ [MD 31:60].

iv PRISCILLA, b. say 1630; living unm. in 1688 [PPR 1:16].

v JONATHAN, b. about 1632; m. Duxbury 10 December 1672 Abigail Hallett; he d. Duxbury 14 February 1696/7 "in the 65 year of his age" [MD 9:159; NEHGR 52:365]. (The date on the tombstone is 14 February 1697, but the double-dating problem is resolved by the probate papers, as administration on the estate was granted on 8 March 1696/7 [MD 6:174-78].)

vi SARAH, b. say 1634; m. by about 1660 Alexander Standish (date based on approximated birthdates of children [NEHGR 52:363-65]).

vii RUTH, b. say 1636; m. Braintree 3 February 1657/8 John Bass [BrVR 716].

viii MARY, b. say 1638; living unm. in 1688 [PPR 1:16].

ix REBECCA, b. say 1640; subject of unfounded rumor that she was "with child," 1 October 1661 [PCR 4:7]; m. in 1667, before 30 October, Thomas Delano [PCR 4:168, 8:122; NEHGR 102:83, 86].

x DAVID, b. say 1642; m. by 1674 Mary Southworth, dau. of CONSTANT SOUTHWORTH and Elizabeth Collier (in his will, dated 27 February 1678, Constant Southworth bequeathed to daughter Mary Alden [PCPR 4:1:18-20]).

COMMENTS: According to Bradford, "John Alden was hired a cooper at Southampton where the ship victualled, and being a hopeful young man was much desired but left to his own liking to go or stay when he came here; but he stayed and married here" [Bradford 443]. In his accounting of the Mayflower families in 1651, Bradford stated under William Mullins that "his daughter Priscilla survived, and married with John Alden; who are both living and have eleven [sic] children. And their eldest daughter is married and hath five children" [Bradford 445]. (As the marginal annotation for this entry gives the "increasing" as fifteen, and the eldest daughter already had five children, the correct number for John and Priscilla is more likely ten [MD 39:111].) Many suggestions have been made as to the English origin of John Alden. Alicia Crane Williams has recently examined all the relevant evidence carefully and exhaustively, and comes to the conclusion that, although one or two of the suggested origins are "tempting," all are far from proved [MD 39:111-22, 40:133-36, 41:201]. By entering "Southampton" under ORIGIN above, we are only taking note of Bradford's statement that Alden was hired at that port; we are not implying that he was born or raised there.
The present account differs somewhat from other accounts in the birth order of the children, and the approximated ages. The estimated dates of birth for the first two children (Elizabeth and John) are reasonably well-defined because they fell between the 1623 land division and the 1627 cattle division. The third child (Joseph) must have been born late in 1627 to appear on the 1643 list of men able to bear arms. The next date which we are able to fix is that of Jonathan, who was said at his death early in 1697 to be in his sixty-fifth year, and so born in 1632 (or possibly early in 1633); note that this gives us a gap of about five or six years between Joseph and Jonathan. We arbitrarily place one of the unmarried daughters, Priscilla, in this gap, although it might as well be Mary who fits here. The remainder of the children are then ranged after Jonathan at two year intervals. This makes Ruth about twenty-two when she married John Bass, and Rebecca about twenty-one when she was the subject of the unfortunate rumor. Given the paucity of solid evidence on many of these points, other plausible arrangements may be easily constructed.
Some accounts of the FAM of John Alden include a son Zachariah, who had a daughter Anne Alden who married in 1699 Josiah Snell. In 1948 Hallock P. Long demonstrated that this son never existed, and that Anna Alden was almost certainly the daughter of John Alden's son Jonathan [NEHGR 102:82-86].
Attempts have been made to include Henry Alden of Billerica, Roxbury and Dedham as a descendant of John Alden, but this cannot be. Henry Alden was rated in Billerica in 1688 [NEHGR 31:303], so he must have been born no later than 1667. The wills of John Alden's sons John and Joseph make it clear that neither of them had a son Henry. John Alden's son Jonathan did not marry until 1672, and his son David apparently even later than that. Henry Alden must have been a late immigrant to New England, with no known genealogical connection with John Alden of Plymouth and Duxbury [MD 42:21ff.].
As noted above, John Alden was frequently a member of the committee on the Kennebec trade. He had actively participated in the trade himself, and in early 1634 he became involved in an incident in which a party of Plymouth men led by himself and John Howland became embroiled with a group of men from the Piscataqua settlement which would grow into Dover. One man on each side was killed, and in the aftermath Alden was detained at Boston as security against the final resolution of the conflict. [See WJ 1:155-56, 162-63; WP 3:167-68; MBCR 1:119; and Bradford 262-68, for the particulars of this incident.]
The results of a 1960 season of digging are given by Roland Wells Robbins in Pilgrim John Alden's Progress: Archaeological Excavations in Duxbury (Plymouth: The Pilgrim Society 1969).

John Alden, b. 1599, d. September 12, 1687, was one of the Pilgrim Fathers who came to America on the MAYFLOWER. He signed the Mayflower Compact, and founded Plymouth Colony in 1620. In 1627 or shortly afterward, together with the Plymouth colonist Myles Standish, he founded Duxbury, where he lived until his death. Alden was active in the affairs of Plymouth Colony, serving alternately as assistant to the governor as deputy from Duxbury.(1664-65, 1667) He lived longer than any of the other signers of the Mayflower Compact. He died about the age of 90.

The unfounding details of his wooing of fellow Pilgrim, Priscilla Mullens (Mullins or Molines) - whom he did marry in 1623 - were the subject of the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow poem "The Courtship of Miles Standish." (1858). In the poem, Alden, deeply in love with Priscilla Mullens, proposes to her on behalf of his shy friend Myles Standish, whereupon she inquires. "Why don't you speak for yourself, John?" ===============================================================
According to Joshua B. Richmond's "Richmond FAM". John Alden was about 22 years old when he arrived in Plymouth. He was the stripling who first leaped upon the rock, as mentioned by Mr. Adams. He built his house on a rise of land near Eagle Tree Pond, where the ruins of his mill are still to be seen. (1897)
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See WFT Vol 8, #3455 for a lengthy story and eulogy about John Alden.
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From WFT Vol 9, #2087

John Alden was not a member of the Pilgrim group that had left Holland for the voyage to America, but was hired on just before departure to make barrels and perform other duties. he was "left to his own liking to go or stay when he came here; but he stayed, and married here". (from the chronicles of William Bradford)

John became successful as a cooper and farmer and in business, enough so to become one of eight bondsmen in Plymouth who assumed responsibility for the Colonial debt. Later, he moved to Duxbury and took over a farm near his friend Myles Standish. He was buried near Standish after he died on September 12, 1687.

John Alden was a maternal ancestor of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; his mother's maiden name was Zilpah Wadsworth and descended from Elizabeth Alden, daughter of John and Priscilla. Elizabeth was an older sister of John Alden, from whom the VanGelder line descends.

John Alden was the great-granduncle of President John Quincy Adams
See WFT Vol 10, #0042
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For a detailed account of the John Alden FAM, see the "FTM, Genealogies of Mayflower Families, A-F, Alden Genealogy.
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Extensive research has been done into the ancestry of John Alden, but nothing has conclusively been found. There are two major theories that have been presented over the years:

Charles Edward Banks, in his book "The English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers, 1929, puts forward a theory that john is the son of George Alden and Jane (---) and grandson of Richard and Avys Alden of Southampton, England. Since Bradford says John Alden was hired in Southampton, this would be a logical place to start looking for Aldens. No other supporting evidence has been found, and it has been noted by many researchers that the names George, Richard, and Avys do not occure anywhere in John Alden's FAM. Naming children after parents and grandparents was an extremely common practice in the seventeenth century, and the absence of such a name is nearly enough evidence to disprove this theory.

The currently popular theory is that John Alden came from Harwich, England. There was a sea-faring Alden FAM living there, who were related by marriage to Christopher Jones, captain of the Mayflower. It has been suggested John Alden may be the son of John Alden and Elizabeth Daye, but this is not fully proven either.

Mayflower Pilgrim. His parents were Jane and George Alden. Husband of Priscella (Mullins) Alden and father of Ruth Alden Bass.
John Alden was hired for a cooper, at South-Hampton, where the ship victuled; and being a hopfull young man, was much desired, but left to his owne liking to go or stay when he came here; but he stayed, and maryed here. (Bradford's History, p. 443, The Mayflower Descendant vol. 1:228)

On 11 November 1620 John Alden joined with the other free adult male passengers of the Mayflower to sign the Compact whereby they agreed to make and abide by their own laws (Bradford's History, 75; New Englands Memorial, p. 15-16)

That is all that is known about the origins of John Alden. Efforts to locate his birthplace and parentage have so far been inconclusive. Although he joined the Mayflower at Southampton, co. Hampshire, England, no records have been found of John in Southampton, and he was not necessarily a native of that place.

Several theories regarding the origins of John Alden were discussed in The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 39:111-121 and vol. 40:133-136. Of these theories, the one with the most prospects is that of the Harwich Alden FAM. A John Alden of Harwich married the daughter of William Russell, a merchant of that town. When William Russell wrote his will on 1 August 1586, he mentioned his son-in-law John Alden who was at that time in captivity in Spain (these were the years just before the Spanish Armada when English and Spanish ships competed for rule of the seas). He also mentions a number of children of John Alden. Interpretation of Russell's will seems to indicate that the captured John Alden had two sons named John. John "the elder" was probably the child of an earlier, unknown, first wife; and John "the younger" was the child of William Russell's daughter. Other children of the captured John Alden were Peter, William and Thomas. Any of these sons could have been the father of John Alden of the Mayflower.

The most appealing facet of the Harwich theory is that William Russell's son Robert, brother of the Elizabeth Russell who married the captured John Alden, married the widowed mother of Captain Christopher Jones of the Mayflower. Thus, if this theory is correct, Capt. Jones would have been this step-son of our John Alden's great-uncle! Certainly, this theory offers ample opportunity for John Alden to have learned about Captain Jones's trip to New England and to gain the job of cooper/carpenter for the voyage. Unfortunately, no records have been found in Harwich or the county of Essex of a John Alden who could be ours. If Captain Jones was related to John Alden, William Bradford did not know if it when he wrote his history or he almost certainly would have mentioned the connection.

John, himself, left us no information about his past. We estimate the year of his birth as 1598 using John's own deposition and a broadside published upon his death. In the deposition made on 6 July 1682 John stated he was "aged 83 yeers or thereabouts" (Plymouth Colony Records, Judicial Acts, Part 2, p. 32; The Mayflower Descendant vol. 3:120-121, which would indicate he was born between 6 July 1598 and 6 July 1599. When John died on 12 September 1687, a broadside published to commemorate the occasion stated he was "about eight-nine years of age," indicating he was born between 12 September 1687 and 12 September 1598 (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 9:129). Combining the two ranges results in an estimated birth date between 6 July and 12 September 1598 or thereabouts.

Thus John was a about twenty-two years old in 1620 and very likely had just finished an apprenticeship in cooperage or carpentry. No letters, no FAM Bible, no journal, no writings survive for either John or Priscilla. All that survives is the story of their courtship.

------------------------
www.alden.org/genealogy/Threegen.htm and www.mindspring.com/~ffeldman/siner_index/wga1.html#138

Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Volume 16, Part One: John Alden; Author: Woodworth-Barnes, Esther Littleford, compiler, and Alicia Crane Williams, ed. Publication: [Plymouth MA:] The General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1999

John was a cooper from Southhampton England. He was the oldest survivor of those who signed the May Flower Compact on 11/11/1620. (William Mullins also signed the compact but he and his wife died in 2/1621 near Provincetown MA.)

John Alden was an assistant for the Plymouth colony for many years, and was deputy governor for two years. His marriage to Priscilla Mullins was the subject of the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow poem, "The Courtship of Myles Standish", which although a classic has little factual basis. John and Priscilla were among the founders of the town of Duxbury. He was thought to have 11 children but only 8 were named as heirs at the time of his death.

In his later years, John Alden was on many juries, including even a witch trial--though in Plymouth's case, the jury found the accuser guilty of libel and the alleged witch was allowed to go free. Plymouth Colony only had two witch trials during its history, and in both cases the accuser was found guilty and punished.

John and Priscilla Alden probably have the largest number of descendants of any Mayflower passenger. Descendents include: President John Adams and John Quincy Adams, poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and vice President Dan Quayle.

In a deposition made on 6 July 1682, John said he was aged 83 years or thereabout, yielding birth date between 6 July 1598 to 5 July 1589. At his death, on 12 sept 1597, a broadside was printed stating that he was 89 years of age, yielding a birth date between 12 Sept 1597 and 11 Sept 1598. Combined they give us a range of 6 July 1598 to 11 Sept 1598, or thereabouts.
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John and Priscilla Alden in Plymouth
From the book "The Alden Family in the Alden House" by Dorothy Wentworth

The marriage of John Alden and Priscilla Mullins is the one bright event in the sober settlement of Pilgrim Plymouth. More fiction than fact runs through the literature every schoolchild has to read, yet in spite of the juggled history and poetic license, the love story survives, the thread of young true love running clear through all the fanciful trappings writers have thought up.

John Alden, the Pilgrim, was the youngest and the last survivor of those who signed the, "Mayflower Compact"; tradition has it that while acting as "proxy" in the courtship of the beautiful Priscilla Mullens or Molines he became the principal, and she thus became the mother of the first white child born in Plymouth Colony. Priscilla's father was William Molines, or as appears among the signers of the "Compact", William Mullins.

William Bradford wrote, in his history Of Plymouth Plantation: "John Alden was hired for a cooper [barrel maker] at Southampton where the ship [Mayflower] victualed, and being a hopeful young man was much desired but left to his own liking to go or stay when he came here; but he stayed and married here." and later wrote "John Alden married Priscilla, Mr. Mullin's daughter, and had issue by her as is before related."

John Alden was an assistant for the Plymouth colony for many years, and was deputy governor for two years. His marriage to Priscilla Mullins was the subject of the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow poem, "The Courtship of Myles Standish", which although a classic has little factual basis. John and Priscilla were among the founders of the town of Duxbury.

In 1634, John Alden was on the Kennebec River assisting in the forceful removal of John Hocking who was illegally fishing and trading on land that had been granted to the Pilgrims. Hockings refused to leave, and when the party arrived at his ship by canoe to board and remove him, he shot and killed Moses Talbot. In return, Hockings was shot and killed. The Massachusetts Bay Colony took matters into its own hands, and arrested John Alden (even though he was not the one who fired the shot). Myles Standish was sent by Governor Bradford to obtain Alden's release, which he successfully did.

In his later years, John Alden was on many juries, including even a witch trial--though in Plymouth's case, the jury found the accuser guilty of libel and the alleged witch was allowed to go free. Plymouth Colony only had two witch trials during its history, and in both cases the accuser was found guilty and punished.

John and Priscilla Alden probably have the largest number of descendants of any Mayflower passenger, but with stiff competition from Richard Warren and John Howland. They are ancestors to Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams, poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Vice President Dan Quayle.
---------------------------------

That is all that is known about the origins of John Alden. Efforts to locate his birthplace and parentage have so far been inconclusive. Although he joined the Mayflower at Southampton, co. Hampshire, England, no records have been found of John in Southampton, and he was not necessarily a native of that place.
Several theories regarding the origins of John Alden were discussed in The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 39:111-121 and vol. 40:133-136. Of these theories, the one with the most prospects is that of the Harwich Alden family. A John Alden of Harwich married the daughter of William Russell, a merchant of that town. When William Russell wrote his will on 1 August 1586, he mentioned his son-in-law John Alden who was at that time in captivity in Spain (these were the years just before the Spanish Armada when English and Spanish ships competed for rule of the seas). He also mentions a number of children of John Alden. Interpretation of Russell's will seems to indicate that the captured John Alden had two sons named John. John "the elder" was probably the child of an earlier, unknown, first wife; and John 'the younger' was the child of William Russell's daughter. Other children of the captured John Alden were Peter, William and Thomas. Any of these sons could have been the father of John Alden of the Mayflower.

The most appealing facet of the Harwich theory is that William Russell's son Robert, brother of the Elizabeth Russell who married the captured John Alden, married the widowed mother of Captain Christopher Jones of the Mayflower. Thus, if this theory is correct, Capt. Jones would have been this step-son of our John Alden's great-uncle! Certainly, this theory offers ample opportunity for John Alden to have learned about Captain Jones's trip to New England and to gain the job of cooper/carpenter for the voyage. Unfortunately, no records have been found in Harwich or the county of Essex of a John Alden who could be ours. If Captain Jones was related to John Alden, William Bradford did not know if it when he wrote his history or he almost certainly would have mentioned the connection.

John, himself, left us no information about his past. We estimate the year of his birth as 1598 using John's own deposition and a broadside published upon his death. In the deposition made on 6 July 1682 John stated he was 'aged 83 yeers or thereabouts' (Plymouth Colony Records, Judicial Acts, Part 2, p. 32; The Mayflower Descendant vol. 3:120-121, which would indicate he was born between 6 July 1598 and 6 July 1599. When John died on 12 September 1687, a broadside published to commemorate the occasion stated he was 'about eight-nine years of age,' indicating he was born between 12 September 1687 and 12 September 1598 (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 9:129). Combining the two ranges results in an estimated birth date between 6 July and 12 September 1598 or thereabouts.

Thus John was a about twenty-two years old in 1620 and very likely had just finished an apprenticeship in cooperage or carpentry. No letters, no family Bible, no journal, no writings survive for either John or Priscilla. All that survives is the story of their courtship.

Priscilla Mullins was the daughter of William Mullins, also a passenger on the Mayflower with his wife Alice and son Joseph. William, Alice and Joseph all died in the terrible sickness and deprivation of the first winter in Plymouth. Priscilla, who as probably still too young to be married, was orphaned, her only surviving kin her brother and sister in England. Poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow celebrated the story of how Priscilla attracted the attentions of the newly-widowed Captain Myles Standish, who asked his friend John Alden to propose on his behalf only to have Priscilla ask, 'Why don't you speak for yourself, John?' Most of the world draws its image of the Pilgrim story from Longfellow's epic narrative poem, The Courtship of Myles Standish. The basic story was apparently handed down in the Alden family and published by John and Priscilla's great-great-grandson, Rev. Timothy Alden, in his Collection of American Epitaphs and Inscriptions in 1814 (264-271). Rev. Timothy's facts are not always correct (he was not born until 1736, fifty years after John's death), and he embellishes in the typical style of his day, but his account of the famous courtship and description of John is as close to the original as we can get:

Mrs. Rose Standish, consort of Captain Standish, departed this life, on the 29 of January 1621. This circumstance is mentioned as an introduction to the following anecdote, which as been carefully handed down by tradition.

In a very short time after the decease of Mrs. Standish, the captain was led to think, that, if he could obtain Miss Priscilla Mullins, a daughter of Mr. William Mullins, the breach in his family would be happily repaired. He, therefore, according to the custom of those times, sent to ask Mr. Mullins' permission to visit his daughter. John Alden, the messenger, went and faithfully communicated the wishes of the captain. The old gentleman did not object, as he might have done, on account of the recency of Captain Standish's bereavement. He said it was perfectly agreeable to him, but the young lady must also be consulted. The damsel was then called into the room, and John Alden, who is said to have been a man of most excellent form with a fair and ruddy complexion, arose, and, in a very courteous and prepossessing manner, delivered his errand. Miss Mullins listened with respectful attention, and at last, after a considerable pause, fixing her eyes upon him, with an open and pleasant countenance, said, prithee John, why do you not speak for yourself? He blushed, and bowed, and took his leave, but with a look, which indicated more than his diffidence would permit him otherwise to express. However, he soon renewed his visit, and it was not long before their nuptials were celebrated in ample form.

Obviously, in addition to the inevitable distortions of stories told and retold over the years, the Rev. Alden had already taken some poetic license with the family story before Longfellow took over. There would have been very little time between the death of Rose Standish on January 29th and the death of William Mullins on February 21st, if all of this took place while Mullins was still alive, and there is little chance even the flamboyant Captain Standish would have been courting Priscilla during those desperate months of sickness and starvation in the winter of 1621. A grain of truth probably exists in the family tradition, but most of the story that found its way to Longfellow's poem is pure imagination.

The marriage date of John and Priscilla is also unknown. They were certainly married at Plymouth. We know that William Bradford's marriage to Alice Carpenter 14 August 1624 was the fourth marriage in Plymouth Colony (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 30:4). The first was that of Edward Winslow and Susannah White in 1621. Francis Eaton's marriage to his second wife, Dorothy, maidservant to the Carvers, was possibly the second (TAG, 72:308-309). John Alden and Priscilla Mullins is likely the third.

Since Priscilla is not listed in the 1623 division of land (which probably took place in early 1623/4 — see below), it is assumed their marriage took place before that list was made and, therefore, John Alden's share included that of his wife. By the division of cattle in May 1627, the Aldens had two children, Elizabeth and John. No birth records for any of the Alden children survive, but from the death record of Elizabeth Alden it appears she was born about 1624-5 and was the eldest child. This places John and Priscilla's marriage about 1623. Since no birth or baptism for Priscilla has been found, we can only make a wild guess that she may have been about sixteen to eighteen in 1620, slightly too young to marry in the first year or two after she was orphaned.

William Bradford's account of the Increasings and Decreasings of the Mayflower passengers, written in 1650, states:
Mrs. Mullins and his wife, his son and his servant died the first winter. Only his daughter Priscilla survived, and married with John Alden, who are both living and have eleven children. with their eldest daughter is married and hath five children (Bradford's History, 445; The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 1:9)

No further written record of Priscilla survives. Bradford's statement that she had eleven children (and that her eldest daughter had five by 1650) is contradicted by his marginal tally of '15' beside the entry. Eleven children plus five grandchildren should have been '16.' Only ten children have been identified. If there were other children, they died unmarried and without heirs before John Alden's estate was settled.

Priscilla died before here husband. A nineteenth century account published by John A. Goodwin in The Pilgrim Republic in 1888 describes the mourners at the funeral of Governor Josiah Winslow in 1680 including 'John Alden, with Priscilla still on his arm' (also New England Historical & Genealogical Register, vol. 51:429). No contemporary corroboration of this statement has been found, and we can only state with certainty that she was alive when Bradford wrote is list in 1650 but dead by the time John's epitaph was published in 1687 (for certainly if Priscilla had been living, the writer would have mentioned the famous widow). Since no special notice was made of Priscilla's death, we can probably assume she did not die very young nor under any strange circumstances. Sadly, neither the birth, marriage, nor the death for one of America's most famous women is known.

The 1623 division of land among the Plymouth colonists (probably made in early 1623/4) placed John Alden in the group that received land on the "north side of the towne. " Others in this group were Edward Winslow, Richard Warren, John Goodman, John Crackston, Mary Chilton, Captain Myles Standish, Francis Eaton, Henry Cooper, and Humility Cooper (Plymouth County Records, vol. 12:4; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 416). The acreage that John Alden is illegible, but was probably four acres — representing on share each for himself and Priscilla, and for her deceased parents William and Alice Mullins (Mayflower Quarterly Feb. 1974, 13).

In 1626 Isaac Allerton negotiated an agreement between the Merchant Adventurers in England who had financed the Plymouth Colony, whereby 53 members of the colony (including John Alden) and five London men (called the 'Purchasers') were to pay L180 for all of the stocks, lands, and merchandise that belonged to the Company (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 2:177; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 419-20). In May 1627 John Alden joined with William Bradford, Capt. Myles Standish, Isaac Allerton, Edward Winslow, William Brewster, John Howland, and Thomas Prence, to undertake (thus they were called the 'Undertakers') the debt owed by the 'Purchasers.' In return, this group of eight men received the boats, furs, and other stores that had belonged to the Company as well as rights to trade for themselves for six years. Payment was to be made in corn and tobacco (Of Plimoth Plantation, 194-195).

The division of cattle made 22 May 1627 placed John Alden, Priscilla Alden, and their children Elizabeth and John in the fourth lot that 'fell to John Howland & his company Joyned to him.' The lot received 'one of the 4 heyfers Came in the Jacob Called Raghorne' (Raghorne is a breed of cattle) (Plymouth County Records, 12:10; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 422).

The colonists began to spread out from Plymouth and settle on the land they had been granted. At first, the families would end to their land during the summer and return to the Plymouth settlement during the winter where they could attend church. The original Alden house in Duxbury was probably begun during the summers and by 1631 the family was staying longer, perhaps the whole year. Bradford and others in Plymouth were worried about losing the families from the original settlement, and in April 1632 John Alden, Capt. Standish, Jonathan Brewster and Thomas Prence signed an agreement promising to bring their families back to Plymouth during the winter. However, as Bradford later wrote, 'First those that lived on their lots on the other side of the Bay, called Duxbury, they could not long bring their wives and children to the public worship and church meetings here, but with such burthen as, growing to some competent number, they sued to be dismissed and become a body of themselves' (Bradford's History, 253). thus the Alden family took up permanent residence in Duxbury.

The Alden grant in Duxbury was accessible by water from the bay and up the river, so that the whole length of the farm had water transportation. The Green Harbor Path, running from Plymouth to Marshfield passed along the west end of the farm. The bounds of the farm were described in a document dated 4 December 1637, but recorded in 1681 or later.

The bounds of the land of Mr. John Alden of Duxbery, as it was layed out by Gov. Bradford, Mr. Edward Winslow, Joshua Pratt, and Edward Bangs. It begines, for the breath of it, att a place where formerly an old pine tree stood, where now there is a gravelly hole, and from thence to a burnt walnut stump, and runinge for the length, and from thence to take its length unto a whie oake tree standing a little within the land of Phillip Delano deceased, the root of that tree still remaining, and from thence for the breadth att the had of the lott up to the old Greens Harbor Path; on the southerly side bounded with the meddow of the said John Alden in part and with the land of Experience Mitchell att the upper end (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:71).

This description was amended under the date 1 January 1637/8 (Alden Family in the Alden House, 14):
The bounds of the land of MR. John Alden att Duxburrow, as it was layed forth by Gov. Bradford, Mr. Edward Winslow, Joshua Pratt, Edward Bangs, as followeth: from an old pine tree by the meddow, which meddow was afterwards allotted unto mee, the said John Alden, and for the breadth of the said land buting upon and ranging along the said Blew Fish River to a burnt walnut stump; and from thence to a walnut tree ranging from the abovesaid stump west north west, which was sum tim after run by Joshua Prate and Phillip Delano, Senior, unto a white oake tree, standing a little within the bounds of Phillip Delanoes land, there being a stump or root of that tree still remaining, and from thence for the breadth att the head, up to Greens Harbour, old path; and on the southerly side of he land bounded ptly with my owne meddow, and with the land of Experience Mitchell towards the upper end.

The first house built and occupied by John and Priscilla was a long, narrow house with a field stone foundation and a root cellar under the west end. Archeological excavations made in 1960 by Roland Wells Robbins revealed the cellar stones and that the house was about 10 feet in width and 38 feet in length (here the Aldens raised 10 children!). Its size would have been similar to a modern mobile home, although the Alden house would have had a loft or second floor. Evidence at the site of the old house proved that the old house had not burned, as many old stories claimed. It had definitely been moved or dismantled. The dimensions of the old house led Robbins to believe that it had been dismantled and moved up the hill to be incorporated as the kitchen, borning room, and buttery of the existing Alden House, which are exactly the same dimensions (Pilgrim John Alden's Progress, 15).

The present Alden house was believed to have been built in 1653, a date reputedly found carved in one of the beams or boards of the house. However, recent archeological work indicates the house may have been built sometime in the latter two decades of the 1600s. It is still believed that beams from the original house were used in the construction of the newer one. Further research is being undertaken by the Alden Kindred of America, Inc., which owns and maintains the house. The Alden house remained in the possession of members of the Jonathan2 Alden family until 1892 and was transferred to the Alden Kindred in 1907 (Alden Family in the Alden House, 128).

John Alden was on the 1633 list of Plymouth freemen among those admitted prior to 1 Jan 1632/3 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:3). The tax list of 25 March 1633 assesses John Alden ?1.4s. The highest tax was assessed to Isaac Allerton (?3.11s.). John Alden was assessed the same tax on the 27 March 1634 list (the highest then being Edward Winslow at ?2.5s.) (Plymouth County Records, vol. 19, 27; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 427-429).

In 1634 a list was made of all colony men able to bear arms (between the ages of 16 and 60). 'Mr. John Alden, Sen., John Alden, Jun., and Jos. Alden' were all listed for the town of 'Duxborrow' (Plymouth County Records, vol. 8:187-196) Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 441).

Also in 1634, John Alden found himself imprisoned in Boston as the results of an incident on the Kennebec River involving parties from the Massachusetts Bay Colony and Plymouth Colony. The Bradford Patent gave Plymouth the right to settle and trade on the Kennebec River. John Howland was in charge of the Plymouth trading post on the river in 1634 when a trading ship from the Piscataqua settlement, under John Hocking, attempted to horn in. After they ignored his warnings to leave, Howland ordered their ship's mooring lines cut. Hocking shot and killed the man who cut the line, and one of the Plymouth men shot and killed Hocking. John Alden had been in Kennebec bringing supplies to the post at this time, but was not a party to the shootings. However, by the time he returned to Boston, a one-sided version of the news had arrived before him, and as he was the nearest Plymouth Colony representative at hand, Alden was arrested. Captain Myles Standish was dispatched with letters from Thomas Prence, Governor of the Plymouth Colony to straighten out the officials in Boston. Prence was successful in convincing Governor Dudley that they had heard only half of the story, the part about Hocking having killed a man being omitted. Alden was released, but the dispute over trading rights on the Kennebec continued acrimoniously between the two colonies (Bradford's History, 263-265).

For a young man hired as a cooper, John Alden soon assumed a place of high responsibility in the Plymouth Colony, serving as an Assistant many times between 1632 and 1640 and 1650 to 1686. He acted as Deputy Governor on two occasions when the Governor was absent. In March 1664/5 and October 1677; was Treasurer for three terms 1656 to 1658; and served on numerous committees and councils of war. This extensive public service indicates that he must have been well educated. Whether he received that education in England or from his fellow Pilgrims such as Winslow and Bradford is not known (Great Migration Begins, 1:21).

In 1636 and 1637 John Alden as assigned mowing ground for the year (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:40, 56). John Alden's cattle mark recorded at Plymouth 15 November 1636 was 'a peece like a long round cut' (Plymouth Town Recs, 1). On 6 March 1636/7, 'A parcel of land containing a knoll, or a little hill, lying over against Mr. Alden's land at Blewfish River, is granted by the Court unto the said Mr. John Alden in lieu of a parcel of land taken from him (next unto Samuel Nash's lands) for public use' (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:51). Bluefish River is a marshy brook in he eastern part of Duxbury.

On 5 February 1637/8 John was granted 'certain lands at Green's Harbor' (later Marshfield). John Alden and Myles Standish were granted 300 acres 'on the north side of the South River' on 2 July 1638, and John was granted 'a little parcel of land ' lying at the southerly side of his lot' on 3 September 1638 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:76, 191, 195). The South River rises in Duxbury and flows through Marshfield to the sea.

In 1638 Assistants Thomas Prence and John Alden were dispatched to Sandwich to settle a dispute over how that town's granted land was to be divided (Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 65).

In October 1645 the General Court granted the inhabitants of Duxbury 'a competent Porcion of lands about Saughtuckquett, towards the west, for a plantacon for them, and to have it foure miles every way from the place where they shall set up their center ' and have nominated Captaine Miles Standish, Mr. John Alden, Georg Soul, Constant Southworth, Joseph Rogers, and Willm Brett to be feoffers in trust for the equall devideing and laying forth of the said lands to their inhabitants.' These lands became known as Duxbury, New Plantation, incorporated in 1656 as the town of Bridgewater (Plymouth County Records, vol. 2:88, 2:101, 143; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 79).

Robert Hicks of Plymouth mentioned in his well dated 28 May 1645, a field on the north side of Plymouth that he had 'lately purchased of Mr. John Aldin' (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 8:144). John Alden bought land from Edward Hall in 1651 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:73).

On 2 February 1657/8 John Copeland and William Braind, Quakers, were charged with verbally abusing John Alden and Thomas Southworth among others. They were ordered to leave the colony, but either did not or returned, and on 8 February the two men were publicly whipped. While Plymouth Colony's treatment of Quakers was milder than Massachusetts Bay Colony, which hanged four, the Quakers were not welcomed in either place and were urged to move on. In 1658 James Cudworth of Scituate, who had lost his position as head of the Scituate military company when he was accused of aiding Quakers, wrote to England to complain about the treatment Quakers were receiving. In his letter he wrote, 'Mr. Alden hath deceived the Expectations of many, and indeed lost the affections of such, as I judge were his Cordial Christian Friends; who is very active in such Ways, as I pray God may not be charged him, to be Oppressions of a High Nature.' Apparently, Cudworth and others had expected Alden to be more sympathetic to the Quaker's plight (Plymouth County Records, vol. 3:130, 115, 162; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 91-92).

'Liberty is granted unto Mr. John Alden to look out a portion of land to accommodate his sons withall, and to make report thereof unto the Court, so it may be confirmed unto him' on 3 June 1657 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 3:120). At the Duxbury town meeting on 19 January 1659, the town granted to Mr. John Alden, Sen., 'all that piece of common land, from the south of Philip Dillano's' (Duxbury Town Records, p. 54).

On 13 June 1660 John Alden was allowed 'In regard that Mr. Alden is low in his state, and occasioned to spend much time at the courts on the country's occasions, and so hath done this many years, the Court have allowed him a small gratuity, the sum of ten pounds '' (Plymouth County Records, vol. 3:195). This did not mean that John was destitute, only that he was short on cash needed to travel on colony business.

In June 1661 the Plymouth Court granted liberty to 'Major Josiah Winslow and others the first born children of the jurisdiction of New Plymouth in reference unto an order or grant of the Court bearing date 1633 to purchase certain parcells of land for their accommodation; viz. a parcell next to the Massachusetts bounds, and another parcell between Namassakett and Bridgewater, and to make report thereof unto the Court that all such may be accommodated as aforesaid.' The purchase was made in 1662 from Josiah Wampetuck, Sachem. Mr. Aldin was fourth on the list of those granted land in what was called the Purchade Purchase'

(Pachade/Pochade/Pachage/Purchade Neck on the Nemasket River near the border of Middleborough and Bridgewater) and his lot was bounded 'with two red Oak trees marked' (New England Historical & Genealogical Register, vol. 3:336). In 1669 the court determined that the first tract should belong to those eight who had their allotments upon Pochade neck and to their heirs; and the second tract to those eight plus those who had their allotments on the east side of Nemasket River in Captain Southworth's purchase.

John was granted a 'competency of land' at Namasskett, 7 Jun 1665, and 100 acres at Teticcut, 4 March 1673/4 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 4:95; 5:141). Namasket and Titicut were villages in the area that became the town of Middleborough.

At the Plymouth Court of General Sessions held in July 1667, Robert Finney was granted 100 acres 'where mr Alden and Captaine Southworth hath land att Namassakett River, if it may be had there '' (Middleboro History, p. 545).

Mr. John Alden was one of the members of a Council of War assembled at Plymouth in April 1667 to deal with threats from the French and Dutch, and the increasing problems with King Philip and the Narragansetts. They commissioned officers of the military companies and arranged for military watches during any possibility of danger. Plans for evacuation of women and children and orders of war for horse and foot soldiers were made. When King Philip's War broke out in 1675, John Alden was a senior advisor to Gov. Josiah Winslow (Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 102, 110).
In 1675, 'The Sixteen Shilling Purchase' was made by Constant Southworth and John Tompson (for ?33) from the Indian sachems of Middleborough. The largest purchase of land in that town, it included what is now the own of Lakeville running to the Dartmouth line. John Alden was one of the 71 original proprietors of this purchase who were assigned lots on 21 November 1679. John received the 15th lot (Middleboro History, p. 621). The list of proprietors in Middleborough taken 28 Jun 1677 includes Mr. John Alden (Middleboro History, p. 551).
On 6 July 1682 Mr. John Alden made a deposition to the Plymouth court (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 3:120-121; Plymouth County Records, vol. 2:32):
John Alden Esqr Aged 83 years or thereabouts Testifyeth and saith that I this Deponant being one of the first Comers into New England to settle att or about Plymouth which Now is about 62 yeers since Doth know and understand by Osamequine the Great Sachem of these pttes that then was; and alsoe from Divers other prsons both English and Indians That the little Iland lying Neare the southerly point of Mount Hope Neck. Called by the Indians Chessawanuck by the English hoge Iland Did then blonge and appertaine to the said Sachem Sachem Osamequin as the other lands adjacent upon the Maine then Did and that the said Iland was Called by the English att the Trading house att Sowamsett then belonging to the Companie of Plymouth Collonie, hog Iland, upon this ocation that the said Companies People att the said Trading house; had then the posession and Improvement of he said Iland by keeping hoggs for theire use thereon; and further I this Depondant Doe Testify that both the said Sachem Osamequin and Wamsitta his reputed Eldest son; Did Give Graunt Allianate Infeoffe and Confeirme the Iland aforesaid unto Richard Smith Now of Naragansett; The said Iland being thus posessed and Improved; att the pleasure of the Colonie of New Plymouth aforesaid, a long time before Rhode Island was Posessed or Improved by any English.
In lieu of a will, John distributed his real estate among his sons by a series of deeds. On 8 July 1674, 'for love and natural affection and other valuable causes and considerations,' John deeded to 'David Alden his true and natural son all that his land both meadow and upland that belongs unto him situate or being at or about a place called Rootey Brook within the Township of Middleborough ' excepting only one hundred acres,' totaling about 300 acres (Plymouth County Land Records, vol. 3:330). Rootey Brook apparently flowed into the Nemansket River near Nemansket (Assawampsett) pond.
On 1 April 1679 John gave to his son Joseph 'all that my share of land. ' within the township of Bridgewater (Plymouth County Land Records, 3:194).
On 1 January 1685[/6] John Alden, Sr., of Duxbury for 'that real love and parental affection which I bear to my beloved and dutiful son Jonathan Alden' deeded all of his upland in Duxbury for which 'see old book of grants and bounds of land anno 1637 folio 137,' and all other lands at Duxbury whether granted by court at Plymouth or town of Duxbury (Plymouth County Land Records, 6:53).
On 13 January 1686[/7] 'for that natural love and affection which I bear to my firstborn and dutiful son John Alden of Boston,' John Alden, Sr., of Duxbury, deeded 100 acres at Pekard Neck alias Pachague with one-eighth of the meadow belonging to that place, and one hundred acres at Rootey Brook (brother David Alden to have the first right of purchase if John, Jr., should wish to sell this hundred acres), together with a sixteen shilling purchase being the fifteenth lot, all in Middleborough, and one hundred acres, the first in a division of one thousand acres in Bridgewater (Plymouth County Land Records, 5:437).
John Alden, Sr. of Duxbury, cooper, gave to sons Jonathan and David Alden five acres of salt marsh at Duxbury and 'my whole proportion in the Major's Purchase commonly so-called being the thirty-fifth part of said purchase' (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 9:145; Plymouth County Land Records, 4:65). The Major's or Five Men's Purchase had been bought by Major Josiah Winslow from sachem Tispequin in 1663 and consisted of a narrow tract on the east side of Nemasket River between the upper and lower Indian paths to Plymouth, extending to the Carver line (Middleboro History p. 600).
John Alden died on 12 September 1687 by the old calendar. His death was noted by Judge Sewell, 'Monday, Sept. 12. Mr. John Alden, the ancient Magistrate of Plymouth, died' (Sewall Diary, 150), and in two broadsides printed to commemorate the passing of the last signer of the Mayflower Compact. Reproductions of the broadsides ere published in The Mayflower Descendant (vol. 9:129, vol. 34:39). John and Priscilla were buried in the old Duxbury burying ground, but he exact location of their graves is not now known. In the 1950s stones were erected by the Alden Kindred in an area where other Alden graves were marked.
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"John Alden was hire for a cooper at Southampton where the ship victuled, and being a hopefull young man was much desired, but left to his own liking to go and stay when he came here, but he stayed, maryed here," wrote William Bradofrd in his History of Plymouth Plantation. A hopeful young man indeed, John Alden was about 21 years of age when the Mayflower sheltered at Provincetown harbor in November of 1620, and hew one one of the 41 men who signed the Mayflower Compact in her cabin shortly after their arrival. His skills and strength must certainly have been a great aid ot the weary Pilgrims in their race to build shelter on the shore before the hard set of winter, and his wise counsel and efficient administration were to serve the colony for the next 67 years,.
In 1623 John took part in the division of the land, being in the group that received land on the norht side of town, but because the record is worn, exactly how many acres he received is unknown. In the division of cattle in 1627, with his wife, Priscilla, and children Elizabeth and John, he was part of the 4th lot that received four Raghoren heifer that had come on the ship Jacob. Also in 1627, Alden joined with seven other men -- Bradford, Standish, Allerton, Winslow, Brewster, Howland and Thomas Prence -- who assumed the debt of the colony from the merchants in London. His trustworthiness and popularity were rewarded by positions in community government for more than 55 years and under five different governors of the colonly. He served at various times as goveronor's assistant, deputy to the General Court, treasurer, deputy governor, and on various committees to reveiw laws, redress abuses, and handle disputes. He also served on the councils of war against the Dutch in the 1620's and 50's and the Indians in 1675.
John and his wife, Priscilla, received grants of land in Duxbury in 1627 and lived there during the farming season, returning to Plymoouth for Sunday worship an dthe winter season. In 1632 a permanet settlement in Duxbury was established by the Aldens, the Standishes and others. John's (and perhaps Priscilla's) later years were spent in his son Jonathan's house, which had been built in 1653 and still stands today. A portion of this house is believed to be the old house built by John, moved from its nearby foundations and added to the new house.
From his own deposition made in 1682 when he stated he was "aged 83 or thereabouts" and have been "one of the first comers into New England to settle at or about Plymouth which is about 62 year sinc..," we know that John Alden was born about 1599. The place of birth is assumed to be England, but no more specific origin has been proved. He died in Duxbury on September 22, 1687, the last surviving signer of the Mayflower Compact. He left no will, having distributed his lands to his children before his death.
John Alden's wooing of fellow Mayflower passenger, Priscilla Mullins, is probably the best-known sotry of the Pilgrims, but little is actually known of their years together. They were probably married by 1623 or 1624, and Priscilla died before John, sometime after 1689, but no more specific dates are known for these two important events. William Bradford recorded in his list of Mayflower passengers that John and Priscilla Alden had 11 children. However, at another place in his manuscript, Bradford's calculations seem to indicate there were only 10 children.
More About JOHN ALDEN:
Burial: Buried near Eagle Tree Pond beside Priscilla
Fact 1: 1632, Move to Duxbury, Massachusetts
[alden.john.et.al.39K.by.gregory.strong.1564109.FTW]
[alden.john.1598.descendants.y.wilma.hornbrook.1900817.ged]
mother and father, William and Alice, died the first winter in the new land as well has her brother, Joseph. Cpt. Standish and John Alden rivaled for her affections


No further written record of Priscilla survives. Bradford's statement that she had eleven children (and that her eldest daughter had five by 1650) is contradicted by his marginal tally of "15" beside the entry. Eleven children plus five grandCHILren should have been "16." Only ten children have been identified. If there were other children, they died unmarried and without heirs before John Alden's estate was settled.

Priscilla died before here husband. A nineteenth century account published by John A. Goodwin in The Pilgrim Republic in 1888 describes the mourners at the funeral of Governor Josiah Winslow in 1680 including "John Alden, with Priscilla still on his arm" (also New England Historical & Genealogical Register, vol. 51:429). No contemporary corroboration of this statement has been found, and we can only state with certainty that she was alive when Bradford wrote is list in 1650 but dead by the time John's epitaph was published in 1687 (for certainly if Priscilla had been living, the writer would have mentioned the famous widow). Since no special notice was made of Priscilla's death, we can probably assume she did not die very young nor under any strange circumstances. Sadly, neither the birth, marriage, nor the death for one of America's most famous women is known.
The 1623 division of land among the Plymouth colonists (probably made in early 1623/4) placed John Alden in the group that received land on the "north side of the towne." Others in this group were Edward Winslow, Richard Warren, John Goodman, John Crackston, Mary Chilton, Captain Myles Standish, Francis Eaton, Henry Cooper, and Humility Cooper (Plymouth County Records, vol. 12:4; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 416). The acreage that John Alden is illegible, but was probably four acres - representing on share each for himself and Priscilla, and for her deceased parents William and Alice Mullins (Mayflower Quarterly Feb. 1974, 13).

In 1626 Isaac Allerton negotiated an agreement between the Merchant Adventurers in England who had financed the Plymouth Colony, whereby 53 members of the colony (including John Alden) and five London men (called the "Purchasers") were to pay L180 for all of the stocks, lands, and merchandise that belonged to the Company (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 2:177; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 419-20). In May 1627 John Alden joined with William Bradford, Capt. Myles Standish, Isaac Allerton, Edward Winslow, William Brewster, John Howland, and Thomas Prence, to undertake (thus they ere called the "Undertakers") the debt owed by the "Purchasers." In return, this group of eight men received the boats, furs, and other stores that had belonged to the Company as well as rights to trade for themselves for six years. Payment was to be made in corn and tobacco (Of Plimoth Plantation, 194-195).

The division of cattle made 22 May 1627 placed John Alden, Priscilla Alden, and their children Elizabeth and John in the fourth lot that "fell to John Howland & his company Joyned to him." The lot received "one of the 4 heyfers Came in the Jacob Called Raghorne" (Raghorne is a breed of cattle) (Plymouth County Records, 12:10; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 422).

The colonists began to spread out from Plymouth and settle on the land they had been granted. At first, the families would end to their land during the summer and return to the Plymouth settlement during the winter where they could attend church. The original Alden house in Duxbury was probably begun during the summers and by 1631 the FAM was staying longer, perhaps the whole year. Bradford and others in Plymouth were worried about losing the families from the original settlement, and in April 1632 John Alden, Capt. Standish, Jonathan Brewster and Thomas Prence signed an agreement promising to bring their families back to Plymouth during the winter. However, as Bradford later wrote, "First those that lived on their lots on the other side of the Bay, called Duxbury, they could not long bring their wives and children to the public worship and church meetings here, but with such burthen as, growing to some competent number, they sued to be dismissed and become a body of themselves" (Bradford's History, 253). thus the Alden FAM took up permanent residence in Duxbury.

The Alden grant in Duxbury was accessible by water from the bay and up the river, so that the whole length of the farm had water transportation. The Green Harbor Path, running from Plymouth to Marshfield passed along the west end of the farm. The bounds of the farm were described in a document dated 4 December 1637, but recorded in 1681 or later.

The bounds of the land of Mr. John Alden of Duxbery, as it was layed out by Gov. Bradford, Mr. Edward Winslow, Joshua Pratt, and Edward Bangs. It begines, for the breath of it, att a place where formerly an old pine tree stood, where now there is a gravelly hole, and from thence to a burnt walnut stump, and runinge for the length, and from thence to take its length unto a whie oake tree standing a little within the land of Phillip Delano deceased, the root of that tree still remaining, and from thence for the breadth att the had of the lott up to the old Greens Harbor Path; on the southerly side bounded with the meddow of the said John Alden in part and with the land of Experience Mitchell att the upper end (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:71).

This description was amended under the date 1 January 1637/8 (Alden FAM in the Alden House, 14):

The bounds of the land of MR. John Alden att Duxburrow, as it was layed forth by Gov. Bradford, Mr. Edward Winslow, Joshua Pratt, Edward Bangs, as followeth: from an old pine tree by the meddow, which meddow was afterwards allotted unto mee, the said John Alden, and for the breadth of the said land buting upon and ranging along the said Blew Fish River to a burnt walnut stump; and from thence to a walnut tree ranging from the abovesaid stump west north west, which was sum tim after run by Joshua Prate and Phillip Delano, Senior, unto a white oake tree, standing a little within the bounds of Phillip Delanoes land, there being a stump or root of that tree still remaining, and from thence for the breadth att the head, up to Greens Harbour, old path; and on the southerly side of he land bounded ptly with my owne meddow, and with the land of Experience Mitchell towards the upper end.

The first house built and occupied by John and Priscilla was a long, narrow house with a field stone foundation and a root cellar under the west end. Archeological excavations made in 1960 by Roland Wells Robbins revealed the cellar stones and that the house was about 10 feet in width and 38 feet in length (here the Aldens raised 10 children!). Its size would have been similar to a modern mobile home, although the Alden house would have had a loft or second floor. Evidence at the site of the old house proved that the old house had not burned, as many old stories claimed. It had definitely been moved or dismantled. The dimensions of the old house led Robbins to believe that it had been dismantled and moved up the hill to be incorporated as the kitchen, borning room, and buttery of the existing Alden House, which are exactly the same dimensions (Pilgrim John Alden's Progress, 15).

The present Alden house was believed to have been built in 1653, a date reputedly found carved in one of the beams or boards of the house. However, recent archeological work indicates the house may have been built sometime in the latter two decades of the 1600s. It is still believed that beams from the original house were used in the construction of the newer one. Further research is being undertaken by the Alden Kindred of America, Inc., which owns and maintains the house. The Alden house remained in the possession of members of the Jonathan2 Alden FAM until 1892 and was transferred to the Alden Kindred in 1907 (Alden FAM in the Alden House, 128).

John Alden was on the 1633 list of Plymouth freemen among those admitted prior to 1 Jan 1632/3 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:3). The tax list of 25 March 1633 assesses John Alden 1.4s. The highest tax was assessed to Isaac Allerton (3.11s.). John Alden was assessed the same tax on the 27 March 1634 list (the highest then being Edward Winslow at 2.5s.) (Plymouth County Records, vol. 19, 27; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 427-429).

In 1634 a list was made of all colony men able to bear arms (between the ages of 16 and 60). "Mr. John Alden, Sen., John Alden, Jun., and Jos. Alden" were all listed for the town of "Duxborrow" (Plymouth County Records, vol. 8:187-196) Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 441).

Also in 1634, John Alden found himself imprisoned in Boston as the results of an incident on the Kennebec River involving parties from the Massachusetts Bay Colony and Plymouth Colony. The Bradford Patent gave Plymouth the right to settle and trade on the Kennebec River. John Howland was in charge of the Plymouth trading post on the river in 1634 when a trading ship from the Piscataqua settlement, under John Hocking, attempted to horn in. After they ignored his warnings to leave, Howland ordered their ship's mooring lines cut. Hocking shot and killed the man who cut the line, and one of the Plymouth men shot and killed Hocking. John Alden had been in Kennebec bringing supplies to the post at this time, but was not a party to the shootings. However, by the time he returned to Boston, a one-sided version of the news had arrived before him, and as he was the nearest Plymouth Colony representative at hand, Alden was arrested. Captain Myles Standish was dispatched with letters from Thomas Prence, Governor of the Plymouth Colony to straighten out the officials in Boston. Prence was successful in convincing Governor Dudley that they had heard only half of the story, the part about Hocking having killed a man being omitted. Alden was released, but the dispute over trading rights on the Kennebec CONT acrimoniously between the two colonies (Bradford's History, 263-265).

For a young man hired as a cooper, John Alden soon assumed a place of high responsibility in the Plymouth Colony, serving as an Assistant many times between 1632 and 1640 and 1650 to 1686. He acted as Deputy Governor on two occasions when the Governor was absent. In March 1664/5 and October 1677; was Treasurer for three terms 1656 to 1658; and served on numerous committees and councils of war. This extensive public service indicates that he must have been well educated. Whether he received that education in England or from his fellow Pilgrims such as Winslow and Bradford is not known (Great Migration Begins, 1:21).

In 1636 and 1637 John Alden as assigned mowing ground for the year (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:40, 56). John Alden's cattle mark recorded at Plymouth 15 November 1636 was "a peece like a long round cut" (Plymouth Town Recs, 1). On 6 March 1636/7, "A parcel of land containing a knoll, or a little hill, lying over against Mr. Alden's land at Blewfish River, is granted by the Court unto the said Mr. John Alden in lieu of a parcel of land taken from him (next unto Samuel Nash's lands) for public use" (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:51). Bluefish River is a marshy brook in he eastern part of Duxbury.

On 5 February 1637/8 John was granted "certain lands at Green's Harbor" (later Marshfield). John Alden and Myles Standish were granted 300 acres "on the north side of the South River" on 2 July 1638, and John was granted "a little parcel of land lying at the southerly side of his lot" on 3 September 1638 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:76, 191, 195). The South River rises in Duxbury and flows through Marshfield to the sea.

In 1638 Assistants Thomas Prence and John Alden were dispatched to Sandwich to settle a dispute over how that town's granted land was to be divided (Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 65).

In October 1645 the General Court granted the inhabitants of Duxbury "a competent Porcion of lands about Saughtuckquett, towards the west, for a plantacon for them, and to have it foure miles every way from the place where they shall set up their center and have nominated Captaine Miles Standish, Mr. John Alden, Georg Soul, Constant Southworth, Joseph Rogers, and Willm Brett to be feoffers in trust for the equall devideing and laying forth of the said lands to their inhabitants." These lands became known as Duxbury, New Plantation, incorporated in 1656 as the town of Bridgewater (Plymouth County Records, vol. 2:88, 2:101, 143; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 79).

Robert Hicks of Plymouth mentioned in his well dated 28 May 1645, a field on the north side of Plymouth that he had "lately purchased of Mr. John Aldin" (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 8:144). John Alden bought land from Edward Hall in 1651 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 1:73).

On 2 February 1657/8 John Copeland and William Braind, Quakers, were charged with verbally abusing John Alden and Thomas Southworth among others. They were ordered to leave the colony, but either did not or returned, and on 8 February the two men were publicly whipped. While Plymouth Colony's treatment of Quakers was milder than Massachusetts Bay Colony, which hanged four, the Quakers were not welcomed in either place and were urged to move on. In 1658 James Cudworth of Scituate, who had lost his position as head of the Scituate military company when he was accused of aiding Quakers, wrote to England to complain about the treatment Quakers were receiving. In his letter he wrote, "Mr. Alden hath deceived the Expectations of many, and indeed lost the affections of such, as I judge were his Cordial Christian Friends; who is very active in such Ways, as I pray God may not be charged him, to be Oppressions of a High Nature." Apparently, Cudworth and others had expected Alden to be more sympathetic to the Quaker's plight (Plymouth County Records, vol. 3:130, 115, 162; Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 91-92).

"Liberty is granted unto Mr. John Alden to look out a portion of land to accommodate his sons withall, and to make report thereof unto the Court, so it may be confirmed unto him" on 3 June 1657 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 3:120). At the Duxbury town meeting on 19 January 1659, the town granted to Mr. John Alden, Sen., "all that piece of common land, from the south of Philip Dillano's" (Duxbury Town Records, p. 54).

On 13 June 1660 John Alden was allowed "In regard that Mr. Alden is low in his state, and occasioned to spend much time at the courts on the country's occasions, and so hath done this many years, the Court have allowed him a small gratuity, the sum of ten pounds " (Plymouth County Records, vol. 3:195). This did not mean that John was destitute, only that he was short on cash needed to travel on colony business.

In June 1661 the Plymouth Court granted liberty to "Major Josiah Winslow and others the first born children of the jurisdiction of New Plymouth in reference unto an order or grant of the Court bearing date 1633 to purchase certain parcells of land for their accommodation; viz. a parcell next to the Massachusetts bounds, and another parcell between Namassakett and Bridgewater, and to make report thereof unto the Court that all such may be accommodated as aforesaid." The purchase was made in 1662 from Josiah Wampetuck, Sachem. Mr. Aldin was fourth on the list of those granted land in what was called the Purchade Purchase" (Pachade/Pochade/Pachage/Purchade Neck on the Nemasket River near the border of Middleborough and Bridgewater) and his lot was bounded "with two red Oak trees marked" (New England Historical & Genealogical Register, vol. 3:336). In 1669 the court determined that the first tract should belong to those eight who had their allotments upon Pochade neck and to their heirs; and the second tract to those eight plus those who had their allotments on the east side of Nemasket River in Captain Southworth's purchase.

John was granted a "competency of land" at Namasskett, 7 Jun 1665, and 100 acres at Teticcut, 4 March 1673/4 (Plymouth County Records, vol. 4:95; 5:141). Namasket and Titicut were villages in the area that became the town of Middleborough.

At the Plymouth Court of General Sessions held in July 1667, Robert Finney was granted 100 acres "where mr Alden and Captaine Southworth hath land att Namassakett River, if it may be had there " (Middleboro History, p. 545).

Mr. John Alden was one of the members of a Council of War assembled at Plymouth in April 1667 to deal with threats from the French and Dutch, and the increasing problems with King Philip and the Narragansetts. They commissioned officers of the military companies and arranged for military watches during any possibility of danger. Plans for evacuation of women and children and orders of war for horse and foot soldiers were made. When King Philip's War broke out in 1675, John Alden was a senior advisor to Gov. Josiah Winslow (Plymouth Colony by Stratton, 102, 110).

In 1675, "The Sixteen Shilling Purchase" was made by Constant Southworth and John Tompson (for 33) from the Indian sachems of Middleborough. The largest purchase of land in that town, it included what is now the own of Lakeville running to the Dartmouth line. John Alden was one of the 71 original proprietors of this purchase who were assigned lots on 21 November 1679. John received the 15th lot (Middleboro History, p. 621). The list of proprietors in Middleborough taken 28 Jun 1677 includes Mr. John Alden (Middleboro History, p. 551).

On 6 July 1682 Mr. John Alden made a deposition to the Plymouth court (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 3:120-121; Plymouth County Records, vol. 2:32):

John Alden Esqr Aged 83 years or thereabouts Testifyeth and saith that I this Deponant being one of the first Comers into New England to settle att or about Plymouth which Now is about 62 yeers since Doth know and understand by Osamequine the Great Sachem of these pttes that then was; and alsoe from Divers other prsons both English and Indians That the little Iland lying Neare the southerly point of Mount Hope Neck. Called by the Indians Chessawanuck by the English hoge Iland Did then blonge and appertaine to the said Sachem Sachem Osamequin as the other lands adjacent upon the Maine then Did and that the said Iland was Called by the English att the Trading house att Sowamsett then belonging to the Companie of Plymouth Collonie, hog Iland, upon this ocation that the said Companies People att the said Trading house; had then the posession and Improvement of he said Iland by keeping hoggs for theire use thereon; and further I this Depondant Doe Testify that both the said Sachem Osamequin and Wamsitta his reputed Eldest son; Did Give Graunt Allianate Infeoffe and Confeirme the Iland aforesaid unto Richard Smith Now of Naragansett; The said Iland being thus posessed and Improved; att the pleasure of the Colonie of New Plymouth aforesaid, a long time before Rhode Island was Posessed or Improved by any English.

In lieu of a will, John distributed his real estate among his sons by a series of deeds. On 8 July 1674, "for love and natural affection and other valuable causes and considerations," John deeded to "David Alden his true and natural son all that his land both meadow and upland that belongs unto him situate or being at or about a place called Rootey Brook within the Township of Middleborough excepting only one hundred acres," totaling about 300 acres (Plymouth County Land Records, vol. 3:330). Rootey Brook apparently flowed into the Nemansket River near Nemansket (Assawampsett) pond.

On 1 April 1679 John gave to his son Joseph "all that my share of land. within the township of Bridgewater (Plymouth County Land Records, 3:194).

On 1 January 1685[/6] John Alden, Sr., of Duxbury for "that real love and parental affection which I bear to my beloved and dutiful son Jonathan Alden" deeded all of his upland in Duxbury for which "see old book of grants and bounds of land anno 1637 folio 137," and all other lands at Duxbury whether granted by court at Plymouth or town of Duxbury (Plymouth County Land Records, 6:53).

On 13 January 1686[/7] "for that natural love and affection which I bear to my firstborn and dutiful son John Alden of Boston," John Alden, Sr., of Duxbury, deeded 100 acres at Pekard Neck alias Pachague with one-eighth of the meadow belonging to that place, and one hundred acres at Rootey Brook (brother David Alden to have the first right of purchase if John, Jr., should wish to sell this hundred acres), together with a sixteen shilling purchase being the fifteenth lot, all in Middleborough, and one hundred acres, the first in a division of one thousand acres in Bridgewater (Plymouth County Land Records, 5:437).

John Alden, Sr. of Duxbury, cooper, gave to sons Jonathan and David Alden five acres of salt marsh at Duxbury and "my whole proportion in the Major's Purchase commonly so-called being the thirty-fifth part of said purchase" (The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 9:145; Plymouth County Land Records, 4:65). The Major's or Five Men's Purchase had been bought by Major Josiah Winslow from sachem Tispequin in 1663 and consisted of a narrow tract on the east side of Nemasket River between the upper and lower Indian paths to Plymouth, extending to the Carver line (Middleboro History p. 600).

John Alden died on 12 September 1687 by the old calendar. His death was noted by Judge Sewell, "Monday, Sept. 12. Mr. John Alden, the ancient Magistrate of Plymouth, died" (Sewall Diary, 150), and in two broadsides printed to commemorate the passing of the last signer of the Mayflower Compact. Reproductions of the broadsides ere published in The Mayflower Descendant (vol. 9:129, vol. 34:39). John and Priscilla were buried in the old Duxbury burying ground, but he exact location of their graves is not now known. In the 1950s stones were erected by the Alden Kindred in an area where other Alden graves were marked.
Administration of the estate of Mr. John Alden of Duxbury was granted to Lt. Jonathan Alden on 8 November 1687. Inventory was taken on 31 October 1687 by Lt. Jonathan Alden who made his oath on the day administration was granted to him. It consisted entirely of moveables and totaled 49.17s.6d. (Plymouth Co Probate Records, vol. 1:10, 16; The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 3:10-11):
On 13 June 1688 the heirs of John Alden, Sr., of Duxbury, signed a release in favor of Jonathan Alden stating that they had received their portion of the estate. Those signing were: Alexander Standish (in ye Right of my wife Sarah deceased), John Bass (in ye right of my wife Ruth, deceased), Mary Alden, Thomas Dillano, John Alden, Joseph Alden, David Alden, Priscilla Alden and William Paybody (Plymouth Co PR, 1:10, 16; The Mayflower Descendant, vol. 3:11).


Father: George Alden b: Abt 1573 in Hampshire, England
Mother: Jane

Marriage 1 Priscilla Mullins b: 1602 in Dorking, Surrey, England
Married: 12 May 1622 in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts 21 9 8 11 15 13 22
Note:
JOHN AND PRISCILLA ALDEN DESCENDANCY CHART
(For Three Generations only)
Those with an asterisk (*) had no descendants.
(Dates are approximate in some cases)

John ALDEN - (1622-1701)
Elizabeth ALDEN-(1623-1717
Joseph ALDEN- (1627-1696)
Sarah ALDEN- (1627-1688)
Jonathan ALDEN Capt.- (1632-1697)
* Mary ALDEN- ( -1688)
* Priscilla ALDEN- ( -1688)
David ALDEN- (1646-1718)
Ruth ALDEN- (1643-1674)
Rebecca ALDEN- (1649-1689)

1-- John ALDEN-(1599-1687)
sp-Priscilla MULLINS-(1602)
2-- John ALDEN - (1622-1701)
sp-Elizabeth PHILLIPS- (1640)
3-- Mary ALDEN- (1659-1667)
3-- Elizabeth ALDEN- (1662-1662)
3-- William ALDEN- (1663-1664)
3-- Elizabeth ALDEN- (1665-1739)
sp-John WALLEY- (1662-1702)
sp-Simon WILLARD- (1676-1713)
3-- William ALDEN- (1665-1667)
3-- Zachariah ALDEN- (1667-1672)
3-- Nathaniel ALDEN- (1668-1701)
sp-Hepzibah MOUNTJOY- (1673-1736)
3-- William ALDEN- (1669-1728)
sp-Mary DRURY- (1672-1727)
3-- Zachariah ALDEN- (1672-1709)
sp-Mary VIALL- (1676-1737)
3-- Nathan ALDEN- (1677-1701)
3-- Sarah ALDEN- (1681-1701)
2-- Elizabeth ALDEN-(1623-1717)
sp-William PABODIE- (1619)
3-- John PABODIE- (1645-1669)
3-- Elizabeth PABODIE- (1647-1678)
sp-John ROGERS- (1641-1732)
3-- Mary PABODIE- (1648-1728)
sp-Edward SOUTHWORTH- (1645-1728)
3-- Mercy PABODIE- (1649-1728)
sp-John SIMMONS- (1647-1715)
3-- Martha PABODIE- (1650-1711)
sp-Samuel SEABURY- (1640-1681)
sp-William FOBES Lt.- (1649-1712)
3-- Priscilla PABODIE- (1652-1652)
3-- Priscilla PABODIE- (1653-1724)
sp-Ichabod WISWALL Rev.- (1637-1700)
sp-Isaac AVERILL-
sp-Michael SPRAGUE- (1649)
3-- Sarah PABODIE- (1656-1740)
sp-John COE- (1649-1728)
3-- Ruth PABODIE- (1658-1725)
sp-Benjamin BARTLETT- (1658-1724)
3-- Rebecca PABODIE- (1660-1702)
sp-William SOUTHWORTH- (1659-1719)
3-- Hannah PABODIE- (1661-1723)
sp-Samuel BARTLETT- (1666-1713)
sp-John CHURCHILL- (1658-1723)
sp-Daniel BARTLETT-
3-- William PABODIE- (1664-1744)
sp-Judith TILDEN- (1670-1714)
sp-Elizabeth Throop PECK-14008 (1667-1717)
sp-Mary MORGAN- (1670-1765)
3-- Lydia PABODIE- (1667-1748)
sp-Daniel GRINNELL- (1658-1740)
2-- Joseph ALDEN- (1627-1696)
sp-Mary SIMMONS- (1638-1697)
3-- Sarah ALDEN- (1665-1713)
sp-Joseph CROSSMAN- (1659)
3-- Isaac ALDEN- (1666-1727)
sp-Mehitable ALLEN- (1664-1727)
3-- Joseph ALDEN Deacon- (1667-1747)
sp-Hannah DUNHAM- (1671-1747)
3-- Hopestill ALDEN- (1668-1753)
sp-Joseph SNOW- (1664-1753)
3-- Mercy ALDEN- (1670-1727)
sp-John BURRILL- (1658-1731)
3-- Elizabeth ALDEN- (1678-1705)
sp-Benjamin SNOW- (1668-1743)
3-- John ALDEN- (1675-1730)
sp-Hannah WHITE- (1681-1732)
2-- Sarah ALDEN- (1627-1688)
sp-Alexander STANDISH- (1627-1702)
3-- Lorah STANDISH- (1661-1725)
sp-Abraham SAMPSON- (1658-1727)
3-- Elizabeth STANDISH- (1663)
sp-Samuel DELANO- (1659-1728)
3-- Mercy STANDISH- (1665-1729)
sp-Caleb SAMPSON- (1660-1750)
3-- Sarah STANDISH- (1666-1739)
sp-Benjamin SOULE- (1665-1729)
3-- Lydia STANDISH- (1669-1734)
sp-Isaac SAMPSON- (1660-1726)
3-- Myles STANDISH- (1671-1739)
sp-Experience SHERMAN- (1678-1744)
3-- Ebenezer STANDISH- (1672-1755)
sp-Hannah STURTEVANT- (1679-1759)
3-- David STANDISH- ( -1689)
Note: Desire, Thomas & Ichabod Standish were
children from Alexander's 2nd wife and
therefore NOT Alden descendants.
2-- Jonathan ALDEN Capt.- (1632-1697)
sp-Abigail HALLETT- (1644-1725)
3-- Elizabeth ALDEN- (1673-1757)
sp-Edmund CHANDLER- (1670-1717)
sp-Pelatiah WEST- (1674-1756)
3-- Anna ALDEN- (1678-1705)
sp-Josiah SNELL- (1674-1753)
3-- Sarah ALDEN- (1679-1738)
sp-Thomas SOUTHWORTH- (1675-1743)
3-- John ALDEN- (1681-1739)
sp-Hannah BRIGGS- (1684-1684)
3-- Andrew ALDEN- (1684-1770/7)
sp-Lydia STANFORD- (-aft 1734)
3-- Jonathan ALDEN- (1686-1770)
sp-Elizabeth ARNOLD- (1689-1729)
sp-Mehetable ALLEN twin- (1708)
2-- Mary ALDEN- ( -1688)
2-- Priscilla ALDEN- ( -1688)
2-- David ALDEN- (1646-1718)
sp-Mary SOUTHWORTH- (1654-1718)
3-- Ruth ALDEN- (1674-1758)
sp-Samuel SPRAGUE- (1669-1764)
3-- Elizabeth ALDEN- (1675-1771)
sp-John SEABURY- (1670-1759)
3-- Priscilla ALDEN- (1679-1735)
sp-Samuel CHESEBROUGH- (1673-1735)
3-- Alice ALDEN- (1685-1744)
sp-Judah PADDOCK- (1681-1770)
3-- Benjamin ALDEN- (1690-1741)
sp-Hannah BREWSTER- (1688-1763)
3-- Samuel ALDEN Capt.- (1688-1781)
sp-Sarah SPRAGUE- (1701-1773)
2-- Ruth ALDEN- (1643-1674)
sp-John BASS- (1632-1716)
3-- John BASS- (1658-1724)
sp-Abigail ADAMS- (1658-1696)
sp-Rebecca SAVIL-
3-- Samuel BASS Deacon- (1660-1751)
sp-Ann KIRKLAND-
sp-Mercy MARSH- (1664)
sp-Mary ADAMS- (1667-1706)
sp-Bethia NIGHTINGALE
3-- Ruth BASS- (1662)
sp-Peter WEBB- (1657-1717)
3-- Joseph BASS- (1665-1732)
sp-Mary BELCHER- (1668-1707)
3-- Hannah BASS- (1667-1705)
sp-Joseph ADAMS- (1654-1736)
3-- Mary BASS- (1669-1716)
sp-Christopher WEBB- (1663-1689)
sp-William COPELAND- (1656-1716)
sp-Ebenezer SPEAR-
3-- Sarah BASS- (1672-1751)
sp-Ephraim THAYER- (1669-1757)
3-- Phillip BASS- (1674)
2-- Rebecca ALDEN- (1649-1689)
sp-Thomas DELANO- (1642-1723)
3-- Benoni DELANO Dr.- (1667-1738)
sp-Elizabeth DREW- (1673-1733)
3-- Thomas DELANO- (1668-1724)
sp-Hannah Bryant BARTLETT- (1668-1725)
3-- Deborah DELANO- (1672-1717)
sp-John WESTON- (1662-1736)
3-- Jonathan DELANO- (1675-1765)
sp-Hannah DOTY- (1675-1764)
3-- Mary DELANO- (1680-1756)
3-- Sarah DELANO- (1682-1746)
sp-John DREW- (1676-1745)
3-- Ruth DELANO- (1684-1722)
sp-Samuel DREW- (1678-1739)
3-- Joseph DELANO- (1685-1770)
sp-Hannah BARTLETT- (1690-1763)
3-- David DELANO- (1678-1705)
sp-Elizabeth EDDY- (1683-1750)
Event: Alt. Marriage Alt. Marriage 1623 in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts
Change Date: 19 Dec 2006
Children
Elizabeth Alden b: 1624 in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts
John Alden b: 22 May 1622 in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts
Joseph Alden b: 22 May 1624 in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts
Sarah Alden b: 1629 in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts
Priscilla Alden b: 1639 in Duxbury, Plymouth County, Massachusetts
Timothy (Allen?) Alden b: Abt 1625 in Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts
Jonathan Alden b: 1632 in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts
Ruth Alden b: 1634 in Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts
David Alden b: 1646 in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts
Rebecca Alden b: Bef 1649 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts
Mary Alden

Sources:
Abbrev: fiske.nathaniel.et.al.a16972.ged
Title: fiske.nathaniel.et.al.a16972.ged
Note:
Source Media Type: Other
Abbrev: Mayflower Descendents and Their Marriages for two Generations After the Landing
Title: Mayflower Descendents and Their Marriages for two Generations After the Landing
Publication: Washington, D. C.; Bureau of Military and Civic Achievbment; 1922
Date: 1 Aug 2002
Repository:
Name: Not Given

Call Number: R929.1 B952
Abbrev: Castle.Fiske.Nurse.Towne&others.ULC.ged
Title: Castle.Fiske.Nurse.Towne&others.ULC.ged
Repository:
Name: Not Given
Abbrev: .
Title: .
Abbrev: alden.john.1598.descend.by.ronald.lajeunesse.1232762.ged
Title: alden.john.1598.descend.by.ronald.lajeunesse.1232762.ged
Repository:
Name: Not Given
Abbrev: alden.john.1598.descendants.y.wilma.hornbrook.1900817.ged
Title: alden.john.1598.descendants.y.wilma.hornbrook.1900817.ged
Repository:
Name: Not Given
Abbrev: Strong Ancestors
Title: Strong Ancestors
Author: Gregory Strong
Publication: Aug 2001
actuarius@mn.mediaone.net
http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=:1564109
Date: 1 Aug 2002
Repository:
Name: Not Given
Abbrev: Great Migration (Anderson)
Title: The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633 [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Original data: Robert Charles Anderson. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633, vols. 1-3.
Author: Robert Charles Anderson
Publication: Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995
Date: 1 Jan 1909
Abbrev: PCR
Title: Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New England
Author: Nathaniel B. Shurtleff and David Pulsifer, eds.
Publication: Boston: 1855-1861
12 Volumes
Date: 1 Jan 1909
Abbrev: Mayflower Increasings, 2nd. ed.
Title: Mayflower Increasings, 2nd. ed.
Author: Roser, Susan E.
Publication: Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1995
Repository:
Name: n/a
Note:
UCLA Research Library

Page: 1ff
Quality: 3
Abbrev: Standish, Myles Descendants Online (Bumpas)
Title: Descendants of Myles Standish and John Alden
http://www.geocities.com/psbumppo.geo/FrameFil.html
Author: Stephen Dexter Bumpas & Paul Stanton Bumpas
Date: 1 Jan 1909
Abbrev: The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633
Title: The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633
Author: Anderson, Robert Charles
Publication: Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995
Note:
excellent 3 vol: A-F G-O P-W
Repository:
Name: n/a
Note:
UCLA Research Library

Call Number: F3 .A53 1995
Page: 23
Quality: 3
Abbrev: Mayflower Pages Online (Caleb Johnston)
Title: Mayflower Pages
Web site
http://members.aol.com/calebj/mayflower.html
Author: Caleb Johnston
Date: 1 Jan 1909
Abbrev: Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Volume 16, Part One: John Alden
Title: Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Volume 16, Part One: John Alden
Author: Woodworth-Barnes, Esther Littleford, compiler, and Alicia Crane Williams, ed.
Publication: [Plymouth MA:] The General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1999
Note:
all
Repository:
Name: n/a
Note:
UCLA Research Library

Page: 20
Quality: 3
Abbrev: Mayflower Families Online
Title: Mayflower Families (web site)
http://www.mayflowerfamilies.com/wills/Essex%20Wills/daniel_rea.htm
Date: 1 Jan 1909
Abbrev: alden.john.1626.ancestors.by.dave.sharp.ged
Title: alden.john.1626.ancestors.by.dave.sharp.ged
Repository:
Name: Not Given
Abbrev: Alden (Mayflower) Kindred of America Online
Title: Alden Kindred of America, Inc.
www.alden.org
Author: A. C. W. Crane or Bob Edmunds
Abbrev: Chmura Genealogy
Title: Chmura Genealogy
Author: Kathy Grauherr Brandt
Publication: Mar 2006
http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:3106226&id=I70218
http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=:2285440

Katckathyb@aol.com
Date: 0047
Abbrev: Frost, Edmund (1593-1672) - Descendants of
Title: Frost, Edmund (1593-1672) - Descendants of
Author: Richard Frost
Publication: Dec 2002
http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2177301
rafjag@hotmail.com
Abbrev: Tallman Family (by Richard Tallman)
Title: Tallman Family (by Richard Tallman)
Author: Richard Tallman
Publication: Sep 2004
http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=ricktallman
Rick@Tallman.com
Date: 1 Aug 2002
Abbrev: Mayflower Increasings (Roser)
Title: Mayflower Increasings, 2nd Edition

Building on the previously published work of John Landis -- the 1922 Mayflower Descendants and Their Marriages for Two Generations After the Landing -- Mrs. Roser's work provides an accurate and reliable summary of all that is presently known about the passengers of the Mayflower for the first three generations in America -- names, dates, places, spouses, children, etc. Unique to the Roser work, each third generation listing includes references to records or sources that will help the researcher find fourth generation children. And new to this edition is a "Probate Appendix" which will assist the reader in identifying fourth and fifth generation children.

Sources noted within the text are given in parentheses in abbreviated form and are then fully identified in the extensive Reference List. Also included as appendices are Governor Bradford's "List of the Mayflower Passengers" and the "1627 Cattle Division," as both are of extreme importance in Mayflower research. The book is fully indexed and contains references to over 6,000 names or persons. ISBN: 0806314796
Author: Susan E. Roser
Publication: Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1995 (2nd ed.)
Date: 1 Jan 1909
Abbrev: Colonial Families of the USA (Mackenzie)
Title: Colonial Families of the United States of America, in Seven Volumes
Author: Edited by George Norbury Mackenzie, LL.B.
Publication: 1907 (Republished Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 1966 and 1995)
Date: 1 Jan 1909
Page: Vol. 2, p. 586
.


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